shakespeare’s language

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Shakespeare’s Language. Cornell Notes. What did almost all plays do? Shakespeare’s Words He introduced _______ words He knew _________ words What did the Elizabethans omit in their writing? My four words Rewrite a five times sentence like Shakespeare. The Elizabethans. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Shakespeares Language

  • Cornell NotesWhat did almost all plays do?Shakespeares WordsHe introduced _______ wordsHe knew _________ wordsWhat did the Elizabethans omit in their writing?My four wordsRewrite a five times sentence like Shakespeare

  • The ElizabethansThey loved languageEven poorly-written plays usually rhymed and alliteratedSound of language was more important than logic of sentence structureE.g. they changed word order or repeated words for emphasis

  • William ShakespeareIntroduced nearly 3,000 words into EnglishHis vocabulary is upward of 29,000 words (quadruple that of an average well-educated person!)

  • Sowhy is it so hard to understand?Many words have shifted meaning since Shakespeares day, or have fallen out of use

  • Still hard to unerstandLetters, syllables, or whole words were sometimes omitted'tis: it is o'er: over ne'er: nevere'er / ere: ever oft: often e'en: even

  • Understand it not IWord order was more flexible. I ate the sandwich. I the sandwich ate. Ate the sandwich I. Ate I the sandwich. The sandwich I ate. The sandwich ate I.

  • Understand? Get it?Pronunciation was quite different from ours, so Shakespeares perfect rhymes usually are imperfect rhymes to us

    love / prove

  • Some TipsThou vs. YouThou = an informal address to one's friends or social inferiorsYou = a formal address to strangers and social superiorsForsooth = No kiddingMarry!, By my faith = WowAlack, Alackaday, Alas, Fie, Out upon it! = Darn it!

  • God's wounds, S'wounds, Zounds = swearingPrating = Babbling, talking too muchPerchance = MaybeForswear = To lie or cheatBetimes = Very early in the morning

    With thanks to:http://www.bardweb.net/language.htmlBest, Michael. Shakespeare's Life and Times. Internet Shakespeare Editions, University of Victoria: Victoria, BC, 2001-2005. .http://www.shakespearehigh.com/classroom/guide/page1.shtmlhttp://www.krucli.com/shakespeare_intro's.htm

  • What do these two passages have in common?Lord Chief Justice: "Your means are very slender and your waste great." Falstaff (an obese and high-living man): "I would that my means were greater and my waist slenderer."

    Romeo and Juliet: Mercutio is a young man with wit and little seriousness. As he lies dying: "Ask for me tomorrow and you will find me a grave man."

  • They both contain PUNS.Lord Chief Justice: "Your means are very slender and your waste great." Falstaff (an obese and high-living man): "I would that my means were greater and my waist slenderer."

    Romeo and Juliet: Mercutio is a young man with wit and little seriousness. As he lies dying: "Ask for me tomorrow and you will find me a grave man."

  • PunA joke that comes from play of wordsCan make use of a words multiple meanings or of a words rhymeEx) In Battle Report, the phrase Drops a note plays on the two meanings of note as a message and as a musical note.

  • What device is Shakespeare using in these passages?"Death, death, O amiable lovely death.""Parting is such sweet sorrow."

  • They are both OXYMORONS."Death, death, O amiable lovely death.""Parting is such sweet sorrow."

  • Oxymorona combination of words with opposing or contradictory meaningsEx) the sound of silence or cool fire or jumbo shrimp

  • What do these passages illustrate?Shylock, a character in The Merchant of Venice, feels mistreated and says: "You foot me as you spurn a stranger cur."When Cleopatra thinks she is the victim of some fast talk from Antony, she says: "He words me, girls, he words me."

  • They both are INVENTIVE with language.Shylock, a character in The Merchant of Venice, feels mistreated and says: "You foot me as you spurn a stranger cur."When Cleopatra thinks she is the victim of some fast talk from Antony, she says: "He words me, girls, he words me."

  • What do these passages illustrate?King Henry IV, who was not fat, was called "portly."In The Merchant of Venice, a servant who intends to hurry tells his mistress he will go with all "convenient" speed.When Antony makes an alliance with Octavius in Julius Caesar, he calls him his "competitor."

  • They contain words that have SHIFTED MEANING.King Henry IV, who was not fat, was called "portly. (stately; imposing)In The Merchant of Venice, a servant who intends to hurry tells his mistress he will go with all "convenient" speed. (near at hand)When Antony makes an alliance with Octavius in Julius Caesar, he calls him his "competitor. (one who strives in common/agrees)

  • What are these passages examples of?King Henry IV says the soil of England will no longer "daub her lips with her children's blood."In A Midsummers' Night Dream, the course of young love is described as "swift as a shadow, short as any dream, brief as lightning."In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo says, "But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun."

  • They all use FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE.The soil will no longer "daub her lips with her children's blood = England will no longer be at war (METAPHOR)The course of young love is described as "swift as a shadow, short as any dream, brief as lightning = it moves extremely quickly (SIMILE)Romeo says, "But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Juliet is the sun = she is a bright beautiful light (METAPHOR)

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