Safety Training Topic HAZARD HazCom... · Safety Training Topic HAZARD COMMUNICATION Purpose of Meeting…

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  • Tailgate Topic 2009 DKF Solutions LLC Page 1

    Safety Training Topic HAZARD COMMUNICATION

    Purpose of Meeting

    To remind workers that exposure to chemicals can result in a serious injury.

    To reinforce hazard communication rules.

    To consider ways to protect yourself from chemical hazards.

    Materials and Preparation

    A copy of the written hazard communication rules or policy.

    Note to Trainer

    Enter your name and the training date on the Training Sign In Sheet.

    Have each attendee sign the Training Sign In Sheet next to their name.

    Use this page for your reference and give attendees copies of the remaining pages.

  • Tailgate Topic 2009 DKF Solutions LLC Page 2

    SAFE

    TY T

    RA

    ININ

    G T

    OPI

    C HAZARD COMMUNICATION

    The Law

    Introduction NOTES: Every day you are exposed to chemicals -

    chemicals that can injure you or that can make you sick. In the workplace alone, there are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced to the work force every year. This means that approximately 32 million workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards on a daily basis. This training has been developed to educate workers about the Hazard Communication policy and how to take appropriate precautions in order to work safely with and around hazardous substances.

    Workplace chemical hazards are regulated by OSHA under the Hazardous Communication Standard (HCS). This law is based on the concept that all employees have a right to know what hazardous substances (such as chemicals) they are being exposed to on the job, the hazards presented by those substances, and how to protect themselves from injury or illnesses when using those substances.

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    NOTES: The first step in protecting you from

    exposures to hazardous substances is to let you know if you are working with, or around, hazardous substances. The responsibility for identifying whether chemicals are hazardous to downstream users begins with the chemical manufacturer. They make this determination by assessing both the physical and health hazards of the product. This information must be provided on the products label and on its Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). This requirement applies to chemicals that come in containers, on bulk chemicals and on certain articles where hazardous by-products may be produced during normal work activities such as welding.

    Identifying Hazards

    Chemicals are classified as having Physical Hazards if they are:

    Explosive Compressed Gas Combustible Liquids Flammable Unstable Water Reactive Oxidizers

    Physical Hazards

    Health Hazards

    Chemicals are classified as being a health hazard if they:

    Can cause cancer Are poisonous (toxic) Cause harm to your skin, internal

    organs, or nervous system Are corrosive - such as acids Cause allergic reactions after repeated

    exposure

    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

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    Once a hazardous product arrives at the job site, it becomes the employers responsibility to make sure that it has arrived with a legible label and a current Material Safety Data Sheet.

    Your employer must also make sure that all Material Safety Data Sheets are immediately available to you for any chemicals that you may work with, or be exposed to.

    You must also receive training on how to read and understand the information on the label and on the MSDS so that you can properly identify and protect yourself when working with that substance.

    Employer Responsibilities

    All containers, regardless of size, must be properly labeled. Although every label looks different, they all must have similar information such as

    Chemical identity Name, address and emergency phone

    number of the manufacturer Physical and health hazards Any special handling instructions Personal protective equipment that

    should be worn when using the product, and

    First aid, fire response and spill cleanup measures.

    Labels must be in English and other languages that are prevalent in the work group. They must be legible and in an easily viewed location. Aboveground piping systems used to transport hazardous chemicals, including liquids, vapors, gases and semi-liquids must also be identified. This can be done by a color coding system, labels, or tags.

    Labeling

    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

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    Many companies use the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) color/number coded labeling system. These diamond-shaped labels are used as a quick identifier so you can easily determine the basic hazards. However, you must be trained to fully understand and correlate the visual warning on the NFPA diamond label with the chemical and its appropriate hazard warnings.

    The colors identify the type of hazard: Blue = Health Red = Flammability Yellow = Reactivity White = Other hazards or special handling

    A number between 0-4 is then used to indicate the degree of risk, with zero indicating no risk, and 4 indicating extreme hazards.

    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

    NFPA Labels

    Portable Containers

    Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) The chemical label is the 1st and most important warning tool because it gives you the important hazard information at a glance. However, for a more in-depth understanding about the chemical, and more importantly how to protect yourself and others from exposure hazards, the Material Safety Data Sheet must be used.

    If chemicals are dispensed from a larger container (i.e. drum) into a smaller, portable container, this container must also have a label unless they the entire chemical is used during your shift and under your control at all times.

    If the chemical is not used during your shift, or is not under your control at all times, then you must put a label on this portable container.

    Portable container labels do not need to include all of the information contained on the primary label (manufacturers label), but it must contain the chemical identity at a minimum.

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    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (or MSDS) are provided by the manufacturer in order to give you detailed information on the safe use of their product. Be sure you know where to find the MSDSs for the products you may be exposed to. See your supervisor for more information about where to find the MSDSs and how to read them.

    Material Safety Data Sheets (continued) sheets

    Personal Protective Equipment

    Reviewing the MSDS to determine what type of PPE should be worn is one of the most important control measures you can take to protect yourself from chemical hazards.

    Example PPE when working with or around hazardous substances:

    Dust masks & Respirators: be sure to review the written respiratory program before using

    Safety glasses, goggles and face shields: used when handling chemicals that may splash or when working around equipment that produces dust or particulates

    Hearing protective devices such as ear muffs or ear plugs

    Foot protection: usually chemical resistant footwear such as boots

    Head protection Full body protection such as chemical

    suits, aprons or coveralls.

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    NOTES: If the proper type of PPE is not available, or

    you have questions on what type of PPE should be worn, see you supervisor before using or working with the chemical. This is all part of your right-to-know what hazards you are exposed to, and your right to protect yourself.

    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

    Personal Protective Equipment (continued)

    PPE Considerations Always inspect your PPE before and after use. Check for signs of wear or damages such as cracks, stiffness, deterioration, pinholes, or damaged seams.

    Do not re-use disposable equipment such as disposable gloves. If your PPE has become grossly contaminated with hazardous chemicals be sure to wash it before putting it away so you dont become contaminated the next time you put it on.

    Contaminated PPE that cannot be decontaminated (washed) should not be thrown into the trash. See your supervisor for proper disposal options.

    Emergency Response Responding to spills and leaks are site and chemical specific. This training session is not intended to teach you how to respond to a spill or leak. Instead, we want you to know that if you work with, or even near a hazardous chemical, you will receive additional training to at least the First Responder Awareness (FRA) level.

    As a FRA, you may be the first witness to a spill or release and your job is to begin the emergency alarm sequence by making the proper notifications and to take protective actions such as evacuating or implementing shelter-in-place procedures.

    If your job requires you to respond to a chemical spill or release to try and contain it, you will receive more advanced training.

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    NOTES:

    Provided by: DKF Solutions Group for

    General Emergency Guidelines

    Review the MSDS and implement the recommended procedures

    Evacuate people from the area

    Isolate the area & keep others from entering

    Turn off ignition and heat sources

    Conclusion

    Remember, you have a right to know what hazardous substances you are being exposed to on the job, the hazards presented by those substances, and how to protect yourself from injury or illnesses when using those substances. Use this knowledge to keep yourself safe. And if you ever need more information or training, see your supervisor immediately.

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