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1 SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR MARION HIGH SCHOOL PREPARED FOR 2020-2021 school year Marion Community Schools Superintendent Brad Lindsay Marion High School Principal Keith Burke Marion High School Assistant Principal Melissa Pogue Marion High School Assistant Principal-James Bell Marion Community Schools provides employment and educational opportunities without regard to sex, race, national origin, religion, handicapping condition or limited English proficiency.

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SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANMarion
Superintendent – Brad Lindsay
Marion High School Principal –Keith Burke Marion High School Assistant Principal –Melissa Pogue
Marion High School Assistant Principal-James Bell
Marion Community Schools provides employment and educational opportunities without regard to
sex, race, national origin, religion, handicapping condition or limited English proficiency.
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The individuals listed below served on the School Improvement Committee for Marion High School. The team developed and
submitted this plan for improving student learning and student achievement.
Principal, Marion High School Keith Burke
Assistant Principal, Marion High School Melissa Pogue
Assistant Principal Marion High School James Bell
Teacher Bobbie Owensby
Teacher Marsha Vermilion
Attendance .......................................................................................................................20
Goals for MHS……………………………………………………………………………28
Goal #2/Strategies/Benchmarks ........…………….…………………………………….31
Goal #3/Strategies/Benchmarks ........…………….…………………………………….33
Rules and Statutes to be Waived……………………………………………………….35
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Approval Sign-Off Forms………………………………..……………………..............38
Marion High School Profile
Marion High School is situated in east central Indiana with a population of approximately 32,300, Marion is an
industrial community with emphasis in manufacturing and health and social services. In addition, Indiana
Wesleyan University provides the community with an in-depth educational and cultural focus. Both IWU and
nearby Taylor University draw on the experienced staff at Marion High School to model teaching styles to many
of their education majors.
Marion High School, 750 West 26th Street, is located on a 37.56 acre campus at the southern edge of Marion,
Indiana. The campus boasts of an 86,400 square foot building constructed in 1962, which includes a 1,468
seatperforming arts center, a 7,050 seat-athletic arena, and a 57-seat planetarium, football field. MHS is proud of
the extensive computer labs, art gallery and wall, simulated living area for the Life Skills classes and wellness
center. Recent updates have been made to the Performance Arts Center, planetarium, library, gymnasium, and
football arena. Additional facilities include the 1,500-seat football stadium, with new turf field with an integrated
track, baseball diamond, softball diamond, and tennis courts.
MHS serves a diverse community of nearly 1,075 students. It is a community that has a representation of all the
demographic groups. The importance of students being successful on the Algebra I and English 10 End of Course
Assessments is the major focus of the instruction at MHS. We also work to improve student attendance, as well
as, our graduation rate. Within the student population at MHS there are highly functional students that are the
driving force behind the strong Advance Placement and dual credit program.
Students may also take advantage of technical/vocational opportunities through Marion Regional Career and
Technology Center. Here students can earn college credits while completing high school credit career and
technology classes. The environment at MRCC fosters a learning-by-doing atmosphere. In the vocational aspect
of their education, students are first taught the pertinent skills of their trades and then given the opportunity to
execute them. More than eighty-five percent of MRCC students are enrolled in classes and training that is
designated as “high demand” by the state of Indiana. MRCC offers one cooperative education program and eleven
career programs.
District Target #1 - Culture Performance Objective: We commit to a culture of enthusiasm and accountability, purposeful learning, winning teamwork, continuous improvement, and being All-In Marion GIANTS!
District Target #2 - Teaching and Learning Belief: If decisions are based upon data, then teacher and student needs will be met. We believe that right relationships produce right results! Performance Objective: All teachers will inspire and facilitate engaged, relevant, and meaningful student learning.
District Target #3 - Financial Efficiency Performance Objective: We commit to wise planning keeping our scorecards current and accurate, and aligning resources to support vision and to achieve our Giant targets.
District Target #4 - Facility Stewardship Performance Objective: We will provide clean, safe, healthy, inviting, and attractive facilities that promote optimal Learning and brand Marion Giant pride! We will continuously improve systems of operations that maximize resources and produce winning results for our children.
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District Target #5 - Communication / Community Performance Objective: We will consistently tell our story to develop a clear understanding of our mission, vision, priority objectives, and strategic plan, to keep Marion Community Schools’ stakeholders current of goal progress, and to promote our MARION GIANTS brand!
District Target #6 - Marketing / Promoting / Branding Performance Objective: We will market, promote, and brand the distinctions of excellence that make Marion Community Schools unique and special. We will generate enthusiasm, support, and Marion Community Schools all-in and all-together MARION GIANT PRIDE!
Vision and Mission
VISION Marion High School, in partnership with our families and community, meet the academic, social, emotional, and
physical needs of our students. MHS is a place where a collaborative community develops curriculum,
instructional strategies, and assessments to ensure all students learn and become GIANTS for life.
MISSION The mission of Marion High School is to provide an environment rich in educational opportunities that
challenge, inspire, and teach 21st century learning skills so that students achieve to their highest potential and
become productive members of society that are college and or career ready.
SCHOOL SLOGAN Be a Giant…Strive for excellence in leadership, scholarship, and character.
Curriculum and Instruction
Local curriculum guides are prepared using the Indiana Standards and other relevant state documents and
guidelines. They contain standards information, scope and sequence, adopted and supplemental materials,
suggested activities, and assessment information. In addition, during the summers of 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,
2017 and 2018 English, social studies, math, science, and health/PE departments updated their curriculum guides
to reflect the new Indiana Academic Performance Standards. All remaining departments will update their
curriculum guides prior to the federally mandated date.
Curriculum review and local curriculum guidebook development is an on-going process with curricula aligned to
the Indiana standards at the time of development. Official revision of local curriculum guides occurs as soon
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after the release of new standards documents as possible. Copies of locally developed curriculum guides are
available in the Curriculum Service Office and each elementary or middle school office for grades pre-K through
8 and in the administrative office at Marion High School and MRCC. In addition, all teachers have a copy of
each curriculum guide relevant to his/her teaching assignment.
Curriculum and instruction are driven by the Indiana Standards. Each fall, teachers are made aware that the most
up-to-date Indiana Standards maybe found on the Marion Community School’s (www.marion.k12.in.us) and the
IDOE’s (www.doe.in.gov) websites. Parents are made aware of the location of the state standards as well. Parents
unable to access the Internet are provided copies of the standards upon request. Teachers are expected to build
their instructional plans using both the local curriculum guide and the Indiana Standards. Marion High School,
along with McCulloch Jr. High, have aligned in core areas, but will continue to meet each summer to update and
enhance curriculum. All other disciplines will be aligned within the next three years.
The school year is divided into two 18-week semesters each containing two nine-week grading periods. We
follow a traditional seven-period day. In October 2016 we added a 52-minute period for language arts lab and
math lab. During this time students who are not above standard on the ISTEP are taught content specific skills
along with test taking skills. Students in need of tutorials for ISTEP will be pulled out of Lab Period for
remediation with a highly qualified teacher in the area of need.
Students may earn a General, Core 40, Academic Technical Diploma, or Academic Honors Diploma from
Marion High School.
A brief explanation of each of these diplomas is as follows:
Core 40- College preparatory course work designed to meet requirements for four-year college
admission and the State of Indiana Core 40 Diploma.
Core 40 with Technical Honors-Course work designed to prepare students for technical
school/post-secondary education, on-the-job training, apprenticeship or work
force entry.
Core 40 with Academic Honors- College preparatory course work designed to meet
requirements for four-year college admission and the State of Indiana Honors
Diploma.
Counselors have one-on-one meetings to discuss four-year plans and to schedule classes for the following year.
Parents and guardians are always invited and encouraged to attend. All students are advised to pursue the Core
40 diploma as a minimum and the requirements for the Academic and Technical Honors diplomas are reviewed
when appropriate. If a student is struggling to meet the requirements of the Core 40 diploma, counselors provide
information regarding the General Diploma and emphasize the Career Academic Sequence that must be met. As
a requirement to earn a Core 40 with Academic Honors, students must earn four (4) credits in two (2) or more AP
classes (and the corresponding AP exams) or earn six (6) transcripted college credits from the priority course list
or a combination of the two:
ENGLISH English Language and Composition (11th Grade AP) English Literature and Composition (12th Grade AP) Elementary Composition (IU Dual Credit for 12th Grade English – Semester 1) Literary
Interpretation (IU Dual Credit for 12th Grade English – Semester 2)
COMPUTERS AP Computer Science
Statistics
SCIENCE Biology AP Chemistry AP Introductory Chemistry (IVY Tech Dual Credit for Chemistry II) +Bio Medical Terminology AP Physics AP Physiology
SOCIAL STUDIES World History AP American History I and II (IVY Tech Dual Credit for US History) Introduction to American Government and Politics (IVY Tech Dual Credit for US Government) AP Psychology
BUSINESS Presentation Graphics (IVY Tech Dual Credit for Interactive Media) Desktop Publishing (IVY Tech Dual Credit for Business Tech Lab 1 and 2) Introduction to Computers with Word Processing (IVY Dual Credit for Business Tech Lab 1) Students can also meet this requirement by taking approved dual credit offerings at area colleges and universities.
WORLD LANGUAGES Spanish 3 (Spanish Levels 1 & 2 Ivy Tech 101 & 102) AP Spanish
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1. ISTEP Plus are given in Math, Science and English
2. AP Exams
AP Exams are offered in May for Biology, Chemistry, Government and Politics, United States History,
World History, English Literature and Composition, English Language, Spanish and Calculus AB.
Students with a qualifying score of 3 or higher may earn college credit.
3. Formative and Summative Assessments
Comparison of classroom formative and summative assessments will be analyzed monthly to identify
student progress towards mastery of the state academic standards. Teacher created assessments will be
used to find areas of weakness in need of re-teaching.
4. SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test)
All students will be encouraged to take this test as many times as possible during their high school years.
The scores from this test are used by colleges to determine entrance eligibility. We will use these scores
to assess the achievement levels of our juniors and seniors.
5. ACT (American College Testing)
All students will be encouraged to take this test as many times as possible. The scores from this test are
used by colleges to determine entrance eligibility. We will use these scores to assess the achievement
levels of our juniors and seniors.
6. PSAT (Pre Scholastic Aptitude Test)
All sophomores will participate in this test. All juniors will be encouraged to take this test. This test is
used as preparation for the SAT. Scores from this test will be used to assess the achievement levels of
our sophomores. Scores from this test also serve as the National Merit Scholar qualifying exam.
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Data
AP Environmental Science
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Grades in AP classes are weighted. To receive the weighted grade a
student MUST take the AP examination.
Diploma Types
Number of Graduates 245 246 252 231 274
Number of Graduates earning Academic Honors Diploma
(AHD)
Percent of Graduates Earning Academic Honors Diploma
(AHD)
31% 32% 31% 25% 24%
Number of Graduates Completing Core 40 (Note: Includes AHD & Core 40)
222 223 223 195 217
Number of Graduates earning Technical Honors Diploma 12 12 10 7 9
Percent of Graduates Earning Technical Honors Diploma
(AHD)
4.9 4.8 3.9% 3.0% 3.2%
Percent of Graduates completing Core 40 (Note: Includes AHD & Core 40)
90.6 90.4 88% 84% 79%
Number of Graduates completing a Regular Diploma 16 25 29 29 48
Percent of Graduates completing a Regular Diploma 9.4 9.6 11.5 12.5% 18%
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0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
MHS Course College Course Name (credits)
Adv. Math CC - Statistics Ivy Tech STAT 301 Elementary Statistics (3)
Adv. Math CC – Finite Math Ivy Tech MATH 135 Finite Math
Adv. Math CC – College Algebra Ivy Tech MATH 136 College Algebra (3)
Adv. Math CC – Trig w/ Analytic Geom. Ivy Tech MATH 137 Trig w/ An. Geom. (3)
Adv. Math CC - Calculus Ivy Tech MATH 211 Calculus I (4)
Adv. SS CC – Intro to Am. Gov. and Pol. Ivy Tech POLS 101 Intro to Am. Gov. and Pol. (3)
Spanish III – DC Ivy Tech SPAN 101 Spanish Level 1 (3)
Spanish III – DC Ivy Tech SPAN 102 Spanish Level 2 (3)
Spanish IV – DC Ivy Tech SPAN 201 Spanish Level 3 (3)
Spanish IV – DC Ivy Tech SPAN 202 Spanish Level 4 (3)
Advanced Drawing Ivy Tech ARTS 100 Life/Object Drawing 1 (3)
Chemistry II Honors – DC Ivy Tech CHEM 101 Introductory Chemistry (3)
Elementary Composition ACP IU ENG W131 Elementary Composition (3)
Literary Interpretations ACP IU ENG L202 Literary Interpretations (3)
American History ACP IU H 105 American History I (3)
American History ACP IU H 106 American History II (3)
Graphic Imaging Technology Vincennes DESN 155 Computer Page Layout (3)
Computer Illustrations & Graphics Vincennes DESN 120 Computer Illustration (3)
Computer Programming (I or II) Ivy Tech CINT 106: Micro Operating Systems (3)
Computer Programming (I or II) Ivy Tech CINT 115: PC Technology Essentials (3)
Computer Tech Support Ivy Tech CINT 116: IT Technician (3)
Computer Tech Support Ivy Tech CINT 106: Micro Operating Systems (3)
Computer Tech Support Ivy Tech CINT 115: PC Technology Essentials (3)
Networking Fundamentals Ivy Tech CINT 121: Network Fundamentals (3)
Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Vincennes REST 100 Intro to Hospitality Management (3)
Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Vincennes CULN 110: Quantity Food Production (6)
Advanced Culinary Arts Vincennes REST 120 Food Service Sanitation (3)
Advanced Culinary Arts Vincennes REST 155 Quantity Food Purchasing (3)
Health Science Education I Ivy Tech HLHS 100 Intro to Health Careers (3)
Health Science Education I Ivy Tech HLHS 111 Health and Wellness for Life (3)
Health Science Education II: Nursing Ivy Tech HLHS 101 Medical Terminology (3)
Health Science Education II: Nursing Ivy Tech HLHS 107 CNA Preparation (5)
Health Science Education II: Pharmacy Ivy Tech HLHS 101 Medical Terminology (3)
Health Science Education II: Phy. Therapy Ivy Tech HLHS 101 Medical Terminology (3)
Health Science Education II: Phy. Therapy Ivy Tech PTAS 110 Physical Therapy Assisting I (3)
Health Science Education II: Phy. Therapy Ivy Tech PTAS 110 Physical Therapy Assisting II (3)
Health Science Education II: Phy. Therapy Ivy Tech PTAS 110 Physical Therapy Assisting III (3)
Construction Technology I Ivy Tech CONT 101 Intro to Construction Technology (3)
Construction Technology I Ivy Tech CONT 102 Construction Materials (3)
Construction Technology I Ivy Tech CONT 106 Construction Blueprint Reading (3)
Construction Technology I Ivy Tech CONT 127 Electrical Basics (3)
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Construction Technology II Ivy Tech BCOT 104 Floor & Wall Layout & Construction (3)
Construction Technology II Ivy Tech BCOT 105 Roof Construction (3)
Construction Technology II Ivy Tech BCOT 113 Interior Finish (3)
Construction Technology II Ivy Tech BCOT 114 Exterior Finish (3)
Emergency Medical Services Ivy Tech PARM 102 EMT Basic (3)
Emergency Medical Services Ivy Tech PSAF 120 First Responder (3)
Welding Technology I Ivy Tech INDT 114 Introduction to Welding (3)
Welding Technology I Ivy Tech WELD 100 Welding Processes (3)
Welding Technology I Ivy Tech WELD 103 ARC Welding (3)
Welding Technology I Ivy Tech WELD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding (3)
Welding Technology II Ivy Tech WELD 101 Gas Welding I (3)
Welding Technology II Ivy Tech WELD 109 Oxy-Fuel Gas Welding and Cutting (3)
Welding Technology II Ivy Tech WELD 207 Gas Metal Arc Welding (3)
Criminal Justice I Vincennes LAWE 100 Survey of Criminal Justice (3)
Criminal Justice I Vincennes LAWE 106 Introduction to Traffic Control (3)
Criminal Justice II Vincennes LAWE 150 Introduction to Criminology (3)
Criminal Justice II Vincennes LAWE 160 Criminal Investigations (3)
Architectural Drafting and Design I Vincennes ARCH 102 Architectural Drafting and Print Reading (4)
Architectural Drafting and Design II Vincennes ARCH 141 Introduction to Architectural CAD (3)
Civil Engineering Architecture (PLTW) Vincennes ARCH 221 Adv. Architectural Software Application (4)
Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW) Ivy Tech ADMF 116 Automation & Robotics I (3)
Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW) Ivy Tech ADMF 103 Graphic Comm. for Manufacturing (3)
Principles of Engineering (PLTW) Ivy Tech ADMF 115 Materials & Processes for Manufacturing (3)
Early Childhood Education I Ivy Tech ECED 100 Introduction to Early Childhood (3)
Early Childhood Education I Ivy Tech ECED 101 Health, Safety, and Nutrition (3)
Early Childhood Education I Ivy Tech ECED 103 Curriculum in Early Childhood Ed (3)
Early Childhood Education II Ivy Tech ECED 105 CDA Process (3)
Education Professions I &II Ivy Tech ECED 101 Health Safety & Nutrition (3) Education
Professions I & II Ivy Tech EDUC 101 Intro to Teaching (3)
Credits in escrow courses are offered to MHS Students on the campuses of both Indiana Wesleyan University
and Taylor University.
2007 166 483 491 974 n/a n/a
2008 137 479 493 972 485 1457
2009 143 476 477 953 461 1414
2010 163 460 483 943 456 1399
2011 111 459 489 948 447 1395
2012 136 463 489 952 460 1412
2013 227 464 475 939 450 1389
2014 147 456 462 918 444 1362
2015 129 469 468 937 451 1388
2016 133 475 476 951 459 1410
2017 136 477 490 967 460 1427
2018 141 478 489 967 461 1428
ACT HISTORY
2013 34
2014 24 22.9 24.1 23.2 22.1 22.0
2015 26 21.3 22.3 22.3 21.5 21.9
2016 50 20.6 21.8 21.8 22.6 21.5
2017 41 20.6 20.8 20.9 20.7 20.8
2018 40 20.8 22.9 21.1 20.9 21.45
The Marion High School Class of 2018 had many scholarship winners, adding up to more than
$11.4 million in scholarship dollars earned.
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Plans for Parent/Guardian Participation
An active parent organization (Marion Parent Organization) has been in place for eighteen years.
We also have parent organizations for our co-curricular offerings, as well as our extra-curricular activities for
students.
Parents volunteer work at registration and serve on school-based-committees looking at issues that impact
MHS. This year, the MPO will continue their focus on fund raising and student/teacher recognition.
SubCommittees of this group also assist our school by helping with prom, homecoming, and the baccalaureate
ceremony for graduating seniors. It is the goal of the parent organization to increase its role in supporting the
students and teachers of Marion High School.
The Friends of MHS, a community involvement committee, are continuing their efforts to support Marion High
School. There are four sub-committees within this organization: student, teacher, parent, and public relations,
which are areas of focus for the continued improvement of Marion High School. This group is assisting Marion
High School with student and staff acknowledgement and celebration, as well as working to bridge the gap
between Marion High School staff, parents, and the community.
The graduation coach of Marion High School will continue working with local African American community
volunteers to serve as mentors in the school. In addition, the graduation coach works with a local group,
primarily composed of African Americans, called the Parent Involvement Committee of Marion High School.
In order to increase parent involvement, Marion High School teachers, counselors, and administrators make
available the following:
• Power School Parent Portal
• Progress Reports
• Regular communication, via e-mail and our automated call system, from MHS administration to parents
• Regular communication, via e-mail, from MHS guidance to parents regarding testing, scholarships, and
scheduling
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• Press releases to the Chronicle Tribune and/or local radio stations about upcoming events at MHS
College Goal Sunday
• College Go Week
• College Cost Estimator
• MLK Scholarship Celebration
• Veterans Day Celebration
• Homecoming
Technology
Marion High School is committed to incorporating technology in the daily delivery of instruction, use as a
resource tool for students, and as a means for parents to receive real time data on student attendance and grades.
We believe that the purposeful use of technology will serve to meet the needs of every student. The following
actions have been or will be put in place to continue to address technology needs:
1. All staff members are required to report attendance electronically and use the computer grade book
program for recording and reporting all grades on a weekly basis.
2. Ongoing training will be provided to the staff to maximize use of the electronic grade book and
attendance, as well as e-mail and Internet research usage.
3. Marion Community Schools uses the DNA Illuminate as a tool for the High School English and
math teachers to develop web-based common formative and summative assessments. This service
will automatically generate individual and aggregate reports by class, school, and population. These
reports will have access immediately to the classroom teacher. The information received will be
used to make timely and effective decisions about curriculum, instruction, and remediation.
Building and district administrators will also receive reports from DNA Illuminate, as well. The
district is committed to including all content areas, as well as AP courses in the use of PS
Assessments.
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4. Marion High School is currently equipped with thirteen (13) fully functioning computer laboratories.
They include three business classrooms, one visual communications lab (fine arts), two Ed Options
credit recovery labs, ALEKS Labs, Khan Academy resources, two READ 180 labs, three open labs,
a Network Systems classroom, a lab that is used to teach drafting and a nationally recognized Project
Lead the Way course, along with a resource lab in the media center.
5. Department chairs have been trained on the Destiny Textbook Manager software, and each
department inventories all textbooks through this system. This provides a technological process to
better manage our resources, minimizes potential loss, and ensures students have access to materials
they need to succeed.
6. All classrooms have LCD projectors.
7. Media Center has been updated with Apple technology and a functional E Shelf.
8. All students have IPADS that are take home devices.
9. Teachers have had ongoing professional de
Providing a Safe and Disciplined Learning Environment
Every school in Marion Community Schools has developed a crisis plan. The plans detail actions to be taken in
emergency situations and were developed collaboratively by a team of staff members. A copy of each building
plan is located in the district and building office.
Officials of Marion High School believe we have a comprehensive safety plan which addresses any and all
types of school emergencies.
Starting with the 2011-2012 school year a uniformed school resource officer was added. He has three distinct
roles: teacher, informal counselor, and law enforcer. In addition to the school resource officer, two uniformed
police officer will provide supervision throughout the school day. One of our safety goals is to increase police
surveillance outside our building in our parking lots before school, after school, and during the lunch hours.
Security officers are to be visible inside the building before, during, and after school – especially during passing
periods and the lunch hours. We have a camera system comprised of 93 cameras allowing us to monitor
behavior and activity going on in strategic areas of the building, including hallways, cafeteria, and parking lots.
Our building has a voluntary Crisis Team comprised of teachers, administrators, and support staff. In addition
to these individuals, emergency responders are also part of the Crisis Team. This team is updated every school
year. All Administrators are trained in ALICE, (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter and Evacuate) in case an
active shooter enters the grounds.
Our school nurse has an emergency response team for emergencies. These individuals (teachers, custodians,
non-certified personnel) are trained in CPR and could help her in any emergency situation. At the beginning
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of each school year, and as needed during the school year, the nurse meets with teachers and classes of any
student that is wheelchair dependent. Evacuation plans for these students are developed for safe evacuation
from Marion High School.
MHS has been equipped with two Automated External Defibrillators. These life-saving devices are located in
the nurse’s office and in the athletic arena. As well a portable defibrillator is available for use at our outside
sports complex. The majority of teachers have been trained to use the AED with CPR.
Our total building plan is a part of our Corporation Safety Plan which is updated yearly or as needed.
Everyone in our building is required to check in at our new security desk, as of the 2012-2013 school year, that
is supervised by a uniformed police officer throughout the school. All visitors are required to wear an I.D. tag.
Teachers/staff who need to leave the building during the school day must sign out with the time and destination
and estimated time of return.
Our building plan is divided by individual buildings, as we are a large facility that covers 37.56 acres and
includes nearly 1,075 students in grades 9 through 12. Our plan for each building (one, two, four, six, athletic
arena, Walton Center auditorium complex, and all parking lots) includes: emergency instructions; a disaster
plan of communication with team leaders for each building; a plan for serious injury/trauma; suicide plan;
evacuation plans for the student body, including the disabled; flood preparedness; lockdown procedures;
procedures to address mass student disturbances, outside disturbances, and hostage situations; chemical spills;
bomb threats (all secretaries are in-serviced on proper telephone technique if this happens, including a form to
complete with all pertinent information); explosion (in the building or the nearby surrounding area which may
affect our building); gunfire/shooting; and national disasters. We also conduct routine drills for the following:
fire drills (one per month—evacuation instructions are posted in each classroom); earthquake drills (twice a
year; we hold one per semester); severe weather drills (two a year; we conduct one per semester including the
Statewide Tornado Drill which is conducted every March); man-made disaster drills, such as lock-down drills
(two a year; we hold one per semester).
Our administrative staff attends safety workshops yearly or as applicable to update school safety issues and
revise our plan as needed. Marion High School has a cell phone in the main office and each classroom is
equipped with a telephone and a working flashlight; batteries are updated as needed.
Marion High School administrators and the district safety specialist continually review and update the safety
guideline due to staff turnover. New teachers are in-serviced each fall to create an awareness of the safety and
crisis intervention plan.
Since January 2011, the following safety enhancements have been implemented:
Exterior doors clear labeled to assist outside emergency responders
• Updated surveillance system
• Access control system to allow entering to the building
• Security/safety review checklist to be completed twice annually by the building principal
• Crisis guidelines flip charts created and distributed to every staff and faculty of Marion High School
• Updated evacuation signs throughout the building
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Officials from Marion High School, the MCS Transportation Department, and officials of Indiana Wesleyan
University met in spring of 2011, to discuss and implement an evacuation plan for the high school, if needed. A
memorandum of understanding was created to accommodate student evacuation.
Starting with the 2010-2011 school year an anonymous tip phone line has been established for students to report
incidents of harassment, drugs, bullying, vandalism, weapons, theft, abuse, and threat. This confidential hotline
is available 24 hours, 7 days a week. Individuals may call, text, or e-mail any safety concern.
Marion High School has also implemented a PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention Support) framework. We
have established common expectations on how students should be safe, be responsible, and be respectful in
various areas of the school during common times (hallways, restrooms, classrooms, cafeteria, outside, arrival,
dismissal, computer labs, extracurricular activities and buses). These expectations are shared with the students
during the first week of school. The expectations will be reviewed at the start of each semester. In addition, we
are implementing a bullying prevention program. This program will be monitored by the PBIS/bullying
prevention team.
Attendance
Marion High School’s current attendance rate is 95.7%. Our goal is to maintain this high level of attendance to
ensure student achievement. Improved attendance rate at Marion High School is an area of concern. Instruction
cannot occur when a student is not present. Furthermore, attendance habits developed in school often extend
beyond high school.
To increase attendance rate:
1. Teachers are to record attendance at the beginning of each period. The attendance office personnel track
the daily attendance of those students marked absent. Telephone calls are made to the home or place of
work to follow up with parents on the whereabouts of their student if marked absent. Home visits are
made.
2. A letter is mailed home to inform parents of truancies. Currently, parents receive letters after the 5th
absence/tardy, the 8th absence/tardy, and after the 10th absence/tardy.
3. Monthly meetings are held with parents of students who are habitually truant. Parents are asked to sign
an attendance contract pledging to monitor and improve their child’s attendance.
4. Probation intakes are sent when truancies/tardies become excessive.
5. Driver’s licenses, work permits, and Marion High School parking permits may be revoked for truancy. .
6. The Prosecutor’s Office may be notified as per Grant County Truancy Program. (This went into effect
in the Fall of 2006.)
7. Administration will have weekly attendance meetings to keep on top of attendance issues.
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8. There will be one auto call made per day in the a.m. and one in the p.m. for absent/tardy students
without pre-arranged absences.
9. When a parent calls in a child for being ill, attendance secretaries will check to see number of absences –
if beyond 10, must tell the parent it cannot be excused without a verifiable note from a physician and
offer the chronically medical condition letter.
10. Attendance secretaries will switch phones to voicemail, after the early morning rush, to complete
truancy policy checklist/letter every morning.
11. An individual has been assigned the role to run district level reports in order to be proactive with
attendance issues and concerns.
12. An incentive program is in place for attendance in conjunction with PBIS.
Graduation Rate
The graduation rate for the 2018-2019 school year is 94.7%. In an ongoing effort to improve our graduation
rate, Marion High School is committed to the following:
1. Encouraging our junior and senior students who qualify to participate in the JAG Program (Jobs for
America’s Graduates).
2. Continuation of the Freshman Center to provide students with an easier transition to MHS. Core
classes will be taught in the Freshman Area to create a school within a school environment.
3. Providing students with alternative ways to earn lost and/or needed credits:
Alternative School
Certified teachers were hired to replace educational assistance in credit recovery programs.
4. Encouraging parent/counselor engagement with students who repeatedly fail to determine the cause
of failure and how the school can help redirect for success by examining the student’s four-year
plan.
5. Creating a positive school climate for all students; fostering a sense of belonging for our students;
creating a safe environment for all stakeholders.
6. Encouraging teachers to use differentiated instruction to address the needs and interests of all
learners.
7. Continued involvement and collaboration with the Graduation Coach. The role of the graduation
coach is to assist students in removing barriers that are prohibiting success and graduation. This
may include addressing the students’ absenteeism, helping the student with counseling services,
developing a gradation plan with the student, and conflict management.
8. Providing community support services in pre-natal care, parenting, and anger management.
9. Sending monthly guidance communication with parents with important information such as
graduation requirements, testing dates, and scheduling deadlines.
10. Upward Bound, a program through Indiana Wesleyan University provides students who may not
think college is possible for them, but would love to see a college degree in the future with varied
activities to support their dreams. These activities include tutoring, study skills training, college
visits, and summer enrichment programs.
11. All parents will be invited to attend scheduling meetings in February to review four year plans and
choose courses for the upcoming school year. Counselors will offer evening appointments for
parents who have commitments during the school day.
12. A 9th grade credit recovery lab is in place to supports students at-risk of failure. Students will have
the opportunity to recover lost credits during the school day.
Cultural Competency in an Educational Environment
Marion High School is a school community that is 50.2% white, 23.8% African American, 9.1% Hispanic,
13.5% multiracial, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Native American.
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After drilling down the data, looking at subgroups, it is clear that our non-white students perform below our
white students on state testing; this is an issue that we are aware of and make efforts to address.
The following strategies have been used:
Hiring of diversity director/graduation coach
Hiring of social worker
Building and district level administrators visiting local black churches
The graduation coach works with local African-Americans to serve as mentors in the school. Previously, the
graduation coach has served as part of a local group, primarily composed of African-Americans, called the
Parent Involvement Group of Marion High School. Although the purpose of this committee was to reach the
parents of African-American students, it was not exclusive to African-Americans.
For the 2020-2021 school year, an area of cultural focus will be the disproportionate number of minority and/or
special education students who have been received disciplinary referrals and interventions.
Areas for Immediate Improvement
Marion High School has made significant progress on building goals related to student achievement. Students
take multiple assessment tests in Math and English. We set goals and continue analyze data and game plan for
the new ISTEP as we gain information. We use common core like assessments to prepare our students. Algebra
cohort passage rate improved from 80.9% in 2012-2013 to 84.3% for the 2013-2014 school we improved again
in 2014-2015 to 87.9% and increased again to 88.9% in 2016 Cohort. We exceeded these numbers on our
traditional ECA. In 2017 the Math ISTEP Pass rate was 31% and in 2018 the Math ISTEP Pass Rate was
29.4%. English 10 ECA made significant gains in 2012-2013 at 63% from the previous year ending in a record
high improvement of almost 13% improvement. We improved to 74.4 pass rate in 2014-15 in English. The
English Pass Rate on ECA was 70.2% in 2016. In 2017 the ISTEP ELA pass rate was 46.2% and in 2018 the
ELA ISTEP Pass Rate was 49.4%
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Our goals going forward are to match and ultimately surpass the state average, concentrating on reading
comprehension with an emphasis writing and problem solving. Another important aspect to improving all of
the above is to improve relationships with students.
To address these issues, professional development has been made available for the faculty and the
administration. Areas of professional development include:
Math activities workshop
Developing Quality classroom assessments
Educational Service Center. All teachers receive notification of all scheduled professional development.
To improve the academic standards Marion High School will utilize teacher written power school assessments
to collect and analyze student data and information to inform instruction to help students meet standards.
The key part of the service is the development of formative assessments aligned with the curriculum and the
Indiana Standards and the delivery of results back to the classroom and to the teacher with a web-based product.
Administration and teacher leaders will provide in service on the formative assessment results and instructional
strategies needed for improvement. Teachers develop the questions for assessment tests to be given in regular
intervals throughout the year in pre and post-test format to inform instruction. Longitudinal data will complete
the understanding of the challenges at Marion High School. The district believes it is imperative to address the
improvement process in the junior high school and continue it through the high school. Consistent measurement
with assessments will provide the accountability for teachers more than once per year. Immediate feedback
from assessments is imperative for the teachers at Marion High School and McCulloch Junior High School.
Formative assessments and improvement results will be tracked to the classroom and the individual teacher then
the data can be submitted to the district.
To ensure data driven decision making is at the forefront of our school improvement process, Marion High
School will use a continuous improvement model. An Instruction leadership team, representing various
academic departments, meets monthly to plan tutorials, enrichment, and incentives for students. English and
math teachers will continue working with administration to develop an instructional calendar and formative
assessments.
Daily schedule—to allow time for in-day remediation for students that are performing below
proficiency level on state tested areas.
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Test talks—a one-on-one meeting with every tester, where strengths and weakness on previous tests are
discussed
War Room is used for:
Data analysis and intervention strategies for individual student success. The data is looked at as a whole and
then also for the individual students. We track all measures of progress and interventions in the war room to
insure continuous improvement for individual students and the school as a whole.
PLC time is used for:
Continuous, job-embedded professional development during the school day focused on specific teacher and
student needs as determined in the PLC collaboration time.
Instructionally Focused Accountability
Building relationships with students is a crucial component to increase achievement and attendance. To help
accomplish this goal: TEACHING AND LEARNING
Relationships and Results
All TEACHERS will INSPIRE and facilitate; engaged, relevant, and purposeful STUDENT LEARNING! At MHS we know that our teachers impact student learning more than anyone. We are intentional in our approach to the classroom. We continue to monitor our progress in and out of the classroom in the war room. We target academic benchmarks, discipline and out of classroom activities. We formulate individual plans and interventions for our students and start these interventions early. We monitor what is working and what is not and adjust accordingly.
Priority Focus: To use PLC’s to analyze data to improve and drive student focused instruction. Make sure all conversations and planning revolve around student learning and how we can better serve our students. Have conversations and plans based on data all around improving student achievement
It All Matters! Where we are Now.
Marion High School:
Weekly department chair PLC meetings during 2nd hour and more
frequently if needed. Formative assessments every 4.5 weeks
Students Not passing ISTEP Math or Language Arts necessitates summer
school remediation ISTEP / NWEA scores are analyzed to determine participation in Math
and Language Labs High School PLC Meeting times 7:55 -8:55 every Friday morning. The first Friday of the
month will be whole group. The remaining PLCs will meet as
departments. All focused on data and moving student achievement
forward
Teaching & Learning, Willing & Able to Transform throughout 2019-
2020
Graduation Rate: Maintain a 97% Graduation Rate and above 89 College and Career Readiness Score
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Action Plan: Provide support for individual students at each grade level with
multiple intervention strategies
Review all 2019-20 individual
Files, Attendance, NWEA, ISTEP,
Students placed in appropriate
meetings.
August
12May 24 Teacher referrals to grade level teams, Attendance Records, Grade Book, Formative Assessments,
NWEA
April-Pres. Past performance, standardized completed by
August 10, 2020
Action Plan: Provide Professional Development on Best Math Teaching Practices and D
Instruction
-Effective Numeracy Lesson Structure - Differentiated Instruction (Targeting Needs and Strengths of each student) -Learning Environment- Disciplining With Your
Heart
Level-
Respond to Instruction- Intervention and Student Supports
Create/Review Upcoming Assessments
and Leaders focused on Identifying Support
Needs and Feedback for teachers
Weekly during the
in connection summaries
30
Increase NWEA Math and Reading Scores by 20% for the 2017-18 School Year
Quarterly Intense Data Days focusing on
teacher quality instruction and student data
Quarterly n War
Classroom Data, Individualized
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• Teachers are asked to be a presence at their doors greeting students before school, and in the halls during
passing periods. The positive communication with students and adult presence in the halls build trust,
show students that teachers care, and provide a safe school environment.
• On the first day of school, teachers were encouraged to use strategies to make students feel welcome, as
well as activities that foster an opportunity for students and teachers to get to know each other.
• The Marion High School Positive Behavioral Interventions and Support (PBIS) committee have
developed incentives to reinforce students who are exhibiting the focus character trait of the month.
Character trait banners are posted in the hallways and in most classrooms. Expectations for positive
student interactions are also posted within highly visible places in the hallways.
• In order to support our students involved in extra-curricular activities, staff will be admitted free to
sporting events by showing their ID and signing in. Administrators will rotate all activities so that there
is always an adult presence.
• We also build relationships with students by showing an interest in their post- secondary plans. Many
opportunities are made available for students to prepare for and explore post-secondary options. The
PSAT is given to all sophomores. College Cost Estimator is a program that allows students and parents
to estimate the cost of attending college. College Goal Sunday (assistance with FAFSA form) and
College Go Week (filling out college applications with assistance and no application fee) are also held
annually at Marion High School.
• Staff celebrates student accomplishments by recognizing seniors with a 3.5 or higher accumulated GPA
with a dinner in which they are honored and permitted to invite two teachers to attend. This reinforces
our belief that we are a team and work together for success. Scholarship Sunday also recognizes all
seniors that receive any type of scholarship; academic, athletic, or those based on special interest or
career objectives. Partnerships with IWU to provide tutoring and Mentors for our students.
MHS Building Goals
GOAL #1 All students will show growth in language, writing, and reading comprehension across the curriculum. GOAL #2 All students will show growth in problem solving and computation across the curriculum.
AFFECTIVE GOAL Providing a school environment where all students are safe, respectful, and responsible, Marion High School
will maintain 95% or above attendance and graduation rate.
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Goal #1: All students will show growth in language, writing, and reading comprehension across the curriculum.
Strategies • Provide professional development during teacher PLC meetings for writing and reading across the
curriculum.
learners.
• Provide opportunities for high school English/LA teachers to collaborate with junior high, intermediate,
and elementary English/LA teachers to vertically align the English curriculum.
• Use Daily Oral Language Activities.
• Create Instructional Focus Calendar for English 10 to distribute to the faculty. Teachers will integrate
the instructional focus into other areas of curriculum whenever possible.
• Create common formative and summative assessments using PS Assessments for the English
Department.
• Use common writing prompts in the English Department.
• Provide in school day time for tutorials (Lab Time) for students performing below proficiency level on
assessments.
• All students that have not passed the English 10 ECA will be placed in an English Lab class for
remediation.
• All students expected to read 10 pages a night in either a novel or literature book. All students will be
expected to express all written work in complete sentences in ALL subject areas.
Benchmarks • Frequent common formative and summative assessments created by the
English department using PS Assessments
• 2-3 common writing prompts by all English students Common content-
specific pre and post assessments
Assessment Tools • End-of-Course Assessment Scores
• Formative/Summative Assessments
School Improvement Action Plan Marion High School—Goal #1
Goal: All students will show growth in language, writing, and reading comprehension across the curriculum.
33
Support Data (from the Profile) Standardized Assessment Local Assessment PS Assessment Analysis ISTEP PS Formative Assessments Curriculum Writing GQE Results PS Summative Assessments Student Surveys SAT/ACT Scores Common Writing Prompt
Parent Surveys Teacher Surveys
learners. 2. Teachers will participate in professional development for reading and writing across the curriculum.
3. English teachers will participate in collaboration with McCulloch Jr. High teachers to vertically align the
English/LA curriculum. 4. English teachers will incorporate daily oral language activities into the English curriculum.
5. Teachers will integrate the instructional focus areas into daily lessons across the curriculum. 6. English teachers will create common formative and summative assessments using Power School. Exams will be used
to: familiarize students with standardized testing formats, examine strengths and weakness in the curriculum, and
determine which students need additional support during the school day. 7. English teachers will develop common writing prompts for all English students. These writing samples will be graded
using the common ISTEP rubric.
Activities to Implement the Intervention
Person(s)
Activities Beg End
ways to successfully
differentiate instruction to
learners.
passed the English ISTEP
English Lab class for
pages in either a novel or
literature book each
State Standards, Data from
ultimately improve student
weekly PD and PLC meetings. Training and coaching from district,
building and teacher leaders occurred
summer 2019 . Adjustments will continue to be
made to curriculum documents
throughout the school year.
for the implementation and evaluation
of DOL activities.
school year.
35
36
8.
night.
required reading.
Goal #2: All students will show growth in problem solving and computation across the curriculum.
Strategies • Provide professional development during teacher meetings for problem solving and use of computation
across the curriculum.
learners.
• Provide opportunities for high school Math teachers to collaborate with junior high, intermediate, and
elementary math teachers to vertically align the Math curriculum.
• Create and review Instructional Focus Calendar for Math Courses to distribute to the faculty. Teachers
will integrate the instructional focus into other areas of curriculum whenever possible.
37
• Provide in school day time for tutorials for students performing below proficiency level on assessments.
Create common formative and summative assessments using PS Assessments for the Math
Department.
• Provide in school day time for tutorials (Lab time) for students performing below proficiency level on
assessments.
• All students that have not shown proficiency will be placed in a Math Lab class for remediation.
Benchmarks Frequent common formative and summative assessments created by the Math department using teacher
created PS Assessments.
Assessment Tools • ISTEP
School Improvement Action Plan Marion High School—Goal #2
Goal: All students will show growth in problem solving and computation across the curriculum. Support Data (from the Profile) Standardized Assessment Local Assessment PS Assessment Data Analysis ISTEP Formative Assessments Curriculum Writing PSAT Scores Summative Assessments
Student Surveys SAT/ACT Scores Parent Surveys Teacher Surveys Interventions:
1. Teachers will participate in continued professional development in differentiated instruction to meet the needs of all
learners. 2. Teachers will participate in professional development for problem solving and use of computation across the curriculum. 3. Math teachers will participate in collaborate with McCulloch Jr. High Math teachers to vertically align the math
curriculum. 4. Teachers will turn in problem solving samples during morning PLC collaboration time. 5. Teachers will integrate the
instructional focus areas into daily lessons across the curriculum. 6. Math teachers will create common formative and summative assessments using standards based assessments. Exams will
be used to: familiarize students with standardized testing formats, examine strengths and weakness in the curriculum, and
determine which students need additional support during the school day. 7. School wide problem solving activities will be given to all students one time per quarter. Math teachers will create
common formative and summative assessments using standards based PS Assessment testing program. Exams will be
used to: familiarize students with standardized testing formats, examine strengths and weakness in the curriculum, and
determine which students need additional support during the school day. Activities to Implement the Intervention
Person(s)
Beg End
collaborative PLC times to
2. Teachers will participate
instructional focus areas
common formative and
Instructional Focus Calendar
Teachers take part in weekly PLC
meetings to collaborate on student
achievement. Use PLC time for ideas of how to
integrate writing across the curriculum.
Training and coaching from teacher
and district leaders occurred during
summer 2019. Adjustments will
continue to be made to curriculum
documents throughout the school year. Teacher and building leaders to develop
Instructional Focus Calendar driven by
teacher leaders.
passed the formative
assessments will be
class for remediation.
Curriculum writing time during
40
Providing a school environment where all students are safe, respectful, and responsible, Marion High
School will obtain and maintain 95% or above attendance rate.
Strategies • Make students aware of the importance of school attendance.
• Create incentive program.
• Improve Power School attendance reporting and enforce policy already in place.
Benchmarks • Continual monitoring of truancies and absences
• Quarterly evaluation of attendance rate as compared to last year’s data
School Improvement Action Plan
Goal: Providing a school environment where all students are safe,
respectful, and responsible, Marion High School will obtain and
maintain 95% or above attendance rate.
Support Data (from the Profile) Standardized Assessment Local Assessment
1. 2018-19 Attendance Rate was 95.2 2. 2017-18 Attendance rate was 95.3 3. 2016-17 Attendance rate was 95.1% 4. 2014-15 Attendance rate was 94.2%
Interventions: 1. Students will be made aware of the importance of the 95%
attendance goal. 2. Weekly, quarterly, and annual incentive program will be
developed to increase attendance. 3. PBIS reinforces student behavior expectations which include
attending class regularly and on time.
Activities to Implement the Intervention Person(s)
Accountable Timeline Resources Professional
41
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Posters will be created and displayed throughout the school emphasizing the importance of attending 95% of the school days.
Prizes will be delivered during lunch for perfect attendance.
Local businesses, in partnership with the community group
“Friends of Marion High School,” will be asked for donations for
quarterly and annual attendance drawings.
Driving licenses will be revoked per Board policy.
Students Rewarded for Positive Behavior, Grades and Attendance
Assistant Principals
Assistant Principals
Assistant Principals
Dessert
Statutes and Rules to be waived
Marion High School requested four non-standard course title waivers for Animal Science, Marine Biology,
Microbiology, and Zoology from two-semester/two credits to one semester/one credit. The official titles for these
courses are:
DUE DATE: 10/1/2019
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PRINCIPAL’S E-MAIL ADDRESS:
43
APPROVAL SIGN-OFF FORM
I, Keith Burke, as the exclusive representative, by signing this document, demonstrate my support for the Professional Development
Program submitted by the above-mentioned school.
________________________________________ Signature Date
Name Group you are
Larry Batchelor Dean
I have reviewed this school improvement plan and have found it to meet our
local requirements as well as those established by Public Law 221. Brad Lindsay, Superintendent
__________________________________________________________ Date
I have reviewed the professional development components of this plan and
have found them to be satisfactory. Scott Simpson, President – MTA
__________________________________________________________ Date
This plan was approved by the Board of School Trustees of the Marion
Community Schools on the date indicated below.
__________________________________________________________