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M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15 1 SYLLABUS M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) Part-II (SEMESTER III & IV) SEMESTER-III (2014-2015) Paper Title of Paper No. of Max. Time Lectures Marks Allowed MCH 301 Analytical Chemistry 65 70 3 hrs. MCH 311 Chemistry of Main Group, Transition & 65 70 3 hrs. Inner- transition Elements MCH 312 Reaction Mechanism of Transition 65 70 3 hrs. Metal Complexes MCH 313 Inorganic Spectroscopy- I 65 70 3 hrs. MCH 321 Applications of Organic Molecular 65 70 3 hrs. Spectroscopy MCH 322 Photochemistry 65 70 3 hrs. MCH 323 Chemistry of Natural Products and 65 70 3 hrs. Synthesis MCH 331 Spectroscopy-I 65 70 3 hrs. MCH 332 Statistical Thermodynamics 65 70 3 hrs. MCH 333 Fundamental and Atmospheric 65 70 3 hrs. Photochemistry PRACTICALS MCH 314 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals -I 100 100 6 hrs. MCH 315 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals-II 100 100 6 hrs. MCH 324 Organic Chemistry Practicals-I 100 100 6 hrs. MCH 325 Organic Chemistry Practicals- II 100 100 6 hrs. MCH 334 Instrumental Physical Chemistry 100 100 6 hrs. Practicals-I MCH 335 Physical Chemistry Practicals - I 100 100 6 hrs. SEMINAR III 20 ½ hrs.

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  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

    1

    SYLLABUS

    M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) Part-II (SEMESTER III & IV)

    SEMESTER-III (2014-2015)

    Paper Title of Paper No. of Max. Time

    Lectures Marks Allowed

    MCH 301 Analytical Chemistry 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 311 Chemistry of Main Group, Transition & 65 70 3 hrs.

    Inner- transition Elements

    MCH 312 Reaction Mechanism of Transition 65 70 3 hrs.

    Metal Complexes

    MCH 313 Inorganic Spectroscopy- I 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 321 Applications of Organic Molecular 65 70 3 hrs.

    Spectroscopy

    MCH 322 Photochemistry 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 323 Chemistry of Natural Products and 65 70 3 hrs.

    Synthesis

    MCH 331 Spectroscopy-I 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 332 Statistical Thermodynamics 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 333 Fundamental and Atmospheric 65 70 3 hrs.

    Photochemistry

    PRACTICALS

    MCH 314 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals -I 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 315 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals-II 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 324 Organic Chemistry Practicals-I 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 325 Organic Chemistry Practicals- II 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 334 Instrumental Physical Chemistry 100 100 6 hrs.

    Practicals-I

    MCH 335 Physical Chemistry Practicals - I 100 100 6 hrs.

    SEMINAR III 20 hrs.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SEMESTER-IV

    Paper Title of Paper No. of Max. Time

    Lectures Marks Allowed

    MCH 401 Environmental and advance Topics 65 70 3 hrs.

    in Chemistry

    MCH 411 Chemistry of Organometallic 65 70 3 hrs

    compounds .

    MCH 412 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 413 Inorganic Spectroscopy - II 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 421 Name Reactions and Reagents 65 70 3 hrs.

    in Organic Synthesis

    MCH 422 Organic Synthesis 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 423 Heterocylic Chemistry 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 431 Spectroscopy-II 65 70 3 hrs.

    MCH 432 Solid State and Radiation Chemistry 65 70 3 hrs

    MCH 433 Surface Chemistry and Polymers 65 70 3 hrs.

    PRACTICALS

    MCH 414 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals -I 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 415 Inorganic Chemistry Practicals-II 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 424 Organic Chemistry Practicals -I 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 425 Organic Chemistry Practicals-II 100 100 6 hrs.

    MCH 434 Instrumental Physical Chemistry 100 100 6 hrs

    Practical-II

    MCH 435 Physical Chemistry Practicals-II 100 100 6 hrs.

    SEMINAR IV 20 hrs.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SEMESTER-III

    PAPER MCH 301: ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65

    (i) University Examination : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks : 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt five one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section

    E is compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16Hrs.

    Qualitative and Quantitative aspects of analysis : Sampling, evaluation of analytical data,

    errors, accuracy and precision, methods of their expression, normal law of distribution if

    indeterminate errors, statistical test of data; F, Q, and T test, rejection of data, and confidence

    intervals.

    Thermo Analytical Methods:

    1. Thermogravimetric analysis, Introduction, Instrumentation, Factors affecting

    thermogravimetric results, applications of Thermogravimetry.

    2. Differential Thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry on line analysis.

    3. Thermometric titrations Introduction theory and applications.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Electroanalytial Methods : Polarography : D.C. and A.C. Polarography, pulse polarogaphy,

    cyclic voltammetry, qualitative and quantitative applications of polarogrpahy and cyclic

    voltammetry.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Electrogravimetry: Current-voltage relationship during electrolysis, electrolysis,

    Instrumentation and applications of electrogravimetry.

    Coulometry : Coulometric methods at constant current and constant electrode

    potential, coulometric titrations.

    Amperometry and its applications, Karl Fischer titration.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Spectrophotometry and Colorimetry: Theory of spectrophotometry and colorimetry, Beer's law,

    Deviation from Beer's law, absorptivity Photometric accuracy. Spectrophotometric titrations and

    titration curves and applications to quantitative analysis.

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy and flame photometry theory, Instrumententation,

    Interferences and evaluation methods, applications. Infrared Spectroscopy, Introduction,

    Instrumentation, Beers Lambert relationship, NDIR & FTIR.

    SECTION-D 17 Hrs.

    Separation Techniques:

    Solvent extraction: Classification and principle and efficiency of the technique, mechanism of

    extraction, extraction by solvation and chelation.

    Technique of extraction: batch, continuous and counter current extractions.

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of solvent extraction: extraction of metal ions from

    aqueous solution, extraction of organic species from the aqueous and non aqueous media.

    Chromatography: Classification, principle and efficiency of the technique. Mechanism

    of separation: adsorption, partition & ion exchange. Development of chromatograms:

    frontal, elution and displacement methods.

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of chromatographic methods of analysis: IC, GLC, GPC,

    TLC and HPLC.

    References:

    1. A Test book of Quantitative Inorganic Analysis: Vogel, Arthur I: (Rev. by

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    GH Jeffery and others) 5th

    Ed.

    2. Instrumental Methods of Analysis; Willard, Hobert H. et. al : 7th Ed.

    Wardsworth Publishing company, Belmont, California, USA, 1988.

    3. Analytical Chemistry; Christian, Gary D; 6th Ed. New York- John Willy, 2004. 4. Basic concept of Analytical Chemistry; Khopkar, S.M. ; New Age, International

    Publisher, 2009.

    5. Modern Polarographic methods in Analytical Chemistry A.M. Bend.

    6. Principles, of Instrumental Analysis; Skoog, D.A. Holler F.J. and Nieman, T.A. Thomson Asia Pvt. Ltd. Signapore.

    7. Laboratory Hand Book of Chromatographic & Allied Methods, Mikes, O. Chalmes, R.A. Elles Harwood Ltd. London.

    4

    .

    .

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH 311: CHEMISTRY OF MAIN GROUP, TRANSITION AND

    INNER TRANSITION ELEMMENTS

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Semester Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1 marks

    each

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17Hrs

    Main Group elements

    Molecular, ionic and metallic hydrides; organometallic compounds of group 1 elements;

    organoberyllium and organomagnesium compounds; boron-nitrogen compounds: borazine,

    substituted borazines, and boron nitride; boron clusters: metal borides, structure and bonding of

    polyhedral boranes, closo, nido and arachno structures, structural study by NMR, Wades rules,

    metalloboranes, carboranes, metallocarboranes; organoboron and organoaluminium compounds.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Main Group elements

    Nitrides, phosphides, azides, Phosphorus-Nitrogen compounds: phosphazines, cyclo and linear

    phosphazenes; chemistry and bonding of sulphur-nitrogen compounds, charge transfer complexes

    of halogens, pseudohalogens; interhalogen compounds: preparation, physical and chemical

    properties, structure, cationic interhalogens, anionic interhalogens, halogen complexes and

    polyhalide ions. Noble gas compounds: synthesis, structure and reactions of xenon fluorides,

    xenon-oxygen compounds, compounds of Krypton and Radon.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SECTION-C 16 Hrs

    Transition elements

    Occurrence and recovery, physical properties, oxidation states: variation of oxidation states across

    a series and down a group, structural trends, noble character, metal halides; metal oxides and oxo

    complexes: mononuclear oxo complexes, polyoxometallates; metal sulfides and sulfide complexes:

    monosulfides, disulfides, sulfide complexes; nitrido and alkylidene complexes, metal-metal bonded

    compounds and clusters

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs

    Lanthanides and actinides:

    Lanthanides: Coordination numbers, stereochemistry, occurrence and extraction, general

    properties, the metals, magnetism and spectra, binary compounds, ternary and complex oxides,

    coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, applications of lanthanides. Actinides:

    Occurrence and general properties. General chemistry of the actinides, the metals, survey of

    oxidation states, the dioxo ions, actinide ions in aqueous solution, complexes and stereochemistry,

    the chemistry of thorium and uranium, organometallic compounds of actinides, applications of

    actinides.

    References:

    1. Inorganic Chemistry by Shriver and Atkins (4th edition) Oxford University Press 2. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton & Wilkinson (5th edition) 3. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton, Wilkinson, Murillo, Bochmann (6th edition) John Wiley

    and Sons ,Inc.

    4. Theoretical Inorganic chemistry by Day and Selbin 5. Lanthanides and Actinides by Simon Cotton 6. The Chemistry of the lanthanides by T. Moeller

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH 312: REACTION MECHANISMS OF TRANSITION

    METAL COMPLEXES

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Semester Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Reactions of octahedral complexes: Ligand replacement reactions, substitution reactions in

    octahedral complexes, inert and labile complexes, mechanisms of substitution reactions

    (dissociative, associative, interchange), acid hydrolysis, base hydrolysis reactions, water

    exchange rates, formation of complexes from aqueous solutions, anation reactions of metal

    complexes,

    Reactions of square planar complexes: substitution reactions, mechanism of ligand

    displacement reactions, the trans effect, theories of trans effect, cis-effect.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Electron transfer reactions: electron transfer theory, mechanisms of electron transfer: inner

    sphere and outer sphere mechanisms, ligand bridged reactions, iron(II)-iron(III) exchange, two

    electron transfer reactions: complimentary and non-complimentary reactions, replacement

    through redox mechanism.

    Metal carbonyl reactions: reactions of octahedral, reactions of binuclear carbonyls, associative

    reactions, species with 17 electrons.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SECTION-C 17 Hrs.

    Fundamental reaction steps of transition metal catalyzed reactions: coordinative

    unsaturation, oxidative addition, addition reactions of specific molecules, addition reactions of

    specific molecules, hydrogen addition, HX additions, addition of X2, addition of organic halides,

    addition reactions of Si-H bonds, elimination reactions, cleavage of C-H bonds, alkane

    activation, cyclometallation reactions, migration reactions, insertion of CO, insertion of CO into

    M-H bonds, other aspects of CO insertion reactions, isocyanide insertions, NO insertion, alkene

    insertions, alkyne insertions, insertion of aldehydes ketones and nitriles, insertions of CO2.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Stability of metal complexes

    Stability of metal complexes, stability constants, difference between thermodynamic and kinetic

    stability

    Determination of stability constants by following methods:

    1. Slope ratio method 2. Jobs method of continuous variation 3. Mole ratio method. 4. Solubility method 5. Bjerrum potentiometric method 6. Ledens polarographic method 7. Ion-exchange method

    Factors affecting stability constants (statistical, electrostatic and chelate effect)

    References:

    1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton and Wilkinson, John Wiley (5th edition and 6th edition)

    2. Inorganic Reactions Mechanism: An Introduction by Edwards W.A. Benzamin, Inc. 3. Inorganic Chemistry by Miessler and Tarr 3rd edition, Pearson Education. 4. Inorganic Chemistry by Shriver and Atkins, Oxford University Press.(4th edition) 5. Inorganic Chemistry by Huheey III and IV editions, , Pearson Education Asia 6. Elementary Coordination Chemistry by Jones and Jones 7. Polarography of Metal Complexes by D. R. Crow.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH313: INORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY-I

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Semester Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy

    General introduction to spectroscopy, electronic and vibrational energy levels in a diatomic

    molecule, relationship of potential energy curves to electronic spectra, assignment of transitions:

    spin-orbit coupling, configuration interaction, criteria to aid in band assignment. The intensity of

    electronic transitions: oscillator strengths, transition moment integral, derivation of some

    selection rules, spectrum of formaldehyde, spin-orbit and vibronic coupling contributions to

    intensity, mixing of d and p orbitals in certain symmetries, magnetic dipole and electric

    quadrupole contributions to intensity, charge transfer transitions, polarized absorption spectra.

    Application of Electronic Absorption spectroscopy: finger printing, molecular addition

    compounds of iodine, effect of solvent polarity on charge transfer spectra, structures of excited

    states.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Infrared Spectroscopy: Introduction, harmonic and anharmonic vibrations, absorption of

    radiation by molecular vibrations, selection rules, force constant, vibration in polyatomic

    molecules, effects giving rise to absorption bands, Group vibrations and limitation of this

    concept.

    Raman Spectroscopy: Introduction, selection rules, polarised and depolarised Raman lines,

    significance of nomenclature, use of symmetry considerations to determine the number of active

    IR and Raman lines; symmetry requirements for coupling, combination bands and Fermi

    Resonance.

    Applications of IR and Raman spectroscopy: Procedures, finger printing, spectra of gases,

    structure elucidation of inorganic compounds, hydrogen bonding systems, change in spectra of

    donor molecules upon coordination, change in the spectra accompanying change in symmetry

    upon coordination

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Microwave Spectroscopy

    Theory, selection rules and intensities of spectral lines, applications of microwave spectroscopy

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    Nuclear electric quadrupole moment, electric field gradient, energy levels, effect of magnetic

    field on spectra, factors affecting the resonance signal, relationship between the electric field

    gradient and molecular structure

    Applications: Interpretation of NQR data, structural information of the following: PCl5, TeCl4,

    BrCN, and HIO3.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Mass spectroscopy

    Instrument operation and presentation of spectral processes that can occur when a maolecule and

    a high energy electron combine, finger printing, interpretation of mass spectra, effect of isotopes

    on appearance of mass spectrum. Molecular weight determination: field ionization techniques,

    evaluation of heat of sublimation and species in the vapour over high melting solids. Appearance

    potential and ionization potential.

    References:

    1. Physical methods for Chemists by R.S. Drago (2nd edition) 2. Basic principles of Spectroscopy by R. Chang. 3. Molecular Spectroscopy by C.M. Banwell. 4. Chemical application of Spectroscopy in Inorganic Chemistry by C.N.R. Rao.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    5. Principles of Mossbauer Spectroscopy by N.N. Greenwood and T.C. Gibb. 6. Mass Spectroscopy by C.A. Power

    PAPER MCH 314: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-I

    Maximum Marks : 100 (i) Semester Paper : 80 Time : 6 Hours (ii) Internal Assessment : 20

    PREPARATIONS AND ESTIMATIONS

    1. Preparation of K3[Fe(C2O4)3]. 2. Estimation of iron. 3. Preparation of K3[Cr(C2O4)3] 4. Estimation of Cr and oxalate. 5. Preparation of (NH3)2Hg Cl2. 6. Estimation of Hg in (NH3)2Hg Cl2. 7. Preparation of Hg [Co(NCS)4] 8. Simultaneous estimation of Hg and Co in Hg [Co(NCS)4] 9. Mercuration of phenol and separation of the compound into o, and p, isomers. 10. Preparation of hexamine cobalt chloride and estimation of cobalt 11. Preparation of [I(Py)2NO3] and estimation of iodine

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 315: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II

    Maximum Marks : 100 (i) Semester Paper : 80 Time : 6

    Hours (ii) Internal Assessment : 20

    Conductometry

    1. Determination of number of ions in [Co(NH3)6]Cl3, [Hg(NH3)2Cl]

    2. Titrations of mixture of acids

    3. Precipitation titrations.

    pH-metric titrations

    1. Acid-base titrations 2. Mixture of acid with a base

    Chromatographic separations

    1. Separation of ions by Paper chromatography 2. Separation of ions by Column chromatography

    Solvent extraction techniques

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 321 : APPLICATIONS OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR

    SPECTROSCOPY

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Ultraviolet and visible Spectroscopy: Principle of UV spectroscopy, Colour and light

    absorption,the chromophore concept,Theory of electronic spectroscopy, orbital involved and

    electronic transition. Effect of solvent and conjugation on max. Woodward Fieser, Fieser-kuhn

    and Nelsons rules. Spectral correlation with structure; Conjugated dienes and polyenes; ,-

    unsaturated carbonyl compounds; Benzene, substituted benzene and polynuclear aromatic

    hydrocarbons. Stereochemical factors in electronic spectroscopy; biphenyls and binaphthyls, cis

    and trans isomers, angular distortion, cross conjugation and steric inhibition of resonance.

    Infrared Spectroscopy: Principle of IR Spectroscopy, Molucular vibrations and modes of

    vibrations. Factors influencing vibrational frequencies; vibrational coupling, hydrogen bonding,

    conjugation, inductive, mesomeric (resonance), field effects and bond angles. Applications to

    identify functional groups; Aliphatic, aromatic and aralkyl hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols and

    ethers; aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid and ester, amines, amides, alkyl halides, aryl halides

    and aralkyl halides. Heteroaromatic compounds (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) and amino acids.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy:Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy,

    Nuclear spin resonance, Chemical shift and its measurement, Relaxation process, Factors

    influencing chemical shift, shielding and deshielding and anisotropic effects, Effect of restricted

    rotation, concentration, temperature, hydrogen bonding, Spin coupling (simple and complex),

    Mechanism of coupling. Coupling constants, geminal coupling, vicinal coupling, virtual and long

    range coupling, Factors influencing geminal and vicinal coupling, chemical equivalence and

    magnetic equivalence of protons, Non first order spectra, Simplification of complex PMR spectra

    : increasing strength, spin decoupling or double resonance and the use of chemical shift reagents.

    Variable temperature NMR spectroscopy : Introduction and applications.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Mass Spectrometry: Introduction, Mass spectra and metastable ion peak. Determination of

    molecular formula and recognition of molecular ion peak and the Nitrogen rule. Molecular

    formula and Hydrogen Deficiency. General rules of fragmentation and the Mclafferty

    rearrangements. Fragmentations associated with functional group: Aliphatic, aromatic, aralkyl

    hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols and ethers, aldehydes, ketons, carboxylic acids, esters, amines

    and amides, alkyl halides, aryl halides and aralkyl halides. Hetroatomic compounds (pyrrole,

    furan, thiophene) and amino acids.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    13C NMR Spectroscopy: Natural abundance of

    13C, resolution and multiplicity. The FT mode

    and rf pulse. Use of proton coupled, proton decoupled and off-resonance decoupling techniques,

    Deuterium substitution and chemical shift equivalence in peak assignments. 13

    C chemical shift;

    effect of substituents on chemical shift, position of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and benzene. Spin

    coupling and 13

    C-1H coupling constants. Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

    Structure elucidation by joint application of UV, IR, NMR and Mass spectroscopy.

    References:

    1. Organic Spectroscopy; William Kemp, Macmillan, Hampshire, UK, 1991. 2. spectroscopic methods in Organic Chemistry; D.H. William and I. Fleming, Tata

    MacGraw-Hill Publishing company Ltd. New Delhi, India, 1991.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    3. Spetrometric Identification of Organic Compounds; R.M. Silverstein, G. C. Bassler and F.C Morill, 5

    th Edition, John Wiley and Sons Inc. , USA, 1991.

    PAPER- MCH: 322 PHOTOCHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper: 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Energy of the molecule, Photochemical Energy Photochemical Excitation of the molecule.

    Electronic transitions types of electronic Excitations and molecular orbital view of excitation,

    Spin multiplicity nomenclature of excited states, The fate of the exicted molecules:

    Photophysical Processes Jablonski diagram, Intersystem crossing, Energy transfer, Laws of

    Photochemistry, Quantum efficiency, sensitization and Quenching.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Photochemistry of Alkenes, Dienes and aromatic compounds, Cis-trans isomerisation of alkenes,

    Dimerisation of alkenes, Photochemistry of conjugated dienes, Photoisomerisation of benzene

    and substituted benzene, Photoaddition of alkenes to aromatic benzenoid compounds, Addition

    of oxygen, Aromatic photosubstitution, Photochemistry of Diazo compounds, Photochemistry of

    Azides.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    -cleavage or Norrish Type-I process, -cleavage reaction, Intramolecular Hydrogen abstraction

    (-Hydrogen abstraction), Hydrogen abstraction from other sites, Formation of Photo enols or

    Photo-enolisation, Photocycloaddition reaction ( Peterno-Buchi Reaction), [2+2] Cycloaddition

    reaction of enones with alkenes.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Photorearrangements of Cyclopentanone, Cyclohexanone rearrangements, Rearrangements of

    Dienones, Photorearrangments of ,-unsaturated ketones, Aza-di--methane rearrangements,

    Di--methane (DPM) rearrangements, Rearrangements in aromatic compounds, Photo-Fries

    rearrangements, Chemistry of vision, Photography, Light-Absorbing compounds,

    Photochromism, Photoimaging, Photochemistry of polymers.

    References:

    1. Fundamentals of Photochemistry: K.K. Rohatgi Mukherji Reprint, Revised edition, New age International (P) Ltd. , Publishers New India.1997.

    2. Modern Molecular Photochemistry; N.J. Turro, The Benjamin/Cummings Co., Inc. California, USA, 1978.

    3. Molecular reactions and photochemistry; Charles H. Depuy and orville L. Chapman, Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, India, 1972.

    4. Organic Photochemistry- W.H. Horsepool. 5. Photochemistry of Exicted states-J.D. Goyle.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 323 : CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks:35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Studies on Biosynthetic Pathways of Natural Products:

    The acetate hypothesis, poly-ketoacids, their aldol type cyclisations and meta orientations of

    hydroxyl groups in naturally occurring Phenols. Isoprene rule. Geranyl pyrophosphate and its

    conversion into -pinene, thujene and borneol. Fernesyl pyrophosphate, geranyl geranyl

    pyrophosphate and mechanistic considerations for their interconversions into cadinene and

    abietic acid.

    Porphyrins: Structure and synthesis of porphyrins, chemistry of Haemin, Chlorophyll,

    Haemoglobin.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Terpenoids and Carotenoids:

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Classifications, Nomenclature, occurrence, isolation, general methods of structure determination.

    Biosynthetic approach and synthesis of following molecules: geraniol, -terpeneol, menthol,

    zingiberene, santonin, abietic acid, camphor, vitamin-A, longifolene, -carotene (basic structure

    of -carotene, -carotene also).

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Alkaloids:

    Defination, nomenclature and physiological action, occurrence,isolation, general methods of

    structure elucidation, degradation, classification based on nitrogen heterocyclic ring, structure,

    stereochemistry, Synthesis and biosynthesis of Ephedrine, Coniine, Nicotine, Quinine,

    Morphine,Reserpine.

    Plant Pigments:

    Occurrence, nomenclature, general methods of structure determination and Biosynthesis of

    flavonoids, flavonol, isoflavones, coumarin: Acetate pathway and shikimic acid pathway.

    SECTION-D 17 Hrs.

    Steroids:

    Occurrence, physiological action, basic skeleton, stereochemistry, structure determination

    Synthesis of Cholesterol, Bile acids, Testosterone, Androsterone, Progesterone, Estrone.

    Biosynthesis of steroids.

    Prostaglandins:

    General study, nomenclature, structure of PGE and synthesis and biosynthesis of PGE1, PGE2

    References:

    1. Organic Chemistry; I.L.Finar; Vol. 1,2 . Pubs: ELBS (1994). 2. Classics in Total Synthesis, Nicolaou K.C. and Sorensen E.J.; Pubs: VCH N.Y. (1986). 3. Biosynthesis of Natural Products; Manitto P. , Pubs : Horwood Ltd. (1981). 4. Organic Chemistry; Solomon T.W.G. and Fryhle C.B. , 7th Edition, Pubs: John Wiley &

    sons Ins. N.Y.(2000).

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    5. Natural Products Chemistry and Biological Significance, J.Mann, R.S. Davidson, J.B. Hobbs, D.V. Banthrope and J.B. Harborne, Longman, Essex.

    PAPER-MCH 324 : ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS I

    Maximum Marks: 100 Time : 6 Hours

    (i) Practical Examination: 80

    (ii)Internal Assessment: 20

    (Multistep Synthesis)

    1. Beckman Rearrangement

    I. Benzene-Benzophenone Benzophenone Oxime Benzanilide

    II. Benzene Acetophenone Acetophenone Oxime-Acetanilide.

    III. Cyclohexanone Oxime-Caprolactam.

    2. Benzillic acid Rearrangement

    I. Benzoin-Benzil-Benzillic-acid

    II. Benzoin-Benzil-Benzil monohydrazone

    3. Fischer Indole Synthesis

    I. N-aryl Maleinilic acid N aryl maleimide

    II. 1, 2, 3, 4 tetrahydrocarbazole

    III. 2-Phenyl Indole from Phenyl hydrazone.

    IR and NMR Spectra of prepared compounds.

    Practicals can be changed with subject to the availability of chemicals.

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    PAPER-MCH 325 : ORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS-II

    Maximum Marks : 100 Time : 6 Hours

    (i) Practical Examination : 80

    (ii)Internal Assessment : 20

    Quantitative Estimations

    1. Hydroxyl group - (Phenolic)

    Expt. l : Determine percentage purity of given phenols by brominating reagent.

    Expt. 2 : To determine the percentage purity of given sample of m-cresol by using brominating

    reagent.

    2. Amine group

    Expt. 3 : Determine the amount of aniline per litre by substitution method.

    Expt. 4 : Determine the amount of m-toluidine in the given sample by brominating reagent.

    Expt. 5 : Find percentage purity of given sample of m-nitroaniline by brominating reagent.

    3. Carbonyl group

    Expt. 6 : To standardise the given glucose solution by Fehling's method.

    Expt. 7 : Determine percentage purity of given sample of glucose.

    Expt. 8 : Determine the percentage purity of sugar by Fehling's method.

    Expt. 9 : To determine the amount of glucose in given sample by Benedict's Solution.

    Expt. 10 : To determine the percentage purity of sucrose by Benedict's method.

    Expt. 11 : To hydrolyse the given sample of jiggery and determine the amount of glucose present

    in it by Benedicts Solution

    4. Acetous Perchloric Acid

    Expt. 12 : To standardise acetous perchloric acid using primary standard potassium hydrogen

    phthalate.

    Expt. 13 : To determine percentage purity of sodium benzoate.

    Expt. 14 : To determine percentage purity of sodium salicylate.

    Expt. 15 : To determine percentage purity of given alkaloid (Ephedrin).

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Expt. 16 : To find percentage purity of Brucine.

    Practicals can be changed with subject to the availability of chemicals.

    PAPER MCH 331 : SPECTROSCOPY-I

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks:35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Molecular Spectroscopy:

    Electromagnetic radiation , interaction of electromagnetic radiation with molecules and various

    types of spectra, Born openheimer approximation, absorption and emission spectroscopy,

    difference between atomic and molecular spectroscopy, types of spectroscopy, selection rules,

    width and intensities of spectral lines. Characteristics of spectral lines, importance of

    spectroscopy,

    Microwave spectroscopy-

    Introduction to microwave spectroscopy, theory of microwave spectroscopy, linear molecules,

    spherical top molecules, symmetric top molecules, asymmetric top molecules ,stark effect ,

    relative intensities of microwave spectroscopy ,applications to microwave spectroscopy,

    Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy-

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    Nomenclature of infrared spectroscopy, theory of infrared spectroscopy, mathematical theory of

    infrared spectroscopy, vibrational frequency, factors which influence vibrational frequency,

    selection rules, photo thermal beam deflection spectroscopy (PBDS), applications to infrared

    spectroscopy to quantitative analysis, difference between microwave spectroscopy and infrared

    spectroscopy, limitations of infrared spectroscopy,

    SECTION-B 17 Hrs.

    Rotation Vibration Spectroscopy- Rotation vibration spectroscopy of diatomic molecules,

    Rotation vibration spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules

    Raman Spectroscopy-

    Quantum and classical theory of Raman scattering, rotational Raman spectrum of diatomic

    molecules, rotational vibrational Raman spectrum, resonance Raman spectrum, intensity of

    Raman peaks, applications of Raman spectroscopy in physical chemistry,

    Ultraviolet Spectroscopy-

    Introduction, origin and theory of ultraviolet spectroscopy, types of transitions in organic and

    inorganic molecules, chromophore and related terms, effect of conjugation, solvent effect,

    choice of solvent,

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-

    Introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR of a bare proton, number of signals ,

    equivalent and nonequivalent protons ,the chemical shift ,spin spin coupling, coupling constants,

    solvents used in NMR spectroscopy, interpretation of NMR spectroscopy of ethyl bromide,

    isopropyl bromide, ethanol , ethanal, acetophenone, applications of NMR spectroscopy,

    limitations of NMR spectroscopy, double resonance, the nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) ,

    internuclear double resonance (INDOR), NMR of paramagnetic compounds, magnetic resonance

    imaging(MRI).

    Nuclear Quaderpole Resonance (NQR)

    Introduction to NQR, theory of intramolecular NQR, sample requirements, applications of

    NQR,

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

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    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    Introduction to ESR, ,comparison between NMR and ESR, types of substances show ESR,

    theory of ESR, choice and concentration of solvent, presentation of the ESR spectrum, hyperfine

    structure of the ESR spectrum, determination of g value, deviation of the g value, line width,

    applications of ESR spectrum, Kramers degeneracy and zero field splitting( ZFS), electron

    nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), electron double resonance (ELDOR),

    Electronic Spectroscopy-

    Introduction to electronic spectroscopy, Frank Condon Principle, vibrational coarse structure of

    electronic spectra , Fortrat diagram, electronic spectra of transition metal ions , electronic spectra

    of organic molecules, charge transfer spectra ,electronic spectra of conjugated molecules,

    applications of electronic spectra to transition metal ions,

    References:

    1 .C.N. Banwell-Molecular Spectroscopy

    2. G.M. Barrow- Molecular Spectroscopy

    3. M. Chandra- Atomic structure, chemical bonding including Molecular Spectroscopy.

    4. Organic Spectroscopy-Principle and applications by Jagmohan.

    5. Physical Spectroscopy by Sham K Anand. & Gurdeep R. Chatwal

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    PAPER MCH 332 STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Quantum Statistics

    Thermodynamic property and entropy. microstates. canonical and grand canonical ensembles,

    comparison between Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics , The

    partition functions , partition function for free linear motion ,for free motion in shared space , for

    liner harmonic vibrations, statistics of photon and electron gases ,velocity ,speed and energy

    distribution functions, Principle of equipartition of energy, barometric equation , theory of

    paramagnetism , thermionic emission

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Applications to gases

    The molecular partition function and its factorization , evaluation of translational, rotational and

    vibrational partition function for monoatomic , diatomic and polyatomic gases , the electronic

    and nuclear partition functions, statistical definition of entropy ,ortho and para hydrogen,

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    statistical weights of ortho and para states, symmetry number, equation of state of non ideal

    gases ,Lennard Jones potentials energy equation, compressed gases.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Solid State

    Classical treatment of specific heat of solids .Einstein and Debye theories of specific heat ,

    limitation of Einstein theory ,Debye T3 law , entropy of solids ,equation of state of solids, order

    and disorder and the melting point.

    Fluctuations

    Mean distribution, mean square deviation , fluctuation in energy in a canonical ensemble, density

    fluctuation in a gas. theory of Brownian motion and Brownian motion of galvanometer , Law of

    mass action ,chemical equilibrium s , equilibrium constant and their computation.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Application of thermodynamics

    Thermodynamics of irreversible processes, simple example of irreversible processes . general

    theory of near equilibrium processes , entropy production from heat flow, matter flow and

    current flow ,generlized equation for entropy production ,The phenomenological relations,

    ,Onsager reciprocal relation (without derivation) ,application of irreversible thermodynamics to

    diffusion ,thermal diffusion , thermo osmosis and thermo molecular pressure difference , the

    Seebeck effect .Peltier effect , non -equilibrium , stationary states ,coupled reactions.

    References:

    1. Statistical thermodynamics by M.C Gupta.

    2. Introduction to Statistical thermodynamics byF.L.Hill.

    3. Statistical thermodynamics by J.F.Lee ,F.W.Sears and D.L. Turcotte.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 333: FUNDAMENTAL AND ATOMOSPHERIC

    PHOTOCHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Photochemistry:

    Introduction, characteristics of electromagnetic radiation, difference between thermo chemical

    and photochemical reactions, Lambert-Beers law and its limitations, laws of photochemistry,

    Jablonski diagram, quantum yield, determination of quantum yield, examples of low and high

    quantum yields, photochemical reactions , photochemical rate law, kinetics of photochemical

    reactions ,kinetics of H2 and Cl2 reaction, kinetics of H2 and Br2 reaction , kinetics of anthracene

    reaction, energy transfer in photochemical reaction, photosensitization and quenching ,Stern

    Volmer equation , rates of intramolecular photophysical processes and intramolecular energy

    transfer, photochemical degradation of excited states of Hg atoms ,Hg sensitized photoreactions

    of simple alkanes and alkenes

    ,luminescence,chemiluminescence,photosensitization,photoinhibitors,fluorescence and

    phosphorescence photo electrochemistry, hot atoms and its reactions ,fluorescence and its

    measurement ,excimer and exciplex formation ,charge transfer spectra ,

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Industrial application of Photochemistry:-

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Technical applications, application of luminescence phenomena to optical bleaching of textiles

    and papers , rapid radiationless transition to ground state ,applications of electron and energy

    transfer processes , photo fragmentations used in photochemical synthesis of detergent and

    insecticides.

    Photochemical oxidation and reductions:-

    Mechanistic features of photo reduction of benzophenone by alcohols, photosensitized

    incorporations of molecular oxygen into organic compounds, type 1 and 11 photo oxygenation

    reactions.

    SECTION-C 17 Hrs.

    Structure of the atmosphere,

    Structure in terms of temperature, characteristics and chemical composition, chemical and

    photochemical reactions in atmosphere, green house effect global warming, the ozone layer in

    the stratosphere. ozone hole.

    Solar radiation, solar spectral distribution outside the earths atmosphere, absorption by N2, O2

    ,O3,and distribution of solar energy on earth,

    Chemistry of upper atomosphere, features of odd oxygen and singlet oxygen,

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Air Pollution

    Air pollutants, COX, NOX ,and SOX hydrocarbons and photochemical smog, halogenated

    compounds ,acid rain ,particulates, effects of atmospheric pollution, monitoring.

    Water Pollutions

    Aquatic environment, water pollutants, chemicals in water, water quality parameters and

    standards, sampling ,preservation ,arsenic contamination in ground water,

    References

    1. :Gilbert & Cundel: Photochemistry.

    2. Calvert & Pits: Photochemistry.

    3. Atmospheric Chemistry, J. Heicklen, Academic Press, New York.

    4. Environmental Pollutionn Control Engineering ,C.S. Rao, New Age International (P)

    limited publisher.

    5. K.K. Rohtagi -Mukherjee: Photochemistry

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    PAPER-MCH 334 : INSTRUMENTAL PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

    PRACTICAL-I

    Maximum Marks : 100 Time : 6 Hours

    (i) Practical Examination : 80

    (ii)Internal Assessment : 20

    (I) Spectrophotometry

    1. Test the validity of Lambert-Beers law.

    2. Study the Cu2+EDTA complex by Jobs method.

    3. To determine the dissociation constant of methyl red by spectrophotometric method.

    4. To determine the dissociation constant of phenolphthalein .

    5. Titrate Fe(II) by spectrophotometric method with 1,10 phenanthroline.

    6. To determine the concentration of Ni ion using dmg by spectrophotometric method.

    7. Determination of the molar extinction coefficients

    (II) Polarimetry.

    .

    1 To find the specific rotation and molar rotation of optically active substances.

    2 To find the strength of optically active substance in the given solution.

    3 To determine the order of reaction and velocity constant for the inversion of cane

    sugar in acidic medium.

    4 To compare the strength of HCl and H2SO4 acids.

    5 To find the percentage of d-sugar and d-tartaric acid in the given solution.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH 335 : PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY PRACTICAL-I

    Maximum Marks : 100 Time : 6 Hours

    (i) Practical Examination : 80

    (ii)Internal Assessment : 20

    (I) Chemical Kinetics

    (a)To study the kinetics of reaction between potassium bromated and potassium iodide in acidic

    medium at room temperature.

    (b) To study the kinetics of reaction between potassium bromated and potassium iodide in acidic

    medium at three temperatures and hence to find out the activation energy of the reaction.

    (c).To study the reaction between H2O2 and HI by clock method at three temperatures, and

    hence to find out the activation energy of the reaction.

    (d).To study the kinetics of hydrolysis of tert. butyl chloride by conductance measurement.

    (II) Phase Rule

    (a). To determine the CST and CSC for phenol/water system

    (b). To find the eutectic point for two component systems i.e. naphthalene\benzoic acid and

    benzoic acid/ cinnamic acid systems.

    (c).To study the limit of homogeneity of three components (C6H6, CH3COOH, and H2O) system.

    (d).To study the limit of homogeneity of three components (CHCl3, CH3COOH, and H2O)

    system.

    (III) TLC

    (a).To separate and identify the given mixtures of colored compounds (azo benzene, hydroxyl

    azo benzene, p-amino azo benzene).

    (b). To separate and identify the given mixtures of colorless compounds (diphenylamine,

    benzophenone, naphthalene and biphenyl anthracene).

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SEMINAR

    Maximum Marks : 20 Time : Hr.

    Every candidate will have to deliver a seminar of 30 minutes duration on a topic which will be

    chosen by him/her in consultation with the teacher of the department. The seminar will be

    delivered before the students and teachers of the department. A three member committee ( one

    coordinator and two teachers of the department of different branches) duly approved by the

    departmental council will be constituted to evaluate the seminar. The following factors will be

    taken into consideration while evaluating the candidate.

    1. Expression

    2. Presentation

    3. Depth of the subject matter and answers to the questions.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SEMESTER-IV

    PAPER MCH 401 : ENVIRONMENTAL AND ADVANCE TOPICS IN

    CHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65 (i) Semester Paper : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Concept and scope of Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Pollution, Green house effect

    and global warming, chemical and Photochemical reactions in the

    atmosphere,Pollutants,contaminents, sinks and receptor.

    Air Pollution : Air Pollutants (CO, NO2, SO2, HC, SPM) Photo chemical smog, Acid rain,

    particulates, Air Pollution accidents (TCDD (2, 3, 7, 8 tetra Chloro binzo - 10 dioxin), Bhopal,

    Chernobyl Air Pollution monitoring instruments, Monitoring of SO2, NO-NOx, CO, CO2 HC

    Ozone).

    Soil Pollution: Pollutants in soil, Agricultural Pollution, Role of Micro nutrients in soil, Ion

    enchange reaction in soil, Monitoring techniques.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Water Pollution : Water Pollutants, Drinking water standards, Investigation of water

    (Physical, Chemical and Biological) Important steps in water treatment (Coagulation,

    filteration) disinfection, Break point chlorination, lime soda ash precess, corrison 'and scale

    formation, fluoridation, taste and color removal, water quality monitoring instruments.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Industrial Effluent Analysis : Quality of Industrial effluents, Physical methods of

    classification, BOD, & COD of industrial effluents. Analysis of metal pollutants in

    effluents.

    Chemical Toxicolgy : Toxic Pollutants in envrionment, Threshold limiting value,

    Biochemical effects of Hg, Cd, As, Pb, O3, PAN, CN and pesticides.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Green Chemistry:

    Introduction, the need of green chemistry, principles of green chemistry, planning of green

    synthesis, tools of green chemistry, Green reagents, Applications of phase transfer catalysts

    in green chemistry, Introduction to Microwave induced green synthesis with applications,

    Use of ultrasound in green chemistry, Bio-catatysts and applications.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Chemistry of Nanomaterials:

    Definition, historical perspective and effects of nanoscience and nanotechnology on various fields. Synthesis of nanoparticles by chemical routes and characterization techniques: Thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation; Growth of polyhedral particles by surface reaction, Ostwald ripening , size distribution ; TEM ; SEM ; AFM ; Light scattering ; XPS. Properties of nanostructured materials : Optical properties; magnetic properties; chemical properties. Overview of applied chemistry of nanomaterials

    References:

    1. Environmental Chemistry by A. K. De.

    2. Environmental Polllition Analysis S. M. Khopkar.

    3. Vogel's text book of Quantitative Chemical Analyses.

    4. Green chemistry, V.K.Ahluwalia, Ane books

    5. P.T. Anastas and J.C.Warner Green chemistry, Oxford

    6. Diwan, Bharadwaj, Nanocomposites, Pentagon.

    7. V.S.Muralidharan A.Subramania, Nanoscience and Technology Ane Books.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH 411: CHEMISTRY OF ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Semester Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Nomenclature of organometallic compounds, types of ligands and their classifications in

    organometallic componds, inert gas rule, transition metal compounds with bonds to hydrogen

    ,characterization of hydride complexes, hydrogen bridges, synthetic methods, chemical

    behaviour of hydrido compounds, mononuclear polyhydrides, carbonyl hydride and hydride

    anion, molecular hydrogen compounds, metal-hydrogen interactions with C-H groups,

    complexes of borohydrides and aluminohydrides, compounds with transition metal single

    ,double and triple bonds to carbon.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Synthesis, structure and bonding aspects of some important organometallic compounds

    a) 1 alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl and aryl ligands.

    b) 2 alkene and alkyne complexes of transition metals. c) butadiene and cyclobutadiene complexes of transition metals). d) cyclopentadiene complexes of transition metals-metallocenes with special emphasis to

    ferrocenes).

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SECTION-C 17 Hrs.

    Homogenous catalysis by transition metal complexes: hydrogenation reactions, alkene

    isomerisation, hydrosilation and hydroboration reactions, alkene hydrocyanation, reactions of

    carbonmonoxide and hydrogen: the water gas shift reaction, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction;

    hydroformylation of unsaturated compounds, alcohol carbonylation, Zeigler Natta

    polymerization of ethene and propene, alkene dimerization and oligomerizations, reactions of

    conjugated dienes, reactions of alkynes, valence isomerisation of strained hydrocarbons, alkene

    and alkyne metathesis, oxidative carbonylations, alkene oxidations (Wacker process), alkane

    oxidations.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Transition metal carbon monoxide compounds: preparation of metal carbonyls: mononuclear,

    binuclear, trinuclear, tetranuclear and larger polynuclear carbonyls. Additional structural and

    bonding features: fluxionality, semibridging CO groups, side on bonding to CO , oxygen to

    metal bonds, vibrational spectra of metal carbonyls, detection of bridging CO groups, molecular

    symmetry from the number of bands, bond angles and relative intensities, force constants,

    prediction and assignment of spectra, carbonylate anions, metal carbonyl hydrides, fluxional

    organometallic compounds.

    References:

    1. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton and Wilkinson, John Wiley and Sons,Inc. (5th and 6th editions)

    2. Inorganic Chemistry by Shriver, Atkins and Longford, Oxford University Press 1990. 3. Inorganic Chemistry by J.E. Huheey. 4. Organometallic Chemistry by R.C. Mehrotra. 5. Organometallic compounds of transition metals by R.H. Crabtree. 6. Homogenous transition metal catalysis by Christopher Masters.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH 412: ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Semester Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 17 Hrs.

    Cluster compounds

    Molecular structures of clusters, metal carbonyl clusters, stereochemical nonrigidity in clusters,

    electronic structures of clusters with -acid ligands, isoelectronic and isolobal relationships,

    structural pattern and synthesis of High Nuclearity Carbonyl Clusters (HNCCs), Electron

    counting scheme for HNCCs, the capping rule, isoelectronic and isolobal relationship, hetero

    atoms in metal atom clusters: carbide and nitride containing clusters, HNCCs of Fe, Ru, Os, Ni,

    Pd, Pt.

    Octahedral metal halides and chalcogenide clusters (M6X8 and M6X12 types), chevral

    phases, triangular clusters and solid state extended arrays.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Inorganic Polymers

    General properties, size and shape of linear polymer molecule, crystalline and amorphous

    polymers, polymer solubility, solubility parameter, glass transition temperature, viscoelastic

    behaviour, chemical flow and stress relaxation.

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    Sulfur polymers: Elementary Sulphur: forms of sulphur, molten sulfur, sulphur vapour. Sulfanes

    and their salts: free sulfanes, salts of sulfanes. Alkyl and aryl sulfanes: preparation, properties

    and structure. Sulfane monosulfonic acid: preparation, properties and structure.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Nanomaterials, nanoscience and nanotechnology

    Terminology and history, novel optical properties of nanomaterials, characterization methods,

    top down and bottom up fabrication, solution based synthesis of nanoparticles, vapour phase

    synthesis of nanoparticles, synthesis using frameworks supports and substrates, quantum wells,

    solid state superlattices, artificially layered crystal structures, self assembly and bottom up

    fabrication, supramolecular chemistry and morphosynthesis, dimensional control in

    nanostructures, DNA and nanomaterials, natural and artificial nanomaterials, bionanocomposites,

    uses and design strategies, polymer nanocomposites.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Supramolecular Chemistry

    Introduction, some important concepts, introduction to recognition, information and

    complementarity, principles of molecular receptor designs, spherical recognition (cryptates of

    metal cations), tetrahedral recognition by macrotricyclic cryptands, cation binding hosts, binding

    of anions, binding of neutral molecules, binding of organic molecules. Supramolecular reactivity

    and catalysis, transport processes and carrier design, supramolecular devices.

    References:

    1. Inorganic Polymers by Stone and Graham. 2. Inorganic chemistry by Shriver and Atkins (4th edition) Oxford University Press 3. Nano: The Essentials; Understanding Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, T. Pradeep, Tata

    McGraw-Hill Education Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.

    4. Modern Aspects of Inorganic Chemistry by H.J. Emeleus and A.G. Sharpe

    5. Supramolecular Chemistry (Concepts and Perspectives) by Jean Marie Lehn

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER-MCH413: INORGANIC SPECTROSCOPY-II

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) Theory Examination: 60 Time: 3 hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Basic principle and theory of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Larmor precession and resonance

    interaction, rotating axis system magnetizing vectors and relaxation, NMR transitions, NMR

    experiment, chemical shift, mechanism of electron shielding and factors contributing to

    magnitude of chemical shift, remote shielding from neighbour anisotropy, interatomic ring

    currents, splitting of signals, spin-spin coupling mechanism, Nuclear overhausser effect, double

    resonance.

    SECTION-B 17 Hrs.

    Applications of NMR

    Application involving the magnitude of coupling constants, complex spectra obtained when J=,

    chemical exchange and other factors affecting the line width, effect of chemical exchange on

    spectra and the evaluation of reaction rates for fast reactions. Consequences of nuclear with

    quadrupolar moment in NMR, exchange reactions between ligands and metal ions.

    Stereochemical non-rigidity and fluxionality: Introduction, use of NMR in its detection, its

    presence in trigonal bipyramidal molecules(PF5), Systems with coordination numbersix (

    Ti(acac)2Cl2, Ti(acac)2Br2, Ta2(OMe)10,).

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Introduction, similarities between EPR and NMR, behaviour of free electron in an external

    magnetic field, basic principle of EPR, the hydrogen atom, presentation of the spectrum,

    hyperfine splitting in isotropic systems involving more than one nucleus, contributions to

    hyperfine coupling constant in isotropic systems. Anisotropy in the g-value, EPR of triplet states,

    nuclear quadrupole interaction, line widths in EPR, applications of EPR.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Mossbauer Spectroscopy: Introduction, Principle, Conditions for Mssbauer Spectroscopy,

    parameters from Mssbauer Spectra, Isomer shift, Electric Quadrupole Interactions, Magnetic

    Interactions MB experiment, Application of MB spectroscopy in structural determination of the

    following:

    i) High spin Fe (II) and Fe (III) halides FeF2, FeCl2.2H2O, FeF3, FeCl3.6H2O. Low

    spin Fe(II) and Fe(III) Complexes-Ferrocyanides, Ferricyanides, Prussian Blue.

    ii) Iron carbonyls. Fe(CO)5, Fe2(CO)9 and Fe3 (CO)12

    iii) Inorganic Sn(II) and Sn(IV) halides.

    References:

    1. Physical methods for Chemists by R.S. Drago. 2. Structure Methods in Inorganic Chemistry by E.A.V Ebsworth and W.H Renkin. 3. Molecular Spectroscopy by C.M. Banwell. 4. Electron Spin Resonance by J.E. Wertz & J.R. Bolton.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 414 : PRACTICAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks : 100 (i) Semester Paper : 80 Time : 6 Hours (ii) Internal Assessment : 20

    A. Preparation of following compounds and study of their important properties UV-Vis and IR spectra.

    1. Preparation of dipyridiniumhexachloroplumbate and estimation of Pb. 2. Preparation of [Co(acac)3] 3. Preparation of hexathioureaplumbous nitrate. 4. Preparation bis(acetylacetonate) oxovanadium (IV). 5. Preparation of cis-and trans-K [Cr (C2O4)2 (H2O)2 6. Preparation of pyridine perchromate. 7. Preparation of butylxanthate. 8. Preparation of sodium tetrathionate. 9. Preparation of [Co(en)2Cl2 ] Cl. 10. Preparation of Cu2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2.

    B. Analysis of

    a) Alloys (Brass, bronze, solder) b) Pesticides

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 415: INORGANIC CHEMISTRY PRACTICALS

    Maximum Marks: 100 (i) Semester Paper: 80 Time: 6 Hours (ii) Internal Assessment: 20

    1. Spectrophotometric analysis

    a) Determination of Cu in unknown solution spectrophotometrically. b) Determination of Fe(II) with 1,10 phenanthroline spectrophotometrically. c) Determination of Fe(III) with potassium thiocyanate spectrophotometrically. d) Determination of Cr(III) with diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometrically. e) Determination of Ni(II) with dimethylglyoxime spectrophotometrically.

    2. To determine stochiometry of complex of Fe-1,10 Phenanthroline by

    a) Jobs method b) Mole-ratio method c)

    3. a) To find out oscillator strengths and assignment of d-d bands to transitions in hexaaquo ions

    of Cr(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Ce(III).

    b) Calculation of 10 Dq and B for hexa aquo ion of Ni(II).

    4. Verification of relative position of following ligands in spectrochemical series: H2O, Py,

    NH3, DMSO, acetyl acetonate, ethylenediamine, acetate and urea.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 421: NAME REACTIONS AND REAGENTS IN

    ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65 (i) Semester Paper: 60 Time: 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment: 10 Pass Marks: 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions ( two from each section ) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt one question from each section : A, B, C and D. Section E is

    compulsory.

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    Catalytic Hydrogenation (Pt, Pd, Ru, Tristriphenylphosphine, Rhodium chloride), Reduction

    with Hydride transfer reagents ( LiAlH4, NaBH4, B2H6, Me3SiH, di-isobutyl aluminium hydride).

    Reduction by dissolving metals: Reduction by Na(Hg) + H2O, Reduction with Zn, Clemmensen

    reduction, Birch Reduction.

    Bakers Yeast ( enzymatic reduction), Hydrogenolysis with tri-alkyltin hydride. Catalytic

    reduction ( Lindlars catalyst, Rosenmunds reduction, Raney Ni).

    Reactivity and selectivity (stereoselectivity and chemoselectivity) of reduction.

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    Oxidation with ozone (O3) , Peracids, Lead tetraacetate Pb(OAc)4 , Periodic acid (HIO4),

    Osmium tetraoxide (OsO4), KMnO4 , HNO3, SeO2 , Woodward and prevost hydroxylation,

    Oxidation with catalytic dehydrogenation with Sulphur, Selenium, Pd-C, Copper in presence of

    air.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    Oxidation with DDQ, Chloranil and Oppenauer oxidation. Oxidation with Cr (VI) in acidic,

    basic and neutral medium, Reactivity umpolung via redox reaction, Chemoselective and

    Regioselective oxidation. Reactivity and selectivity of oxidation.

    SECTION-C 17 Hrs. Organometallic Reagents:

    Methods of preparation and applications of Organozinc, Organomangnesium, Organolithium,

    Organosilicon, Organocuprate reagents.

    Some special reagents in synthesis:

    1,3 dithianes, dicyclohexylcrbodiimide(DCC), Willkinsons catalyst, Merrifield resin, Phase

    transfer catalyst, Crown ethers, Lithium diisopropylamide (LDA), Use of compounds of

    Thallium (III) in organic synthesis.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    Selective name reactions in organic synthesis:

    Mechanism and applications of the following reactions- Favorskii reaction, Fisher indole

    synthesis, Nametkin rearrangement, Lossen, curtius, Beckmann rearrangements, Chichibabin

    reaction, Shapiro reaction, Paal-Knorr synthesis, Barton reaction, Hoffmann degradation, Emde

    degradation, Von Braun reaction. Skraup synthesis.

    References:

    1. Advanced Organic Chemistry-Reaction, Mechanism and Structure; Jerry March, John Wiley.

    2. Advanced Organic Chemistry; F.A. Carey and R.J. Sundberg, Plenum. 3. Modern Organic Reactions; H.O. House, Benjamin. 4. Organic Chemistry Reactions and Reagents , O.P. Aggarwal, Goel Publishing House,

    Meerut.

    5. Reactions, Rearrangements and Reagents, S.N. Sanyal, Bharati Bhawan (P&D). 6. Applications of Redox and Reagents in Organic Synthesis,Dr. Ratan Kumar Kar. New

    Central Book Agency, Delhi.

    7. Name Reactions in Organic Synthesis, Dr. Arun R. Parikh, Dr. Hansa Parikh, Foundation Books, Delhi.

    8. Moderns Synthetic Reactions,Carruthers.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 422: ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    Maximum Marks : 70 Lectures : 65

    (i) University Examination : 60 Time : 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks : 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections : A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from each section) and will be of 1

    marks each.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE CANDIDATES

    Candidates are required to attempt five one question from each section: A, B, C and D. Section E

    is compulsory

    SECTION-A 16 Hrs.

    1. An introduction of synthesis and synthetic equivalents. General principle of disconnection

    approach; Importance of order of event in organic synthesis. Introductory meaning of one C-

    X and two C-X groups disconnection. Reversal of polarity (umpolung). New application of

    organosilicane compounds, cyclisation reactions of carbene and nitrenes. Protective Groups:

    Principle of protection of alcoholic, amino, carbonyl, and carboxylic groups with suitable

    examples from synthetic point of view.

    2. Synthesis of alkene, elimination pyrolytic syn elimination, synthesis of allyl alcohol,

    sulphoxide sulphenate rearrangement, through phosphorous ylide, decarboxylation of

    lactum stereo selective synthesis of tri-tetra substituted alkenes through use of acetylenes.

    Use of nitro compounds in organic synthesis. Fragmentation of sulphonates, oxidative

    decarboxylation of carboxylic acids. Decomposition of toulene p-sulphonylhydrazones,

    stereospecific synthesis from 1, 2-diols. Stereoselective route to , carbonyl compounds

    SECTION-B 16 Hrs.

    1. C-C bond formation: Generation and importance of enolate ion,

    regioselectivity,stereoselectivity. Generation of dianion and their alkylation, alkylation of

    relatively acidicmethylene groups. Hydrolysis and decarboxylation of alkylated product,

    O-Vs-C alkylation,C-alkylation of vinyl group, aryl group. Formation of enamines and

    alkylation. Alkylation ofcarbon by conjugate additions.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    2. One group C-C - disconnection: Disconnection of simple alcohols, of simple olefins,

    carbonyl compounds control in synthesis, friedal craft's type examples.

    SECTION-C 16 Hrs.

    1. Reaction of carbon nucleophiles with carbonyl group: Condensation process

    favouredequilibrium by dehydration of aldol products, under acidic and basic conditions,

    Amine catalysed condensation, Mannich Reaction, Nucleophilic addition, Cyclisation

    process, Derzen, Perkin, Stobbe reaction. Sulphur slides, phosphorous ylides and related

    spices as nucleophiles.

    2. Diels Alder Reaction: General feature dienophile diene, intramolecular Diels Alder

    reaction stereochemistry and mechanisms, photo sentized Diels Alder Reaction, homo

    Diels Alder reaction, ene synthesis, cycloaddition reaction of allyl cations/anions. Retro-

    Diels Alder's Reaction.

    SECTION-D 16 Hrs.

    1. Two Group Disconnections 1,3-Difunctionalized compound -hydroxy carbonyl

    compounds.1-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, 1,3-di carbonyl compounds, 1-

    unsaturated lactones, 1,5-dicarbonyl compounds michael disconnection, use of Mannich

    Reaction in disconnection, Robinson's annelation.

    2. Synthesis of the following natural product using disconnection approach.

    Caryophyllene, Pencilline, Cephalosporin, 11-Oxoprogestrone, 11-Hydroxy

    progesterone, Aphidicaline and Juvabione.

    References:

    1. W. Carruther : Some Modern Method of Organic Synthesis.

    2. H. O. House : Modern Synthetic Reactions.

    3. I. L. Finar : Organic Chemistry, Vol.2.

    4. R.O.C. Norman; J.M. Coxon : Principles of Organic Synthesis.

  • M.Sc. (CHEMISTRY) PART-II (SEMESTER III & IV) Session 2014-15

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    PAPER MCH 423: HETEROCYCLIC CHEMISTRY

    Maximum Marks: 70 Lectures: 65

    (i) University Examination: 60 Time: 3 Hours

    (ii) Internal Assessment : 10 Pass Marks : 35%

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER

    The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Sections A, B, C and D will

    have two questions from the respective sections of the syllabus and will carry 12 marks each.

    Section E will consist of 8 short-answer questions (two from