oscon 2011 wylie

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  • Government Open Source Collaborations

    Brian Wylie Sandia National Laboratories

    Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of

    Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  • Government Open Source Resources

    GOSCON Government Open Source Conference (goscon.org)

    Open Source Center: Foreign open source intelligence data (opensource.gov)

    Open Source Software Institute: Non-profit corp/govt/acad (oss-institute.org)

    Government Open Source Software Resource Centre (gossrc.org)

    Center for Strategic and International Studies (tracks open source legislation csis.org)

  • Government Open Source Around the World

    Data Courtesy of the Center for Strategic and International Studies

    0

    20

    40

    60

    80

    100

    120

    140

    160

    180

    Europe Asia LatinAmerica

    NorthAmerica

    Africa MiddleEast

    FailedProposedApproved

    Open Source Initiatives by Region (2000-2009)

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • Government Open Source Example Projects

    Open source data analysis and visualization platform

    Sandia Los Alamos

    Kitware

    University of Utah

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • Government Open Source Example Projects

    Sandia

    Kitware

    Indiana University Stanford

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • Government Open Source Collaboration Benefits

    Government

    Commercial

    Academic

    No specific vendor lock-in/out Allows a diversified development team Known code base (strengths and weaknesses) Typically easier to integration with other OS tools Improvement of the OS project Money Leveraging project for other/future work Improvement of the OS project

    Student/Professor support Publishing/Sharing Improvement of the OS project

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • Government Open Source Collaboration Issues

    Need to relax into existing OS license* New projects should pick a liberal OS license Funding source may hesitate on Open Source Proprietary projects / Intellectual Property Government bureaucracy Mixed software skill set Deliverables can get distorted * No govt sell back clause Work may not be publication material If you do publish, it may be a joint publication

    Government

    Commercial

    Academic

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • Government Open Source Questions Section

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to be less reliant on American brands, and the development of strong viable open- source alternatives. Between 2006 and 2007, we see a second boost in open-source policies, which could be attributed to a reaction to theglobal release of a major closed-source software package, to avoid vendor lock-in. This reaction was likely driven in part by the desire of governments to avoid costly software renewal as well as unfavorable reception of the closed-source software package.

  • (view included video)

    PresenterPresentation NotesPrior to 2001, there was almost no activity in policy related to open-source, which could be the result of a lack of maturity in open-source software development up until this point and/or difficulty in finding documentation of older open-source policies online. The first year in which we see a significant increase in open-source policies is 2002, followed by a sharp jump in 2003 (see Figure 2). Potential explanations for the marked surge in open-source policies in 2003 could include increased lobbying efforts by large multinational firms invested in open- source, the growth of anti-Americanism and the desire to