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NEASC Annual Meeting December 4-6, 2013 Philip J. Sisson Provost/VP of Academic and Student Affairs Middlesex Community College sissonp@middlesex.mass.edu. Measuring Civic Engagement. MCC Fast Facts. Two Campuses – Bedford and Lowell Majors : 75 degree and certificate programs - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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NEASC Annual Meeting December 4-6, 2013 Philip J. Sisson Provost/VP of Academic and Student Affairs Middlesex Community College sissonp@middlesex.mass.edu

NEASC Annual MeetingDecember 4-6, 2013Philip J. SissonProvost/VP of Academic and Student AffairsMiddlesex Community Collegesissonp@middlesex.mass.eduMeasuring Civic Engagement

MCC Fast FactsTwo Campuses Bedford and LowellMajors: 75 degree and certificate programs Full-time Faculty: 125 Part-time Faculty: 460 Average Class Size: 21

Total enrollment: 13,267 Full-time Enrollment: (12 credits per semester): 5,307 (44%) Female: 7,651 (58%) Male:5,616 (42%)

Social Responsibility RubricThe MCC graduate will demonstrate Social Responsibility within the college community with: Multicultural and Diversity Awareness

Student demonstrates involvement with people different from him/herself Student acknowledges the presence of different viewpoints Student recognizes own identity and culture and appreciates other culturesStudent articulates impact of a diverse societyEthics, Values and Social JusticeStudent recognizes injustice and discriminationStudent demonstrates the ability to make decisions based on ethical and moral reasoningCitizenship and Civic EngagementStudent demonstrates an understanding of the value of citizenshipStudent recognizes that s/he belongs to a community and demonstrates awareness of the communitys needsStudent engages in service to othersStudent demonstrates understanding of how social change is achieved in a democratic system

7The Vision Project A Public Agenda for Higher Education in Massachusetts

Key OutcomesCollege ParticipationRaising the percentage of high school graduates going to collegeand the readiness of these students for college-level work. College CompletionIncreasing the percentage of students who complete degree and certificate programs. Student LearningAchieving higher levels of student learning through better assessment and more extensive use of assessment results.Workforce AlignmentAligning occupationally oriented degree and certificate programs with the needs of statewide, regional and local employers.Preparing CitizensProviding students with the knowledge, skills and dispositions to be active, informed citizens.Closing Achievement GapsClosing achievement gaps among students from different ethnic, racial and income groups in all areas of educational progress.ResearchConducting research that drives economic development.

Time to Lead: The Need for Excellence in Public Higher Education, September 2012Institutional Culture/Shared Responsibility for Civic EngagementCommitted Leadership Institution/SystemStrong Collaboration Academic and Student AffairsOrganizational Structure/SupportUse Internal and External ResourcesTransition from Inputs to Outcomes FocusOn-Going Faculty Development Assignment DesignShared Commitment to Assessment/ImprovementSelected Resources/ReferencesACPA and NASPA. 2004. Learning Reconsidered: A Campus-Wide Focus on the Student Experience. Washington, DC: ACPA and NASPA.Clayton-Pedersen, Alma R., Sharon Parker, Daryl G. Smith, Jos F. Moreno, and Daniel Hiroyuki Teraguchi. 2007. Making a Real Difference with Diversity: A Guide to Institutional Change. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.Colby, Anne, Elizabeth Beaumont, Thomas Ehrlich, and Josh Corngold. 2007. Educating for Democracy: Preparing Undergraduates for Responsible Political Engagement. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Jacoby, Barbara. 2009. Civic Engagement in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Kanter, Martha J., and Carol Geary Schneider. 2013. Civic Learning and Engagement. Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 45 (1): 614. Kuh, George D. 2008. High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.NASPA. N.d. NASPAs Lead Initiative on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement. http://www.naspa.org/clde/lead_initiative.cfm. National Leadership Council for Liberal Education and Americas Promise. 2007. College Learning for the New Global Century. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.National Task Force on Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement. 2012. A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracys Future. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

Appendix A

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix B

Appendix C

Appendix C

Appendix D

Appendix D

Appendix E

Appendix ECapstone4Milestones32Benchmark1Connections to ExperienceConnects relevant experience and academic knowledgeMeaningfully synthesizes connections among experiences outside of the formal classroom (including life experiences and academic experiences such as internships and travel abroad) to deepen understanding of fields of study and to broaden own points of view.Effectively selects and develops examples of life experiences, drawn from a variety of contexts (e.g., family life, artistic participation, civic involvement, work experience), to illuminate concepts/theories/frameworks of fields of study.Compares life experiences and academic knowledge to infer differences, as well as similarities, and acknowledge perspectives other than own.Identifies connections between life experiences and those academic texts and ideas perceived as similar and related to own interests.TransferAdapts and applies skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situationsAdapts and applies, independently, skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situations to solve difficult problems or explore complex issues in original ways.Adapts and applies skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation to new situations to solve problems or explore issues.Uses skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation in a new situation to contribute to understanding of problems or issues.Uses, in a basic way, skills, abilities, theories, or methodologies gained in one situation in a new situation.Integrated CommunicationFulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) in ways that enhance meaning, making clear the interdependence of language and meaning, thought, and expression.Fulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) to explicitly connect content and form, demonstrating awareness of purpose and audience.Fulfills the assignment(s) by choosing a format, language, or graph (or other visual representation) that connects in a basic way what is being communicated (content) with how it is said (form).Fulfills the assignment(s) (i.e. to produce an essay, a poster, a video, a PowerPoint presentation, etc.) in an appropriate form.UMass/Lowell - Integrative Learning and Community Engagement RubricAppendix FCapstone4Milestones32Benchmark1Reflection and Self-AssessmentDemonstrates a developing sense of self as a learner, building on prior experiences to respond to new and challenging contexts Envisions a future self (and possibly makes plans that build on past experiences that have occurred across multiple and diverse contexts).Evaluates changes in own learning over time, recognizing complex contextual factors (e.g., works with ambiguity and risk, deals with frustration, considers ethical frameworks).Articulates strengths and challenges (within specific performances or events) to increase effectiveness in different contexts (through increased self-awareness).Describes own performances with general descriptors of success and failure.Civic Identity and CommitmentProvides evidence of experience in civic-engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a reinforced and clarified sense of civic identity and continued commitment to public action.Provides evidence of experience in civic-engagement activities and describes what she/he has learned about her or himself as it relates to a growing sense of civic identity and commitment.Evidence suggests involvement in civic-engagement activities is generated from expectations or course requirements rather than from a sense of civic identity.Provides little evidence of her/his experience in civic-engagement activities and does not connect experiences to civic identity.Civic Contexts/ StructuresDemonstrates ability and commitment to collaboratively work across and within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim. Demonstrates ability and commitment to work actively within community contexts and structures to achieve a civic aim.Demonstrates experience identifying intentional ways to participate in civic contexts and structures.Experiments with civic contexts and structures, tries out a few to see what fits.Appendix FGoal: To Prepare Individuals for the Role of Citizenship: Engaging students in the knowledge, skills, and values they need to contribute as active and informed members of a democratic society in order to promote the growth of healthy communities, global economic vitality, social justice and the common goodEach objective can be measured by a number of learning outcomes listed below. This rubric should be used to access students civic learning and engagement, including program learning outcomes. Objective 1: Civic and Democratic Knowledge: Foster the knowledge students need to assume the roles and responsibilities of citizenship through formal curricula, co-curricular activity, and community engagementObjective 2: Civic and Democratic Skills: Foster the development of the personal and life skills students need to become responsible citizens and active participants in democratic lifeObjective 3: Civic and Democratic Values: Engage students in opp