parent education program for dyslexic children

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  • Houston Independent School DistrictCreating a College-Bound Culture PARENT EDUCATION ON DYSLEXIA HELPING OUR PARENTS HELP OUR STUDENTS

    Dyslexia Program Support ServicesOffice of Special Populations

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDRead:

    Houston Independent School District: Creating a College-Bound Culture

    PARENT EDUCATION ON DYSLEXIA Helping Our Parents Help Our Studentsby keeping our parents informed so they can work with us in making good decisions for their child and set them on the road to academic success.

  • PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMEffective August 8, 2006, Chapter 19 TAC 74.28 is revised to indicate that school districts and charter schools shall provide a parent education program for the parents/guardians of students with dyslexia and related disorders.

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDThe Texas Administrative Code includes the laws governing the regulation and administration of public schools.

    Chapter 19 of the Texas Administrative Code (TAC) 74.28 address dyslexia and parent education.

    Read slide

    The word may was amended to SHALL effective August 2006.

  • The Parent Education Program should include:Characteristics of dyslexia and related disordersInformation on assessment and diagnosis of dyslexiaInformation on effective strategies for teaching dyslexic students; andAwareness of information on modification and especially modifications allowed on standardized testing.

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDRead slide and provide examples of:

    Characteristics of dyslexia

    Information on referral, assessment and diagnosis

    Talk briefly about possible strategies

    Briefly mention the bundled accommodations on TAKS, etc. and other allowable accommodations

  • PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMIn addition:The purpose of the Districts Parent Education Program is to inform parents of the services and options available to students under Section 504This program can utilize a variety of methods in sharing information with parents

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDParaphrase slide.

  • PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMThe parent education program may include any of the following:HISD Parents Guide to Dyslexia Brochure (English/Spanish) PTO/PTA MeetingsBreakout sessions on Parent NightParent videos/books, live-trainingParent Communication-documentation of contactSchool/District websites with links to parent resourcesTitle I Parent meetings-agenda/sign-in sheets documentationParent Conferences with documentation

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDPresentations and discussions can be held on the major areas required by TAC 74.28:

    Characteristics of dyslexia and related disordersInformation on assessment and diagnosis of dyslexiaInformation on effective strategies for teaching dyslexic students; andAwareness of information on modification and especially modifications allowed on standardized testing.

    In the regions, separate elementary and secondary parent meetings may be beneficial because each will a somewhat different focus.

  • PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAMThe parent education program may include any of the following:School/District websites with links to parent resourcesNewsletters (school/regional/departmental)International Dyslexia Association BrochuresPowerPoint onlineDyslexia Day, i.e., 8-10 am invite parents Include in School/Region/Department Vendor Fairs and Expos HealthHandbooks (student/parent/district)

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDContinuing.There are a variety of ways to inform parents about the services and options available: read slide.

  • TAKS Bundled AccommodationsExample of some information to share:

    School districts are allowed to use additional accommodations to administer the TAKS reading tests to students in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 who are identified as having dyslexia. These bundled accommodations are designed for students who have been identified as having dyslexia and who routinely use accommodations in the classroom. These accommodations can be used to administer both the English- and Spanish-version reading tests, including all three Student Success Initiative (SSI) administrations at grades 3 and 5.

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDBeginning in spring 2006read slide.

  • TAKS Bundled AccommodationsThe following students are eligible for the bundled accommodations: Dyslexia students identified under Section 504Dyslexia students identified under IDEA/Special Education Other Special Education students Students who are identified as having dyslexia but are not in a program.

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDRead Slide.

  • TAKS Bundled AccommodationsStudents who qualify and are recommended by the campus Section 504 or Special Education ARD Committee to receive these accommodations during TAKS must receive them as a bundled package; that is, the test administrator must administer the reading test using all three of the following accommodations:orally reading all proper nouns associated with the each passage before students begin reading that passage,orally reading all questions and answer choices to students, andextending the testing time over a two-day period

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISD

  • TAKS Bundled AccommodationsAdditionally, students who are identified as having dyslexia and are routinely receiving some classroom accommodations but are not in a program may be recommended for the bundled accommodations by the campus 504 or Sp Ed ARD committee. Documentation of these accommodations is required. Students who qualify to receive these bundled accommodations may be tested individually or in small groups

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISDStudents must be identified as having dyslexia and routinely receiving accommodations in the classroom to be eligible to receive the TAKS Bundled Accommodations.

  • PARENT EDUCATION PROGRAM

    Dyslexia Program Services Office of Special Populations Houston ISD

    56.pdf

    DYSLEXIA PROGRAMSUPPORT SERVICES

    Noelia Garza,Assistant Superintendent

    Special Populations

    A. Nell Williams, Coordinator Dyslexia Program Support Services

    HOUSTON INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICTHattie Mae White Educational Support Center

    4400 West 18th Street, Houston, Texas 77092-8501

    BOARD OF EDUCATIONDiana Dvila, President

    Manuel Rodrguez, Jr., First Vice President

    Harvin C. Moore, Second Vice President

    Arthur M. Gaines, Jr., Secretary

    Greg Meyers, Assistant Secretary

    Kevin H. Hoffman

    Dianne Johnson

    Natasha M. Kamrani

    Lawrence Marshall

    Abelardo Saavedra, Ph.D., Superintendent of Schools

    Karen Soehnge, Ph.D., Chief Academic OfficerOffice of Academic Services

    REGIONAL SUPERINTENDENTSCynthia Wilson, NorthThelma Garza, East

    Warner D. Ervin, SouthScott Van Beck, West

    Adriana Tmez, Central

    Deborah Singleton, Alternative and Charter Schools Manager

    DYSLEXIA PROGRAMSUPPORT SERVICES

    SPECIAL POPULATIONS

    Dyslexia means a disorder of constitutional origin manifested bya difficulty in learning to read,write, or spell, despite conventional instruction, adequate intelligence, and sociocultural opportunity.

    Texas Education Code 38.003 (d)

    CHARACTERISTICS OF DYSLEXIA AND RELATED DISORDERS1. Difficulty with the development of phonologi-

    cal awareness and phonological processingskills (processing the sounds of speech),including segmenting or breaking spokenwords into individual sounds.

    2. Difficulty decoding nonsense or unfamiliar words accurately.

    3. Difficulty reading single words in isolation.

    4. Inaccurate and labored oral reading.

    5. Lack of reading fluency.

    6. Variable degrees of difficulty with reading comprehension.

    7. Difficulty learning the names of letters andtheir associated sounds.

    8. Difficulty with learning to spell.

    9. Difficulty in word-finding and rapid naming.

    10. Difficulty with aspects of written composition.

    11 Difficulty with learning and reproducing thealphabet in correct sequence (in either oralor written form).

    12. Family history of similar problems.

    WAYS TO HELP YOUR CHILD If a child misreads letters in words, have him or

    her name the letters aloud. Use a place marker when reading. Find someone to read textbooks to the child. Use audio-taped books. Highlight or underline important information in

    the textbook. After reading, recite or write a summary of the

    information. Before reading a textbook:

    Read the title and think