representation 2. ren© magritte: the treachery of images (1928-9)

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  • Slide 1
  • Representation 2
  • Slide 2
  • Ren Magritte: The Treachery of Images (1928-9)
  • Slide 3
  • Ren Magritte: Two Mysteries (1966)
  • Slide 4
  • Mise an abyme put in an abyss. Infinite regression On your breakfast table is your packet of cornflakes, and on your packet is a picture of the smiling Kellogg family at breakfast, and on their table is a picture of your packet which has a picture of the smiling Kellogg family, and so on (M. Ashmore) e.g. Hamlet: the mousetrap scene Midsummer Nights Dream: the play of the rude machanicals
  • Slide 5
  • Re-presentations: we think that the model (reality) precedes, pre-exists the representation
  • Slide 6
  • Representations and schemata Do we represent what we see?
  • Slide 7
  • Magritte: The Uses of Speech
  • Slide 8
  • Magritte: The Interpretation of Dreams
  • Slide 9
  • Alain: Egyptian life class, 1955
  • Slide 10
  • Relief of the divine birth of Hatshep sut
  • Slide 11
  • Gentile da Fabriano: Adoration of the Magi (1322-3)
  • Slide 12
  • Rubens: Adoration of the Magi (1633)
  • Slide 13
  • Power of representations society of the spectacle (Guy Debord) Images replace what we see Emile Zola: I dont think we can claim that we have seen something until we have not photographed it
  • Slide 14
  • Magritte: The Human Condition
  • Slide 15
  • Andy Warhol: Marilyn (green) 1960s
  • Slide 16
  • Andy Warhol: Marilyn (pink) 1960s
  • Slide 17
  • Warhols pictures no realism cheap, poor quality, mass-produced image face soul the body is well-known public property: an image where the soul should be
  • Slide 18
  • Claude glass - Thomas Gainsborough
  • Slide 19
  • Tintern Abbey through a Claude glass
  • Slide 20
  • Claude glass Named after Claude Lorrain Small portable mirror tinted with dark foil Recommended to 18th-century painters picturesque effect the very idea of landscape
  • Slide 21
  • Tintern Abbey
  • Slide 22
  • Technologies of representation New technologies change our views of representation itself and of the mind (camera obscura; photograhic memory) They change what we (can) see and how we see
  • Slide 23
  • Prosthetic images we could not see these things otherwise Microscope was called by Richard Hooke, its inventor, an artificial organ (1665), that supplies the infirmities of the natural How can we check images of the invisible?
  • Slide 24
  • 19th-century cartoon about the microscope
  • Slide 25
  • the dark side of the moon
  • Slide 26
  • Mrs. R ntgen s hand
  • Slide 27
  • Slide 28
  • embryo scan
  • Slide 29
  • M. C. Escher: Relativity
  • Slide 30
  • M. C. Escher: Waterfall
  • Slide 31
  • analog and digital images digital vs analog technologies of making images Digital images stored as data represent a matrix rather than an image Images are generated
  • Slide 32
  • the hyperreal HYPERREAL: the generation by models of of a real without origin in reality (Jean Baudrillard) images that are not representations generated by formulas, algorithms
  • Slide 33
  • cyberspace I looked into one of the video arcades. I could see in the physical intensity of their postures how rapt the kids wereThese kids clearly believed in the space games projected. Everyone I know who works with computers seems to develop a belief that theres some kind of actual space behind the screen, someplace you cant see but you know is there. (William Gibson: Neuromancer)
  • Slide 34
  • Barbie dolls
  • Slide 35
  • Barbie doll Originally designed as a fashion doll for adults (Mattel, 1959) Teaches fixed, normative gender roles to girls (codes of femininity: defined through the body, standards of dress and behaviour Barbie is a consumer. She demands product after product, and the packaging and advertising imply that Barbie, as well as her owner, can be made happy only if she wears the right clothes and owns the right products (Marilyn Ferris Motz)
  • Slide 36
  • Barbie/2 multicultural Barbies: same body (racial difference ) ethnic, aerobic, fitness phases female body as cultural plastic desexualised in detail over-eroticised in general outlines impossible body
  • Slide 37
  • Sindi (Cindy) Jackson: Living Doll
  • Slide 38
  • Valeria Lukyanova
  • Slide 39
  • human Barbie
  • Slide 40
  • Technologies of the body You can shape your body into whatever you want it to be Elastic body: transformer Barbie and human Barbies as posthuman
  • Slide 41
  • SIMULACRUM e.g. Somehuman Barbies: thing modelled on an image that has no original
  • Slide 42
  • Tasaday tribe (Philippines)
  • Slide 43
  • Disneyland Disneyland is there to conceal the fact that it is the real country, all of real America, which is Disneyland Disneyland is presented as imaginary to make us believe that the rest is real, when in fact all of Los Angeles and the America surrounding it are no longer real, but of the order of the hyperreal and of simulation. (Baudrillard)
  • Slide 44
  • William Wallace monument
  • Slide 45
  • Braveheart
  • Slide 46
  • Paul Foelsche: Lialloon (1879, New Guinea) anthropo- metry
  • Slide 47
  • Anthropometry, Bertillonage Alphonse Bertillon, Prefect of Paris Police (late 19th century)
  • Slide 48
  • Lialloon -The photo constructs us as its makers and beholders -us= civilised, modern Europeans -possessing the scientific gaze
  • Slide 49
  • What does Lialloon represent? -Lialloon: not an individual -provides objective knowledge (photography is true) -(1) image of barbarity for us (an other) Barbarity, primitivism: -(2) noble savage (touched up with charcoal) -(3) potential criminal (Foelsche: colonial administrator) -allegory of race
  • Slide 50
  • The politics of representation politics = power is involved Who has the right (power) to represent something? Who tells the story of extinct peoples? history written by the winners technological inequality
  • Slide 51
  • James Bond: Roger Moore or Sean Connery
  • Slide 52
  • posters of Dr. No (1962)
  • Slide 53
  • Pierce Brosnan / Daniel Craig
  • Slide 54
  • He was a comely handsome fellow, perfectly well made; with straight strong limbs, not too large; tall and well shaped He had a very good countenance, not a fierce and surly aspect; but seemed to have something very manly in his face, and yet he had all the sweetness and softness of an European in his countenance too, especially when he smiled. His hair was long and black, not curled like wool The colour of his skin was not quite black, but very tawny; and yet not of an ugly yellow nauseous tawny, as in the Brasilians, but of a bright kind of a dun olive colour, that had in it something very agreeable, though not very easy to describe. (Defoe: Robinson Crusoe, 1719)
  • Slide 55
  • Robinson Crusoe and Friday
  • Slide 56
  • Robinson Crusoe and Friday 2
  • Slide 57
  • Bronislaw Malinowski
  • Slide 58
  • Bronislaw Malinowski among the Trobriand Islanders (1918)
  • Slide 59
  • Malinowski s diary (1918) At 5 I went to Kaulaka. A pretty, finely built girl walked ahead of me. I watched the muscles of her back; her figure, her legs, and the beauty of the body so hidden to us, whites, fascinated me. Probably even with my own wife Ill never have the opportunity to observe the play of back muscles for as long as with this little animal. At moments I was sorry I was not a savage and could not possess this pretty girl. At Kaulaka, looked round, noting things to photograph.
  • Slide 60
  • America was invented before it was discovered (Giuseppe Cocchiara) Who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past. (Orwell: Nineteen Eighty-Four + ADFs Memory War)
  • Slide 61
  • Politics of representation Representations: political practices, sites of conflict and resistance Representations can be changed, revised Jean Rhys: Wide Sargasso Sea (madwomans story in Jane Eyre) J. M. Coetzee: Foe (Friday and Susan Barton) Michel Tournier: Friday or the Ends of the Pacific
  • Slide 62
  • Friday (French film, 1981)