ngss update chris campbell, nsta district vii director

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COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

NGSS UpdateChris Campbell, NSTA District VII Director----- Meeting Notes (10/30/12 09:43) -----This is an "eagle eye" view of the NGSS, so please don't get bogged down in the weeds right now.1

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

In addition to the curriculum content, the Science Framework Revision Team proposes several recommendations for school districts in Mississippi. The recommendations are as follows: 1) Elementary science education is essential. The concepts, principles, processes, and skills must be acquired in order to comprehend what students see, hear, read and interpret. Science at the elementary level can be used to enhance reading comprehension and should be a central, integrated part of elementary education. 2) More resources should be available for science teachers. Equipment, computer programs, primary or related documents, and other resources should be a part of a well-rounded science education program. School districts should promote the acquisition of appropriate outstanding educational resources. 3) The number of students in lab-based science courses should be limited to twenty- four (24). This makes laboratory activities safer and more meaningful for the student. 4) Lab-based science courses should include an average of twenty percent (20%) of instructional time for active laboratory activities. Those teachers should be allotted additional planning time to prepare for these essential activities.

ScienceStandards

The next generation

7A Framework for K-12 Science EducationReleased in July 2011Developed by the National Research Council at the National Academies of SciencePrepared by a committee of Scientists (including Nobel Laureates) and Science Educators

Three-Dimensions:Scientific and Engineering PracticesCrosscutting ConceptsDisciplinary Core Ideas

Free PDF available from The National Academies Press (www.nap.edu)Print Copies available from NSTA Press (www.nsta.org/store)InstructionCurriculaAssessmentsTeacher Development

Developing the Standards82011-2013July 2011

What is the Vision of the Framework for K-12 Science Education?Over multiple years of school, students shouldActively engage in scientific and engineering practicesApply crosscutting concepts to deepen their understanding of the core ideas in scienceHave opportunities to carry out scientific investigations and engineering design related to disciplinary core ideas

A Framework for K-12 Science Education, pp. 8-9Learning experiences should engage students with fundamental questions about the world and how scientists investigate and find answers to questions, so that by the end of grade 12, students can

Engage in public discussions on science-related issues,Be critical consumers of scientific information related to their everyday lives,Continue to learn about science throughout their lives, and Appreciate that science and the current scientific understanding of the world are the result of many hundreds of years of creative human endeavor.

A Framework for K-12 Science Education, p. 9NGSS Development ProcessIn addition to a number of reviews by state teams and critical stakeholders, the process includes two public reviews.

1st Public Draft was in May 2012

2nd Public Draft will take place by December 2012

Final Release is expected in the Spring of 201311Conceptual Shifts in the NGSSK-12 Science Education should reflect the real world interconnections in science.Using all practices and crosscutting concepts to teach all core ideas all year.Science Concepts Build Coherently Across K-12The NGSS focus on deeper understanding and application of content Science and Engineering are integrated in K-12 science educationScience Standards coordinate with ELA and Math Common Core Standards (CCSS)

Dimension 1: PracticesThe practices describe behaviors that scientists engage in as they investigate and build models and theories about the natural world and the key set of engineering practices that engineers use as they design and build models and systems.

Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)Developing and using modelsPlanning and carrying out investigationsAnalyzing and interpreting dataUsing mathematics and computational thinkingConstructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)Engaging in argument from evidenceObtaining, evaluating, and communicating informationScientific and Engineering Practices

14Dimension 2: Crosscutting ConceptsCrosscutting concepts have application across all domains of science and include: Patterns, similarity, and diversityCause and effectScale, proportion and quantitySystems and system modelsEnergy and matterStructure and function Stability and change

Dimension 3: Disciplinary Core IdeasDisciplinary core ideas have the power to focus K12 science curriculum, instruction and assessments on the most important aspects of science. To be considered core, the ideas should should meet at least two of the following criteria and ideally all four: Have broad importance across multiple sciences or engineering disciplines or be a key organizingconcept of a single discipline;Provide a key tool for understanding or investigating more complex ideas and solving problems;Relate to the interests and life experiences of students or be connected to societal or personal concerns that require scientific or technological knowledge;Be teachable and learnable over multiple grades at increasing levels of depth and sophistication.

Life SciencePhysical ScienceLS1:From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes

LS2: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

LS3:Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits

LS4: Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity

PS1: Matter and Its Interactions

PS2: Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions

PS3: Energy

PS4: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information TransferEarth & Space ScienceEngineering & TechnologyESS1: Earths Place in the Universe

ESS2: Earths Systems

ESS3: Earth and Human ActivityETS1: Engineering Design

ETS2: Links Among Engineering, Technology, Science, and SocietyDisciplinary Core Ideas17

http://vimeo.com/41704037How to Read the NGSS (if Internet available)

MS.PS-SPM Structure and Properties of MatterStudents who demonstrate understanding can: Construct and use models to explain that atoms combine to form new substances of varying complexity in terms of the number of atoms and repeating subunits. [Clarification Statement: Examples of atoms combining can include Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2) combining to form hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or water (H2O).] [Assessment Boundary: Valence electrons and bonding energy are not addressed.] Plan investigations to generate evidence supporting the claim that one pure substance can be distinguished from another based on characteristic properties. [Clarification Statement: Properties of substances can include melting and boiling points, density, solubility, reactivity, flammability, and phase.] Use a simulation or mechanical model to determine the effect on the temperature and motion of atoms and molecules of different substances when thermal energy is added to or removed from the substance. [Assessment Boundary: Quantification of the model or use of mathematical formulas are not intended.]Construct an argument that explains the effect of adding or removing thermal energy to a pure substance in different phases and during a phase change in terms of atomic and molecular motion. [Assessment Boundary: The use of mathematical formulas is not intended.]2122Performance expectations combine practices, core ideas, and crosscutting concepts into a single statement.

Construct and use models to explain that atoms combine to form new substances of varying complexity in terms of the number of atoms and repeating subunits. [Clarification Statement: Examples of atoms combining can include Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2) combining to form hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or water(H2O). [Assessment Boundary: Restricted to macroscopic interactions.] Closer Look at a Performance Expectation

Construct and use models to explain that atoms combine to form new substances of varying complexity in terms of the number of atoms and repeating subunits. [Clarification Statement: Examples of atoms combining can include Hydrogen (H2) and Oxygen (O2) combining to form hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or water(H2O). [Assessment Boundary: Restricted to macroscopic interactions.] Closer Look at a Performance ExpectationPerformance expectations combine practices, core ideas, and crosscutting concepts into a single statement. 23

DO NOT CIRCULATE24Construct an argument that explains the effect of adding or removing thermal energy to a pure substance in different phases and during a phase change in terms of atomic and molecular motion. PRACTICE: Use arguments and empirical evidence to support or refute an explanation for a phenomenon.

DCI: Gases and liquids are made of molecules or inert atoms that are moving about relative to each other. The changes of state that occur with variations in temperature or pressure can be described and predicted using these models of matter. The term heat as used in everyday language refers both to thermal motion (the motion of atoms or molecules within a substance) and radiation (particularly infrared and light). Temperature is not a measure of energy; the relationship between the temperature and the total energy of a system depends on the types, states, and amounts of matter present.

CCC: Evidence is used to support claims about causal relationships.

Explanations vs. ArgumentsExplanations The products of science

Arguments The process of reac