Prepare for an Interview

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<p>C4 Risk Management Group Ltd</p> <p>PREPARE FOR AN INTERVIEW As a WitnessUnit Standard 1294</p> <p>Prepare For a Formal Interview</p> <p>Introduction This study guide is designed to prepare you for assessment against NZQA Unit Standard 1294 Be Interviewed in a Formal Situation. This Unit Standard is a compulsory requirement of the National Certificate in Security Levels 2, 3 and 4. It is knowledge based module and can be achieved by completing this distance learning module or attending a class.</p> <p>Trainer/Assessor Your trainer and assessor will issue you this module and give you a time frame for it to be completed by. If you have any questions you can contact your assessor at any time. Once you have completed this module your assessor will discuss it with you to ensure your knowledge is sufficient to pass the assessment test.</p> <p>Recommended Study Technique 1. Browse or read through this workbook to get the general idea of what it is about. 2. Study the material and complete the assessments test at the end of the module. 3. Hand the completed assessment test to your assessor for marking. 4. The learning module can be kept by you for your records.</p> <p>2</p> <p>Preparing For an Interview As a WitnessIntroduction</p> <p>Being interviewed is part of everyday life. We get interviewed whenever we apply for a job, open a bank account, claim insurance, get a mortgage and at many other times during our regular work or personal activities. Some interviews are very informal but many are formal interviews. It is a process where questions are asked and answers are obtained for a purpose. In this module we will focus on a particularly important part of the job of being a security officer; being interviewed by Police as a witness. However the learning points will be relevant to any interview you are involved in and the skills you will learn are transferable. This module will relate too much of study requirements in unit standard 21107 Communications. Prior to starting this module you should have completed the modules on Communication (21107) and Cultural Awareness (1304). You should revise those two modules prior to commencing this one. Many of the communication points are covered in those two The purpose of an interview .</p> <p>The nature of formal interviews No matter how formal the interview is it is an interactive discussion between two or more people. Our natural ability to think, ask and answer questions, identify the meaning of a question all come into play. Not only do we have to consider what we are doing but the interviewer must also be doing the same.3</p> <p>Because of the nature, intended outcome and the purpose of the interview it is important that both parties plan and prepare before the interview takes place. The interview will be affected by many factors; some of these are also barriers to an effective interview; Verbal abilities y y y y y y y y Language skills (first or second languages) Accents Use of jargon or codes that are not understood by both parties Speaking clearly Voice modulation Tone of voice Fear or embarrassment Inappropriate use of humour</p> <p>Barriers Non Verbal Interaction Body language Hand shaking Various understanding of positive and negative answers Eye contact or lack of Appearances o Personal presentation o Clothing y Personal spacing y Attitude y y y y y</p> <p>Cultural issues</p> <p>4</p> <p>y Cultural sensitivity with respect to males interviewing females y Cultural differences y A lack of cultural awareness can adversely affect an interview Gender y Some people are not comfortable when being interviewed by members of the opposite sex</p> <p>Planning and preparing for a formal interview A formal interview should not be done off the cuff or in other words without preparation and planning. If we are being interviewed by a police officer regarding a crime or a suspect we must understand the importance of the interview. If the correct information is not passed on to the police officer a crime may remain unsolved or an offender may not be imprisoned. Remember information is what the police are after, and we have it!</p> <p>5</p> <p>Participants in a formal interview with a police officer</p> <p>An interview by a police officer is normally a very simple one on one meeting. Police are very skilled at these and they train themselves to a high level due to the nature of their job.</p> <p>The interviewer</p> <p>The person interviewing you will most likely be a sworn member of the police. They could be of any rank from constable to Inspector and may be a detective of similar rank. At times more than one officer may be present. They will conduct the interview in order to achieve their purpose which is to find out information regarding certain offences or suspects.</p> <p>The interviewee</p> <p>Obviously you are the interviewee, the person being interviewed. You should be well presented and well prepared. In the end you will be managed through the interview by an experienced police officer but they will not know what you know.</p> <p>Support Person</p> <p>If you are being interviewed by police officers you are able to take along a support person if you feel you need to. This person can be someone from your work or if necessary because of cultural needs can be anyone you chose.6</p> <p>Planning for a formal interview</p> <p>No matter what your level of experience is or what the purpose of an interview is you should plan for it. Here are some important things you should consider prior to the interview. y What is the purpose of the interview? o If this is not known you must ask! y What questions are they likely to ask? o What was the offence? o When did it occur? o What was seen or heard? o Where did it happen? y Who else do you know is also being interviewed? y What sources of information should be made available to the police? Can copies be made for them in advance? o Certificate of Approval o Log book, reports, y Who will be the interviewer(s)? o What are their names and rank? o What station do they work from? y Where will the interview take place? y How long will the interview take? o Allow plenty of time o Don t rush yourself y Consider your personal presentation, uniform etc y What if there are changes to the interview? o If you plan for some changes then there is less chance you will get upset o Expect some questions you didn t plan for, remember the police will have other information that you don t know</p> <p>7</p> <p>Participating in a formal interview</p> <p>If you have planned for the interview the rest should go smoothly. Remember the police officer is experienced at interviewing and you are on their side! If necessary let the officer know you are nervous or tell them what concerns you might have. The Introduction When you first meet the interviewing officer be confident, introduce yourself and let them know what evidence or supporting documentation you have with you. This will often prevent the need for them to ask some questions and will also let them know that you have planned for the interview and that you are professional. It is good at first to use the rank of the officer as a sign of respect. They will normally let you use their first name. Also if necessary ask them where they would like you to sit. Normally it will be obvious but its always good to check. Remember they have planned for the interview as well. It is also probably that a drink of water or tea/coffee will be offered to you. It is fine to accept these, especially water as it helps keep your mouth from drying up while talking.</p> <p>Appropriate Dress and Appearance This is a formal interview; however police interviews can occur at any time or place. It may occur in the comfort of a police station or it may occur out in the street at the scene of a crime. It is very good practice to always dress in your company uniform when being interviewed specially if you are going to the police station or being interviewed at your place of work or company offices.</p> <p>8</p> <p>If you are being interviewed at your own home then it would be okay to relax your dress standard but don t be too relaxed! It is very important to have a high level of personal hygiene and appearance when you are being interviewed. A happy and positive disposition is far better than a totally serious or negative one. A sense of humour is fine however don t joke too much and make sure you do not make any inappropriate jokes or comments.</p> <p>During the interview Most police stations have dedicated interview rooms which are normally small rooms with a table and a few chairs, however be ready to be interviewed anywhere. The interviewing police officer will normally make sure you know who they are and what the purpose of the interview is. If you are not sure of their identity or the subject of the interview it is entirely okay for you to ask. Also, don t forget to ensure that the person you are passing on vital information is in fact a police officer. It is okay to ask for identification. All Police carry ID cards much like your COA. They may have a list of questions already prepared for you to answer. They may also have some other forms of evidence to show you and ask questions about. Eye contact should be maintained with the interviewing officer but don t be afraid to maintain your normal cultural norms, a police officer is well aware of the various cultural issues in New Zealand. Your body positioning should be sitting up rather than a relaxed laid back position. People who are interested normally sit up and even lean forward to show interest in what is being said. But each situation will vary so ensure your positioning is appropriate to the circumstances you find yourself in.9</p> <p>Personal spacing is normally set by the size of the interview room. There is normally an optimum spacing of about 1.5 metres but this can vary depending on individual circumstances. Voice modulation and tone should be normal and show that you are interested. Don t speak too quietly or too loudly.</p> <p>Questions In most cases you can guess what questions will be asked. An interviewing officer will start with identifying who you are and who you work for. They will ask about your job, work sites and how long you have been in security for. This will assist them understand who they are dealing with; a new security officer or one with a lot of previous experience. They may even want to ask more about you, your family, sports you play or people you both know. This is normal practice to put you at ease, make you more comfortable and develop rapport between both of you. Then they will get to the business end of the questioning. If they are interviewing you about an offence you may be asked to sign a statement about what you have said. Read it before you sign it and make sure it is right. If you don t know the answer it is fine to tell them that. Don t try to make anything up or guess at the answer. It is possible that giving the wrong information may lead the police into a false line of enquiry and waste time as well as create doubt about you as a future witness in a court hearing.</p> <p>10</p> <p>Prepare for an Interview as a witness: TestQuestion 1 What is the purpose of being interviewed as a witness? a. To find out information regarding certain offences or suspects b. To gather information as to your involvement in a particular offence c. To test how good you are as a witness d. None of the above Question 3 Poor communication can hinder the interview process; what are some contributing factors? a. Lateness, untidy appearance, b. Seated incorrectly, dislike the interviewer c. English is a second language, accents d. All of the above Question 2 Who is likely to interview you at a Police interview? a. Constable b. Detective c. Private Investigator d. A &amp; B</p> <p>Question 4 A support person can accompany you to the interview; who can this be? a. Someone assigned by the court b. A member of your family c. Someone from family, work or for cultural needs d. your lawyer</p> <p>Question 5 If you are being interviewed by more than one police officer what should you consider? a. Maintaining eye contact with both interviewers b. Understanding their roles some may ask questions, others may be there to observe and make notes c. Maintain attention to person who asked the question, however share answer with all. d. All of the above Question 7 When is the best time to tell the interviewing Police officer that you have brought along some evidence relating to the interview a. Half way thru b. At the end of the interview c. At the beginning of the interview d. Its not important, only if they ask you Question 9 During an interview you should sit a. Next to the Police Officer b. Relaxed on a couch c. Opposite the Police Officer d. Lean back on the chair s back legs</p> <p>Question 6 If you are being interviewed by a plain clothed detective that you do not know should you ask to see their Identification Card? a. Yes b. No c. Only if they want you to see it d. No you just have to trust them</p> <p>Question 8 What is an ideal personal space between the interviewer and someone being interviewed? a. 1.5 metres b. 3.5 metres c. 0.5 metres d. 0.25 metres</p> <p>Question 10 Should you sign a statement written by the interviewing Police officer a. Yes, but you should read it first b. No c. Yes, just sign it, you have to trust them d. Wait until your lawyer has seen it</p> <p>11</p> <p>Planning for an interview.</p> <p>Scenario: While working as a site security officer one night you witnessed a motor vehicle accident outside the main gates to the site. The offending vehicle drove off after the accident. You ran out and assisted the driver (victim) of the other car who needed hospital treatment. You provided first aid treatment until the ambulance arrived. Fortunately you were able to get the registration number of the offending vehicle. You completed your site log with all these details as well as preparing a full report for your supervisor. The police have asked you to come into the station and be interviewed on what you saw in relation to the accident. List what planning you would carry out prior to the interview; what would you take with you; what information would you ensure that you have?</p> <p>................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................................. ...............................................................................................................</p>