OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION 2013

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OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION 2013. GHS: A WORLDWIDE SYSTEM FOR HAZARD COMMUNICATION. Goals & Objectives. Define what Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) is and its purpose. Explain the Global Harmonized System and how it effects HAZCOM. Review the four major components of HAZCOM. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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OSHA HAZARD COMMUNICATION 2013 GHS: A WORLDWIDE SYSTEM FOR HAZARD COMMUNICATIONGoals & ObjectivesDefine what Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) is and its purpose.Explain the Global Harmonized System and how it effects HAZCOM.Review the four major components of HAZCOM.Learn the new Pictograms & understand Safety Data SheetsWhy Hazard Communication and Chemical SafetyChemicals are all around us every day.Chemicals can be:Corrosive.Reactive.Flammable. Explosive.Oxidizing.Inert.OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryWhy Hazard Communication & Chemical SafetyIn many cases, the chemicals you may be dealing with at work are no more dangerous than those you use at home.However, in the workplace:Exposure likely more oftenConcentrations likely higherLonger duration of exposureOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryPurpose of the Hazard Communication StandardTo inform employees about hazardous chemicals they work withInformation provided through:Information on Chemical LabelsSafety Data SheetsTraining on Hazard CommunicationWritten HAZCOM ProgramIt is your Right to KnowOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryFour Major PartsWritten HAZCOM ProgramContainer Labeling RequirementsSafety Data SheetsEmployee TrainingOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryGlobal Harmonized System is :Standardizing chemical classifying and labeling on a global scale. Internationally Comprehensible. Provides consistent and simplified communications. Improved labeling provides greater hazard awareness.OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryGHS IMPLEMENTATION DATESKey Elements of Written HAZCOM ProgramChemical inventory list of all chemicals used in the workplace. Updated when new chemicals are obtained. Obtaining Safety Data Sheets (SDS) for all chemicals within our inventory. Method for ensuring all chemicals are labeled. Employee training requirements. A COPY OF THE COMPANY WRITTEN HAZCOM PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE FOR YOU TO REVIEW IN OUR OFFICEOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryContainer LabelingNew labeling system being implemented over next few years GHS CompliantPictograms are a key component you must learnOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryPrimary vs. Secondary LabelsPrimary Labels come from manufacturer.GHS now mandates how these primary labels must appear.Secondary Labels used when roofer places chemical into a smaller secondary container.Examples include:gasoline cansspray bottles filled with membrane cleanerbucket full of paintEtc.Secondary Labels must provide the same level of information to employees as primary labels. Best practice is to replicate the shipping primary labels.OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryThere are six major primary label elements:Signal WordsHazard StatementsPrecautionary StatementsProduct IdentificationSupplier/Manufacturer IdentificationSymbols called PictogramsInternationally Recognized PictogramsMAJOR CHANGES IN HAZCOM 2012Primary Container LabelingOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabels: Signal WordUsed to indicate the severity of the hazard and alert employees to the potential hazard.Only 2 signal words will appear:DANGER(more severe hazard)WARNING (less severe hazard)Not all labels will have a signal word. Some chemicals are not hazardous enough to require that a signal word appear on the label.OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabels: Hazard StatementThere are specific hazard statements that must appear on the label based on the chemical hazard classification.Examples:Flammable liquid and vaporCauses skin irritationMay cause cancerOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabel: Precautionary StatementsMeasures that should be taken to protect against hazardous exposures, or improper storage or handling of a chemical.Examples:Wear safety gogglesWear neoprene glovesWash with soap and waterStore in a well ventilated placeWear respiratory protectionOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabel: IdentificationManufacturer & Product identificationAll six required label elements on new GHS compliant label. OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabels: PictogramsThere are 9 pictograms. Health Hazards Physical HazardsEnvironmental HazardsOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryLabeling - PictogramsFlame Over CircleFlameFlameExploding BombOxidizersFlammables Self-reactives Pyrophoric Self-heating Emits flammable gas Organic peroxides Explosives Self-reactive Organic peroxidesLabeling - PictogramsSkull and CrossbonesCorrosionGas CylinderAcute toxicity (severe)Skin corrosion; burnsEye damageCorrosive to metalsGases under pressureLabeling - PictogramsHealth HazardExclamation MarkEnvironmentalCarcinogen Respiratory Sensitizer Reproductive Toxicity Target organ toxicity Mutagenicity Aspiration toxicityIrritant Dermal sensitizer Acute toxicity (harmful) Narcotic effects Respiratory tract irritation Environmental toxicitySample Primary LabelItems in blue required GHS elements. Sample Primary LabelOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryUnacceptable Secondary LabelingOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryAcceptable Secondary Labeling Procedures. Minimize use of secondary containers, use primary.Secondary label must effectively relay same information as primary. Best practice is to duplicate labels for products you often move into secondary containers. (one method is quicklable.com)No label required if kept in full control of roofer and used in same shift.www.quicklabel.comOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety Data Sheets (SDS)Previously known as Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)GHS new term is SDS. Prior MSDSs had very little standardized format which led to confusion. All SDSs will have a consistent 16 section format with consistent terminology OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety Data Sheets (SDS)You will receive specific training on the chemicals you work with through safety meetings, tool box talks, and on the job by your foreman. Safety Data Sheets are always available. Ask your foreman should you wish to review them. OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) SDSs contain all 16 Sections in specific order:Section 1 - Identification:Product IDManufacturer name, address, phone numberEmergency phoneRecommended useRestrictions on useSection 2 - Hazard identification:All hazardsRequired label elementsOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 3 - Composition:Chemical name, synonymsCAS numberPercentage of ingredientsTrade secret claimsSection 4 - First aid:Required treatment for each route of exposureAcute (immediate) symptoms, effectsImmediate, special treatmentsOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 5 - Fire fighting:Extinguishing techniquesExtinguishing equipmentHazardous combustion productsEquipment, precautions for firefighters Section 6 - Accidental release:Personal precautionsProtective equipmentEmergency proceduresContainment and cleanup methodsOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 7 - Handling, storage:Safe handlingSafe storageIncompatible materials Section 8 - Exposure control, Personal protection:Permissible exposure limits (PELs)Threshold limit values (TLVs), other exposure limitsEngineering controlsPersonal protective equipment (PPE)OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 9 - Physical, chemical properties:Chemical appearanceOdor, odor thresholdPhysical properties (pH, flash point, flammability limits, vapor pressure and density, auto-ignition temp., decomposition temp., viscosity, etc.)Section 10 - Stability, reactivityConditions to avoidIncompatible materialsHazardous decomposition productsOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 11 - Toxicological information:Routes of exposureImmediate, chronic effectsToxicity dataCarcinogenicity Section 12 - Ecological information (non-mandatory):Eco toxicityBiodegradabilityOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 13 - Disposal considerations (non-mandatory):Waste descriptionWaste handling, disposalSection 14 - Transport information (non-mandatory)DOT shipping name, hazard class, packing groupUN numberOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety data sheet (SDS) Section 15 - Regulatory information (non-mandatory):Product-specific safety, health, environmental regulations Section 16 - Other information:Date of SDSs preparation or last revisionOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryKey Terms & Definitions Flashpoint: The lowest temp. at which a liquid produces enough vapor to ignite.Flammable: Any substance easily ignited and quick burning including liquids with a flashpoint under 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Toxic: Any substance (alone or via chemical reaction) able to cause harm/injury to the body through absorption, ingestion, inhalation, or injection. Caustic/Corrosive: Any substance able to burn, damage, corrode organic tissue by chemical reaction. PEL: (Permissible Exposure Limit) OSHA standard recognized as the maximum amount or concentration of chemical a worker may be exposed to over an 8-hour work day. OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryPhysical Hazard vs. Health HazardChemicals can be:Physical hazards are exhibited by certain chemicals because of their physical properties (e.g., flammability, reactivity, etc.)Health hazard - Occurs when a chemical produces an acute or chronic health effect on exposed employees.OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryAcute vs. Chronic Health EffectsAcute:Occurs quicklyUsually occur after exposure to high concentrationsExamples: Fiberglass can cause immediate itchiness, extremely loud noises can cause hearing damage, high concentrations of Carbon Monoxide (CO) can lead to death. ChronicDevelop slowlyEffects arent seen until later in lifeMay not see, feel, or smell the dangerExamples include asbestosis, silicosis, mesothelioma, lung cancer from cigarette smoke, chronic hearing lossOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySafety Data Sheet ReviewReview Gasoline SDS HandoutOverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummarySummaryIt is your right to know. The HAZCOM Program and SDSs are available for you at anytime. All secondary containers MUST be labeled and relay all pertinent information listed on primary label. New SDSs and Labels will be filtering into the workplace over the next two years. There are 9 new pictograms that will help us recognized hazards related to chemicals. If you ever have any questions, ASK!OverviewWhat is Global Harmonized System (GHS)Written ProgramContainer LabelingSignal WordsHazard StatementPrecautionary StatementIdentificationsPictogramsSample LabelSecondary LabelingSafety Data Sheets16 ElementsKey Terms & definitionsSummaryQuestions?NOTES: While many employees may already be trained in HAZCOM, this presentation assumes that some may have not. As a result this presentation provides a basic breakdown of the HAZCOM standard, what employees are required to know, as well as details regarding the recent changes. As with any generic HAZCOM training program, we cannot possibly cover training specific to every work place. It is YOUR requirement as an employer to train employees on:- Hazards and safe work practices for chemicals being worked on- Location and availability of Written HAZCOM Program- Location and availability of Safety Data Sheets (SDS)- Specific labeling system to be used for secondary containers___________________________________________________________________Welcome to our Presentation on OSHA HAZCOM 2012. OSHA updated its regulations on HAZCOM and you will see many changes in coming years. Today we will train you on the HAZCOM standard and what you will see as a result of these changes. If this is your first time attending a HAZCOM training session, this training will provide you with all you need to know about the Hazard Communication standard.*We have clear and defined goals for this course. Pictured here are those goals. (REVIEW)In the end we want you to have a clear picture of all covered. If you have any questions please ask at anytime. *In construction chemicals are all around us. You will be exposed to them through the operations you will perform as a roofer, or by other contractors. As they are so prevalent, it is important that you know how to work with them safely. *Many of the chemicals you will work with are no different or no more hazardous than those you may work with around the house. However at work you may be exposed to chemicals more frequently, for longer periods, and to higher concentrations. *The Hazard Communication standard is your Right to Know. Prior to HAZCOM there was little requirements for manufacturers to provide testing and information on the chemicals they distributed. As such there was little education to the employer or the employees. This standard mandates that the end users of the product have knowledge regarding these chemicals and how to work with them safely. *- There are four major components to the HAZCOM standard. (REVIEW SLIDE)*In 2012 OSHA adopted the Global Harmonized System into its HAZCOM regulation. There has been much speculation regarding what this system is, but most of the changes it brings will effect manufacturers. There will be major changes to the way chemicals are classified and how they are labeled and communicated. You need to be made aware of the changes in how they communicate hazards so that you can understand what the manufacturer is relaying. *Our economy is now Global, and as such chemicals are manufactured, transported, and sold around the world more than ever before. There has always been significant difficulty in this as laws involving communicating chemical hazards has varied from country to country. The Global Harmonized System is meant to address that. Chemicals are now classified, labeled and communicated consistently across all countries in the world that incorporate GHS. For you the worker, this means better consistency and less confusion in the labels and communications you will see. *There are four key dates for GHS implementation. Today we are covering the training session which will educate you employees on the changes you will see in coming years. These changes will be gradual as manufacturers are changing processes to comply and that will take some time. By December 2015 however, all chemicals purchased will have all new elements in place. By June of 2016, any chemicals we have remaining in the companies possession is required to comply with the new requirements.So in short we are training you today for something you will see implemented in coming months and years. As these changes take place its important you understand the information being relayed. *One of the key elements of the HAZCOM standard is a written program. We at (company name) have a written program in place. Our program has all the elements listed here (REVIEW SLIDE). *Another key component of the HAZCOM Standard is container labeling. Container labels are arguably the most important line of communication with the end user. Prior to using a chemical most people will review the label for information. In coming years there will be many changes to container labels. While the labels may not look identical they are all now required to have six key components. One of those components is a pictogram. You see one pictured here. Guess what it means? (Health Hazard). As we review these pictograms in a bit you will see that they are pretty easy to understand and by their use you can quickly get some important information about the chemical with a simple glance. *When we discuss container labels there are two types of containers and labels. Primary and secondary. Secondary containers can be very dangerous as often the labeling is not transferred. Recent examples include roofers drinking from a gatorade bottle which someone put splice wash in. (REVIEW SLIDE)While secondary containers have always been required to be labeled they will soon be required to be labeled in a manner that relays all the required information of the new GHS primary label. Best practice is to replicate the primary label to put onto the secondary container. This will ensure all the information is properly relayed. *As mentioned there are six primary labeling elements that GHS mandates. These are internationally recognized and even consistent with the Department of Transportation placarding. We will review each. *- The first element is a simple signal word. (REVIEW SLIDE)*- Hazard statements give a little more information about the particular chemical. *Precautionary statements tells us basic information on how to work safely with the chemical. *There are two identification requirements. One being the Manufacturers identification and the second being the product name. Common sense requirements. Pictures here is a sample label with all six elements. The sixth, as you see here, is the pictograms which we review now. *Pictograms provide us a quick explanation of the chemical from a distance. A quick glance at the pictogram can tell us very important information.*Review pictograms with class. For reference here is some explanation of the chemical terminology listed:Oxidizers: Provides oxygen to a substance which can support and enrich fire and combustion. Keep away from flame. Flammables: Chemicals with a flash point under 100 degrees fahrenheit. This means at ambient temperatures they will let off enough vapor to support flame. Pyrophoric: Can ignite spontaneously upon exposure to air. Self-Heating: Similar to pyrophorics but typically require larger quantities or more time to heat and self-ignite. Emit Flammable Gas: Chemicals that when exposed to water or water vapor can emit flammable gas. Organic Peroxides: Accelerate combustion and fire. Fertilizers as an example. Self-Reactive: Highly explosive chemicals (acetylene)*Acute toxicity: Can have adverse effects in a short period of time (usually 24 hours)*Carcinogen: Cancer causing agentRespiratory Sensitizer: Can cause breathing difficulties with minimal exposureReproductive Toxicity: Can have adverse effects to sexual function and fertility as well as to offspringMutagenicity: Capable of inducing mutationAspiration Toxicity: Severe acute affects such as chemical pneumonia Dermal Sensitizer: Can cause rash*Here is another sample label. Important thing to know that although the container labels may not look exactly the same they all have at least the same six required elements. *Pictured here are unacceptable methods of secondary container labeling. Gasoline cans commonly known to have gas, diesel, or oil/fuel mixture often do not have any labeling. We cannot assume others know whats inside and their hazards. *To stay compliant and reduce hazards we want to minimize the use of secondary containers. When we must use secondary containers we need to ensure that the labeling we place on them effectively communicates all the required labeling elements. In most cases its easier and a best practice to duplicate all the information onto the secondary label.For common items such as gasoline we can have pre-printed sticker labels. We can have specific labels made up.There is an exemption to secondary container labeling. If you, as an example, take a secondary container of splice wash to use on the roof and keep it in your possession the entire shift, utilize it all or return any excess into the primary container, it then does not require a label. HOWEVER we NEVER want to see a drinking receptacle such as a gatorade or water bottle used as a secondary container for chemicals. *What used to be known as material safety data sheets, under the new GHS are now referred to simply as safety data sheets. Prior MSDS were inconsistent and relayed information in many different formats. New SDSs will have a consistent 16 sections. *Today we will discuss briefly what a SDS is and review one. We will review specific SDSs for chemicals you work with during tool box talks and your foreman will provide you specific training in the field based upon these SDSs. Should you ever have any questions or wish to see the SDSs they are available for you to review. Just ask. *The next few slides will briefly show you the 16 sections. SECTION 1: Product name, manufacture and contact information. SECTION 2: List of all hazards and labeling elements. *SECTION 3: Chemical name and ingredients. SECTION 4: First aid measures*SECTION 5: How to extinguisher in event of a fireSECTION 6: Clean up measures in event of release*SECTION 7: Safe storage, materials it may be incompatible withSECTION 8: Required PPE and exposure levels. This is one of the more important sections that we use frequently. *SECTION 9: Physical properties of the chemical such as its flashpoint.SECTION 10: Conditions to avoid*SECTION 11: Routes of exposure, how the chemical can get into the bodySECTION 12: Non-mandatory items related to the environmental hazards*SECTION 13: Non-mandatory item related to safe disposalSECTION 14: DOT shipping information, non-mandatory on the SDS*SECTION 15: Regulations which may be applicable, non-mandatorySECTION 16: Any other information the manufacturer wishes to relay *When reading a SDS there are some terms which you may not be aware of that are of importance. Here are a few you should know: (REVIEW SLIDE)*Some chemicals have both physical and health hazards. A physical hazard is a chemical which for example is explosive and the explosion itself is a physical event which could cause injury or death. A health hazard is a chemical which can enter the body and effect you with an acute or chronic illness rather than by a physical event. *There are four ways which chemicals can enter the body:Inhalation: you can breathe the chemical in through the nose, mouth, and lungsThe chemical can be absorbed through the skinThe chemical can be ingested through the mouth, drinkingThe chemical can be injected. In roofing this sometimes occurs with a spray gun injecting paint into the body. *Its important to know that chemicals do not always effect us immediately. Just because you feel know effects from a chemical does not mean it is not harming you. Products such as asbestos can take as long as 30 years to do enough damage to be realized.- (REVIEW SLIDE)*Review the provided gasoline SDS. Purpose is for the class to familiarize themselves with it. *- Summarize the class by reading the bullet points above. **

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