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Issue 80 of Photo Professional Magazine

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  • guide to studio accessories

    how to turn every enquiry into a sale

    wacom intuos5 tablet on test

    guide to studio

    why capturing expressions is a wedding gold mine

    why one head is better than two Location lighting made surprisingly easy

    issue 80 4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

    Follower of fashionEnjoy the outrageous Photoshop-fuelled world of John Farrar

    Follower pro portfolio

    Unmissable tips for getting your images in printUnmissable tips for getting

    How to get publisHed

    the perfect back-up camera?Low price, high spec Nikon D7100 tested

    expert advice to help you print and sell your finest work expert advice to help you print and sell your finest work FiNe ARtFiNe ARt ARt ARMAKe MoRe MoNeY FRoM

    the perfect back-up camera?Low price, high spec Nikon D7100 tested

    brilliant sennheiser accessories worth 500!win

  • 004 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    CONTENTSISSUE 80

    Business MattersPro Academy Gear

    Regulars

    032 SElliNg SmilES Forced smiles and clichd poses dont sell photos. Genuine emotions and real expressions do, so master the art of capturing them to guarantee good sales.

    038 TravElliNg lighT COVER Damien Lovegrove explains how he packs all his kit into hand luggage and demonstrates his one-head approach to lighting fashion portraits on location.

    044 fiNE arT fiNESSE Youre making the move into selling your images to collectors, but are your prints making the right impression? Choose the best media for your images and youll soon be producing prints with impact.

    082 NikON d7100 COVER If you think this latest launch sounds like a minor upgrade to the companys D7000, think again. Its actually Nikons flagship DX DSLR, but does it wow our reviewer?

    090 waCOm iNTuOS 5COVER If you eschew the modest mouse and take fine control of your editing with a pen and tablet, you might want to try this pro level but well-priced offering from Wacom.

    092 buyErS guidE COVER Studio accessories they can make or break a shoot, so make sure the ones you invest in add value.

    055 buSiNESS maTTErSHot tips and expert advice to help you position, market and run your business so it stays in the black.

    058 iTS a TEam gamE Dont fly solo. Collaborating with other professionals will improve your shoot and leave your portfolio bulging.

    064 SigNEd & SEalEd COVER Getting a prospective client to sign on the dotted line is key to making the sale. So how do you do it?

    068 makiNg iT pay COVER Theres probably no tougher market than fine art. Six photographers tell us how they turn a profit from it.

    006 iNbOX Light up your photography life with news of the latest product launches, winners (there are no losers) and competitions.

    016 pOrTfOliO: JOhN farrarCOVER Believing in the one killer shot, John Farrar strives for absolute perfection all the time. He hits that mark with every one of his striking beauty images.

    016

    SUBSCRIBE & SAVE 50% 13 ISSUES FOR JUST 29 - see p78 for our special offer

    Discover powerful but portable alternatives to a speedlight when on location

    038

    022 prOJECT: dOiNg TimE COVER Commercial photographer Adam Hinton doesnt often get nervous, but he does admit to an anxious moment when shooting in a gang-run El Salvadorian jail.

    022

  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 005

    Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge, CB22 3HJ.

    No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

    Cant find a copy? Finding your nearest Photo Professional magazine stockist couldnt be easier. Simply contact: COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QE Alternatively call 01895 433600.

    When you have finished with this magazine, please recycle it

    Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJ Telephone 01223 499450 enquiries@bright-publishing.com www.photopromagazine.comeditorialEditor Terry Hope 01959 563007 terryhope@bright-publishing.comTechnical Writer Ian Fyfe 01223 499456 ianfyfe@bright-publishing.comSub Editors Lisa Clatworthy 01223 499450 Hannah Bealey 01223 499450Editorial Director Roger Payne 01223 499460 rogerpayne@bright-publishing.comDesign Director Dean UsherDesign & Production Manager Grant GillardadvertisingSales Director Matt Snow 01223 499453 mattsnow@bright-publishing.comKey Accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.comMike Elliott 01223 499458 mikeelliott@bright-publishing.comBusiness Development Director Dave Stone 01223 499462 davestone@bright-publishing.comAll advertising copy to: pproads@bright-publishing.compublishingPublishing Directors Andy Brogden & Matt PluckHead of Circulation Chris Haslum

    068

    Cover image John Farrar

    SUBSCRIBE & SAVE 50% 13 ISSUES FOR JUST 29 - see p78 for our special offer

    082

  • PORTFOLIO | JOHN FARRAR

    016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80016 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 80

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the approach of others and made sure he did

    something completely different. The result is a highly original style of photography where

    nothing is quite what it seemsWORDS EMMA MESTON PICTURES JOHN FARRAR

    KeepQui

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the

    QuiJohn Farrar took a long hard look at the

    eepQui

    eeprky

    John Farrar took a long hard look at the

    kyJohn Farrar took a long hard look at the

    eepky

    eeprkyr it

  • PORTFOLIO | JOHN FARRAR

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 017

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  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 031

    038 travelling lightExpert advice from Damien Lovegrove on lighting location fashion with one head.

    pro academyProviding you with the essential skills, techniques and ideas you need to make it as a successful professional photographer

    EssEntial pro sEcrEts

    rEvEalEd

    032 selling smiles Top tips and helpful hints to capture the genuine happiness on the big day that

    will guarantee you good sales.

    044 prints with impactFind out what media is available and how to create fine art prints that sell.

  • pro academy

    ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    pro academy

    ISSUE 79 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    P O S I N G W E D D I N G S

    Genuine, happy expressions are what sell wedding pictures and yet its so easy to come away with results that look stiff and staged. Margaret

    Soraya reveals how she achieves a more natural approachWORDS & PICTURES MARGARET SORAYA

    eXpreSSIoNall IN the

    hen I look at any image, what makes it come alive for me is just one thing: expression. It appears that others agree, because most of the couples who book me to photograph their

    wedding say that the main reason they chose me is the natural and unposed feel of my work.

    Real expressions, eyes that light up with smiles, genuine moments between couples, funny moments with children

    these are the things that produce reactions within us. Have you noticed how when looking at some images, you find yourself smiling without thinking? Its simply a natural and emotional response. Heres a look at some of the ways I manage to achieve this style throughout my work.

    WMAIN IMAGE

    Reportage-style photography is becoming ever

    more popular and the key to this is staging

    your subjects in a natural manner.

    Candid style Laughter I never relax at a wedding. Often people come up and talk to me during the downtime at weddings, which is lovely, but one half of me is talking while the other half is constantly listening out for the sound of laughter. If you hear laughter, you usually have a great image just waiting to be shot. You have to be fast, find the laughter, lift the camera and shoot before the moment is gone. A longer lens is usually what you need for a scenario of this kind.

    Bridesmaids together before the wedding can be a source of laughter and fun, while speeches are another time to capture some fantastic and natural expressions.

    MomentsMoments happen at weddings everywhere, and usually discreetly. Ever known a bride and her dad to stop and pose for the camera whilst having a genuine and affectionate moment? You need to be aware of these things and to be prepared for when they might happen. Things to look out for include dad seeing his daughter ready to be married, line-ups, the groom seeing his bride for the first time and couples as theyre walking down the aisle, happy and relieved that theyre together.

    Children At weddings, I usually take the approach of playing with children, setting up games of hide and seek behind my camera, throwing balloons and asking them to twirl. Their natural smiles will appear and, with a bit of effort, so will some lovely images. Candid styles work well with children as well. Watch them, follow them and shoot a lot because children move fast!

    more INformatIoNwww.sorayaphoto.com

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  • ISSUE 80 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 055

    n my albeit fairly biased opinion, copyright law should be essential training for everyone involved in creative industries, not just