Photography 101 Focus. Depth of Field Shallow to Deep

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  • Photography 101Focus

  • Depth of FieldShallow

    to

    Deep

  • FocusAutomatic orManual???

  • Camera ShakeStance - TripodNight Photography requires long exposure slow shutter speed

  • Photographs that Changed the World

    "Any picture can speak 1,000 words, but only a select few say something poignant enough to galvanize an entire society. The following photographs screamed so loudly that the entire world stopped to take notice."

  • Ground Zero SpiritPhotographer: Thomas E. FranklinYear: 2001

  • The Afghan GirlPhotographer: Steve McCurry

  • Napalm Girl

  • Starving Boy and Missionary

  • Segregated Water FountainsPhotographer : Elliott Erwitt Year : 1950

  • Earthrise Photographer: William Anders, NASAYear: 1968The late adventure photographer Galen Rowell called it the most influential environmental photograph ever taken. Captured on Christmas Eve, 1968, near the end of one of the most tumultuous years the U.S. had ever known, the Earthrise photograph inspired contemplation of our fragile existence and our place in the cosmos.

  • Anne FrankPhotographer: unknownYear: 1941Six million Jews died in the Holocaust. For many throughout the world, one teenage girl gave them a story and a face. She was Anne Frank, the adolescent who, according to her diary, retained her hope and humanity as she hid with her family in an Amsterdam attic. In 1944 the Nazis, acting on a tip, arrested the Franks; Anne and her sister died only a month before their camp was liberated. The world came to know her through her words and through this ordinary portrait . She stares with big eyes, wearing an enigmatic expression, gazing at a future that the viewer knows will never come.

  • Migrant MotherDorothea Lange, 1936For many, Florence Owens Thompson is the face of the Great Depression. Taken while visiting a dusty California pea-pickers camp in February 1936, the photographer captured the resilience of a proud nation facing desperate times.

  • HindenburgMurray Becker, 1937

  • Einstein with his Tongue OutArthur Sasse, 1951

    While Einstein certainly changed history with his contributions to nuclear physics and quantum mechanics, this photo changed the way history looked at Einstein. By humanizing a man known chiefly for his brilliance, this image is the reason Einsteins name has become synonymous not only with "genius," but also with "wacky genius."While Einstein certainly changed history with his contributions to nuclear physics and quantum mechanics, this photo changed the way history looked at Einstein. By humanizing a man known chiefly for his brilliance, this image is the reason Einsteins name has become synonymous not only with "genius," but also with "wacky genius."

  • Hazel BryantIt was the fourth school year since segregation had been outlawed by the Supreme Court. Things were not going well, and some southerners accused the national press of distorting matters. This picture, however, gave irrefutable testimony, as Elizabeth Eckford strides through a gantlet of white students, including Hazel Bryant (mouth open the widest), on her way to Little Rocks Central High.

  • Tianammen SquarePhotographer: Stuart Franklin-MagnumYear: 1989

    A hunger strike by 3,000 students in Beijing had grown to a protest of more than a million as the injustices of a nation cried for reform. For seven weeks the people and the Peoples Republic, in the person of soldiers dispatched by a riven Communist Party, warily eyed each other as the world waited. When this young man simply would not move, standing with his meager bags before a line of tanks, a hero was born. A second hero emerged as the tank driver refused to crush the man, and instead drove his killing machine around him. Soon this dream would end, and blood would fill Tiananmen. But this picture had shown a billion Chinese that there is hope

  • Abbey Road1969 Ian MacMillan

  • I Have a DreamPhotographer: Bob AdelmanYear: 1963WASHINGTON, D.C.At the climax of his I Have A Dream speech, Martin Luther King Jr. raises his arm on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and calls out for deliverance with the electrifying words of an old Negro spiritual hymn, Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!, 1963.

  • Mandela Walks FreePhotographer:Year:

  • The Kiss at Times SquarePhotographer : Alfred Eisenstaedt Year : 1945