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Pattern Book of Upholstery is a rare book in the world of interior design as a comprehensive visual guide to a central aspect of furnishings. Encyclopaedic in scope, this book allows the designer to easily comprehend the historical and contemporary range of furniture options in upholstery and communicate with clients and the industry. In a professional design office Pattern Book of Upholstery will join the shelf of primary reference books - one of the fundamental tools of the trade.

TRANSCRIPT

  • Introduction by William S. Hooper

    Notes on Upholstery

    An Upholsterer's perspective by Jody Xuereb

    Guide to Using this Book

    sofAsPlates 181

    chAIrsPlates 82145

    DINING chAIrs Plates 146161

    MIscellANeoUsChaise Longue, Daybed, Roundabout, Tte--Tte, Benches and OttomansPlates 162193

    Appendices

    1. upholstery Details2. Fabric Considerations and Standard Fabric Yardages3. Measurements For upholstered Furniture4. Considerations That Come First5. upholstery Construction by Jody Xuereb

    A selected list of Upholstery fabrics

    Glossary

    Index

    selected references for custom Upholstery

    coNTeNTS

    I

    II

    III

    Iv

    9

    10

    19

    22

    31

    115

    181

    199

    235

    262

    264

    269

    270

  • Introduction by William S. Hooper

    Notes on Upholstery

    An Upholsterer's perspective by Jody Xuereb

    Guide to Using this Book

    sofAsPlates 181

    chAIrsPlates 82145

    DINING chAIrs Plates 146161

    MIscellANeoUsChaise Longue, Daybed, Roundabout, Tte--Tte, Benches and OttomansPlates 162193

    Appendices

    1. upholstery Details2. Fabric Considerations and Standard Fabric Yardages3. Measurements For upholstered Furniture4. Considerations That Come First5. upholstery Construction by Jody Xuereb

    A selected list of Upholstery fabrics

    Glossary

    Index

    selected references for custom Upholstery

    coNTeNTS

    I

    II

    III

    Iv

    9

    10

    19

    22

    31

    115

    181

    199

    235

    262

    264

    269

    270

  • 2322 u P H O L ST ERY

    Here are some commonly known models:

    Bank of england chairAn English style curved-back chair designed by Sir John Soane as part of his work on the Bank of England in the early 19th century. The arms have a distinctive form and curve continuously around the back. The chair was originally wood with a leather seat, but now may have a fully upholstered body with exposed frame and legs (plate 134).

    Billy Baldwin slipper chairA short and square armless chair named after the American decorator Billy Baldwin (1903-1983), who designed it. it is distinctive for the cut-out notch inside the back into which the loose seat cushion slips (plate 139).

    BreckMost often a sofa, the Breck is defined by its distinctive scroll arm that slopes down from the top of the back to the front, and has a slight wing. it is a very deep model ideal for tall clients or large spaces (plates 33 and 34).

    BridgewaterA very popular sofa or chair style. The distinguishing feature is the arm, which is called a Bridgewater or English arm. it is a variation of a roll arm, in which the front of the arm curves and wraps around to the outside (the fabric is pulled over). There is an English edge that runs the length of the arm on the outside. The arm also has a distinctive dip in the middle. Typically the piece has a tight scroll back. it also has a distinctive scoop on the side rail. Perhaps named after the town of Bridgewater in England (plates 39, 40, 96, and 97).

    Buatta chairA small-scale lounge chair with a distinctive horizontal split back and scroll arms. Designed by the American decorator Mario Buatta in 1968 for his own apartment (plate 111).

    carr sofaA sofa with a fat scroll arm that is approximately 12 to 13 inches wide. The back has a slight curve with lower corners (plate 35).

    chanel sofaA popular model copied from the original sofa Coco Chanel had in her apart-ment above her boutique on Rue Cambon in Paris. The sofa was distinctive for its brown suede, length (approximately 9 feet long), depth (approximately 45 inches), and projecting paneled arm with nailhead trim. The distinctive arm defines it as a Chanel, while the size can vary (plate 36).

    chesterfieldAn historic sofa still produced today. The back and arms are at the same height. The interior and exterior corners where they meet are rounded, creating a con-tinuous flow. The back and arms are quite thick, always rounded, and often tufted (plate 69).

    Davenport sofaA curved sofa with the back and arms as a continuous piece in three parts. The back and arms are tight and fitted. The back is shaped. The model was designed by Natalie Davenport, who worked for the American decorating firm McMillen (plate 14). Not to be confused with the term davenport, which is synonymous with sofa in some American regions, or the English writing desk.

    GuiDe To uSiNG ThiS Book

    Terms are often interchangeable. We mention a few here to highlight specific examples that are included in the book.

    Often, a term or name is specific to one countryfor example, the same model is described as a Gainsborough chair in Britain, while in America it is called a Martha Washington or lolling chair.

    Or, current usage may ignore the words original meaning. Couch was historical-ly used to describe a daybed that resembled a chaise longue more than a narrow bed. it is often assumed that couch came from the French word coucher mean-ing to lie down. A sofa is a more fully upholstered piece than a settee, which is usually seen as a historic model with an exposed frame (the seat and back can be upholstered). The settee developed from the settle, an earlier furniture piece that was essentially a bench with arms and a back.

    While sofa and couch are used interchangeably, the two have different social connotations. A couch is perceived as suburban or middle class, while sofa is a term used by those in the know who are involved in the world of high-end design. As someone once said, the difference between a sofa and a couch is $20,000.

    Other terms denote true differences in form or function. For example, while bench and ottoman are sometimes used interchangeably there are some ba-sic differences. A bench is long and narrow, usually without a back, never round, never skirted, nor fully upholstered, and is usually between 36 and 72 inches. An ottoman is round, square or other shape, usually fully upholstered, and commonly skirted, and is as tall as a bench (18 to 20 inches). There is also the footstool which is lower (about 12 inches) than both the ottoman and the bench and is usually only 18 to 20 inches in width.

    Then there is the practice of naming models. Often upholsterers, trade-only show-rooms, and retail shops attach names to certain styles. The name might reflect a decorative detail (like biscuit-tufted dining chair) or is chosen because of an enticing connotation to encourage sales (like Oasis sofa).

    Significantly, there are certain models of sofas and chairs that upholsterers and decorators refer to using the same proper name. These models were often named after the original commission or the decorator who created the original model (the origin in most cases is lost or not widely known). usually, these pieces proved to be popular with the upholsterers other clients, so the model stayed on the showroom floor and became a named model. Each workroom has its own varia-tions, but the overall forms are similar.

    it is always recommended that a decorator present a photograph or a detailed drawing of the desired piece to the upholsterer before work beginsan image that has been approved by the client. This ensures that all agree.

  • 2322 u P H O L ST ERY

    Here are some commonly known models:

    Bank of england chairAn English style curved-back chair designed by Sir John Soane as part of his work on the Bank of England in the early 19th century. The arms have a distinctive form and curve continuously around the back. The chair was originally wood with a leather seat, but now may have a fully upholstered body with exposed frame and legs (plate 134).

    Billy Baldwin slipper chairA short and square armless chair named after the American decorator Billy Baldwin (1903-1983), who designed it. it is distinctive for the cut-out notch inside the back into which the loose seat cushion slips (plate 139).

    BreckMost often a sofa, the Breck is defined by its distinctive scroll arm that slopes down from the top of the back to the front, and has a slight wing. it is a very deep model ideal for tall clients or large spaces (plates 33 and 34).

    BridgewaterA very popular sofa or chair style. The distinguishing feature is the arm, which is called a Bridgewater or English arm. it is a variation of a roll arm, in which the front of the arm curves and wraps around to the outside (the fabric is pulled over). There is an English edge that runs the length of the arm on the outside. The arm also has a distinctive dip in the middle. Typically the piece has a tight scroll back. it also has a distinctive scoop on the side rail. Perhaps named after the town of Bridgewater in England (plates 39, 40, 96, and 97).

    Buatta chairA small-scale lounge chair with a distinctive horizontal split back and scroll arms. Designed by the American decorator Mario Buatta in 1968 for his own apartment (plate 111).

    carr sofaA sofa with a fat scroll arm that is approximately 12 to 13 inches wide. The back has a slight curve with lower corners (plate 35).

    chanel sofaA popular model copied from the original sofa Coco Chanel had in her apart-ment above her boutique on Rue Cambon in Paris. The sofa was distinctive for its brown suede, length (approximately 9 feet long), depth (approximately 45 inches), and projecting paneled arm with nailhead trim. The distinctive arm defines it as a Chanel, while the size can vary (plate 36).

    chesterfieldAn historic sofa still produced today. The back and arms are at the same height. The interior and exterior corners where they meet are rounded, creating a con-tinuous flow. The back and arms are quite thick, always rounded, and often tufted (plate 69).

    Davenport sofaA curved sofa with the back and