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  • Ohio Confederation of Teacher Education OrganizationsFall ConferenceOctober 26, 2006Columbus, Ohio

  • We did then what we knew how to do,When we knew better,We did better.-Maya Angelou

  • Todays DiscussionFederal Historical PerspectiveContext of Ohios Performance ExpectationsKey Aspects of NCLB and IDEA 04The Ohio Integrated System for Academic and Behavior Supports, Response to Intervention, Disproportionality, Early Intervening Services, AYP and Other Topics of InterestOhios Progress To DateQuestions and Discussion

  • ESEA PL 107-110 No Child Left BehindLegislative Requirements Inform and Support an Integrated Systems Approach Between NCLB & IDEA 04IDEA 04 108-446Operating Standards for Ohios SchoolsOperating Standards for Ohios Schools Serving Children with Disabilities

    Accountability-data based decision makingProgress in the general curriculum for ALL studentsSystems of Intervention for ALL studentsScientifically Based InstructionIncreased parental involvement Academic Content StandardsProfessional Development StandardsPrincipal StandardsTeaching Standards

  • National Context

  • Over 50% of U.S. crime is committed by 5-7% of children between ages of 10-20 Over 82% of crime is committed by people who have not completed school 70% of youth viewed as antisocial in school are arrested within 3 years of leaving school Problem behavior is the single most common reason why students with disabilities are removed from regular schools, work, and house settings (From Kincaid, D. University of South Florida)Student Problem Behavior: Social Cost

  • Student Problem Behavior: Economic CostThe average cost of the most highly restrictive placements for students with disabilities is $150,000

    Federal & state governments add 1,500 prison beds every week costing $30 billion/ year

    It is projected that soon more Americans will be in prison than will attend the nations 4-year collegesKincaid, h Florida(Kincaid, D., University of South Florida)

  • Ohios Context

  • Ohios 2005-2006 Annual Report Card on Educational ProgressAverage of all students scores on state tests has increased by 19+ points, from 73.7 to 92.997% of LEAs have improved their performance index score200 LEAs moved up at least one state designation8 of 10 Ohio LEAs are either Excellent or EffectiveNo Ohio LEAs in Academic Emergency; 7 in Academic Watch; 88% of Ohio LEAs in top three designations

  • Ohios 2005-2006 Annual Report Card on Educational Progress(cont)Adequate Yearly Progess(AYP) for Ohios 610 LEAs193 met AYP244 missed AYP for one subgroup97 missed AYP for two subgroups76 missed AYP for three or more subgroupsPercent of Schools and LEAs Meeting AYP2003-2004: 83%(schools) 64%(districts)2004-2005: 75.7%(schools) 55.5%(districts)2005-2006: 60.6%(schools) 31.6%(districts)

  • Ohios 2005-2006 Annual Report Card on Educational Progress(cont)Graduation Rates Climb1996-1997 (79.8%)2004-2005 (86.2%)Achievement Gap Remains a Challenge

  • Impact of 491 Office Referrals in an Elementary School in Ohio... Administrative Time Lost7,365 minutes123 hours20 work days* Based on 15 minutes per referral.

    Student Instructional Time Lost22,095 minutes368 hours61 school days* Based on 45 minutes out of the classroom.Adapted from Barrett et.al.*** $6,500 or more spent per year for an instructional leader to process office referrals.* Based on an average salary of $70,000

  • Impact of 3057 Office Referrals in a Middle School in Ohio... Administrative Time Lost45,855 minutes764 hours95 work days* Based on 15 minutes per referral.

    Student Instructional Time Lost137,565 minutes2,292 hours382 school days* Based on 45 minutes out of the classroom.Adapted from Barrett et.al.*** $35,000 or more spent per year for an instructional leader to process office referrals.* Based on an average salary of $70,000

  • The Ohio Integrated Systems Model for Academic and Behavior SupportsThe Ohio Integrated Systems Model for Academic and Behavior Supports is a comprehensive school-wide prevention & intervention model that provides support systems which address both academic and behavioral needs of ALL students.

  • Ohio Integrated Systems Model for Academic & Behavior Supports Big Ideas in Beginning ReadingDIBELSFlorida Center for Reading ResearchInstitute for the Development of Educational AchievementNational Center for Culturally Responsive Educational SystemsNorth Central Regional Educational LaboratoryOregon Reading FirstPositive Behavior Intervention and SupportsSchool Wide Information Systems (SWIS)What Works Clearinghouse

  • Ohio Integrated Systems ModelWhole School SystemsComprehensivePreventionInterventionContinuum of SupportsAcademic and BehaviorAll Students

  • Key Features of an Effective Integrated Model

  • Summative Effects of an Integrated ModelShephard Kellam, Johns Hopkins UniversityReading Instruction Reading & Behavior Instruction Behavior Instruction SignificanceBL

  • Research FoundationsBased on longitudinal research, achievement is strongly and reciprocally linked to behavior and psychological well being.School wide prevention/intervention efforts in early grades promote academic achievement, prevent school failure and drop out.School wide prevention/intervention efforts promote emotional and behavioral well-being; prevent drug abuse, aggression, and mental disorders.

  • Research Foundations Supporting OISMProven relationship between academic and social behavior skill development (Kellam,1998)Effectiveness of a system wide, 3 tiered model of intervention with increasing intensity to infuse behavior and academic support across a school for all students in need of assistance (Sugai, Horner,Kameenui, Simmons, 2002)Established efficacy of educational systems change as a means to improve schools, and consequently, student achievement (Fullan, 2003)

  • Ohio Integrated System for Academic and Behavior Supports (OISM) andResponse to Intervention (RtI)DisproportionalityEarly Intervening ServicesAdequate Yearly Progress (AYP)Association with School Improvement

  • Progress of Schools and Districts Involved with the Ohio Integrated Systems Model for Academic and Behavior Supports

  • State Improvement Grant OutcomesCharacteristics of the sampleEvidence of accuracy of implementationLiteracy outcome dataStakeholder satisfaction with the modelState Evaluation Coordinator for Ohio SIG: Francis E. Lentz Ph.D. University of Cincinnati

  • Characteristics of the SampleTwo cohorts 59 buildings 2004-05 78 buildings 2005-06 137 total buildingsGeographically distributed across stateSimilar proportions of at-risk students in NCLB subgroups compared to other OH schools OISM buildings were lower performing on OH report card than OH normOISM buildings were significantly lower in reading performance than overall OH schools

  • Implementation AccuracySET data for PBS implementation (75% implemented)Building action plans (65% accuracy for use of strategic planning process)SWIS/DIBELS implementation & use of web data systems (123 buildings) use of data to make decisions across tiers of support

  • Literacy Outcome DataBoth cohorts significantly improved fall to spring outcomes for measures analyzed (ORF, NWF, LNF )22,000 students in DIBELS databaseCohort one better improvement than cohort two(one with more experience than two ) may speak to effect of level of implementation)

  • Stakeholder SatisfactionBelief about the effectiveness of OISM components for teachers, principals, and regional coaches.All groups indicated strong belief that OISM will be effective in improving outcomes with coach and principal ratings being highestOverall, participants believed that OISM will improve outcomes, skills related to OISM are good, but there are some concerns about knowledge and commitment of their peers.

  • Evaluation of Impact of the

    Ohio Integrated Systems Model 2005-06

    Chart1

    10389123107

    75%

    65%

    89%

    78%

    Implementation of OISM Components

    Accurate Use of Collaborative Strategic Planning Process

    Web-based Discipline Screening Tool (SWIS) in Place

    Web-based Literacy Screening Tool (DIBELS) in Place

    137 OISM Buildings

    Implementation Accuracy Data

    Sheet1

    OISM SchoolsImplementation of OISM ComponentsAccurate Use of Collaborative Strategic Planning ProcessWeb-based Discipline Screening Tool (SWIS) in PlaceWeb-based Literacy Screening Tool (DIBELS) in Place

    13710389123107

    SchoolsOISM SchoolsImplementation of OISM ComponentsAccurate Use of Collaborative Strategid Planning processWeb-based Discipline Screening Tool (SWIS)Web-based Literacy Screening Tool (DIBELS

    Approximately Equal Number of Rural Surburban and Urban Schools StudiedRural13710389123107

    Surburban

    Urban

    Sheet1

    75%

    65%

    89%

    78%

    Implementation of OISM Components

    Accurate Use of Collaborative Strategic Planning Process

    Web-based Discipline Screening Tool (SWIS) in Place

    Web-based Literacy Screening Tool (DIBELS) in Place

    137 OISM Buildings

    Implementation Accuracy Data

    Sheet2

    Sheet3

  • Grade Levels that Showed Significant Improvement

    from Fall to Spring on Early Literacy Measures

    Grade

    Statistically Significant Improvement

    No Statistically Significant Improvement

    K

    X

    1

    X

    2

    X

    3

    X

    4

    X

    5

    X

    6

    NA (too few students)

    22,000 students in

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