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A process book from the Neon Vancouver/Ugly Vancouver colaboration project between Emily Carr and teh Museum of Vancouver,from ComD student, Bree Galbraith, and IXD student, Cody Jones.

TRANSCRIPT

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Process

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    For this project, we were given the task of creating an Augmented Reality App for a collaboration with the Museum of Vancouver (MOV).

    The brief described how just 50 years ago, Vancouver was a riot of colour that exploded along the downtown streets by way of one of the largest displays of neon in the world.

    Our job was to explore a specific sign in a particular location in the city, take a multi sensory approach to the application, and create a sequential visual story with an associated auditory component.

    The sign we selected was the Ovaltine Cafe, a Vancouver landmark that opened its doors in the 1940s, and hasnt show signs of slowing down (or changing its decor) since.

    Overview

    Core Design Studio Em

    ily Carr University

    of Art + Design

    The Visible City: Illuminat

    ing Vancouvers Neon

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    A field-trip to the MOV provided us with inspiration and information on the techniques of creating and repair-ing neon signage.

    We captured the neon in its dormant state to gain a better understanding of the parts that make up each piece. By comparing that with the signs when they are lit, we could see how the two aspects play off of one an-other.

    This juxtaposition was something that we wold play on later on in our process of developing our App.

    Visual Research - Signage at MOV

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    During our visit to the MOV, we paid close attention to the letter forms behind the neon, as well as the structure of each piece.

    Visual Research

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    More photos from our visit to the MOV.

    Visual Research

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    More photos from our visit to the MOV.

    Visual Research

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Our sign, the Ovaltine Cafe can be found at 251 Hastings Street. It was made by the Wallace Neon company in 1945, and is still going strong, drawing both people and movie sets into the unique cafe year after year.

    Wallace Neon used the Ovaltine Cafe sign as their feature sign to explain to new customers the steps they take to design and produce neon signage. The sign was then grandfathered-in under the 1974 sign by-law: it projects from the side of the building facade and the neon letters occupy more that 40% of the sign face.

    The Ovaltine has been seen on screen in episodes of the X-Files, Davincis Inquest and on the big screen in I-Robot.

    Visual - Ovaltine

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    As a part of our research, we looked to existing examples of Apps that were using the Augmented Reality feature for inspiration.

    We quickly determined that rather than have multiple AR features that would ultimately overwhelm the user, we would concentrate on the histori-cal information that surrounds our sign as well as another, yet to be de-termined feature that would engage the user and draw them further into the AR experience.

    Visual/Functional

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    As Wikipedia explains, Augmented reality (AR) is a term for a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generat-ed sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. It is related to a more general concept called medi-ated reality, in which a view of reality is modified (possibly even diminished rather than augmented) by a com-puter. As a result, the technology functions by enhancing ones current perception of reality. By contrast, virtual reality replaces the real world with a simulated one.

    Visual/Functional

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    When we first started out, we thought about the circumstances that our user would be downloading and using the App.

    We began to create scenarios, and decided that our user would most likely discover the application on the MOV website, and be prompted to download it from that space.

    For that reason, we decided that our App needed to speak the same visual language as the existing MOV site, and began to create prototypes based off of this form.

    We also decided early on to use the MOV typeface, Vag Rounded in our interface.

    Visual Research - MOV Brand

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    We poured through many old newspapers that described the time when neon was making its debut on the streets of Vancouver.

    With headlines such as Neon has come to enhance the beauty of British Columbia, we knew that we had to emphasize the history of neon signage in Vancouver.

    Our research also led us to an article written for the Vancouver Sun on November 13, 2009 by John Mackie, called Bright lights, old city: Remembering Vancouvers neon glory, where it was stated, In 1953, Neon Products boasted there were 19,000 neon signs in the city of Vancouver one for every 18 residents.No more. Times changed, neon faded in popularity, and was even derided as a sleazy light source by anti-blight crusaders. In the late 1960s Vancouver council enacted

    Textual Research

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Textual Researchlaws that put an end to the big neon spectacular for decades you couldnt even put up a flashing neon sign. Today there are only a few dozen of the 19,000 signs left...

    The Vancouver Museum has a collection of vintage neon signs, including classics like the Smilin Buddha Cabaret (the Buddhas belly ripples) and the Aristocratic Cafe (featuring the stores dapper mascot, Risty).

    But the museum has limited storage the Aristocratic sign is so large it wont fit through the museums doors, and had to be displayed outside when the museum put on a neon display. It has recently passed on several old signs, including Wallys Burgers and Ted Harris Paints.

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Historical Neighbourhood ImagesWe used the Vancouver Public Li-brary to reference many images that showed the Ovaltine Cafe neighbour-hood throughout the 30s all the way up to present for our research.

    This aspect of our research was es-pecially important for us as we could begin to understand how the area had transitioned through the years, and the actual role the Ovaltine Cafe has played on Hastings Street.

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Our neighbourhood research gave us the feeling that the AR feature we had discussed about the rich history of the sign was as important as we had first determined.

    Historical Neighbourhood Images

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    Our early ideas had us focusing on the usability of the App, and how the user would navigate through the App. We tried to make the best use possible of the brief we had been given by the MOV, and came to the conclusion that our interface would have to be intuitive and direct.

    Early Ideas

  • Bree GalbraithCody Jones

    CORE Design Studio IV

    Museum of Vancouver Neon App Project 2 October 2011

    These are a few of our early examples of our initial ideas about the look and feel of our app. We stayed very close to the existing MOV identity, which we drew from the MOV website for.

    We thought of the App as a container for all the MOV signs, and tried to examine what all the signs had in common, and what features they could offer the user that were unique.

    In keeping with our original thought, the historical references were most important.

    Initial Iterations

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    Welcome!Explore Vancouvers famous and historic neon signage from the early 20th century.Be a part of history! Add your photo (of a historic sign) to our archives!Visit the MOV and show us your photo with a historic sign to recieve $5 off your admission price!

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    ARISTOCRATIC

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    BOW-MAC

    DUNNS TAILOR

    ONLY SEAFOOD

    OVALTINE CAFE

    SMILIN BUDDHA

    the signs

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    the ovaltine cafe

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    The Ovaltine Cafe was established in 1942.

    ovaltine cafe

    Wallace Neon, who made the landmark sign, proudly used it as their feature sign to explain to new customers the steps in designing, producing and hanging a sign.

    The sign was grandfathered in under the 1974 sign by-law: it projects from the building facade and the neon letters occupy more than 40% of the sign face.The Ovalti