slidecast: barriers to e-learning job training (with sound)

Download Slidecast: Barriers To E-Learning Job Training (with sound)

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Learning at work as an employee is inherently different from being a student in an academic setting and, as such, is beset with different challenges. As trends in the adoption of e-learning for the delivery of job training increase, new challenges related to distance learning with technology have also emerged. Recognition that continued learning in the workplace, now via technological methods, is required for maintaining proficiency and achieving career goals means that understanding the challenges unique to learning at work is paramount. This qualitative study explored barriers to successful online job learning. Interviews with thirty federal government employees from the Forest Service and National Park Service enrolled in an online wilderness planning course revealed that attrition frameworks typically used to describe barriers to persistence in academia and distance education only partially describe hindering factors relevant to workplace learning. Although these hindering factors can generally be categorized as workplace; personality trait, and preference; course design/structure; or technology barriers, such categorization oversimplifies the true nature of employees’ struggles to learn on the job. This study's findings reveal three overarching systemic problems: 1) illusion of convenience, 2) absence of deeper learning, and 3) lack of an organizational culture of learning. These systemic problems demonstrate that complex interactions between various barriers create a cyclic system often preventing attainment of student-controlled, student-centered learning, two benefits of self-paced study. Other barrier interactions can foster employment of superficial, rather than deep, learning strategies possibly leaving employees ill-prepared to negotiate the situations for which they are supposedly being trained. Cultural elements of the structure and organization of work suggest that workplace learning is devalued, under-recognized and often unsupported, making the challenges to adaptation in an increasingly technological era even more significant.

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  • 1. Government Employee Experiences in an Online Wilderness Management Course Lisa Eidson Wilderness Information Specialist,http://www.wilderness.net Technology Steward,http://connect.wilderness.net Masters Student (graduated fall 2009), University of Montana

2. Importance of E-Learning

  • E-learning allows government to continue training employees despite:
    • Increasingly restricted travel
    • Shrinking natural resource budgets
  • E-learning represents the future of wilderness training

3. Presentation Outline

  • Importance of e-learning
  • What is e-learning?
  • Research
    • Study details
    • Results
      • Systemic problems
    • Conclusions
    • Recommendations

4. E-Learning Defined Correspon- dencecourses Video CD-ROM DVD Online learning Inter- active TV WEBTV Mobile/hand-held devices Learning software/ tutorials E-Learning is: Networked Internet-driven Inclusive 5. E-Learning Benefits

  • Convenient
  • Accessible
  • Reliable and universal
  • Accurate
  • Scalable
  • Easy to learn
  • Risk-free
  • Equality of participation
  • Efficient

6. E-Learning Trends Training Magazines 2002, 2003, 2007 Industry Reports ~50% of training offered by Department of Agriculture delivered online Year Percentage ofTraining Delivered Electronically in Private Sector Companies 2002 19% 2003 26% 2007 30% 7. Other E-Learning Research

  • E-learning can be as effectively as classroom learning
  • Students generally satisfied
  • Attrition rates higher than in classroom
  • Withdrawing/persisting students experience same barriers
  • Development of categorical frameworks to describe barriers

8. Categorical Barrier Framework Guiding Study Rubenson (1986), Garland (1992), Schilke (2001) Techno-logical Epistemo-logical Dispositional Institutional Situational E-learning Barriers Barriers that stem from learner's life situation Barriers related to learning institution Barriers related to learners personality, nature Barriers associated with course content, structure, design Barriers caused by computer-related problems 9. Study Design

  • Goal
    • Describe barriers to successful e-learning experiences in a wilderness management course
  • Qualitative research
    • Semi-structured interviews
      • Guided by barrier framework
  • 30 students
    • Forest Service (57%), National Park Service (43%)
    • Completed the Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework online course in spring 2008

10. Wilderness Stewardship Planning Framework Course

  • Offered by the Arthur Carhart National Wilderness Training Center
    • Wilderness training arm of federal government
  • Free to government employees
  • Registration, completion occurred within 6-month timeframe
  • Course requirements included:
    • 8 main modules
      • 30-60 minutes each
      • Choice of PDF or synchronized PPT w/sound
    • Optional application learning exercises
    • Practice tests
    • Final exam

11. Screen Snap of Synchronized PPT w/ Sound Interface

  • Screen snap of course

Table of contents Pace, sound, display controls Animated learning content area 12. Research Results Illusion of convenience Absence of deeper learning Lack of an organizational culture of learning Workplace barriers Personality trait and preference barriers Course structure/ design barriers Technology barriers Barrier categories Systemic problems Strong contribution to problem Weak contribution to problem 13. Systemic Problem 1 Illusion of Convenience Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by Cycle Negative inputs Escape routes 14. Minimizing Factor: Competing Priorities Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by Learning in the workplaceisnt the main priority. shoe horn [learning] in "work [learning] aroundobligations" 15. Maximizing Factor: Displacement Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by If I found that I had something to do at work and I couldnt get to it, I could always do it at my home. 16. Recurring/Singular Learning Interruptions: Workplace Distractions Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by continuous interruptions 17. Interruption Mitigation Strategies: Coping Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by I just decided even though it might take more time and I might have to restart after distractions, that I wasgoing to slog through. 18. Delaying Learning Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by All those thingsplayed into the mix of [the coursework] just gettingpushed further and further back. 19. Strategies to End Procrastination: Cramming Recurring and singular events Convenient time chosen, learning begins Available times to learn identified Learning delayed Learning interrupted Lack ofsequestration Strategies Maximizingfactors Minimizingfactors Strategies Caused by Decreased by Exacerbated by Exacerbated by Lack of sequestration Ended by Mitigated by Increased by Once I procrastinated so long,I had to force myself to do [the course] all in a very short amount of time. 20. Systemic Problem 2 Absence of Deeper Learning

  • Superficial learning is focused on:
    • Memorization vs. task content
    • Satisfying assessment demands vs. integration/reconciliation of new knowledge
  • Students who learn superficially:
    • Learn less
    • Remember less
    • Exit training ill-prepared to apply training
  • Impediments to deeper learning
    • Learning strategies/preferences
    • Course design/structure/delivery
    • Minimized retention
    • Attitudes toward e-learning

21.

  • Preference for group learning, lack of interaction

Learning Strategies/Preferences I feel like I learn better in a group, because theres more interaction. Theres a potential for [an e-learning] course to just be appealing to one style of learning. Anytime theres a group of people, youre going to hear things that are outside of your box of thought. 22.

  • Lack of professional networking

Learning Strategies/Preferences Its that casual interaction that reinforces some of the learning points that you miss [in e-learning]. 23.

  • Lack of personalized evaluation

Learning Strategies/Preferences The testing brought you back to really exact things rather than the general idea. I found that [the testing] really geared to how I needed to learn the concepts. If there was an assignment that I could have picked from and submitted it for peer review, that would have been much more challenging to me. 24.

  • Focus on words not concepts

Course Design/Structure/Delivery It almost felt like a crossword.you start to focus a little too much on the wording and a little too little on the meaning and the comprehension. 25.

  • Ease of dist