pedagogical content knowledge of preservice

Download PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE OF PRESERVICE

Post on 12-Feb-2017

215 views

Category:

Documents

2 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE OF PRESERVICE SECONDARY

    MATHEMATICS TEACHERS

    by

    HULYA KILIC

    (Under the Direction of Denise S. Mewborn)

    ABSTRACT

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how a methods course and its associated

    field experience supported the development of pedagogical content knowledge for preservice

    secondary mathematics teachers. I also investigated what course topics contributed to that

    development from the preservice teachers perspective. The data were collected in the form of

    interviews, observations, questionnaire and class artifacts and were analyzed according to the

    pedagogical content knowledge framework developed for this study. Six preservice teachers

    participated in the study, and each was interviewed three times during the semester. All

    documents produced by the preservice teachers or distributed in the course were collected to gain

    a better understanding of the nature of the course topics and preservice teachers experiences

    with them.

    I defined pedagogical content knowledge as having four components: knowledge of

    subject-matter, knowledge of pedagogy, knowledge of learners, and knowledge of curriculum.

    Knowledge of subject-matter refers to knowing mathematical concepts, facts, and procedures

    and the relationships among them. Knowledge of pedagogy encompasses knowledge of planning

    a lesson and teaching strategies. Knowledge of learners entails knowledge of students common

  • difficulties, errors, and misconceptions. Finally, knowledge of curriculum includes knowledge of

    learning goals for different grade levels and instructional materials such as technology,

    manipulatives, and textbooks.

    The preservice teachers knowledge of subject-matter was influential on the other

    components of their pedagogical content knowledge. The preservice teachers ability to make

    appropriate connections among mathematical concepts, to generate different solutions and

    representations for problems, to address students difficulties and misconceptions effectively,

    and to choose appropriate examples to teach a particular topic were largely based on the depth of

    their subject-matter knowledge. However, the field experiences contributed to their repertoire of

    examples of students difficulties and misconceptions as well as instructional strategies and

    materials. Although the preservice teachers thought that course topics contributed to their

    pedagogical content knowledge, they were weak in applying their knowledge when they were

    asked to design a hypothetical lesson or help a hypothetical student who was struggling to

    understand particular mathematical concepts. The findings of this study imply that teacher

    education programs need to offer content courses that provide preservice teachers with

    opportunities to review fundamental topics taught in secondary school mathematics classes.

    INDEX WORDS: pedagogical content knowledge, preservice teachers, secondary,

    mathematics, methods course, field experiences

  • PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE OF PRESERVICE SECONDARY

    MATHEMATICS TEACHERS

    by

    HULYA KILIC

    B.S., Bogazici University, Turkey, 2001

    M.S., Bogazici University, Turkey, 2005

    A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of The University of Georgia in Partial

    Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree

    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    ATHENS, GEORGIA

    2009

  • 2009

    Hulya Kilic

    All Rights Reserved

  • PEDAGOGICAL CONTENT KNOWLEDGE OF PRESERVICE SECONDARY

    MATHEMATICS TEACHERS

    by

    HULYA KILIC

    Major Professor: Denise S. Mewborn

    Committee: Sybilla Beckmann-Kazez Jeremy Kilpatrick

    Electronic Version Approved: Maureen Grasso Dean of the Graduate School The University of Georgia August 2009

  • iv

    DEDICATION

    I dedicate this work to my family for their endless love and support.

  • v

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    I would like to express my gratitude to the Mathematics and Science Education

    Department Faculty for giving me the opportunity to pursue my PhD degree in such a prestigious

    doctoral program. It was an honor to meet the many outstanding professors that inspired me by

    their wisdom and experience. They helped me to become aware of different issues related to

    mathematics education and enlarge my vision as a prospective researcher in the field.

    I would like to give my sincere thanks to my major professor, Dr. Denise Mewborn, for

    her suggestions, encouragement, and support throughout my graduate work. I want to express

    special thanks for allowing me to be a member of Elementary Mathematics Assessment Project

    (EMAP) team and deepening my knowledge of educational research.

    I would like to thank to my committee members, Dr. Sybilla Beckmann-Kazez and Dr.

    Jeremy Kilpatrick for their encouragement and valuable comments to make this work better. I

    want to give my special thanks to Dr. Beckmann for giving me the opportunity to teach

    mathematics content courses for elementary teachers. I appreciated her endless support and

    guidance when teaching those courses. Unquestionably, Dr. Kilpatrick helped me realize that

    analytical and critical thinking is essential to be good researcher and practitioner. I only wish that

    I had more time to learn from his experience and knowledge.

    I also would like to thank the preservice teachers that agreed to participate in my study

    and devote their time and efforts. I give my sincere thanks to the instructors who allowed me to

    observe their classes and helped me to collect my data for this study.

  • vi

    Finally, I would like to thank to my family and friends in Turkey for their encouragement

    and support. I am happy to have made new friends in Georgia and I thank to them for their

    kindness.

  • vii

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Page

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.............................................................................................................v

    LIST OF TABLES......................................................................................................................... ix

    LIST OF FIGURES .........................................................................................................................x

    CHAPTER

    1 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................1

    Background ...............................................................................................................4

    Research Questions ...................................................................................................7

    2 LITERATURE REVIEW AND THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK ...........................10

    Pedagogical Content Knowledge ............................................................................10

    Teacher Education...................................................................................................23

    Theoretical Perspective ...........................................................................................28

    3 METHODOLOGY ......................................................................................................32

    Participant Selection................................................................................................33

    Data Collection........................................................................................................37

    Data Analysis ..........................................................................................................40

    4 DATA ANALYSIS......................................................................................................44

    Participants ..............................................................................................................45

    Knowledge of Pedagogy .........................................................................................53

    Knowledge of Learners ...........................................................................................76

  • viii

    Knowledge of Curriculum.......................................................................................86

    Knowledge of Subject-Matter .................................................................................98

    5 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................115

    Conclusions ...........................................................................................................119

    Limitations of the Study ........................................................................................123

    Implications ...........................................................................................................124

    Suggestions for Further Studies ............................................................................128

    Concluding Remark...............................................................................................129

    REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................130

    APPENDICES .............................................................................................................................137

    A Questionnaire ................................................................................

Recommended

View more >