mount holyoke alumnae quarterly summer 2014

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Newborn Screening and the lasting impact of Virgina Apgar 29; Recap of Reunion 2014; Investing in Opportunities for Reinvention

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  • SUMMER 2014

    Mount HolyokeAlumnae Quarterly

    A RECORD-BREAKING REUNION 2014

    INVESTING IN OPPORTUNITIES FOR REINVENTION

    INSIDE THE GETTELL AMPHITHEATER

    ESTABLISHING A DAILY WRITING PRACTICE

    IN THIS ISSUE

    Madeleine Stout 13 lends a face and a voice to newborn screening

    Life Blood

    MHC_Sum14_CoversFinal.indd 2 7/1/14 4:27 PM

  • John

    Kuc

    hle

    ts hard-wired into me. There comes a moment in late July when I begin

    thinking about the start of school. The days grow a bit shorter. I start counting pre-

    cious summer weekends. And then there are all those back-to-school television commercials that still make me want to buy new notebooks.

    Like many of you, I have always enjoyed school. When I was a girl, I adored my teachers. I remem-ber being a second grader in Miss ONeils class and shyly handing her an invitation to dinner. I dont remember the exact language in my note, but I do recall the postscript.

    Could you let me know right away? I asked. I dont want my mother to clean the house for nothing.

    I still love the classroom, and thats why I always make a point to teach one course each year. Ive co-taught Critical Race Theory with Lucas Wilson, Bio-

    Ethics with Rachel Fink, and two courses with Richard Moran: Sociology of Prisons and Sociology of Medicine.

    When philosophy professor Tom Wartenberg walked into my office and said, Its about time you co-taught something in your home department, I couldnt resist.

    Tom teaches Philosophy for Children, a stellar course that shows students how to explore philosoph-ical questions with children using picture books such

    as Frog and Toad and The Bear That Wasnt. Our students work with sec-ond graders at the Martin Luther King Jr. School of Excellence in nearby Springfield. We teach them to teach youngsters how to ponder weighty questions such as, When you act bravely, can you be scared?

    I was honored when Tom asked me to partic-ipate, and I enjoy every-thing about the course, even riding the bus with our students down to Springfield. Thats when I get to hear whats on their minds: what they worry about, what engag-es them, and why some feel compelled to spend end-less hours in the librarya campus preoccupation thats been around since I was a student.

    For everyone involved in the course, the payoff comes at the end. Then its the second graders turn to board buses and spend the day on campus with us. Few things are more important, we believe, than showing children that college can be in their future. Other professors lend a hand in underscoring the point: Larry Schipull demonstrates the college organ and Rachel Fink shows the kids sea urchins in her lab, after which the kids take a trip to the art muse-um. The day is capped off with an awards ceremony where each child graduates from the course and receives an I am a Philosopher button.

    The experience of teaching Philosophy for Children reinforces for me the transformative power of education. Mount Holyoke students love what they do, and I love helping them open doors.

    And, speaking of opening doors, one day as our group arrived at the MLK School, a fourth grader and graduate of the course saw us coming through the door. Those are the philosophers, he enthusi-astically yelled to the second graders waiting for us. Theyre going to change your life!

    iPresidents Pen

    The experience

    of teaching

    Philosophy for

    Children reinforces

    for me the

    transformative

    power of education.

    LYNN PASQUERELLA 80

    Second-grade philosophers at the Martin Luther King Jr. School of Excellence

    MHQ_Sum14_Depts_Final.indd 2 6/23/14 3:51 PM

  • Meg

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    : Ben

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    14: D

    eird

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    Mal

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    D E PARTM E NTS

    2 LYONS SHARERemembering Talcott Greenhouse and WMHC, responses to faith, a winning haiku, and a look back at #MHCReunion

    7 UNCOMMON GROUND Alumnae Association welcomes new president, College celebrates 177th commencement, Women in Public Service Institute

    Ten Minutes With: Athletic Trainer Ellen Perrella

    Insiders View: Richard Glenn Gettell Amphitheater

    Go Figure: Commencement by the Numbers

    The Maven: Beth Dunn 93 on writing

    The Female Gaze: Painter Jude Harzer 87; filmmaker Bess OBrien 81; authors Maria Chaudhuri 99, Corinne Demas, Violet Kupersmith 11, and Marjory Wentworth 80

    34 MoHOME MEMORIES The Beer Explosion of 1972

    On Display: The Megatherium of Clapp Lab

    Then and Now: Canoe Sing

    37 CONNECTIONS Pancake study break, grandmother tea, alumnae promoting peace

    A Place of Our Own

    40 CLASS NOTES

    80 MY VOICEJudy Stein 56 on Where are the Womens Voices?

    ContentsS U M M E R 2014 // VO LU M E 98 // N U M B ER 3

    26

    16

    FE ATU R E S

    35

    ON THE COVERIllustration by Alex Nabaum

    18 Life Blood Madeleine Stout 13 lends a face and a voice to newborn screening

    24 Scoring Infants for Survival The lasting impact of Virginia Apgar 29

    26 Changemakers ReuniteA recap of reunion 2014 in words and pictures

    28 Investing in Opportunities for ReinventionMount Holyokes Frances Perkins Program continues to pave the way for nontraditional students

    MHQ_Sum14_Depts_Final.indd 3 6/23/14 3:51 PM

  • Join the Conversation

    quarterly@mtholyoke.edu

    facebook.com/aamhc

    twitter.com/aamhc

    instagram.com/mhcalums

    alumn.ae/linkedin

    f

    LET TE RS | E MAI L | FACE BOO K | T WIT TE R | I N STAG R AM | LI N KE D I N

    alumnae.mtholyoke.edu2

    Tayl

    or S

    cott

    Lyons Share

    Delegates

    hugging the one

    million dollar tree

    at #mtholyoke

    #wpsp #some leaders

    #Simmons

    MARIA JOSE 17 @MAJOCORREA ARG

    @aamhc To tell you the truth, I CHOSE the

    college by accident. I STAYED because it offered

    a stimulating yet nurturing environment.

    TINKY WEISBLAT 76 @LATINQUE

    INSIDERS VIEWThoughts of the Talcott Greenhouse (Inside the Greenhouse, spring 2014, p. 10) bring back many happy memories from childhood as well as the College years. So glad to hear it is going strong and even expanding to share with celebrations in Holyoke.

    Amy Faivre 92 Allentown, Pennsylvania

    I loved working [at the greenhouse] from 1980 to 1983 with Mr. Walker, a very fine man who always had the best interests of the students at heart. He began the sick ward to re-make plants healthy for them, and he always was willing to give a plant away. He kept the jungle room going, and he was a great inspiration to me!

    Laura Hawkins 83 via Facebook

    NATIONAL POETRY MONTH

    Uncommon Women

    Fearlessly changing the world

    With passion and love.

    Joanne Dalpe 88

    For National Poetry Month in April, we held a haiku contest on Facebook. Alumnae submitted haikus in the comments section of the post, and the one with the most likes won. Congratulations, Joanne Dalpe 88!

    Mary-Alice Austins 82 daughter, Helen, told her mother that she had decided to attend Mount Holyoke as part of the class of 2018 by presenting her with this T-shirt.

    We will have six daughters and one niece on campus next year! Go, class of 82!Maria Sherry Murphy 82

    Its my dream that my daughter would want to go. Shes only 10. I have a few more years of gentle urging (reverse psychology . . . )

    Natalie McNelis 90

    f

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  • Mount Holyoke Alumnae Quarterly ||| S U M M E R 2 0 1 4 3

    I told the girls that Ive had this

    @mtholyoke shirt for 12 years and they just

    stared at me, mouths agape. #old

    K AT CALVIN 05 @AGINDC

    Robert Frost gave a lecture in 1937 for only 35 cents! Who was the most interesting or inspiring guest lecturer that you saw while at Mount Holyoke?

    fWE ASKED

    Gloria Steinem, 1994my first year. . . . At reunion this past year, I stood in that room and told my unborn daughter (in utero at the time) and husband about that evening!Mary Haddad 98

    Maya Angelou, who talked to me about her work ethic when it comes to writing. I was shaking!

    Jean Mills 83

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    I just read Building Foundations in Faith (spring 2014, p. 16) and was dismayed to find that nowhere in the article or its graphic illustrations was any representation of the earth-based Pagan and Wiccan faiths. (Although the on-campus Pagan faith group was briefly mentioned in the sidebar, no Pagan women were quoted and no symbols of our faith were shown.) When I attended Mount Holyoke the Pagan & Wiccan Collective was one of the most active faith groups on cam-pus, and it would be no exaggeration to say that that group had a bigger impact on my development as a community leader than any of my other experi-ences at MHC. That group was where I first formulated and practiced the val-ues of non-hierarchical leadership and faith-based community service. Sever-al of the women I met there have gone on to become High Priestesses and community leaders after graduation, and I myself take roles of teaching and service in several Pagan gatherings each year. Paganism and Wicca are fairly unique among modern religions by virtue of having the female goddess archetype be central to most peoples practice and having the majority of leaders in the community be women. The inclusion of a Pagan perspective in this article would have added an instructive contrast to the religious communit