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  • nº. 31 ISSN 2171-6293

    SíMILE HIVERN 2015. Desembre-Gener-Febrer

  • SíMILE Butlletí del COBDCV sumari

    DESTACATS

    Makerspaces for learning and education Nascimento, Susana......................................................................................................................p. 4-7

    Experiencia de voluntariado en las 3es Jornades Valencianes de Documentació Piraquive, Fernando …………………………………………..…………………………...……..…....p. 8-9

    Bibliotecarios y documentalistas como líderes del cambio Carabantes Alarcón , David ……………………………..…………………………..……..……..…p. 10-14

    EXPERIÈNCIES

    “The Black Diamond”: la interacció d’espais en una biblioteca Corral, Maria.............................................................................................................................p. 16-19

    INFORMA

    L’Assemblea General Ordinària i l’Assemblea General Extraordinària……………....….…...p. 20

    Fins demà!.....……………………………..………………..………………………………...………p. 22-23

    DE LITERATURA, D´ALTRES ARTS I DE BIBLIOTEQUES

    Divagacions sobre els llibres perduts Guillem Alapont, Ramon…………………………...…………… …………………….….……..…...p. 24-27

    LECTURES

    Handbook of Research on Comparative Approaches to the Digital Age Revolution in Europe and the America. Carabantes Alarcón, David…………………………………………………………………...……...p. 28-30 Biblioteca Pública. Mientras llega el futuro, de Fernando Juárez-Urquijo Giménez Chornet, Vicent……………………………………………………………………………..p.32-33 Archivos, de Ramon Alberch-Fugueras Giménez Chornet, Vicent……………………………………………………………………………..p.34-35

  • SIMILE, Butlletí del COBDCV, Número 31 (2015)

    ISSN: 2171-6293

    Edició:

    Col·legi Oficial de Bibliotecaris i Documentalistes de la Comunitat Valenciana (COBDCV)

    Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Informàtica. Universitat Politècnica València (UPV)

    Camí de Vera s/n

    València, 46002

    Tfo. +34 620707369

    Dirigeix i coordina :

    Vocalia de Comunicació i Publicacions COBDCV

    Lola Alfonso Noguerón. Cap de la Unitat de Documentació RTVV-CulturArts

    Comité de redacció i maquetació :

    Mar Buigues García. Documentalista COBDCV

    Mª Dolores Martínez Santiago

    Estefanía Aguilar Moreno

    Traductora-correctora de valencià :

    Antonia Tárraga Giménez

    Fotografía portada:

    Grup de treball Símile

    E D

    ITO R

    IA L

    http://issuu.com/cobdcv-valencia http://www.cobdcv.es/

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  • A maker is someone who tinkers, hacks, fixes, recreates and assembles objects in creative

    and unexpected ways. The rise of a next generation of craftspeople, tinkerers, hobbyists and/

    or inventors is now mostly based on lowering costs and easier access to tools and

    communities (Mota 2011, Troxler 2010). On one hand, a set of digital fabrication devices (CNC

    machines, CAD programs, laser cutters, 3D printers), open source and low-cost hardware

    (Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and others), ambient sensors (for instance Co2, temperature, light

    intensity, sound, or humidity), or even smartphones and smart devices, are more readily

    accessible and used. On the other hand, data for conducting your projects is available online

    (such as schematics, circuit layout, code, 3D models, electronics tutorials and support

    materials), together with the existence of online communities to exchange experiences, share

    work, and support others with common interests.

    You see nowadays a great diversity in makers, individually or collectively, from crafters,

    hackers, artists, designers, scientists and engineers, to amateurs, hobbyists, entrepreneurs,

    companies, students, professors, researchers, children, communities, and civil society

    organizations. One of the main supporters of what's being called the maker movement is

    Maker Media in the US, which has online and pop-up stores (with Do-It-Yourself/DIY

    electronics, tools, kits, and books), publishes MAKE (bimonthly magazine showing

    step-by-step DIY projects), and organizes Maker Faires around the world. A Maker Faire is a

    festival of science, art and crafts DIY projects, first held in 2006 in the Bay Area with 100

    exhibiting makers, hands-on workshops, demonstrations, and DIY competitions, expanding to

    1,100 maker entries and over 130,000 attendees in its 2014 edition. In 2013, 98

    independently-produced Mini and Featured Maker Faires occurred around the world, including

    Tokyo, Rome, Santiago, and Oslo. In 2014, Maker Faire Rome received 90,000 visitors and

    hosted more than 600 projects and 360 workshops.

    Makerspaces for learning and education

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    Susana Nascimento

    Comissió Europea, Centre Comú de Recerca

    SÍMILE nº 31

  • Beyond these Maker Faires, a number of makerspaces exist where makers can fabricate,

    tinker, assemble, prototype and manufacture their objects. A makerspace is a general term

    for any “innovative workshop spaces that allow people to access tools freely and make things

    in collaborative projects” (Smith et al., 2014). As an example, hackerspaces are

    community-operated informal spaces, mostly with origins in the counter culture movement

    under an ethos of individual freedom, autonomy and ingenuity (Coleman 2013, Maxigas

    2012). There are currently 1988 hackerspaces worlwide, 1217 of them are marked as active

    and 358 as planned1. As another example, FabLabs are small-scale spaces organized in a

    network founded by the MIT’s Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA) lead by Neil Gershenfeld

    (2005). Started in 2004, the Fab Lab network had 45 labs in 2010, and in November 2014,

    413 Fab Labs (active and planned)2. Makerspaces now exist in a wide diversity in terms of

    their organisation, purpose and setting. Some function more independently with self-funding

    schemes or private memberships, while others have institutional support from universities,

    companies, or governmental agencies, for instance through initiatives and programs

    promoting creativity, digital skills and entrepreneurship.

    In particular, we are witnessing a rise in the number of learning and educational organizations

    such as libraries, museums, science centers, etc., setting up makerspaces with the purposes

    of enhancing learn-by-doing practices, promoting the skills of creativity, collaboration and

    critical thinking, and combining literacy in areas such as art, design, science, technology,

    engineering or math. As long-standing and trusted community sites, libraries and museums

    are well-suited to bring together in the same place different methods and forms of education,

    and make them available on a shared basis to the local communities.

    As he proclaimed June 18 as the National Day of Making3 in the opening of the 2014 White

    House Maker Faire, President Barack Obama unveiled a series of initiatives, including the

    commitment of more than 130 libraries to create more makerspaces4, coupled with new

    programming and investments from the Institute of Museum and Library Services5, such as

    online training in digital literacy for librarians and museum professionals (with Mozilla Founda-

    tion), strategic awards for libraries and museums to create makerspaces and engage in other

    maker-related programming, or a freely accessible [email protected] Library and Museum toolkit

    to help launch effective makerspaces and programs (with the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum,

    ———————————————

    1 http://hackerspaces.org/wiki/List_of_Hacker_Spaces. Accessed 19 November 2015. 2 http://www.fabfoundation.org/fab-labs/. Accessed 19 November 2015. 3 https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/06/18/fact-sheet-president-obama-host-first-ever-white-house-maker-

    faire.Accessed 20 November 2015. 4 For list of makerspaces in libraries, see for instance https://www.google.com/fusiontables/DataSource?docid=1ur0ifo

    -RvglbfzwRPu0KMYAM9-XNyFFIf6U2hTeL#rows:id=1.Accessed 20 November 2015. 5 https://www.imls.gov/issues/national-issues/makerspaces. Accessed 20 November 2015.  

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  • the San Francisco Exploratorium, the North Carolina State University Libraries, and the

    Chicago Public Library). Nowadays you can already find online library-focused maker

    resources67, such as “Make it @ Your Library” (Innovative Librarians Explore, Apply and

    Discover/ILEAD USA program with Instructables) or the “Making in the Library Toolkit” (the

    Young Adult Library Services Association / YALSA).

    In Europe encouraging projects and initiatives are also