preservice elementary teachers learning to use curriculum

Download Preservice Elementary Teachers Learning to Use Curriculum

Post on 01-Jan-2017

215 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • PRESERVICE ELEMENTARY TEACHERS LEARNING TO USE CURRICULUM MATERIALS TO PLAN AND TEACH SCIENCE

    By

    Kristin Lee Gunckel

    A DISSERTATION

    Submitted to Michigan State University

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

    DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

    Department of Teacher Education

    2008

  • ABSTRACT

    PRESERVICE ELEMENTARY TEACHERS LEARNING TO USE CURRICULUM MATERIALS TO PLAN AND TEACH SCIENCE

    By

    Kristin Lee Gunckel

    New elementary teachers rely heavily on curriculum materials, but available

    science curriculum materials do not often support teachers in meeting specified learning

    goals, engaging students in the inquiry and application practices of science, or

    leveraging students intellectual and cultural resources for learning. One approach to

    supporting new elementary teachers in using available science curriculum materials is to

    provide frameworks to scaffold preservice teachers developing lesson planning and

    teaching practices. The Inquiry-Application Instructional Model (I-AIM) and the Critical

    Analysis and Planning (CA&P) tool were designed to scaffold preservice teachers

    developing practice to use curriculum materials effectively to plan and teach science.

    The I-AIM identifies functions for each activity in an instructional sequence. The CA&P

    provides guides preservice teachers in modifying curriculum materials to better fit I-AIM

    and leverage students resources for learning.

    This study followed three elementary preservice teachers in an intern-level

    science method course as they learned to use the I-AIM and CA&P to plan and teach a

    science unit in their field placement classrooms. Using a sociocultural perspective, this

    study focused on the ways that the interns used the tools and the mediators that

    influenced how they used the tools. A color-coding analysis procedure was developed to

    identify the teaching patterns in the interns planned instructional approaches and

    enacted activity sequences and compare those to the patterns implied by the I-AIM and

    CA&P tools. Interviews with the interns were also conducted and analyzed, along with

    the assignments they completed for their science methods course, to gain insight into

  • the meanings the interns made of the tools and their experiences planning and teaching

    science.

    The results show that all three interns had some successes using the I-AIM and

    CA&P to analyze their curriculum materials and to plan and teach science lessons.

    However, all three interns used the tools in different ways, and some of their ways of

    using the tools were different from the intentions for the tools. These differences can be

    accounted for by the variety of mediators that influenced the interns use of the I-AIM

    and CA&P tools. These mediators were rooted in the Discourses at play in the various

    communities in which the interns participated during their teacher preparation program.

    Some of the practices and resources of these various Discourses interfered with or

    supported the interns use of the I-AIM and CA&P tools. Each intern took a different

    trajectory through these Discourses and encountered different practices that mediated

    how each used the I-AIM and CA&P tools.

    The results of this study suggest that the goal of preparing preservice teachers to

    use the I-AIM and CA&P tools should be to provide preservice teachers with

    opportunities to use the tools and help them develop the metaknowledge about the tools

    necessary to critically analyze the affordances and weaknesses of different approaches

    to teaching science.

  • Copyright by KRISTIN LEE GUNCKEL 2008

  • v

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    I entered the doctoral program in the Department of Teacher Education surer of

    what I was moving away from than what I was moving toward. I found a community of

    wonderful, caring, and intelligent people who welcomed me, invited me to participate in

    their intellectual pursuits, and guided me as I found my new direction. I am most grateful

    to my advisor, Dr. Edward Smith, who opened his heart and shared his passions with

    me. I benefited greatly from his guidance and support and deeply respect his

    commitment to science education, social justice, and family. I thank Dr. Christina

    Schwarz for sharing her friendship and mentorship, and Dr. Charles Andy Anderson for

    sharing his vision and experience. I would like to recognize Dr. James Gallagher, who

    made many experiences possible for me as part of the Center for Curriculum Materials

    in Science. I am indebted to Dr. Lynn Paine and Dr. Glenda Lappan for serving on my

    committee and offering helpful advice and direction. In addition, I would like to

    acknowledge the friendship and support of my colleagues and friends Dave Grueber,

    Blakely Tsurusaki, Mark Enfield and Felicia Moore. You all are truly amazing people who

    make the world a better place.

    This dissertation would not have been possible without the participation of the

    three interns, Dana, Leslie, and Nicole, who volunteered during the stressful final

    semester of their elementary teacher internship to share with me their work and thoughts

    about planning and teaching science. I wish them the best in their future careers as

    teachers. They will make us proud.

    Most of all, I want to thank my partner, Marcy Wood, who got me here in the first

    place. I am looking forward to new adventures as we move ahead into the next phase of

    our lives together.

  • vi

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    List of Tables.................................................................................................................... ix List of Figures................................................................................................................... xi Chapter 1 Introduction.......................................................................................................1

    Situating the Study ......................................................................................................1 Identifying the Problem...........................................................................................1 Design-Based Research Project ............................................................................3

    Overview of the Dissertation .......................................................................................5 Chapter 2: Frameworks ..........................................................................................5 Chapter 3: Methods ................................................................................................5 Chapters 4, 5, 6: Cases of Dana, Leslie, and Nicole..............................................6 Chapter 7: Discussion and Conclusions.................................................................6 Chapter 8: Implications...........................................................................................6

    Chapter 2 Frameworks......................................................................................................7

    Chapter Overview........................................................................................................7 Teachers and Curriculum Materials ............................................................................7 A Vision for Analysis & Modification of Curriculum Materials ....................................11

    Aligning with the Intended Curriculum ..................................................................11 Analyzing the Instructional Approach ...................................................................12 Taking Students into Consideration .....................................................................13 Modifying Curriculum Materials ............................................................................15

    Previous Design Cycles ............................................................................................16 The Inquiry-Application Instructional Model and Critical Analysis & Planning Tool...20

    Experiences, Patterns, Explanations (EPE) .........................................................20 Inquiry-Application Instructional Model (I-AIM).....................................................22 Critical Analysis & Planning Tool (CA&P) ............................................................24 Initial Results using the I-AIM and CA&P .............................................................26

    Research Questions..................................................................................................26 Chapter 3 Methods..........................................................................................................30

    Chapter Overview......................................................................................................30 Study Design .............................................................................................................30 Context ......................................................................................................................33 Sample Selection ......................................................................................................35 Data Collection ..........................................................................................................37

    Course Artifacts ....................................................................................................38

Recommended

View more >