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  • Slide 1
  • POETRY AND US
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  • Poetry and versification What poetry is not and what poetry is. What poetry is not and what poetry is. What does versification study? What does versification study? Kinds of rhyme and rhyming patterns. Kinds of rhyme and rhyming patterns. Rhythm and meter; poetic units: syllable, foot, line and stanza Rhythm and meter; poetic units: syllable, foot, line and stanza Metrical patterns: iamb, trochee, anapest, dactyl; their modifications: spondee, pyrric foot Metrical patterns: iamb, trochee, anapest, dactyl; their modifications: spondee, pyrric foot Meters: dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, pentameter, octameter Meters: dimeter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentameter, hexameter, pentameter, octameter Stanza patterns: heroic couplet; ballad; ottava rima, Spenserian stanza; sonnet (Petrarchan and Shakespearean) Stanza patterns: heroic couplet; ballad; ottava rima, Spenserian stanza; sonnet (Petrarchan and Shakespearean) Modern and exotic forms of verse Modern and exotic forms of verse
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  • Daffodil - A plant of the genus Asphodelus or Narcissus (N. Pseudo-narcissus). It has a bulbous root and beautiful flowers, usually of a yellow hue.
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  • From the diary of Dorothy Wordworth, Thursday, April 15, 1802. When we were in the woods beyond Cowbarrow park we saw a few daffodils close to the water side, we fancied that the lake had floated the seeds ashore and that the little colony had so sprung up But as we went along there were more & and yet more & at last under the boughs of the trees, we saw that there was a When we were in the woods beyond Cowbarrow park we saw a few daffodils close to the water side, we fancied that the lake had floated the seeds ashore and that the little colony had so sprung up But as we went along there were more & and yet more & at last under the boughs of the trees, we saw that there was a longbelt of them along the shore, about the breadth of a country turnpike road. I never saw daffodils so beautiful they grew among the mossy stones about & about them, some rested their heads upon these stones as on a pillow for weariness & and the rest tossed & reeled & danced & seemed as if they verily laughed with the wind that blew upon them over the Lake, they looked so gay ever glancing ever changing long belt of them along the shore, about the breadth of a country turnpike road. I never saw daffodils so beautiful they grew among the mossy stones about & about them, some rested their heads upon these stones as on a pillow for weariness & and the rest tossed & reeled & danced & seemed as if they verily laughed with the wind that blew upon them over the Lake, they looked so gay ever glancing ever changing
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  • William Wordsworth I WANDERED lonely as a cloud I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: In such a jocund company: I gazed--and gazed--but little thought I gazed--and gazed--but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils. March 19, 1804 And dances with the daffodils. March 19, 1804
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  • What is poetry? What is Poetry? According to the Merriam Webster Dictionary it is: writing that formulates a concentrated imaginative awareness of experience in language chosen and arranged to create a specific emotional response through meaning, sound, and rhythm.
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  • DEAD POETS SOCIETY Understanding Poetry, by Dr. J. Evans Pritchard, Ph.D. To fully understand poetry, we must first be fluent with its meter, rhyme, and figures of speech. Then ask two questions: One, how artfully has the objective of the poem been rendered, and two, how important is that objective. Question one rates the poem's perfection, question two rates its importance. And once these questions have been answered, determining a poem's greatest becomes a relatively simple matter.
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  • Why? We don't read and write poetry because it's cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. Medicine, law, business, engineering, these are all noble pursuits, and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for. To quote from Whitman: "O me, o life of the questions of these recurring, of the endless trains of the faithless, of cities filled with the foolish. What good amid these, o me, o life? Answer: that you are here. That life exists, and identity. That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?
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  • VERSIFICATION Objectives of VERSIFICATION: to study kinds of rhymes and rhyming patterns to study kinds of rhymes and rhyming patterns to analyze stressed/unstressed syllables alteration to analyze stressed/unstressed syllables alteration to classify stanza patterns to classify stanza patterns to differentiate lines according to the number of syllables to differentiate lines according to the number of syllables to examine the presence /absence of pause at the end of the line [enjambment or run-on line and end-stopped line] to examine the presence /absence of pause at the end of the line [enjambment or run-on line and end-stopped line]
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  • Poetic Terms RHYTHM(Webster): regular recurrence of elements or features; periodicity of different types. RHYTHM(Webster): regular recurrence of elements or features; periodicity of different types. METER : any kind of periodicity in verse determined by the character (stressed/unstressed) and/or number of syllables in a line; systematically arrange and measured rhythm in verse; rhythm that continuously repeats a single basic pattern; fixed metrical pattern verse form METER : any kind of periodicity in verse determined by the character (stressed/unstressed) and/or number of syllables in a line; systematically arrange and measured rhythm in verse; rhythm that continuously repeats a single basic pattern; fixed metrical pattern verse form VERSE: a line of metrical writing VERSE: a line of metrical writing FOOT: unit used in poetry composed of syllables in some pattern of unaccented and accented syllables (UNITS OF POETRY : Syllable foot line stanza) FOOT: unit used in poetry composed of syllables in some pattern of unaccented and accented syllables (UNITS OF POETRY : Syllable foot line stanza)
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  • METRICAL PATTERNS Iamb - - a foot consisting of 2 syllables where the accent lies on the 2nd syllable Iamb - - a foot consisting of 2 syllables where the accent lies on the 2nd syllable Trochee - - a foot in which 1 accented syllable is followed by 1 unaccented foot Trochee - - a foot in which 1 accented syllable is followed by 1 unaccented foot Anapest - - 3 syllable foot made of 2 unstressed syllables followed by 1 stressed syllable Anapest - - 3 syllable foot made of 2 unstressed syllables followed by 1 stressed syllable Dactyl - - 3 syllable foot which is accented on the 1st syllable Dactyl - - 3 syllable foot which is accented on the 1st syllable
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  • Iamb An iamb is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. It consists of a short (unstressed) syllable followed by a long (stressed) one. An iamb is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. It consists of a short (unstressed) syllable followed by a long (stressed) one. metrical foot poetryshort (unstressed) syllablelong metrical foot poetryshort (unstressed) syllablelong The iambic pentameter is one of the most powerful measures in English poetry. The iambic pentameter is one of the most powerful measures in English poetry.iambic pentameterEnglishpoetryiambic pentameterEnglishpoetry To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. -- Alfred Tennyson To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. -- Alfred Tennyson Alfred Tennyson Alfred Tennyson
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  • Anapaest An anapaest is a metrical foot used in formal poetry that may be seen as a reversed dactyl. An anapaest is a metrical foot used in formal poetry that may be seen as a reversed dactyl.metrical footdactylmetrical footdactyl Because of its length and the fact that it ends with a stressed syllable and so allows for strong rhymes, anapaest can produce a

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