mjhs the golden ray newspaper spring 2013

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Mt. Juliet High School’s Science Technology Engineer- ing and Mathematics club placed 19 of 43 high schools from around the world at NASA’s 20th annual Great Moonbuggy Race. Each year, drivers, mechanics, and engineers alike migrate to Huntsville, Ala. to race their moonbuggies for a grand prize of $3,000. Between the high school and college divisions, roughly 600 students attended this year. There were students from 23 different states, and the countries of Puerto Rico, India, Canada, Germany, Mexico, and Russia. To be part of the race, contestants had to design and create their own moonbuggy. The moonbuggy must have been able to hold two drivers (one boy and one girl), have a maximum dimension of 4’x 4’x 4’, be light enough for the two drivers to carry, have a turning radius of 15 feet or less, have seat restraints, functional breaks, and the lowest surface must have been a minimum of 15 inches. Under the pressure of a time limit, the moonbuggies were carried to the start line and assembled. Once assem- bled, the moonbuggies had to prove their ability to sustain a half-mile course with various obstacles that simulate “craters”, rocks, “lava” ridges, inclines and “lunar” soil. Penalties were given for taking too long to assemble your moonbuggy at the start line, avoiding obstacles, or if a driver came in contact with the ground. The course had to be completed twice by each team, and the best time was taken out of the two. Mt. Juliet’s moonbuggy took almost a full year to develop. With the help of the auto tech class, construction was easier. Several students from the STEM club helped to build the moonbuggy, but only six were able to attend the actual race. They did run into a minor problem though. The steering mecha- nism was not complete until the day before the actual race, causing the drivers, Brittany Roberts and Alex Lurie, to postpone practicing until they were actually in Huntsville. With that, they still managed to successfully navigate and complete the course both days. When asked about his thoughts on the race, STEM club sponsor David Haines remarked, “We’re very pleased with the results, espe- cially since our drivers didn’t get the chance to practice until we were in the parking lot of the Space Center.” Overall, Mt. Juliet’s best time was 10 minutes 35 seconds, land- ing them 19 of the 43 high schools competing, and the number two high school competing from Tennessee. To learn more about The Great Moonbuggy Race, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov. By: Lindsey Cotner NASA MOONBUGGY RACE Spring 2013 - www.MjhsGoldenRay.com Issue 2 January - May 2013 1800 Curd Rd Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 www.MjhsBnn.com AP Chemistry studies with Vanderbilt On March 4, AP chemistry students from MJHS were given the opportunity to visit the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanascale Science and Engineering and participate in a research lab. The objective for the trip was to learn more about nanoscale science by making solar cells with berry pigments. “Na- noscale science is just science on a small scale. We use it to look for ways to solve energy problems,” says chemistry teacher, Gayle Hayes. Nanoscale science was not the only thing that the students learned about while there. Interacting with the older college students taught them how to be successful at a higher level. The students really enjoyed the trip. “My favorite part was getting to look at and learn about all the cool equipment they had,” says intrigued MJHS peer, Chandler Bauder. Overall, the trip was a success for Hayes’ AP chemistry classes, and they hope to do more things like this in the future. By: Summer Adams INSIDE EDITORS STAFF WRITERS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Ms. L. Alisha Nicholas Summer Adams Lindsey Cotner Lexi Bates Schyler Cuthbertson Morgan Daniels Gracie Burkeen Shelby Ambrose Sydney Brumbach Amber Carpenter Shelby Crawford Schyler Cuthbertson Shelby Dolleris Lauren Dutch Tessa Eiche Braden Fox Chalemar Holmes Kira Ivanich Emma Perez Jaila Tibbs Alexis Tracy NEWS: 1 -2, 4 CLUBS: 3 FEATURES: 5 SR LAYOUT: 6-7 AWARDS: 8-9 SPORTS: 10 COMMUNITY: 11 COLLAGE: 12

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MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

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Page 1: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

Mt. Juliet High School’s Science Technology Engineer-ing and Mathematics club placed 19 of 43 high schools from around the world at NASA’s 20th annual Great Moonbuggy Race. Each year, drivers, mechanics, and engineers alike migrate to Huntsville, Ala. to race their moonbuggies for a grand prize of $3,000. Between the high school and college divisions, roughly 600 students attended this year. There were students from 23 different states, and the countries of Puerto Rico, India, Canada, Germany, Mexico, and Russia. To be part of the race, contestants had to design and create their own moonbuggy. The moonbuggy must have been able to hold two drivers (one boy and one girl), have a maximum dimension of 4’x 4’x 4’, be light enough for the two drivers to carry, have a turning radius of 15 feet or less, have seat restraints, functional breaks, and the lowest surface must have been a minimum of 15 inches. Under the pressure of a time limit, the moonbuggies were carried to the start line and assembled. Once assem-bled, the moonbuggies had to prove their ability to sustain a half-mile course with various obstacles that simulate “craters”, rocks, “lava” ridges, inclines and “lunar” soil. Penalties were given for taking too long to assemble your moonbuggy at the start line, avoiding obstacles, or if a driver came in contact with the ground. The course had to be completed twice by each team, and the best time was taken out of the two. Mt. Juliet’s moonbuggy took almost a full year to develop. With the help of the auto tech class, construction was easier. Several students from the STEM club helped to build the moonbuggy, but only six were able to attend the actual race. They did run into a minor problem though. The steering mecha-

nism was not complete until the day before the actual race, causing the drivers, Brittany Roberts and Alex Lurie, to postpone practicing until they were actually in Huntsville. With that, they still managed to successfully navigate and complete the course both days. When asked about his thoughts on the race, STEM club sponsor David Haines remarked, “We’re very pleased with the results, espe-cially since our drivers didn’t get the chance to practice until we were in the parking lot of the Space Center.” Overall, Mt. Juliet’s best time was 10 minutes 35 seconds, land-ing them 19 of the 43 high schools competing, and the number two high school competing from Tennessee. To learn more about The Great Moonbuggy Race, visit http://moonbuggy.msfc.nasa.gov.

By: Lindsey Cotner

NASA MOONBUGGY RACE

Spring 2013 - www.MjhsGoldenRay.com Issue 2 January - May 2013

1800 Curd Rd Mt. Juliet, TN 37122 www.MjhsBnn.com

AP Chemistry studies with Vanderbilt On March 4, AP chemistry students from MJHS were given the opportunity to visit the Vanderbilt Institute for Nanascale Science and Engineering and participate in a research lab. The objective for the trip was to learn more about nanoscale science by making solar cells with berry pigments. “Na-noscale science is just science on a small scale. We use it to look for ways to solve energy problems,” says chemistry teacher, Gayle Hayes.

Nanoscale science was not the only thing that the students learned about while there. Interacting with the older college students taught them how to be successful at a higher level. The students really enjoyed the trip. “My favorite part was getting to look at and learn about all the cool equipment they had,” says intrigued MJHS peer, Chandler Bauder. Overall, the trip was a success for Hayes’ AP chemistry classes, and they hope to do more things like this in the future.

By: Summer Adams

INSI

DE

EDITORS STAFF WRITERSGRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Ms. L. Alisha NicholasSummer AdamsLindsey Cotner

Lexi BatesSchyler Cuthbertson

Morgan DanielsGracie Burkeen

Shelby AmbroseSydney Brumbach Amber CarpenterShelby Crawford

Schyler CuthbertsonShelby DollerisLauren Dutch

Tessa EicheBraden Fox

Chalemar HolmesKira IvanichEmma PerezJaila Tibbs

Alexis Tracy

NEWS: 1 -2, 4CLUBS: 3FEATURES: 5SR LAYOUT: 6-7

AWARDS: 8-9SPORTS: 10COMMUNITY: 11COLLAGE: 12

Page 2: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

Don Willoughby’s Honor’s Greenhouse Management class had its annual Green-house Sale. A wide variety of plants were on sale including fl ats for $12 and hanging baskets from $12 - 15. The plants came with a product care label so buyers can know how to care for their plants. Willoughby’s class has a sale every year. Spenser Lee explained that “The sales go towards ex-panding the greenhouse.” Buying a plant at the Greenhouse Sale is an investment towards the future of MJHS’s agriculture program.

News2

Josh Beattie, a junior at MJHS, won the Volunteer State Community College Annual High School Auto-CAD Competition on April 20. The ACAD competition is an annual event hosted at the Volunteer State Community College computer lab. Participants had three hours to recreate an archi-tectural design in AutoCAD 13, software for comput-er-aided design and drafting. Each participating high school selected one junior or senior to compete. Mr. Bobby Petty, teacher of the drafting class, chose Beattie. Beattie stated “I have taken drafting classes each year since I was a fresh-man.” Contestants had to display good architectural and engineering skill. Josh was awarded a $500 Lowe Engineering Award, in addition, his parents matched the cash reward.

Math students bring home gold

By: Braden Fox

Annual greenhouse saleBy: Braden Fox

AutoCAD student wins fi rst

Four MJHS students received high honors at the American Math Competi-tion at Cumberland University. 26 students from MJHS went to the AMC in Feb. and brought home victory for the school. Eric Whitmire, Ryan Downs, and Chase Buscherfeld won the top three spots for the AMC 12 test. Whitmire won fi rst place while Downs and Buscherfeld tied for second. They all received 1000 dollar schol-arships to Cumberland University. Cole Ellis took third place for the AMC 10 and received a $500 scholarship to Cumberland as well. The AMC is a contest purposed to spur interest in mathematics and to develop talent through the excitement of friendly completion as problems are solved in a timed format. Students had to complete a test of 25 questions with-in a set given amount of time. Though it may sound easy, these are long hard equations that are very confusing. Downs confessed that he only got to answer 12 questions. To prepare for the AMC the students had after school tutoring sessions with their number one supporter, Mrs. Bell, a math teacher at MJHS. The AMC 12 winners were ecstatic when they received their winning titles. Whitmire stated, “I was happy to know that I had done better than all the other students there.” MJHS could not be more proud of all of the winners at the AMC this year.

Golden win for teachers

Two teachers at Mt. Juliet High School, Mr. David Haines and Ms. Emily Howard won fi rst place at the Tennessee Academy of Science for a stem lesson over golden gauge for math, science, and technology on November 12, 2012. Ms. Howard and Mr. Haines created a golden section gauge that maintains the golden ratio. They also made a poster which gave examples of the golden ratio the Greeks used in their architec-ture. An example of the golden ratio would be that the length of your shoulder to your elbow is the same length as your thigh. We are very proud of these teachers for making such a successful project and winning fi rst place for their stem lesson.

By: Lexi Bates

AP Art is the yearlong course divided to form Honors Art IV and AP. Over the course of one year the stu-dents spend their time making portfo-lios that consist of twelve different art projects. Teacher Derek Elwell says, “You cannot just be smart and pass the AP Art exam, it generally takes you a year of work to do it.” The portfolio is in breadth form, with 12 separate works of art. They send their portfolios to the college board, digitally through the computer. There are three types of categories for the portfolios: fi rst portfolio = Draw-ings, second portfolio = 2D Art, third Portfolio = 3D Art. The students have to do anything and everything to fi ll those categories. Eight drawings and seven 2D drawings were submitted for a total of fi fteen items.

AP Art broadens mindsBy: Shally Holmes and Shelby Dolleris

MJHS Senior, Anna Murphy has been a “senior editor” for the MJHS yearbook staff for four years. Many hours of preparation and time goes into making a yearbook. They must have the names of every student (and they must be spelled correctly), every sport schedule, and write stories for a variety of top-ics. Murphy said, “It’s a lot harder than everyone gives us credit for.”Murphy tells us that every student has a certain job such as; treasurer, photographers, editing, story writers, and Photoshop editor. Everyone works together as a team to make the yearbook. Each of the students must agree on a cover and title so everything comes together. Murphy signed up for yearbook in middle school and has been a member since her freshmen year. Her favorite part of yearbook is tak-ing pictures and seeing people’s different expressions.

In the world of yearbookBy: Shelby Ambrose

Page 3: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

3ClubsHe’s All That

By: Lindsey Cotner

The MJHS Youth in Government organization was awarded Premiere Delegation for the 5th year in a row, along with multiple honors awarded to the students. Youth in Government is an annual four day conference designed for students from across Tennessee to experience what it is like to be a part of the state government. The students stay at the Sheraton Hotel downtown and the actual conference is held in the chambers of the Capitol building. Each student has a particular role in the program. They may serve as members of the press corps, senators, representatives, justices, lawyers, or as department commissioners and lobbyists. Of the 800 students present at conference, roughly 35 of them were from Mt. Juliet. This year, MJHS went above and beyond what was expected of them. From a docket of over 200, seven of the top 20 bills selected were from Mt. Juliet. Abby Schultz, senior, was one of the fi fteen

selected to attend National Affairs, which is the highest honor a TN delegate can achieve. Bailey

Choudhury, junior, was selected as Outstanding Governor’s Cabinet member, and Eric Whitmire, senior, was selected as Outstanding Senator. Five year sponsor, Amber Gailbreath, commented, “This

is amazing. I’m very proud of our students.” Many of Mt. Juliet’s delegates had their bills pass in the house and senate, and some even went on to have their bills passed and signed into law by the governor. Those students are seniors Zack Duncan, Cory Smith, Connor Gannon, Ryan Jenkins, Caleb Charlton, Torrey Cheney, and junior Caroline Wilkman. When asked about her overall experience, senior and lobbyist Emma Atkins stated, “It was really fun, and I made a bunch of friends. I’m glad I went; it’s a great place to meet people and fi gure out what you believe in. Everyone should have at least one experience like that.” Aside from the debating and voting that goes on, the students are allotted ample free time to meet delegates from different schools, build new relationships, and even fi nd love according to some. They had two hours for lunch and dinner each day, and also had two dances for the students to enjoy during the evening.

Y.I.G. shines at 2013 conference

On March 8, 2013 HOSA, Health Occupations Students of America, preformed a mock car crash, in front of Mt. Juliet High School, in order to promote the dangers of texting while driving. With cars donated from the local junk yard, Mt. Juliet Police Department, Mt. Juliet Fire Department, an ambulance service, and Vanderbilt LifeFlight set the scene of the instance. When asked about the mock crash Audrey Frazier said, “HOSA has been doing mock crashes for six plus years for drunk driving, but this year they did it for texting and driving. Every school in Wilson County does a mock crash, but we are the only ones who do it every year. We have to ask Mr. Brown beforehand before doing the crashes.”

Students involved in the “crash” were Clayton Neal, Sr., Becky Braswell, Sr.,Mcala Machese, Sr., Tanner Pearson, Jr., Meshia Seny, Jr., Sammy Anderson, Soph., Maryn Schwab, Soph., The mock crash is an interesting way for students to realize that some of the things they do can be dangerous. Students learn that drinking or texting drive can not only affect them but other people as well. For further information click the link below. http://www.wsmv.com/story/21560455/students-learn-dangers-of-texting-while-driving

HOSA’s mock crash creates texting and driving awarenessBy: Shally Holmes and Shelby Dolleris

Page 4: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

4

On Wednesday, March 20, four students from MJHS competed and placed fourth in the Personal Finance Challenge at Tennessee State University’s Avon Williams Campus. Andrew Bakheet, Dustin Chitwood, Austin Cook, and John Don-ovan were the fi rst team to represent MJHS at the Personal Finance Challenge. After their teacher, William Schwarz, registered them, the team qualifi ed by scoring in the top ten percent in the state on a 30-question online test.

At the challenge, eight teams from the state went head to head in four rounds. “There were two individual timed quizzes, one team quiz, and a Jeopardy buzz-in for the top four teams. Our team was competing for third or fourth,” Schwarz explained. They ended up placing fourth after the Jeopardy round. The national competition is in May, and although MJHS did not qualify, they look forward to trying again next year.

Personal Finance class conquers challenge

Robert Vachunek’s auto-tech class offers affordable services not only to teach-ers and students, but also to the community. Services include: oil change, transmission services, car wash, and air condition-ing services. The affordable prices of these services are: oil changes for $24.00, wipers for $20.00, transmission services for $65.00, car washes for $10.00 inside and out, and tune-ups starting at $39.00. A new service Vachunek is proud to announce is tire rotation and balancing at an incredible price of $10. All of the profi ts go to the auto-tech program. Vachunek has been in the auto industry for 27 years. He says, “My students are very reliable.” There is no money back guarantee, but he oversees all of the students work before it is returned to the customer. If interested, contact Robert Vachunek at [email protected] for an appointment and please allow one to two business days advance notice.

Auto Tech services community

News

By: Lexi Bates and Shelby Crawford

By: Lauren Dutch

NASA visited MJHS on February 22 to see the engineering talent of the STEM (Science Technol-ogy Engineering Mathematics) classes; students in STEM also participated in video conferences with NASA offi cials and scientists. Students in Mr. David Haines’ and Ms. Alisha Nicholas’ STEM classes fi led into the theater to take part in a Q&A session with NASA scientists John Rector, Mallory Johnston, and Mike Kynard. This event was part of the Distance Learning initiative. The Q&A revolved around discussing the SLS (Space Launch System). Topics ranged from the probability of extraterrestrial life to the strenuous astronaut exercise regimen. The STEM classes had their own work to show off. NASA engineer Dr. Don Krupp and public af-fairs offi cer Shannon Ridinger were exposed to many of the STEM projects. Remote-controlled cars, 3-D models, and much more were on display in the Commons area after the hour-long Q&A session. The purpose of the Distance Learning program is to foster an interest in math and science in stu-dents. As Rector explained during the Q&A session, “Everything is math… You have to be able to do the math and science.” Krupp gave words of advice for students, “Just because you come from a small school doesn’t mean you can’t achieve great things.” STEM is a great way for students to broaden their horizons and realize their potential.

Distance learning blast off with NASA and TN Tech University By: Braden Fox

Science interacts with MJE On Feb 21, the honor/AP junior and senior science classes from MJHS went to Family Science Night at Mt. Juliet Elementary and produced four interactive stations dealing with chemistry and biology. Mrs. Gayle Hayes’ and Mrs. Cher Carlisle’s science classes presented four

demonstrations: two chemistry and two life sciences. The two chemistry stations were a smell and taste test against apple and potatoes while the other consisted of fi nding the DNA of a strawberry. Dry ice properties and acid base indicators in house hold products were the two life science stations. “I want them to see what a science fair looks like and also want them to gain confi dence to share science with the community,” says Hayes.

Christina Contreras, Kyle Houser, and Melissa Hollinger were a few of the science students that participated in the science fair. Each stated they had a great time and felt that their expectations were met by the younger students. Over all the science fair was a success. The children not only enjoyed the exhibits, they furthered their education.

By: Tessa Eiche and Kira Ivanich

www.MjhsGoldenRay.com

Page 5: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

5Features “Moving on up” is a traditional pep rally intended for students to make an easier transition from grade to grade and to make the seniors last prep rally something special. Principal Mel Brown says that “It’s like watching your children leave.” He hopes that when all of the seniors walk out those doors they are better people from when they en-tered. Mr. Brown asks himself “Did we do it? Are they going some-where? Are they getting the senior experience they wish for? Do they have pride and confi dence in their alma mater?” After this “moving on up” tradition, the seniors continue to walk outside to fi eld day. Some fi eld day activities will be “paint parties”, paint twister, shaving cream slip ‘n’ slide, piñata, kickball, and much more. “Moving on up” will start at 8:30 and transition into fi eld day which ends at 11:11 and all seniors leave after. Field day will be messy so as Mr. Brown says “Don’t get hurt and don’t go nuts.” Wear fi eld day shirts or a t-shirt that you do not mind getting messy, girls put hair up, no swim suits are allowed unless under shirt, bring extra clothes and a towel, and bring goggles if needed.

Moving on up

The Tennessee High School Press Association held its annual award ceremony in March with high schools being represented from across the state. The THSPA recognizes the best in high school journalism, including newspaper, yearbook, web design, and broadcasting. Mt. Juliet High School’s broadcasting classes, known to students as WBNN, was well represented at the award ceremony held at Lipscomb University. For the individual awards, Becky Braswell, Chandley Gaines, Paige Holness, and Nathaly Vega won 2nd place for best lip dub video. Cole Carroll won 2nd place in the state for best videographer for his work on Word of the Day videos and for a video he created for the fall theatre performance. Bonny Baker, Cole Carroll, Connor Flippo, and Chandler Ghumm won 2nd place for best commercial for a commercial they created for a local State Farm insurance agent. For the overall awards, WBNN won 3rd place for best sports news, 2nd place for best overall high school television station, and 1st place for best news magazine for producing the best high school news program in the state of Tennessee. WBNN broadcasts their news daily to Mt. Juliet and West Wilson County residents on Comcast and TDS channel 9. The news and other promotional videos are also available for viewing on the web by visiting www.mjhsbnn.com/wbnn.

MJHS making large technological advancesBy: Joe Martin

Twins invade MJHSBy: Jailia Tibbs

By: Emma Perez

Hey You!In the movie of your life, who would play you?

•“Will Ferrell.” Chris Pryoilla, junior.

•“Denzel Washington.” Michael Lewis, senior.

“Rupert Grint.” Nathaniel “Cheese” Chiarizzio, senior.

“Richie from the Benchwarmers.” Tyler Brown, freshman.

•“Mr. Bean.” Jackson Hollinshead, junior.

•“Adam Sandler.” Colby Eady, sophomore.

•”Sylvester Stallone.” Caleb Turner, sophomore.

•“Kate Middleton.” Elizabeth Jan-kowich, senior.

•“Whitney Houston.” Ebony Davis, junior.

•“Keke Palmer.” Jaylyn Cantrell, junior.

The Mt. Juliet Gold-en Ray staff had a joy over the past few weeks interviewing many sets of twins here at MJHS. Each set of twins were asked the same questions, and the staff could only interview eight sets. Carson and Brette Ruff, Rae and Ron DeGray, Jessica and Wesley Garner, Meagan and Bethany Daniel, Laura and Me-lissa Bush, Alexis and Alyssa Welsh, Courtney and Ashley Brissette, and Nick and Nathan

Elder were all inter-viewed. To see each set of twins’ interviews, visit our website: www.MjhsGoldenRay.com.

On the morning before prom, seniors come to school for senior breakfast and to gather their cap and gown for gradu-ation. Principal Mel Brown started the tradition of senior breakfast eight years ago to give the senior another memory from Mt. Juliet High School. “It is a special event for special people; no juniors, sophomores, or freshman; just seniors” said Principal Brown. To make this event happen, teachers and parents get involved. The food and decorations are provided by the student’s parents and faculty. Seniors are asked to treat the event as a formal banquet and to dress accordingly. Throughout the years, this occasion for seniors has been a success. It brings seniors together for one of their last times to celebrate the four years they have been at Mt. Juliet High School. Thanks to Principal Mel Brown, MJHS Staff, and senior parents for making this a memorable tradition.

SR breakfast becomes traditionBy; Lexi Bates

Seniors sore high at Senior Night

On March 2, Seniors of MJHS dressed up and celebrated the annually held senior night. Mr. David Agree, the main organizer, says there are two sides of preparation: the super-latives and the show. The superlative process began by preparing the categories for vote. Once the senior class offi cers create the cate-gories, they present them to Agee, and then to Principal Mel Brown for fi nal approval. Afterwards, nominations take place during lunch. The team, a few teachers and senior class offi cers working with Agee, or-dered the trophies in advance from MJ Trophy, counted the nominations, and then created the ballot. The ballots were voted on at a later date during lunch. Those were counted by the teachers and kept a secret until they were revealed on the big night. As for the show, Mr. Jon Trusty was in charge of the auditions. In between each award presentation, there was a performance such as dancing, singing, or a monologue. There were two rehearsals before the show, a technical rehearsal, to ensure all microphones and speakers were working properly, and a fi nal dress rehearsal. All participants also had to arrive early to the event. As one can see, a lot of preparation goes into this amazing night for the senior class. Agee says, “The past few years have been great for two reasons: good organization and great students.” All the hard work paid off and the seniors had a great night cheering for fellow classmates.For the list of Superlative Winners, visit www.MjhsGoldenRay.com.

By: Shelby Crawford

Carson & Brette Ruff

Page 6: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

6 Senior

Page 7: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

7Layout

Page 8: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

Academics8

On May 9, 120 Mt. Juliet High School seniors were deemed TN Scholars at the annual award ceremony held at Cumberland University. The TN Scholars award ceremony is where students are recognized for achieving their requirements for becoming a TN schol-ar. The requirements for being able to partici-pate in this event are having one higher math beyond Algebra II, 80 hours of community service, overall “C” average in TN Scholar

courses, 95% attendance record, no OSS, and two Career and Technical Educations, Dual Enrollment or AP classes. Lebanon Wilson County Chamber of Commerce and colleges are responsible for this event. Mt. Juliet was one out of seven schools to participate. There were three students from MJHS to win scholarships; Elliot Warner received $500

from Genesco, Taylor Showley received $500 from Lebanon Wilson County Chamber of Commerce, and Anthony Fruscione received $500 from Genesco. “The awards ceremony is a great opportu-nity to showcase Mt. Juliet’s students for its community and academics” said Guidance Counselor Arlene Barlow. During the ceremony, Mt. Juliet High School’s section started yelling our great chant “Bear Pride, Mt. Juliet High!” MJHS was the only group to cheer and support their school.

MJHS Students go above and beyondBy: Lexi Bates

2013 School CalendarAugust 1: First Day of SchoolSept. 2: Labor DaySept. 12: 1/2 DaySept. 13: Parent/Teacher ConferenceOct: 7-18: Fall BreakNov. 11: StockpileNov. 20: 1/2 DayNov. 27-29: Thanksgiving HolidayDec. 19-20: High School ExamsDec. 23-31: Winter Break

Enrollment DatesEnrollment opens: Tuesday May 28thEnrollment closes: Friday June 7thIntercession begins: Monday June 10Intercession ends: Wednesday June 19Time each day: 8am-3pmCost:$50 per course

The Renaissance Fair, ran by Social Studies teacher Samantha Davenport, is a time for our school to come together over history and learn how it affects us today. It started as a way to connect World Studies to English as the class reads about Renais-sance and Shakespearean times, and has grown into a Mt. Juliet High School tradition. After studying the Renaissance in class, the students are given a week to prepare an exhibit covering the many aspects of the 13th century. In order to minimize the cost of the fair, students bring supplies from home, as well as whatever the teacher can provide. Daily grades are given throughout the week as the class works hard, and a test grade is given to the fi nal product. “It’s a really good chance for the students to show project ownership, and it gets better

every year,” said Daven-port. The fair usually takes place outside or in the gym, where students from all over the school can attend. The class is graded on the presen-tation of whatever aspect of the Renaissance they were assigned, how well they teach other students about it, and their correct use of language and grammar.

World Studies conquers Renaissance FairBy: Sydney Brumbach

Page 9: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

Honors and Scholarships 9

Honors and Distinction

John Abernathy, Jessica Allred, Justin Angle, Haley Austin, Meredith Baltz, Jayden Baxley, Kailey Bilbrey, Cody Brandon, Shelby Brown, Chase Buscherfeld, Laura Bush, Ca-leb Charlton, Cristina Contreras, Austin Cook, Shelby Crawford, Nathan Curtis, John Donovan, Ryan Downs, David Duncan, William Fox, Connor Gannon, Amie Gipson, Kennedy Glover, Austin Gober, James Grace, Avery-Ana Green, Alec Groome, Matthew Hotsinpiller, Ryan Jenkins, Christopher Johnston, Madeline Junkins, Joseph Lodwick, Molly Lydick, Morgan Lyttle, Hunter Mason, Ashley McIndoo, Jacob Myers, Meredith Nale, Harsh Patel, Caitlyn Richardson, Samuel Ruwe, Abby Schultz, Melissa Scott, Austin Self, Thomas

Sharpe, Christina Shaver, Catherine Smith, Thomas Stanley, Hannah Tunks, Nathan Ware, Christopher West, Eric Whitmire, Anne Zimmerman

John Abernathy, Jessica Allred, Justin Angle, Haley Austin, Meredith Baltz, Jayden Baxley, Kailey Bilbrey, Cody Brandon, Shelby Brown, Chase Buscherfeld, Laura Bush, Ca-

By: Summer AdamsBy: Summer Adams

On Feb 15 three of MJHS’s fi nest football players, Cody Carr, Caleb Hopkins and Trey Nealious signed to Cumberland Uni-versity. Cumberland was an easy choice for the boys. “It’s close to home, and I get to play with some of my friends,” says Hopkins.

The trio plans to shake things up next year and one of their new coaches, Taurean Smith, agrees that they can. “They’re all good players with great character that I believe can take this program to the next level,” says Smith. Going off to college can be a hard thing, but the boys know that MJHS has pre-

pared them for everything. With four years of good times, hard work and the best coaches under their belts, success is inevitable. The student body of MJHS is excited to see what the three young men will achieve as they move on to the next level as Cumberland Univer-sity Bulldogs.

Touchdown for Cumberland University

Elijah Wilson awarded Austin Peay State Uni-versity’s full track scholarship

Connor Gannon accepted to the Air Force Academy

Chris West and Dorothy Devy awarded the Graden Gaines Memorial Scholarship

Qualifi ed for the Men’s Tennessee Open

Brady Eady signed with Cumberland University

Chris West and Dorothy Devy awarded the Connor Gannon accepted

Qualifi ed for the Jordan Hollister awarded the Daughters of Revolution Award

Jordan Hollister awarded

Josh Belhu signed with TN Tech University

Victoria Millslagle won fi rst place in a fash-ion competition at Austin Peay University.

Brady Eady signed with Cumberland

Josh Belhu signed with TN Elijah Wilson awarded Austin Peay State Uni-

Victoria Millslagle won fi rst place in a fash-

For More News ~ Please Visit The Golden Ray’s Online Newsite at www.MjhsGoldenRay.com

Page 10: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

The MJHS Lady Bears had a great basketball season this past year, going almost to the state cham-pionship with a record of 25-10. They exceeded all expectations even with their many obstacles. The team had an exciting year, going farther in the tournament than anyone expected. They got all the way to sub-state before losing to Brentwood by a score of 64-50. Although their exceptional season was cut short, Head Coach Chris Fryer is not discouraged. “We may not have gone as far as we would have liked, but I am so proud of my team.” Lacking seniors and subsequent-ly experience on the team this past year, no one expected MJHS to get far. When their valuable post, Ron DeGray, was injured and unable to play, anticipations were even lower for our basketball team. “The other girls really stepped up. They prac-

ticed even harder to make up for losing our post,” said Fryer. As to next season, Fryer says he can only hope to go that extra mile and gain the experience needed to go

even further. The team is holding a summer camp June 10-12. Visit www.MjhsB-nn.com/mjhs/athletics for more information.

The Mt. Juliet Color Guard placed fi fth at the Winter Guard Interna-tional World Championship in Dayton, OH. During competition the Winter Guard also placed fourth out of 108 in pre-lims, and fi fth in semis out of 45. Unfortunately they did not make it to the fi nals, but made 22 out of 108 in Worlds. “The competition was so much fun and very in-formative” says the team. The piece they performed was called Leave. The performance was 4:21 long. They were judged on four main elements: movement, visual, ensemble and equipment. The girls had been preparing for the Winter Guard Championship since last Nov, and an enormous amount of hard work was put into their routine. They practiced three hours a day and nine hours a week on Tues, Thurs, and Fri. Also they practiced on Sat. from 6:00 – 9:00. Next year they plan on improving their ranking next year.

Cross Country has record season

MJHS’s varsity boys’ basketball season came to a close with a 17-13 record after their 65-73 loss to Dickson on Feb. 23, 2013. Head Coach Troy Allen attributes the Dickson loss to their early lead and to them being one of the best teams in the state. Allen said “I’m upset the season is over, but I’m confi dent the team exceeded everyone’s expectations.” Thomas Sharpe, senior shooting guard, was also disappointed after the team lost to Dickson but is proud of everything his team accomplished. Though his high school career is over, Sharpe is looking for-ward to seeing what the team will do in the future. Throughout the season, MJHS supported their basketball team with pep rallies and energetic student sections, especially before games against their county rival, Wilson Central. Allen says the team was always confi dent before facing Central. The players’ great attitudes made coaching the team very easy for Allen as they worked on developing techniques. He feels James Wom-ack, Reagan Johnson, and Thomas Sharpe stepped up and made the biggest improvements this year. Allen held tryouts for the 2013-2014 season in the spring and is excited that he will have six seniors next year. The team is holding a summer camp June 10-12. Visit www.MjhsB-nn.com/mjhs/athletics for more information.

Spring SportsDrum Line and Color Guard go to Worlds

11

Tennis has a great season

Lady Bears Basketball shocks the courtBy: Sydney Brumbach and Summer Adams

Boys Basketball comes to an endBy: Lauren Dutch

By: Shelby Dolleris On April 20, 2013, the MJHS Winter Drum Line went to Dayton, OH to compete against 19 groups from nine states in the Winter Guard Inter-national World Championships. Their performance consisted of rous-ing drums, eerie chimes and xylophones. They had a Tin Man from The Wizard of Oz theme with entire Tin Man suits hand-made out of silver duct tape. On Friday during prelims, they placed seventh with a score of 89.288, and on Saturday night they placed sixth with a fi nal score of 91.488. This is the highest placement drum line has had in three years. “We worked harder, did what we were told and got what we wanted,” says senior Eli Fowler. Drum line’s success could not have been achieved without instructor Jason Palmer who has put hours into educating the musicians at this school. “Without Jason, I would not be the same person. He taught me respect and patience,” tells Fowler. With the combined effort and love of this activity, between Palmer and the dedicated musicians willing to learn and improve, the Mt. Juliet High School Drum Line has achieved great success.

The MJHS tennis team fi nished up the season with six all district players and two regional players. Head Coach Derek Elwell, says, “This year was a turning point for the tennis program in how the team views themselves. This should prepare the future development of the program in helping us not come up short in district games. In the future, we may not lose district matches to teams such as Hendersonville and Beech because of the success we built during this season.” Adding more success too this great season, Elwell was awarded District Coach of the Year. The girl’s overall record was 6-1 and the boy’s overall was 5-2. The tennis team fi nished out the season with a 36-0 record in Wilson County, meaning they never lost a game to anyone in the county. The team did incredible and hopes to improve next season.

By: Shelby Crawford

By: Kira Ivannich

Page 11: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

By: Shelby Crawford

Senior Spotlight

Community 10

MJHS Class of ‘9320 Year ReunionJune14-15, 2013

Friday night Pre-Party at Hotel Preston

Saturday morning Picnic at Charlie Daniels Park Saturday night Dinner Party at

Hotel Preston $50 - Single $95 - Couple

RSVP and purchase tickets by May 31www.MJHS93.classquest.com

For more go to MjhsGoldenRay.com

Joseph Gordon Rice Mt. Juliet native, Joseph Gordon Rice, graduated from MJHS in 1943. His family bought a 300 acre farm across from what is now Willoughby Station. In high school, he played football, basketball and boxed. His brother owns “Rice’s Ham Store” on Leb-anon Rd which is now ran by his nephew. In 1972, while meeting with the mayor and ten others, Rice discussed incorporation of the Mt. Juliet Planning Commission, and they decided to hold an election. As you can see, Rice has lived a fulfi lling life right here in MJ.

Flora Satterfield Flora was born on December 6, 1924 in St. Louis, Missouri. She attended Central High School in St. Louis but had to drop out at 16 to help her mother work due to the Depression. Her fi rst job was at Sears working behind the soda fountain. Flora got married at 18 to a man in the Navy and her travel-ing began. She moved to England, Washington D.C., New York, Italy, and back to St. Louis when her husband retired after 24 years. He found employment as the real estate man for Kroger which transferred

the couple to Mt. Juliet. Her husband started the Kroger on Mt. Juliet road, and she a Homemaker. She has four wonderful kids. Flora Sat-terfi eld is a sweet woman who has lived a long wonderful life.

the couple to Mt. Juliet. Her husband started the Kroger on Mt. Juliet

Technology preserving historyWith the help of our community, CDC classes and Computer Science

classes, MJHS has begun digitally archiving our history by scanning hight school yearbooks. Thus far we have 10 yearbooks from 1949 to 1981. We are in the process of scanning more yearbooks. To donate books, please

contact Ms. Nicholas through [email protected]

Page 12: MJHS The Golden Ray Newspaper Spring 2013

12 Bear Side

Thank you to my wonderful students! Love you!Ms. Nick

The Golden Ray Staff

Mr. Larry WilliamsThank you for your many

years of service. ENJOY RETIREMENT!!