smithers interior news, february 29, 2012

of 28 /28
By Cameron Orr Smithers / Interior News To a non-geologist onlooker, Rock Talk may cause eyes to glaze with an abun- dance of technical jar- gon. However the an- nual Smithers-based conference on mineral exploration and min- ing had some rocking good news. Christine Ogryzlo, communications di- rector for the Smithers Exploration Group, said that there are two main things that peo- ple in the Bulkley Val- ley should know about the industry this year. “First of all, north- western British Co- lumbia is the busiest part of this province as a dense area for mineral exploration. In 2011, half of the expenditures on min- eral exploration took place in northwestern British Columbia. There was a record $220 million spent on exploration...That’s pretty impressive,” she said. The other thing that people should know is that Smithers itself has a “critical mass” of professionals and support companies for the industry. “Smithers plays a very important role in the projects that are all the way...to the Yu- kon border.” Smithers contin- ues to be an attractive town for the industry with the abundance of professionals and also the well-serviced airport. Ogryzlo also said that there is no reason to expect the high level of spending on explo- ration for the region to go down anytime soon. “That’s because of the driving of the commodity prices. Commodity prices for copper, for gold, any of the precious metals, are at record highs,” she said. In regional geolo- gist Jeff Kyba’s presen- tation he pointed out that the $220 million spent in the northwest is an increase of $48 million from 2010, and includes at least 54 drilling projects and 21 projects with over $2 million in ex- penditures. In the Omenica region, exploration spending also grew to $71.5 million, ac- cording to the report of John DeGrace, a contraction regional geologist based in Prince George. That is an increase from $33 million in 2010. Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach thinks that Smithers is poised to benefit from industry activity in the coming years. He added that the town is lucky to have the Smithers Explora- tion Group to promote exploration activity in the area. Stikine MLA Doug Donaldson, also the official opposition’s mining critic, said that he will take mining is- sues to the legislature and will be question- ing the government on priority spending for the mining sector. STEELHEADS The Steelheads still have their heads up after loss. SPORTS/A9 I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N S S S S S S S S S S I I D D D D E E F F F F F F F F F F FE E E E E E E E E E EA A A A A A A A A A A T T T T T T T T TU U U U U U U UR R R R RE E E ES S Town battles ice conditions By Cameron Orr Smithers/Interior News The Town of Smith- ers is burning through more fuel to keep up with an unusually icy winter. The town said last week that they’ve gone through 36,511 litres of diesel in snow clear- ing operations during the period of Novem- ber and December 2011, and January this year. That’s a 37 per cent rise from the same pe- riod the year before which saw them go through 26,586 litres. Unusual tempera- tures for the winter, with continual freeze- thaw, as well as rain, which started before Christmas and con- tinues this month, have been hard on the town. “We’re certainly taking it seriously and our public works department has been working like crazy to do everything they can to stay on top of it,” said Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach. The town notes that conditions have also done a number for pothole growth and increased cracking on roads. Council in response have recommended in- creased funding for the road patching program in 2012. Bachrach also add- ed that they’ll have to look at possibly raising the general road main- tenance budget if this sort of winter is going to be repeated. Rock spending on a roll in northwestern region Submitted Students at Smithers Secondary School hosted a fashion show in the Round Room last Wednesday, displaying an assortment of styles created by the students themselves. FASHION SHOW SHOW NEW CURATOR The Bulkley Valley Museum’s new curator settles into role. OUR TOWN/A5 HOSPITAL SUPPORT A cash infusion for Wrinch Memorial helps with training. THREE RIVERS/B3 LETTERS LETTERS A7 SPORTS SPORTS A9 COMMUNITY COMMUNITY A13 THREE RIVERS THREE RIVERS B1 CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS B5 INVESTORS GROUP A3 RAYZ BOARDSHOP A9 HIGH: 0 LOW: -5 HIGH: 1 LOW: -4 HIGH: 3 LOW: -6 HIGH: 4 LOW: -2 HIGH: 2 LOW: -5 W W W W W W W W W W W W W W WE E E E E E E E E EA A A A A A A A A A A T T T T T T T T TH H H H H H HE E E E ER R Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday See ROCKS on Page A4 105th Year - Week 9 Smithers, B.C. Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com Single Copy • $1.34 ($1.20 + 14¢ HST) th Year - Week 9 Smithers, B.C. Wednesday, February 29, 20 1 2 www. interior- news.com Single Copy • $1.34 ( $1.20 + 14¢ HST) T T HE HE I I NTERIOR NTERIOR N N EWS EWS Praise-A-Reader Edition Praise-A-Reader Edition 88 days ‘til Relay for Life, May 26th. “Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back” “Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back”

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February 29, 2012 edition of the Smithers Interior News

TRANSCRIPT

Page 1: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

By Cameron OrrSmithers / Interior News

To a non-geologist onlooker, Rock Talk may cause eyes to glaze with an abun-dance of technical jar-gon.

However the an-nual Smithers-based conference on mineral exploration and min-ing had some rocking good news.

Christine Ogryzlo, communications di-rector for the Smithers Exploration Group, said that there are two

main things that peo-ple in the Bulkley Val-ley should know about the industry this year.

“First of all, north-western British Co-lumbia is the busiest part of this province as a dense area for mineral exploration. In 2011, half of the expenditures on min-eral exploration took place in northwestern British Columbia. There was a record $220 million spent on exploration...That’s pretty impressive,” she said.

The other thing that people should know is that Smithers itself has a “critical mass” of professionals and support companies for the industry.

“Smithers plays a very important role in the projects that are all the way...to the Yu-kon border.”

Smithers contin-ues to be an attractive town for the industry with the abundance of professionals and also the well-serviced airport.

Ogryzlo also said

that there is no reason to expect the high level of spending on explo-ration for the region to go down anytime soon.

“That’s because of the driving of the commodity prices. Commodity prices for copper, for gold, any of the precious metals, are at record highs,” she said.

In regional geolo-gist Jeff Kyba’s presen-tation he pointed out that the $220 million spent in the northwest is an increase of $48

million from 2010, and includes at least 54 drilling projects and 21 projects with over $2 million in ex-penditures.

In the Omenica region, exploration spending also grew to $71.5 million, ac-cording to the report of John DeGrace, a contraction regional geologist based in Prince George. That is an increase from $33 million in 2010.

Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach thinks that Smithers is

poised to benefit fromindustry activity in thecoming years.

He added that thetown is lucky to havethe Smithers Explora-tion Group to promoteexploration activity inthe area.

Stikine MLA DougDonaldson, also theofficial opposition’smining critic, said thathe will take mining is-sues to the legislatureand will be question-ing the government onpriority spending forthe mining sector.

STEELHEADS

The Steelheads still have their heads up after loss.

SPORTS/A9

IIII NNNNNNNNNNNN SSSSSSSSSS II DDDD EE

FFFFFFFFFFFEEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTUUUUUUUURRRRREEEESS

Town battles ice conditions

By Cameron OrrSmithers/Interior News

The Town of Smith-ers is burning through more fuel to keep up with an unusually icy winter.

The town said last week that they’ve gone through 36,511 litres of diesel in snow clear-ing operations during the period of Novem-ber and December 2011, and January this year.

That’s a 37 per cent rise from the same pe-riod the year before which saw them go through 26,586 litres.

Unusual tempera-tures for the winter, with continual freeze-thaw, as well as rain, which started before Christmas and con-tinues this month,

have been hard on the town.

“We’re certainly taking it seriously and our public works department has been working like crazy to do everything they can to stay on top of it,” said Smithers Mayor Taylor Bachrach.

The town notes that conditions have also done a number for pothole growth and increased cracking on roads.

Council in response have recommended in-creased funding for the road patching program in 2012.

Bachrach also add-ed that they’ll have to look at possibly raising the general road main-tenance budget if this sort of winter is going to be repeated.

Rock spending on a roll in northwestern region

Submitted

Students at Smithers Secondary School hosted a fashion show in the Round Room last Wednesday, displaying an assortment of styles created by the students themselves.

FASHION

SHOWSHOW

NEW CURATOR

The Bulkley Valley Museum’s new curator settles into role.

OUR TOWN/A5

HOSPITAL SUPPORT

A cash infusion for Wrinch Memorial helps with training.

THREE RIVERS/B3

LETTERS LETTERS A7SPORTS SPORTS A9COMMUNITY COMMUNITY A13THREE RIVERS THREE RIVERS B1CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS B5

INVESTORS GROUP A3RAYZ BOARDSHOP A9

HIGH: 0LOW: -5

HIGH: 1LOW: -4

HIGH: 3LOW: -6

HIGH: 4LOW: -2

HIGH: 2LOW: -5

WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTHHHHHHHEEEEERRWednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

See ROCKS on Page A4

105th Year - Week 9 Smithers, B.C. Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com Single Copy • $1.34 ($1.20 + 14¢ HST), y, y ,th Year - Week 9 Smithers, B.C. Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com g py ( Single Copy • $1.34 ( )$1.20 + 14¢ HST)

TTHE HE IINTERIOR NTERIOR NNEWSEWSPraise-A-Reader EditionPraise-A-Reader Edition

88 days ‘til Relay for Life, May 26th.“Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back”“Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back”

Page 2: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

Organizer Ben Heemskerk brought a hard hat to a Feb. 22 open house about a summer trail use plan for the Bulkley tim-ber supply area, and it wasn’t a bad idea.

To judge by stand-ing shows of support, half the people who filled the seats, stairs and upper balcony in the Northwest Com-munity College foyer came calling to scrap the plan.

“Why do we need a RAMP?” asked Telkwa resident Ted Cullis, who says the Recreational Access Management Plan is an attempt by bureau-crats and foreign-born “transplants” to tell long-time valley resi-dents where they can or can’t ride their ATVs.

Heemskerk, a mem-ber of the volunteer board that re-convened the RAMP last Oc-tober, said the plan is needed to protect the Bulkley’s many un-desiginated summer

trails.“All the places I

used to recreate as a kid—they’re all hous-ing developments now,” he said, speaking of his childhood home in the Okanagan.

“If we can get it right now, it’ll make a differ-ence 50 years from now when this valley con-tinues to change.”

As for who sits on the RAMP table, Heemskerk said the key is to strike a bal-ance of off-roaders, horse riders, hikers and other user groups—not to discriminate based on length of residency.

“That’s not fair,” he said. “Everybody should be included in a planning process for community they live in.”

Rick Fuerst, a Telk-wa councillor who also called for scrapping the RAMP, agreed that length of residency should not be an issue.

The problem, Fu-erst said, is that a lot of motorized users do not feel the RAMP can fairly represent their interests.

“I beat the drums to get a lot of people out. If I had more time, I could have had a thou-sand people at that meeting,” he said.

Fuerst said it’s not enough that six of the 12 RAMP members simply own an off-road vehicle, and two are members of the BV Quad Riders Club—the process should in-volve elected officials.

“They talk about being the voice of the public, and I think an elected body definitely is that, just by its na-ture,” he said.

Fellow Telkwa councillor Rimas Zit-kauskas made a similar call at the meeting, sug-gesting that summer trails planning should

be handled by the Re-gional District of Bulk-ley Nechako.

But the 736,000-hectare Bulkley timber supply area stretches far outside regional district boundaries, said Kevin Eskelin, a recreation officer with B.C.’s Recreation Sites and Trails Branch.

Eskelin also said that designating and main-taing trails on Crown land is ultimately a pro-vincial responsibility.

From the early 2000s until 2008, the B.C. government formed RAMPs in Vander-hoof, Golden, Fernie, Cranbrook and several towns in the Koote-nays. Those plans were made with advisory committees made up of

local recreation groups, but the Bulkley RAMP is the first in a provin-cial shift to have plans led by an arm’s length community board.

After the Feb. 22 meeting, Heemskerk said the RAMP table may take more time with a draft that was expected in March.

“You’re not just going to push some-thing through when you haven’t adequately been able to deal with public comments,” he said.

“People often have these lines in the sand,” he added, “But when they can actually have a real conversation they realize ‘Hey, we’re people too. We can get along.’”

NEWSNEWSA2 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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35191 Hwy 16 Large home on 40 acres (25 cleared), large pond, great views and Hwy access. 30 min to Smithers and 15 min to Houston.

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Andrew Hudson/Interior News

Jeff Anderson, chair of the Bulkley Valley Community Resources Board, speaks at a Feb. 22 open house on a summer trails plan.

By Andrew HudsonSmithers/Interior News

RAMP talk brings critics, supporters

Page 3: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

NEWSNEWSThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A3

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Minding Your Money Lighten your debt load - strategies for eliminating debt

It’s such a slippery and subtle slope – sliding into debt, that is. A little here, a little there and before you know it, most of your money is going to servicing debt instead of enjoying life now or saving for a financially secure tomorrow.If you have a life partner, debt can be a symptom of a larger problem – like poor communication, differing goals and life expectations, or if one of you is a saver and the other a spender. If that sounds like your situation, you’ve got plenty of company. Only 15% of Canadian couples have never disagreed about money and one in ten Can-adians have left a relationship due to disagreements over money.*That’s why it’s important to look beyond your debt symptoms – spending too much, watching your debt mount – to uncover the real reasons for you debt issues, like identifying the behavior that got you into debt in the first place, and taking steps to resolve the issues so your slide into debt doesn’t cause even bigger problems down the road.Start with a detailed financial review and by establishing financial life goals that both of you share, understand, and agree to. Focus on reducing your debt load by targeting ‘bad debt’ first – high interest rate credit or retail cards, for example – and through a debt consolidation/monthly debt reduction plan.Then, look longer term with a realistic financial strategy for saving toward your kids’ education,your retirement, paying down your mortgage … and/or other life goals that are important to you.Your strategy could include:

Establishing an emergency reserve using Tax-Free Savings Accounts (TFSAs).• Protecting your family with life, critical illness and disability insurance.• Funding your children’s education with Registered Education Savings Plans (RESPs).• Funding your retirement (and/or your partner’s retirement) with Registered Retirement• Savings Plans (RRSPs).•

Depending on your personal situation, there are other debt-reduction, money-saving strategies that will help al-leviate stress and get you debt-free and on track for financial security. Your professional advisor can provide both the third-party perspective and the financial planning expertise to develop the plan that will work for you.

*PayPal survey – March 2009

This column, written and published by Investors Group Financial Services Inc. (in Québec – a Financial Services Firm), presents general information only and is not a solicitation to buy or sell any investments. Contact your own advisor for specific advice about your circumstances. For more information on this topic please contact your Investors Group Consultant.

2012 SmithersSpirit of the Mountains Winter Festival

February 8 - 12, 2012The Town of Smithers extends a BIG thank you to all those who helped to make this year’s Spirit of the Mountains Winter Festival a success. We hope you enjoyed the five days of activities and events that were planned.

Our Event Organizers include:Bulkley Backcountry Ski SocietyBulkley Valley BackpackersBulkley Valley Cross Country Ski ClubBV Pool & Recreation CentreBV Search and RescueHudson Bay MountainMOST for Children ECDSmithers Lions ClubTrails NorthB & T Wagon RidesSmithers Community Services Association - Literacy OutreachSmithers Steelheads Hockey groupSmithers Works and Operations staffSmithers Recreation staffSmithers Curling Club

If you would like to host an activityduring next year’s Fesitval, please contact Andrew Hillaby, Director of Recreation, Parks & Culture at 250.847.1600.

Don’t let cyber bullies score!We’re holding a poetry writing contest for young people to raise awareness about online bullying and its effects. The winner flies to Vancouver to see the Canucks play! The deadline is March 16. Visit our website or call our offices for more info. Doug Donaldson, MLA, Stikine | Smithers 847-8841 | Hazelton 842-6338 dougdonaldson.ca | @donaldsondoug | facebook.com/dougdonaldsonmla

MLA reacts to government’s budget

More help for housing, seniors

By Cameron Orr and Tom FletcherSmithers / Interior News

The B.C. govern-ment is restricting spending increases and keeping its small business income tax alive to meet its bal-anced budget target before the 2013 elec-tion.

Finance Minister Kevin Falcon pre-sented his first bud-get Tuesday, with a deficit of $969 mil-lion for the fiscal year starting April 1, as B.C. pays to end the harmonized sales tax. His three-year plan predicts a $154 mil-lion surplus in 2013-14 and $250 million

surplus the following year.

To do that, the budget aims to hold government spend-ing growth down to two per cent for three years, with most of it going to health and education. That leaves most other ministries with little or no increase for in-flation, a restriction that is expected to reduce overall B.C. government staff from about 27,000 this year to 25,000 by 2014-15.

Falcon also re-versed course on business taxes. The government has been promising for years that it would elimi-

nate the small busi-ness income tax this spring, after lower-ing it to the current 2.5 per cent. Now it will continue at 2.5 per cent until B.C.’s financial picture im-proves.

Falcon is also con-sidering a one per cent increase in the general corporate tax rate to 11 per cent, but not for another year depending on financial conditions. That move positions the B.C. Liberals po-litically for an election against NDP leader Adrian Dix, who has called for a corporate tax increase.

Stikine MLA Doug Donaldson suggested

that the finance min-ister did the best job he could but added that his ‘boss’, Chris-ty Clark, has no solid vision for the future of the province.

He slammed cut-backs in the budget in the Ministry of Advanced Education, pointing to the Indus-try Trade Association in particular which has a $9 million cut-back, he said.

“When we’ve got a college like North-west Community Col-lege that’s struggling financially, I was hoping to see more emphasis on the skills training that’s need-ed,” said Donaldson.

He said he’s not

suggesting every ministry needs to see more funding but that with the prospect of further increased spending on resource extractions in the north a jobs plan is needed to give local people the skills to work.

“If you don’t have that then a jobs plan is next to meaningless unless you’ve got the training component,” he said.

He also noted that nothing was men-tioned about forestry in the budget, a fact he said he found shocking.

Finance Minister Kevin Falcon found money in his restraint budget Tuesday to boost home building and renovations.

First-time buy-ers are eligible for up to $10,000, but only if they buy a new home. That follows a harmonized sales tax

break announced last week, which raises the threshold for an HST rebate on new homes from $525,000 to $850,000. The HST rebate was also extended to the pur-chase of new vacation homes, offered until the HST reverts to the old provincial sales

tax in March, 2013.Falcon also an-

nounced a new se-niors’ home renova-tion tax credit offers up to $1,000 for up-grades and modifi-cations that allow seniors to remain in their homes.

B.C. Federation of Labour president Jim

Sinclair blasted the housing bonus, which he said goes mainly to wealthy people who can afford new homes, while government ser-vices for seniors, for-estry and other needs can’t keep up.

Page 4: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

NEWSNEWSA4 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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Started at Lokks Salon in the fall, establishing quite the clientele already and always welcoming new clients.

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“ ”

Among the focuses for Donaldson is de-velopment a frame-work around First Na-tion consultation. As deputy chair for the Select Standing Com-mittee on Finance, he said he heard om a lot of people in the pri-vate sector saying they want the government to establish more cer-tainty over their role in consultation.

He’ll also be ques-tioning the government over budget estimates for the environmental assessment office.

He said that it ap-pears the EAO is not getting an increase to its budget this year, which Donaldson finds troubling as there is a potential of $32 bil-lion in investments for the north in the next few years. No more funding could create a

backlog of permitting, he said.

“Nobody can argue against looking for in-creased efficiencies but if it comes to cutting corners that’s going to lead to unnecessary delays so we need to have public confidence in the environmental assessment process,” he said.

This was the 23rd year for the Rock Talk conference.

ROCKS from p. A1

By Malcolm BaxterKitimat / Black Press

Transport Canada says its TERMPOL review of the North-ern Gateway project “has not identified any regulatory issues or gaps or the need to consider any new reg-ulatory requirements at this time.”

TERMPOL is short for Technical Review Process of Marine Terminal Sys-tems and Tranship-ment Sites.

Transport Canada explains, “TERM-POL is an extensive, though voluntary re-view process in which proponents involved in building and op-erating a marine terminal system for bulk handling of oil, chemicals and lique-fied gases can partici-pate.”

Enbridge did take part in the process and “would be expect-ed to fully implement its commitments and intentions” detailed in its submissions to the process.

Transport Can-ada said the Cana-

dian Coast Guard reviewed the water-ways the oil tankers would use, the size of the largest tankers, marine traffic density and factors affecting manoeuvrability.

They found that the proposed route complied with nation-al and international regulations and pro-vided “the required clearances for good vessel manoeuvrabil-ity and allowances for very large crude carri-ers (VLCC).”

It noted that was consistent with the results from simula-tions undertaken by Enbridge.

Transport Canada went so far as to say that those results showed VLCCs “are capable of navigating the entire route unas-sisted.”

In other words, es-cort tugs are not nec-essary, which Trans-port Canada says is consistent with the opinions of Pacific Pilotage Author-ity Canada and BC Coast Pilots .

However, Enbridge has committed to the

use of such tugs and, as mentioned above, would therefore be expected to live up to that commitment.

The BC pilots had pointed to some nar-row spots “as war-ranting caution for two-way traffic.” And the Canadian Coast Guard had noted the Lewis Passage-Wright Sound area “warrants some caution as a re-sult of multi-direc-tional traffic.”

However, in prac-tice the pilots organi-sation would “adjust a vessel’s speed to avoid meeting other vessels in these areas.”

Transport Canada noted speeds may have to be adjusted to take into account traffic in the Wright Sound area.

The report also pointed out that with increased shipping, there could be an in-creased threat to the “well-being of marine populations [primar-ily whales] along the shipping route.

And that Enbridge has said it would take steps “to avoid con-tact with mammals.”

Public confi dence needed

Tanker concerns minimal

Page 5: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

By Cameron OrrSmithers / Interior News

It didn’t take Mi-chelle Reguly long to be shocked by Smithers history.

The Bulkley Valley Museum’s new curator, in the job now for close to three months, left small-town Ontario to take the post in small-town B.C. and has found the area a very welcoming and friendly community.

As for what shocked her about our local history, it was one of Smithers’ little known — at least to people from outside the area— fact that we are the original home of the egg carton.

“The egg carton. Did not know about the egg carton at all,” she said when asked if there has been any-thing surprising about Bulkley Valley history.

The safe transport of eggs is, of course, only a small part of local history. Since ar-riving in town from an area relatively near Sudbury, Ontario she has been cramming a century’s worth of knowledge, thanks to the information sources of Bulkley Val-ley Museum Director Fergus Tomlin, locally written books, and the

collected wisdom of residents.

“I love visitors. They either have stories or presents. I’m okay with that,” said Reguly, who doesn’t let any air of dryness surround her work as a collector of old things.

She said there have been a lot of people who have come in to tell her about many previously untold sto-ries of the valley. She welcomes the knowl-edge.

“Lots to learn, lots to learn,” she said. “[And] still lots to learn.”

With a Masters in museum studies from the University of Syd-ney in Australia, she knows a lot about the craft of chronicling history, but she’s also very good at breaking down, in simple terms, what it is she does.

“It’s sort of a scav-enger hunt through

time,” she said.Her journey to cu-

ratorship started, natu-rally, many years ago.

She said that as a child, during her fam-ily vacations, art galler-ies and museums were a common stop and she developed a fond appreciation of those places.

Initially her desire was to take up being an artist and have her works on display, but it eventually shifted to being the person dis-playing the objects.

“It came about when I discovered I couldn’t draw straight lines with rulers, I realized I need to get out of making art and displaying art,” she said.

Being able to take museum studies in the warm climate of Aus-tralia was a bonus.

Right now she’s overseeing The Grey exhibit, showcasing in-formation on the recent Hollywood film that was produced partly in Smithers.

In the spring they’ll be presenting another exhibit, that one on the Titanic and it’s infa-mous voyage.

And yes, there is a Smithers connection to that tragedy. If you want to know how we’re involved, you’ll have to see the show.

Cameron Orr / Interior News

Michelle Reguly poses for a photo during a welcome luncheon in her honour at the Old Church. Last working for a museum in Ontario, she has settled in to the Bulkley Valley and has gone to work discovering many of the region’s secrets.

OUR TOWNOUR TOWN

Keeper of valley historyKeeper of valley historyCurator enjoys new post

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Man Art The Gallery challenged men to break out of their traditional crafts or trades and let loose their creative, artistic spirits. Feb. 28-March 31. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 12-4pm. More info: www.smithersart.org, [email protected], 250-847-3898.

Opening reception for Man Art, Friday, March 2, 7-9 p.m. at the Smithers Art Gallery. Come along and discover the artists you might not have known existed! All welcome and admission is free.

Smithers Film Society March 4, 7:30 p.m. at the Roi Theatre. Pina.

Growing fruit in the Bulkley Valley March 5, 7 p.m., NWCC Gathering Area. Three fruit growers discussing their strategies for growing strawberries, raspberries, and tree fruits in the north.

Yukon Adventure: Rafting the Firth River Thursday, March 8, 7:30 p.m. at NWCC. Slides and talk by Brenda Anderson and Debbie Courtliff for the BV Naturalists.

Watoto Children’s Choir Thursday, March 8, 7 p.m. at Mountain View Assembly for one performance only. Free admission. An opportunity is made available for you to contribute financially to the Watoto Children’s Choir.

Seniors Income Tax Clinic Saturday, March 10, 1-4 p.m. at Pioneer Activity Centre. Please Call Staffie at 250-847-2380 for an appointment.

The Cheesecake Burlesque Revue Saturday, March 10, 8:30-11:30 p.m. at the Hudson Bay Lodge. www.cheesecakeburlesque.com.

To list your nonprofi t coming events please drop off your listings at The Interior News, 3764 Broadway Ave., fax us at 250-847-2995, or email [email protected]. Deadline for submissions is Fridays at noon. Maximum 25 words. Limited space is available. We regret we cannot accept items over the phone.

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It’s sort of It’s sort of a scaven-a scaven-ger hunt ger hunt through through

time.time.— Michelle Reguly— Michelle Reguly

The Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A5

Page 6: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

I remember walking into a shop on Main Street my first weekend in town. I was here to get a feel for what Smithers was all about after I had

said yes to a job as this paper’s editor.

I had only been a re-porter at the even-small-er town paper the Kiti-mat Northern Sentinel so taking the spot as editor here was a daunt-ing prospect.

I talked to the guy behind the counter and remarked that I hoped that, given my ‘fresh-ness’ to the job, people would give me a fair shake and time to ad-just. I suppose my fear was that this town was going to rip me apart in the early days.

In a calm, soothing voice the guy replied that no, the town wouldn’t.

That was the television moment where I took a comically large gulp before a break to commercial.

Well, it’s been 903 days since I published my in-troductory column in the paper (I used an online ‘date calculator’ to figure that out) and for the most part I think things worked out pretty well in the end. At least from what people are telling me.

I haven’t come out of this experience entirely bruise-free. I’ve been rightly, and sometimes not-so-rightly, chewed out for things that were in the paper by, um, some of our more passionate readers.

Really, though, that tells me people take intense pride in the paper, and want it to be the best and most accurate source for news. It’s a mandate that I’ve strived towards ever since arriving.

I’m confident that my replacement, Percy Hé-bert, will take this paper and make it even bet-ter. He’s a finalist for two Ma Murray newspaper awards this year, it should be noted, an indication of the quality of work you can expect from him.

I’ll let him fill you in on what he’s all about next week. March 7 will be his first issue of The Interior News, incidentally the last day that I’ll be a resident of the Town of Smithers. From myself, I wish him a great 903 days and more as editor of the paper.

A big thanks needs to go to everyone in the Bulkley Valley who have supported me, pushed me to be better, and who have sent in letters over the years. It’s been a wild ride.

Of course thanks to my Interior News co-work-ers who guided me along in my early days and who continue to be a rock solid newspaper team.

I will certainly miss this town, I’ll miss the Bulk-ley Valley as a whole, and I’ll miss seeing a constant stream of my eye-rolling puns in this paper’s head-lines. I’ve had fun being here, and I hope you’ve had fun having me.

I have to have a little bit of a brag here; today it was

plus-7 degrees. Did you hear that? Not as warm in the north-east but as most often seems to be the case the sun did shine.

Many of you have called about the in-creasing number of common redpolls coming to the feeders. Included in those re-ports are the sightings of some birds that seem sick. You will notice these birds eas-ily. They are usually quite puffed up and lethargic. The prob-lem is that birds who feed in large flocks

poop where they eat and the result is sal-monella. There hap-pened to be a couple articles about pine siskins on the coast having the same issue. The Vancouver Sun and the Province had this information.

What can we do? First, make sure all the old seed is raked up. Clean your feed-ers with a 10 per cent bleach solution. Air dry the feeders before you put them back. One suggestion was that if sick birds are detected take down the feeders.

Make sure sick birds are picked up.

You can put them in a little box. They will most often die. If they do pass on make sure you dispose of the wee bodies in a safe

way. I burn the dead birds in a wood stove if it happens that ill-ness comes this way. So far I have not seen any. Wash your hands after handling sick birds.

Sorry to go on and on about that but it did seem important.

I should have men-tioned more about all the owls folks seem to be seeing. A couple great grey owls seen across the way near Tyhee Lake. I have heard the saw whet owl most evenings.

Jean from Fort Nel-son has a good group of evening grosbeaks at her feeder. She has

noticed a couple with the leg mite problem. Does it affect other species? I have never seen the problem on other birds. I am sure someone who knows a lot more that I do will let me know.

I have noticed two ravens who come here every day seeming to be whispering sweet nothings to each oth-er.

I will make more of an effort to men-tion the many sight-ings you have called in for next week. Keep the calls coming to 250-846-5095 or just e-mail a note to [email protected].

MEMBER:B.C. and Yukon Community Newspaper Association

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B.C. Press CouncilTHE INTERIOR NEWS IS A POLITICALLY INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY BLACK PRESS GROUP LTD.

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THE INTERIOR NEWSTHE INTERIOR NEWS • ESTABLISHED APRIL 13, 1907 • MEMBER OF THE B.C. PRESS COUNCIL

We acknowledge the fi nancial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES including HST:

Local – $43 per yearSeniors – $31.50 per year

Out of Area – $65 per yearUSA – $246 per year

Serving Smithers, the Bulkley Valley, the Hazeltons and District, Houston and District, and published on Wednesday of each week at 3764 Broadway Avenue, Smithers, B.C.

Copyright number 321634.Stories, photographs, illustrations, designs and type styles in The Interior News are the property of the copyright holders, its illustrations repo services and advertising agencies. Reproduction in whole or in part, without written permission, is specifi cally prohibited.

Authorized as second-class mail by the Post Offi ce Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.

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The Interior News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby street, Nanaimo, B.C., V9R-2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

THE INTERIOR NEWSTHE INTERIOR NEWS

P.O. Box 2560, Smithers, B.C., Smithers, B.C.3764 Broadway Ave. • Phone 847-3266 • Fax 847-2995

: [email protected] [email protected]

P.O3764 Broadway Ave. • Ph

VERTISINV RTA GADADVERTISINGOPINIONOPINION2010

2010 WINNER

Birders reporting numbers of sick redpolls

A6 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

That’s all, folks

woushakjust. was goin

ON THE LINEON THE LINECameron OrrCameron Orr

tiothebegreacTy

FOR THE FOR THE BIRDSBIRDS

Brenda MalloryBrenda Mallory

Page 7: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

OPINIONOPINION

LETTERS TO THE EDITORLETTERS TO THE EDITORSuccessful

Alzheimer’s walk

Editor :Thanks for walking,

Smithers. To everyone who helped make the 2012 Investors Group Walk for Memories a success: You’ve helped make a difference for people in our commu-nity who are living with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.

Through our event and 23 others held around the province on Jan. 29, we’ve raised more than $690,000 – and counting – to sup-port the work of the Al-zheimer Society of B.C. This amount exceeds our record-breaking totals from last year. Smithers alone raised over $7,600 and money is still coming in. If you would still like to donate, contact the In-vestors Group office at 250-847-9620.

Funds raised help people who are im-pacted by the disease to have the confidence and skills to maintain quality of life, and sup-port research into the causes, more effective treatments and a cure.

Special thanks to our dedicated volun-teer committee for the countless hours each of you has contributed, and also to all care giv-ers who were the spe-cial honouree’s of this year’s walk.

We’ll see you in 2013. Save the date: Jan. 27, 2013. Visit www.walk-formemories.com for more information.

Shauna PetersonSmithers Investors

Group Office

Talking Long Guns

Editor:“The Conservative

Party described the regis-try as ‘wasteful and inef-

fective’ which needlessly targeted law-abiding Ca-nadians...They claimed the registry did nothing to reduce crime.” (Inte-rior News, Feb. 22)

Bill C-10, which cre-ates mandatory mini-mum sentences for mi-nor marijuana offences, targets law-abiding Ca-nadians, is wasteful, inef-fective, and does nothing to reduce crime. I guess the Long Gun Registry needs to be scrapped so we can afford to put non-violent offenders in jail instead those who own weapons that can kill others.

Conservative reason-ing: You never know when a psychotic pot-smoker is going to point a reefer at an innocent person and pull the trig-ger. Clearly, people in possession of pot are much more dangerous to society than drunks in possession of firearms.

David DickinsonHazelton

Another long gun rebuttal

Editor:Cullen defends vote

on long gun registry (Interior News, Feb. 22, A4) could be dis-missed as the ranting of a curmudgeon who hates firearms. Unfor-tunately there is more to that. Since he has lost credence among the law-abiding gun owners a long time ago, Mr. Cullen has now turned to scare mon-gering among the un-initiated. His statement that “gun shops have to call the National Fire-arms Centre when sell-

ing a gun when private sellers don’t have such provisions,” is hog-wash. Does he think the Conservatives are so daft that they want to start a new long gun registry? Once Bill C-19 passes the Senate — the chamber of so-ber second thoughts — and becomes law, any transactions concern-ing non-restricted long guns will be based on the concept that each participant is the holder of a valid Firearms Li-cence. That document is the size of a driver’s licence and has a pho-tograph of the owner.

At a town council meeting Patrick Stewart was knitting a toque. Learned to knit at Scotch & Stitch, hosted by Brown Eyed

Girl Knitting Shop (no longer in business). Ellen was with him, she learned to knit as a child in Ger-many. Most Saturday mornings there is a group, sometimes 18 in number, who meet to knit togeth-er.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac turns 220 this year. Abraham Lincoln reportedly used the almanac to discount a witness in an 1858 murder trial. The almanac has had only 13 editors over the years. During World War II a copy was found in a German spy’s coat pocket. Another book to check out: Forgotten Bookmarks. Owner of a used book store, the au-thor found all kinds of bookmarks and started a collection. When our library has the annual book sale there are al-ways interesting book-marks to be found. They are collected and handed out to people who have purchased books.

Anniversaries and warm congratulations: Andre and Toby Coupe, 34 years; Jim and Fay Van Horn, 50 years; Excited, proud grandmother Shirley, her first grandchild was born on Oct. 13, 2011, Aiden Walter Atkinson, parents are Chris and Lori.

Time to start planning that garden. In Our Backyard continues with Seed Propagation. Lo-cal gardener Irene Howard shares her knowledge of starting garden plants, seed germination, trans-planting, soil mixes, hardening off, plant biology, diseases and troubleshooting. It’s on March 12, 7 p.m. at the library. I rotate my crop to different parts of my garden. Have been growing potatoes that are scabby, do not look good but are still ed-ible. Can’t figure out why this happens. Ever since I used sheep manure, not sure if that is the cause. This workshop should be helpful. Am planning on doing some canning this year. The website bhg.com/yesyoucan has downloadable instructions for fruits, vegetables, safety guidelines, delicious reci-pes for pickles, jams, more.

Man Art, showcasing original creations by men, different media, is running at the Smithers Art Gal-lery. Runs from Feb. 28 to Mar. 31. Opening recep-tion on Friday, March 2, 7-9 p.m.

CICK 93.9 FM’s outreach project: Smithers’ first Arts ‘zine! Free, and found at news stands around town. Watch for a CICK window display at Interior Stationery. Station is also holding a fundraiser called Casino Royale DJ Dance Party, with Lightning Guitar Monsters (5 year old DJ Ari), SLOB, Thorium Sericulture, Red Burn, The Abyss, to name a few. Come dressed to dance and game the night away. It’s on Saturday Mar. 3, start-ing from 8:30 p.m. At the Elks Hall. Tickets are $10 at Mountain Eagle Books, BC Web or call CICK at 250-847-8769. Visit smithersradio.com to find more information on the station.

Happy birthday, almanac

The Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A7

Letters to the editor policyLetters are welcomed up to a maximum of 300 words. Letters are subject to editing for clarity, brevity and legality. All letters must include the writer’s name, daytime telephone number and hometown for verification purposes. Anonymous, or pen names will not be permitted. Not all submissions will be published. Letters may be e-mailed to: [email protected].

YOUR INTERIOR NEWS TEAMYOUR INTERIOR NEWS TEAM

Otto KoldykSales Representative

Andrew HudsonReporter

Dan MesecSports Reporter

Ada WohlandProduction

Laura BottenFront Office

Cheryl TessierOffice Assistant

Shannon HurstHazeltons Correspondent

Cameron OrrEditor

Grant HarrisPublisher

See LETTERS on p. A8

VIEW FROM VIEW FROM THE PORCHTHE PORCH

Lorraine DoironLorraine Doiron

interior-news.com

Did bullying affect you in your school days?

Yes80%

No20%

Feb. 29 is Pink Shirt Day. How did bullying affect your life in school?

This week’s question was asked on The Interior News’ Facebook page.

Online Online poll resultspoll results

Susie Holland Flint

My son was bullied in school and it has affected

him into his adulthood. He is very recluse and finds it

hard to trust people.

Posted 3 days ago

Norma Ormandy-Bisenberger

I was bullied in the Smithers schools many years ago, because I was the only

redhead in my classes I was called all sorts of names by the other girls...it’s funny

because most of those girls grew up to eventually dye

their hair red.

Posted 3 days ago

Today is Pink Shirt Day to support an

end to bullying. See pinkshirtday.ca for more information

Page 8: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

OPINIONOPINIONA8 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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It has to be renewed every five years with a current passport-like photograph. There is no prior warning and it is up to each indi-vidual not to miss the deadline. The standing order “you must apply to renew your licence before the expiry date on your current li-cence” leaves no doubt that any laggard faces the confiscation of his

firearms. If this isn’t gun control, what is?

Incidentally, there is a curious aspect to Mr. Cullen’s tirade about the “lack of gun con-trol”, the “potential bootleg market” and the “ease for gangs to get guns.” When he talks about the licence verification provision, intentionally or not, he uses the all-encom-passing word ‘gun’ rather than the dis-

tinct term ‘long gun’, thereby changing the whole concept. ‘Guns’ include all firearms, whether they are non-restricted — like shot-guns and rifles — or restricted — like hand-guns. Since 1934 trans-

actions of the latter have always involved the Firearms Centre. That provision is not likely to change and there is no reason that it should.

Walter HromatkaSmithers

LETTERS from p. A7

Country still has gun control

Prudent, defined as “careful in managing re-

sources so as to pro-vide for the future”, is a laudable goal when discussing public fi-nances in these eco-nomic times.

In fact, BC Lib-eral Finance Minister Kevin Falcon used it numerous times lead-ing up to, and during, the provincial budget Feb. 21.

But I was wonder-ing what the word actually meant to the finance minster or his government when I opened the 2012/13 budget documents to find the seventh an-nual deficit in the BC Liberal’s 12-year lega-cy and another $7 bil-lion added to the pro-vincial debt next year.

The minister knew these figures in ad-vance and yet contin-ued with his ‘prudent’ messaging. I believe that shows a signifi-cant credibility gap for this government.

This ‘say one thing and do another’ ap-proach is evident in many other outcomes

of the 2012/13 budget despite what Premier Clark and her MLAs are saying publicly.

I focus on what these contradictions mean to Stikine’s ru-ral communities and people.

The first example is about skills training for people living in the northwest. One way of providing for the future is through train-ing opportunities so that local people have the best chance for lo-cal jobs. Yet last year Northwest Commu-nity College’s trades training allocation from the provincial In-dustrial Training Au-thority was cut by 4%.

In this budget, ITA funding is slashed by more than $9 million. The implications for trades programming are worrying. The Ministry of Advanced Education budget is being cut back at a time when each col-lege across the north is facing a million dollar plus deficit. This does not bode well for core funding being sought by NWCC’s award winning School of Exploration and Min-ing, let alone expand-ing to meet labour market needs. The budget means we are setting the stage for a ‘fly in, fly out’ labour force. This scenario would be an injustice for residents of the northwest, where un-employment is higher than average.

The second exam-ple that stood out for me is that the word ‘forestry’ or ‘forests’ did not appear once in the minister’s bud-get speech. And yet, the auditor general’s recent report said the government’s refores-tation efforts are not

keeping up with the growing inventory of land needing restock-ing and that the Min-istry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has no real plan around forest management. The re-sponse in the budget? A $20 million cut in the next two years in silviculture, inventory and forest restoration activities. It makes one wonder how that is managing in a way to provide for the future. Forestry built many of our communities – it can still provide good jobs but the public for-ests must get the atten-tion they deserve from government.

Oh, and a sample of what did get funded in next year’s budget? $15 million for an ad-vertising campaign to promote the BC Lib-eral’s jobs plan. And the Officer of Pre-mier’s $9 million bud-get remained intact.

Odd priorities and ones that don’t match up with what is needed in the north. Doug Donaldson is the

Stikine MLA.

Prudent not a word to defi ne budget

f the 2012/13 budget

plunotfunby win

GUEST VIEWGUEST VIEWDoug DonaldsonDoug Donaldson

Page 9: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

By Dan MesecSmithers / Interior News

The Steelheads faced a disappointing loss this past weekend against the Williams Lake Stampeders in the first game of the SMP Cup final, however it’s not dampening their spir-its as they prepare to take on the Stampeders at home in only a few short days.

At the first step on to the ‘fish tank’ bus, the Steelheads were feeling loose and ready for the task at hand. After a team meal and warm up session at the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Center the Steelheads came out flying, a tech-nique that has found them sound success this season.

Exploding out of the gate, they quickly took dominance over Stam-peder territory early in the game. However, this was a much different game than the Steel-heads have been use to lately. So far in the playoffs the Steelheads have been blowing the competition out of the water though with the Stampeders it’s turning into a different story. Both teams are skilled

and have the drive to win, so it will be a gritty battle to the end.

The first period was scoreless. Each team found numerous chanc-es but neither team could finish. Smithers netminder Mike Wall, and Williams Lake goaltender Justin Foote were outstanding, re-jecting 43 and 35 shots respectively.

Crushing hits and flaring tempers made this by far the best game of the season so far.

The second period had a bit of a slow start for the Steelheads, who

were trapped behind the blue line for most of the period which lead to a Stampeder goal at 5:49 into the second.

“They’re out there communicating with each other really well,” said head coach Tom DeVries during the second intermission. “They’re staying posi-tive and very excited for the third period so hopefully good things will happen and we’ll get a goal.”

Despite the fact that they didn’t achieve that this game they are very optimistic about

the next two games at home.

Toward the end of the game tensions were running high, as the Steelheads pulled Wall in the dying seconds of the game to try and break one through. Coming up short the Steelheads lost their first game of the 2011-2012 season 1-0, ending their unbeaten streak and posting a 22-1 record by the end of the game.

“We got unlucky in a few places. We played re-ally well, we’re not down on ourselves for the way we played, not like last

year when we stunk the building,” assistant cap-tion Ryan DeVries told The Interior News.

“We feel good, it’s best of three for a rea-son and we feel we out played them for the most

part and we’re feeling confident coming home and taking two in a row in our own barn.”

Inside this Week:Check

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SPORTSSPORTSThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A9

Steelheads loss won’t dampen spirits for SMP Cup victory

Dan Mesec/The Interior News

Steelheads forwards Rob Miller and Ian Smith rush the Stampeders’ net as a loose puck fl oats free. The Steelheads had a number of chanc-es to score but just couldn’t get the bounces they needed Saturday night in Williams Lake.

Dan Mesec/The Interior News

Smithers Captain Darryl Young leads his team on to the ice for the fi rst game of the fi nal round of the SMP Cup playoffs at the Cariboo Recre-ation Complex in Williams Lake, Sat. Feb. 25.

Page 10: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

SPORTSSPORTSA10 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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A i t ki f

Skating to the classicsBy Dan MesecSmithers / Interior News

The Smithers figure skating club will be performing this year’s carnival this weekend with a new twist that may have you dancing from your seats. In the past the carnival has been focused on telling a particular story. This year athletes will be skating to the sounds and memories of clas-sic films like Footloose and Grease.

“All of the skaters have worked so hard at memorizing their numbers,” said head

coach Melissa Robin-son. “I have had high expectations by giving all of the kids more then one number to remember. The cos-tumes are great this year and all of the kids seem to be having fun.”

This past weekend the club was in Kiti-mat for a jamboree, with skaters coming in from all over the Northwest region.

While in Prince Ru-pert, Smithers figure skater Samantha Fal-lows received the pres-tigious Senior Artistic award, recognizing her

for her effort to create a superb performance.

With more than 80 skaters a part of the club this year the Smithers figure skat-ers will be prepar-ing to host their own northwest competi-tion next year after having another suc-cessful year that will come to a close this weekend with the final carnival and the event is sure to please.

The carnival, called ‘A Night at The Mov-ies’, will kick off March 2. at 6:30 p.m. at the Smithers Civic Center.

Jon Muldoon/The Interior News

Neve Foreman, 11, and Taylor Foreman, 13, rehearse their moves for the Footloose segment of the Smithers Figure Skating Clubs 2012 Winter Carnival.

CHECK US OUT ONLINECHECK US OUT ONLINEinteriorinterior--news.news.comcom

Page 11: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

By Cameron OrrSmithers / Interior News

Twelve pairs of ski-ers took to the slopes of Hudson Bay Moun-tain for an afternoon of light-hearted com-petition for Winter-land’s Amazing Race competition.

The skiers had to complete a series of challenges on the hill for the eventual prize of bragging rights — and $300 to spend at Winterland.

The team of Erin Havard and Claire Challen smoked the competition to place first.

In second place was Mark Rossman and Becky Misener.

Katherine Gattiker and Sam Hildebrandt came in at third.

Winterland owner Richard Norton said it was an event de-signed all around hav-ing fun.

The challenges cov-ered the gamut from trying to find an im-age in a magazine to skiing a mild slope blindfolded while your partner guided you with only their voice.

They also had to do other things such as taking pictures with skiers who weren’t competing, eating eight soda crackers without any water, and blowing a bubble with bubble gum.

In short, it wasn’t just a skiing competi-tion.

“If you could ski well you could get from one challenge to the next pretty easily,” said Norton. But skill didn’t translate to suc-cess in the race neces-sarily.

He said the inter-est is out there to pos-sibly do a summer-time Amazing Race in town.

SPORTSSPORTSThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A11

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Smithers vs. Williams Lake in Smithers for the S.M.P. CupAll Saturday games are as follows: warm up at 7 pm, puck drop at 7:30. All Sundays games: warm up at 1 pm, puck drop at 1:30 pm.

Ticket prices and game times subject to change without notice.

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Lump sum cash withdrawals, which are taxed • in the year of receipt.Convert to an annuity ( xed term or life)• Take out a Registered Retirement Income • Fund (RRIF) or any combination of these.

Annuity: An annuity purchase provides a pre-determined dollar amount of taxable monthly income, which remains xed for the life of the annuitant. The amount payable is determined by interest rates in effect at the time of pur-chase. Generally, a higher market interest rate at the time of purchase will result in higher pe-riodic income from a given amount of capital.RRIF: A Registered Retirement Income Fund is similar, in most respects, to a Registered Re-tirement Savings Plan, except that a minimum annual withdrawal is determined by regula-tion. This amount is included in the annuitant’s income each year. There is no requirement to change investments within an RRSP when it is converted to an RRIF.

Skiers compete in Amazing Race

Cameron Orr/Interior News

Amazing Race skiers prepare to start their fi rst challenge on Hudson Bay Mountain.

Page 12: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

SPORTS / COMMUNITYSPORTS / COMMUNITYA12 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

In 1913 a new community was in design. Survey-ors working for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad were laying out the streets that we in Smithers walk and drive upon today! January 1, 2013 we will begin our centennial celebration.

Smithers Centennial 2013 belongs to all residents of Smithers – current and former. If you would like to plan or be part of an event for our Centennial year, we invite you to get started and join the team.

August 3 – 10 has been selected for the Smithers 2013 Homecoming. Please invite your friends and family to visit Smithers then. Many event ideas are being worked on now, but what will make our centennial memorable for each and every one of us, is how we participate. You are encouraged to plan an event with your friends and family or with your sport club or community organization. Events can be very small or very large. If you are part of an ongoing or annual event or tournament, we urge you to consider adopting the Smithers Centennial 2013 theme and feel free to use our logo.

Some of the events and projects we are aware of include a Centennial Calendar, History of Hockey, Centennial Concerts, historical exhibits, and story-telling.

We are in the process of constructing a website at www.smithers2013.com, so check it out in the next few weeks. There is also a facebook page “Smith-ers Centennial 2013” which is one other way to stay in touch and share ideas.

Please contact any of the team you know - Gladys Atrill, ChairJo Ann Groves, Vice ChairDavid McKenzie, FinanceCheryl Ann Stahel, MarketingHeather Gallagher, MarketingGrant Harris, Marketing Sean Mitchell, Centennial 2013 Legacy Marlene Raddatz, AdministrationBill Goodacre, HomecomingCarli Heinrichs, Centennial 2013 QuiltSharon Carrington, Entertainment

Or you can email: [email protected]

I read because . . .

Praise-A-Reader Monthin Support of Literacy in Smithers

For pure pleasure, enlightenment andmotivation, and to learn about current events.

- Cindy Palmer

“ ”

Otters at WesternsBy Dan MesecSmithers / Interior News

Two BV Otters were in the lanes this weekend compet-ing at the Western Championships in Winnipeg, looking to top the podium once again.

Brian Dohler and Brett Zollen, 17, have been training for months and their hard work finally paid off, qualifying to compete in three events in Winnipeg.

Dohler is a long distance specialist, in freestyle, sprint and backstroke putting up a new personal best to qualify at 2:08.45.

Zollen is a breast-stroke and freestyle sprint specialist, com-pleting his 100 metre breast stroke with a time of 1:08.76. Both swimmers have at-

tracted attention for Swim BC as the top swimmers of Points North as they head to the Western Champi-onships.

“This year, the competition was hosted in Winnipeg, February 16-19,” wrote Otters head coach Saskia Ter-porten in an email to The Interior News. “This short course (25 m) competition serves as an excellent racing and develop-ment opportunity for Youth and Junior competitors.”

The BV Otters will also be hosting a swim meet here in Smithers for March 10-11, with teams from Prince Rupert, Terrace and Kitimat competing against some of the top swimmer in the north for the top of the po-dium.

To coincide with International Wom-en’s Day, the Bulkley Valley Concern As-sociation is present-ing the Cheesecake Burlesque Revue from Victoria.

The association says men and women alike are encouraged to come to the event dressed in costumes — hats, evening at-tire — for an evening of “sass and spar-kles.”

The Cheeseckaes will also be facilitat-

ing a women’s work-shop called Sass 101 on Saturday, Mar. 10, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

The workshop is limited to 30 peo-ple so it is best to act quickly to get a ticket for that, which includes the evening show.

The main show itself runs on Mar. 10 at 8:30 p.m. at the Hudson Bay Lodge.

Tickets are being sold at Mountain Eagle Books.

For news items or advertisingThe Interior News • 250-847-3266

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Page 13: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

By Cameron OrrSmithers / Interior News

A new program at the Northwest Community College (NWCC) in Smithers is bringing high level paramedic training to rural ambulance workers.

The Justice In-stitute of B.C. has teamed up with the NWCC to bring the Primary Care Para-medic Program, which is the second level of ambulance training in the province.

The first level is Emergency Medical Responder.

All of the students in this current pro-gram, 12 in the current intake, are currently medical responders for BC Ambulance.

This training, which traditionally isn’t well available in rural com-munities, means para-medics can provide even better support to their patients.

Greg Wright, the JIBC’s regional train-

ing coordinator, said that this second level of training begins with anatomy and physiol-ogy and moves onto other topics such as administering IVs and protocols for various medicines.

“What this means is they can actu-ally assist patients by providing drugs to patients in situa-tions they normally wouldn’t be able to receive them, particu-larly in rural commu-nities,” added Steven Mills, the JIBC’s PCP program coordinator. “They can actually take, for example, a patient who is having an asthma attack and they can provide that patient medication.”

This new level of training will also help paramedics handle pa-tients on longer trips.

“In rural commu-nities there’s often a lot of transport time to hospital, so some-times paramedics re-ally need to be able to provide fluid replace-

ment to keep patients alive until they can get to the hospital,” said Mills.

NWCC Smithers campus principal Re-gina Saimoto said this program is in response to a need expressed in many communities, including Smithers.

“It’s great for our community to have this level of training,” said Saimoto.

The program is also running in Port Mc-Neill and will open in the future in Dawson Creek and Kamloops.

The students in

this program have come from all over the northwestern region.

Saimoto adds that this is a part-time pro-gram meaning people can continue to work while training.

“The more of those obstacles that we can take away in terms of accessibility...makes it more likely that people can take advantage of those opportunities,” she said.

COMMUNITYCOMMUNITYThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A13

Smithers Community Services

This month’s book chosen by the Early Childhood Educators is Connected Parenting, written by the Canadian author, Jen-nifer Kolari. Kolari promotes approaching our children with compassion, setting reasonable limits, and supporting them as they make good decisions in an easy to read, humorous style. “This book will not give you a perfect child, but will give you more tools to deal with those times when your child’s be-haviour is, inevitably, less than perfect” (pg 276).

A variety of topics are covered ranging from sleeping to temper tan-trums to bath-room issues with everything in between. Tips for work-ing parents, team parenting, role playing and a tool box of ideas are included in the book. There is a formula for problem solv-ing and the ac-ronym CALM: Connect, Affect, Listen, and Mirror is given as an-other wonder-ful technique

for parents.

Kolari gives a strategy, followed by an example, plus a story to make it relevant to the parent reader. Part one was an impor-tant starting point for readers as it focuses on making or repair-ing the connection between children and their parents. Everything else within the book is then based off of this concept as it is the foundation for all the other strategies, techniques and benefi ts children of all ages. As Kolari covers a topic she has given the

page numbers for the reader to fi nd out more linked to that specifi c subject. She outlines what to do and what not to do for different scenarios and ages. When a parent is ready to start using the strategies outlined they are asked to practice while their child is being good so that when diffi cult situations arise they will both understand what is happening and will have a more successful result. One area in which there may be some confusion is over how Kolari uses the term ‘Time Out’. She does not use it in the traditional sense and at all times she stays with the child, does not send them into isolation and uses it in an attachment friendly manner. When parents cover this portion of the book the Early Childhood Educators ask that readers take the time to note Kolari’s use of time out and take it in the way it is intended. This book was given a fi ve star rating and is highly recom-mended by the Early Childhood Educators as it reaffi rms the early learning techniques they use with children. By reading this book parents will better be able to have a team approach to raising their children with each other, preschool teachers and trained child care providers. There are interviews with the author on the internet that are very interesting and readers can gain further incite regarding the Kolari’s views.

Brought to you by...

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BOOKS & BEYOND

Did you know you can use your Smithers Library Card in any British Co-lumbia public library? All you need is a BC OneCard. Th e next time you’re travel-ling be sure to bring your Smithers Library card with you, so you can sign up for a BC OneCard and take advantage of all the great public libraries across the province. Smithers’ Li-brary memberships are free for residents that live in Smithers or within the Fire Protection Area and for all out-of-town schooled aged children. If you live outside of this area there are out-of-town membership fees; $35.00 for a family, $33.00 for an individual and new this year a senior’s rate of $20.00.In Our Backyard fr ee pre-sentation series is back!Monday March 12th @ 7pm: Irene Howard - Start-ing seeds for your garden.

Monday April 2nd @ 7pm: Patrick Williston - Maple Syrup harvesting.Looking for a great read? Check out these best sell-ers now at the library:

Kill Shot: Vince Flynn • Th e Virgin Cure: Ami • McKay Steve Jobs: Walter Isaac-• son Quiet: Susan Cain • Falling Backwards: Jann • Arden

Remember you can ac-cess your Library account around the clock through the Library’s website: smithers.bclibrary.ca . You can browse our collection, place an item on hold, or renew items.Drop by the library at 3817 Alfred Avenue, telephone 250-847-3043 or email [email protected]. Join us on facebook for regular library updates and event listings.

Lynne Lychak will be 85 years young on March 7th, 2012.

The family is honoured to be hosting an open

house at the Paul Lychak Hall on

March 10th, 2012, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

We are looking forward to celebrating this

wonderful occasion with all of you!

See everyone there,The Lychak Family

Program at NWCC steps up paramedic skills

The paramedics taking their second level training in Smithers.

CICK party

By Dan MesecSmithers / Interior News

Smithers CICK Community Radio station will be hosting a Casino Royal fun-draising event Satur-day night at the Elks Hall with roulette, blackjack and enter-tainment.

93.9 FM will be hosting a number of performers including DJ GOBE, The Abyss, Thorium Sericulture, Elephant in the Ga-rage, Red Burn and much more.

The Casino Royal theme is sure to attract some secret agents so try and dress in your best 007 costume.

Come out and sup-port your commu-nity radio station on March 3, at 8:30 p.m. at the Elks Hall.

Tickets are be-ing sold at Mountain Eagle Books, BC Web and CICK.

For more informa-tion call CICK at 250-847-8769.

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Page 14: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

A14 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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2 m

onth

ly p

aym

ents

div

ided

by

26 b

i-w

eekl

y pe

riods

eve

ry tw

o w

eeks

com

men

cing

on

the

cont

ract

dat

e. D

eale

r m

ay s

ell f

or le

ss. O

ffers

var

y by

mod

el a

nd n

ot a

ll co

mbi

natio

ns w

ill a

pply.

** F

rom

Feb

. 1, 2

012

to A

pr. 2

, 20

12, r

ecei

ve 0

% A

PR p

urch

ase

fi nan

cing

on

new

201

2 Fi

esta

(exc

ludi

ng S

)/Fo

cus

(exc

ludi

ng S

) mod

els

for

a m

axim

um o

f 60/

72 m

onth

s to

qua

lifi e

d re

tail

cust

omer

s, o

n ap

prov

ed c

redi

t (O

AC

) fro

m F

ord

Cre

dit.

Not

all

buye

rs w

ill q

ualif

y fo

r th

e lo

wes

t int

eres

t rat

e. E

xam

ple:

$20

,000

pur

chas

e fi n

ance

d at

0%

APR

for

60/7

2 m

onth

s, m

onth

ly p

aym

ent i

s $3

33.3

3/$2

77.7

8, c

ost o

f bor

row

ing

is $

0 or

APR

of 0

% a

nd to

tal t

o be

rep

aid

is $

20,0

00.D

own

paym

ent o

n pu

rcha

se fi

nanc

ing

offe

rs m

ay b

e re

quire

d ba

sed

on a

ppro

ved

cred

it fr

om F

ord

Cre

dit.

Taxe

s pa

yabl

e on

full

amou

nt o

f pur

chas

e pr

ice.

±Le

ase

ane

w 2

012

Focu

s SE

sed

an w

ith m

anua

l tra

nsm

issi

on a

nd g

et 0

% le

ase

annu

al p

erce

ntag

e ra

te (L

APR

) fi n

anci

ng fo

r up

to 4

8 m

onth

s on

app

rove

d cr

edit

(OA

C) f

rom

For

d C

redi

t. N

ot a

ll bu

yers

will

qua

lify

for

the

low

est L

APR

pay

men

t. Le

ase

a ve

hicl

e w

ith a

val

ue o

f $20

,599

at 0

% L

APR

for

up to

48

mon

ths

with

$2,

100

dow

n or

equ

ival

ent t

rade

in, m

onth

ly p

aym

ent i

s $1

99, t

otal

leas

e ob

ligat

ion

is $

11,6

52 a

nd o

ptio

nal b

uyou

t is

$7,8

28. O

ffer

incl

udes

Man

ufac

ture

r R

ebat

e of

$25

0 an

d cu

stom

er c

ash

of $

500.

Tax

es p

ayab

le o

n fu

ll am

ount

of l

ease

fi na

ncin

g pr

ice

afte

r M

anuf

actu

rer

Reb

ate

is d

educ

ted.

Offe

r in

clud

es fr

eigh

t and

air

tax

of $

1,60

0 bu

t exc

lude

s va

riabl

e ch

arge

s of

lice

nse,

fuel

fi ll

char

ge, i

nsur

ance

, reg

istr

atio

n, P

PSA

, adm

inis

trat

ion

fees

and

cha

rges

, any

env

ironm

enta

l cha

rges

or

fees

, and

all

appl

icab

le ta

xes.

Add

ition

al p

aym

ents

req

uire

d fo

r PP

SA, r

egis

trat

ion,

sec

urity

dep

osit,

NSF

fees

(whe

re a

pplic

able

), ex

cess

wea

r an

d te

ar, a

nd la

te fe

es. S

ome

cond

ition

s an

d m

ileag

e re

stric

tions

of

64,0

00 k

m o

ver

48 m

onth

s ap

ply.

A c

harg

e of

16

cent

s pe

r km

ove

r m

ileag

e re

stric

tions

app

lies,

plu

s ap

plic

able

taxe

s. M

anuf

actu

rer

Reb

ates

can

be

used

in c

onju

nctio

n w

ith m

ost r

etai

l con

sum

er o

ffers

mad

e av

aila

ble

by F

ord

of C

anad

a at

eith

er th

e tim

e of

fact

ory

orde

r or

del

iver

y, b

ut n

ot b

oth.

Man

ufac

ture

r R

ebat

es a

re n

ot c

ombi

nabl

e w

ith a

ny fl

eet c

onsu

mer

ince

ntiv

es. A

ll pr

ices

are

bas

ed o

n M

anuf

actu

rer’s

Sug

gest

ed R

etai

l Pric

e. †

From

Feb

. 1, 2

012

to A

pr. 2

, 201

2, r

ecei

ve $

250/

$50

0/ $

750/

$1

,000

/ $1

,750

/ $2

,000

/ $2

,500

/ $3

,000

/ $3

,500

/ $4

,000

/ $4

,500

/ $5

,000

/ $5

,500

/ $6

,500

/ $7

,500

/ in

Man

ufac

ture

r R

ebat

es w

ith th

e pu

rcha

se o

r le

ase

of a

new

201

2 Fo

cus

(exc

ludi

ng S

)/ F

lex

SE, E

-Ser

ies/

Exp

lore

r (e

xclu

ding

Bas

e)/

Fusi

on S

, Tau

rus

SE, E

scap

e I4

Man

ual,

Tran

sit C

onne

ct (e

xclu

ding

Ele

ctric

)/ M

usta

ng V

alue

Lea

der/

F-3

50 to

F-5

50 C

hass

is C

abs/

Edg

e (e

xclu

ding

SE)

/ Fl

ex (e

xclu

ding

SE)

/ M

usta

ng V

6 (e

xclu

ding

Val

ue L

eade

r)/

Fusi

on (e

xclu

ding

S),

Taur

us (e

xclu

ding

SE)

, Exp

editi

on/

Mus

tang

GT

(exc

ludi

ng G

T500

and

Bos

s 30

2)/

Esca

pe a

nd H

ybrid

(exc

ludi

ng I4

Man

ual)/

Esc

ape

V6, F

-250

to F

-450

gas

eng

ine

(exc

ludi

ng C

hass

is C

abs)

/ F-

150

Reg

ular

Cab

(exc

ludi

ng X

L 4x

2)/

F-15

0 Su

per

Cab

and

Sup

er C

rew

, F-2

50 to

F-4

50 d

iese

l eng

ine

(exc

ludi

ng C

hass

is C

abs)

. All

Rap

tor,

GT5

00, B

OSS

302,

and

Med

ium

Tru

ck m

odel

s ex

clud

ed. T

his

offe

r ca

n be

use

d in

con

junc

tion

with

mos

t ret

ail c

onsu

mer

offe

rs m

ade

avai

labl

e by

For

d of

Can

ada

at e

ither

the

time

of fa

ctor

y or

der

or d

eliv

ery,

bu

t no

t bo

th. M

anuf

actu

rer

Reb

ates

are

not

com

bina

ble

with

any

fl ee

t co

nsum

er in

cent

ives

. ††

Offe

r va

lid fro

m F

ebru

ary

1, 2

012

to A

pril

15, 2

012

(the

“Pro

gram

Per

iod”

). R

ecei

ve a

max

imum

of [$

500]

/ [$

1000

] w

orth

of se

lect

ed F

ord

cust

om a

cces

sorie

s, fac

tory

inst

alle

d op

tions

, or

Cus

tom

er C

ash

with

the

pur

chas

e or

leas

e of

a n

ew 2

012

Ford

[Fi

esta

, Foc

us, E

scap

e]/[

Fusi

on, M

usta

ng (e

xclu

ding

GT

500)

, Tau

rus,

Edg

e, F

lex,

Exp

lore

r, Ex

pedi

tion,

E-S

erie

s, T

rans

it C

onne

ct] (e

ach

an “

Elig

ible

Veh

icle

”)du

ring

the

Prog

ram

Per

iod

(the

“Offe

r”).

Offe

r m

ust b

e ap

plie

d to

the

Elig

ible

Veh

icle

. The

Elig

ible

Veh

icle

mus

t be

deliv

ered

or

fact

ory

orde

red

durin

g th

e Pr

ogra

m P

erio

d. T

axes

pay

able

on

the

tota

l pric

e of

the

Elig

ible

Veh

icle

(inc

ludi

ng a

cces

sorie

s an

d fa

ctor

y op

tions

), be

fore

the

Offe

r va

lue

is d

educ

ted.

Thi

s O

ffer

is s

ubje

ct to

veh

icle

, acc

esso

ry, a

nd fa

ctor

y in

stal

led

optio

n av

aila

bilit

y. O

nly

one

(1) O

ffer

may

be

appl

ied

tow

ard

the

purc

hase

or

leas

e of

eac

h El

igib

le V

ehic

le. T

his

Offe

r ca

n be

use

d in

con

junc

tion

with

mos

t ret

ail c

onsu

mer

offe

rs m

ade

avai

labl

e by

For

d of

Can

ada

at th

e tim

e of

fact

ory

orde

r or

del

iver

y, b

ut n

ot b

oth.

Thi

s O

ffer

is n

ot c

ombi

nabl

e w

ith C

PA, G

PC, D

aily

Ren

tal A

llow

ance

s, th

e C

omm

erci

al F

leet

Ince

ntiv

e Pr

ogra

m (C

FIP)

, or

the

A/X

/Z/D

/F P

lan

Prog

ram

. Som

e co

nditi

ons

appl

y. O

ffer

avai

labl

e to

res

iden

ts o

f Can

ada

only.

***E

stim

ated

fuel

con

sum

ptio

n ra

tings

for

the

2012

Fie

sta

1.6L

I4 5

-spe

ed M

anua

l tra

nsm

issi

on: [

6.9L

/100

km (4

1MPG

) City

, 5.1

L/10

0km

(55M

PG) H

wy]

/ 2

012

Focu

s2.

0L I4

5-s

peed

Man

ual t

rans

mis

sion

: [7.

8L/1

00km

(36M

PG) C

ity, 5

.5L/

100k

m (5

1MPG

) Hw

y] /

201

2 Es

cape

2.5

L I4

6-s

peed

Aut

omat

ic tra

nsm

issi

on: [

10.0

L/10

0km

(28M

PG) C

ity, 7

.1L/

100k

m (4

0MPG

) Hw

y] /

201

2 Ed

ge 3

.5L

V6 F

WD

6-s

peed

Aut

omat

ic tr

ansm

issi

on: [

11.1

L/10

0km

(25M

PG) C

ity, 7

.2L/

100k

m (3

9MPG

) Hw

y]. F

uel c

onsu

mpt

ion

ratin

gs b

ased

on

Tran

spor

t Can

ada

appr

oved

test

met

hods

. Act

ual f

uel c

onsu

mpt

ion

will

var

y ba

sed

on r

oad

cond

ition

s, v

ehic

le lo

adin

g, v

ehic

le e

quip

men

t,an

d dr

ivin

g ha

bits

. ‡R

emem

ber

that

eve

n ad

vanc

ed tec

hnol

ogy

cann

ot o

verc

ome

the

law

s of

phy

sics

. It’s

alw

ays

poss

ible

to

lose

con

trol

of a

vehi

cle

due

to in

appr

opria

te d

river

inpu

t fo

r th

e co

nditi

ons.

‡‡

Som

e m

obile

pho

nes

and

som

e di

gita

l med

ia p

laye

rs m

ay n

ot b

e fu

lly c

ompa

tible

– c

heck

ww

w.s

yncm

yrid

e.co

m for

a li

stin

g of

mob

ile p

hone

s, m

edia

pla

yers

, and

fea

ture

s su

ppor

ted.

Driv

ing

whi

le d

istr

acte

d ca

n re

sult

in lo

ss o

f ve

hicl

e co

ntro

l, ac

cide

nt a

nd in

jury

. For

d re

com

men

ds tha

t dr

iver

s us

e ca

utio

n w

hen

usin

g m

obile

pho

nes,

eve

n w

ith v

oice

com

man

ds. O

nly

use

mob

ile p

hone

s an

d ot

her

devi

ces,

eve

n w

ith v

oice

com

man

ds, n

ot e

ssen

tial t

o dr

ivin

g w

hen

it is

saf

e to

do

so. S

YNC

is o

ptio

nal o

n m

ost n

ew F

ord

vehi

cles

. ††

†© 2

011

Siriu

s C

anad

a In

c. “

SIR

IUS”

, the

SIR

IUS

dog

logo

, cha

nnel

nam

es a

nd lo

gos

are

trad

emar

ks o

f SIR

IUS

XM R

adio

Inc.

and

are

use

d un

der

licen

ce.

©20

12 F

ord

Mot

or C

ompa

ny o

f Can

ada,

Lim

ited.

All

right

s re

serv

ed.

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HOSKINS FORD SALES LTD HOSKINS FORD SALES LTD Hwy 16, SmithersHwy 16, Smithers

250-847-2237 250-847-2237 1-800-663-7765 1-800-663-7765 www.hoskinsford.comwww.hoskinsford.comThis is Ford CountryThis is Ford Country

Page 15: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

COMMUNITYCOMMUNITYThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com A15

For many people across B.C., mining means opportunity. The industry creates jobs at mine sites and spinoffs for surround-ing businesses, the economic bene ts of which are often spread across nearby villages, towns and cities. In addition to employment, mining compan-ies also have a responsibility to respect and contribute to the communities in which they operate. Seabridge believes strongly in responsible mining and making a connection with the communities in which it does business.

For example, last year Seabridge participated in sever-al community initiatives in north-ern B.C., including the Gitxsan Summit, the Smithers District Chamber of Commerce and the Northwest Community College job fair. The company also do-nated to the Stewart Christmas Hamper program, the Gitanyow family dance, the Mount Rainey Figure Skating Club and the Bulkley Valley Fall Fair.

As for its proposed KSM Pro-ject, located 65 kilometres northwest of Stewart, Seabridge has visited local communities around the region to outline its proposed KSM Project mine plan and, more importantly, to listen to what citizens have to say about the development.

A common theme that arises is the need to create more jobs in the region, particularly for young people, many of whom are leav-ing their homes to look for work elsewhere. But, with the electri- cation of Highway 37 and new development projects on the horizon, including Seabridge’s proposed KSM Project, the job prospects are starting to look a lot more promising. Canada’s mining sector is growing at twice the rate of the economy, with a forecasted shortfall of almost 100,000 workers over the com-ing decade. In B.C. alone, it’s estimated the industry will need 15,000 additional workers over the next 10 years amid erce competition from other prov-inces and industries for labour with similar skill sets.

Mining companies are re-sponding by trying to attract under-represented groups to the industry, including members of Canada’s aboriginal commun-ities, to ensure a strong provin-cial and national mining sector for years to come.

Seabridge is taking action by investing in local commun-ities, including a $100,000 contribution it recently made to the British Columbia Ab-original Mine Training Associ-ation (BC AMTA) to help fund a skills upgrading program,

known as Pathways to Success (P2S), in three, 10-person PS2 training programs in Gitanyow, Gitxsan and Tahltan commun-ities this year.

Finding staff is already an issue for exploration and mining pro-jects in B.C., according to Laurie Sterritt, BC AMTA’s executive director. “Seabridge’s contribu-tion clearly demonstrates they understand that workforce cap-acity development in Aboriginal communities is a way to deliver business results,” Sterritt said.

For more on the KSM Project, visit the Northwest Community College Trades Career Fair in March in Terrace; the Tahltan Central Council’s youth confer-ence in Dease Lake in April; and the Minerals North conference in Burns Lake in May. You can also drop by the KSM Project of- ce located at 1235 Main Street in Smithers (250.847.4704). To learn more about the BC AMTA P2S program, visit www.bcamta.ca.

Seabridge Gold Inc.,1235 Main Street, P.O. Box 2536,Smithers, BC V0J 2N0

www.seabridgegold.net [email protected]

Learn more about the KSM Project

RESPONSIBLE MINE DEVELOPMENT IS ABOUT INVESTING IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES

www.seabridgegold.net [email protected] more about the KSM Project

Advance Public NoticeLoad Restrictions

In order to preserve road base strength, pursuant to Section 66 of the Transportation Act, and to provisions of the Commercial Transport Act, notice is hereby given that load restrictions may be placed on short notice in the near future on all highways within the Bulkley Stikine District, including areas from Burns Lake west to Kitwanga, and north to the Yukon border, including Atlin. Restrictions will be imposed in each service area, as conditions warrant.

The restrictions will limit vehicles to 100 per cent, 80 per cent, 70 per cent or 50 per cent of legal axle loading.

Overweight permits will not be granted and all term overweight permits are invalid for the duration of the restrictions.

Trucking and transportation companies, as well as the general public, should govern themselves accordingly.

Your cooperation in adhering to the above regulations is appreciated.

If you normally receive bulk deliveries of water, fuel, livestock feed or other produce, please plan ahead so interruption to your deliveries will be minimized.

Dated in Smithers, British Columbia, this 22nd day of February, 2012.

Carl Lutz, District ManagerMinistry of Transportation and InfrastructureBulkley Stikine District

For more information about load restrictions, contact local Operations Technician Brad Boyden at 250 847-7403 or visit the Load Restrictions section of www.DriveBC.ca.

904 - Bulkley Stikine Load Restrictions.indd 1 2012-02-16 4:06:00 PM

Dr. K. Blouw & Dr. C. Pageare pleased to announce the opening

of their new Family Prac ce at1260 Main Street, Smithers

March 29th, 2012Please call 250-847-2240

for appointments.

New pa ents also welcome!

Ride the Lifts with Doug!Want to win a day of skiing and be treated to lunch at the Whisky Jack lounge? Go to dougdonaldson.ca and enter your name and email address in the box on the homepage. Good luck!

Doug Donaldson, MLA, Stikine | Smithers 847-8841 | Hazelton 842-6338 dougdonaldson.ca | @donaldsondoug | facebook.com/dougdonaldsonmla

Gallery a man’s world for MarchBy Cameron OrrSmithers / Interior News

Don’t expect Man Art to be a collection of cliches like raised toilet seats or contin-uous loops of instant replays.

Man Art will be a venue for male art-ists across the north-west to show that they’re more than just the trade they use to make a living.

Michel Kafer with the Smithers Art Gal-

lery said that the ori-gin of this show was from women-oriented shows from years ago. At the time it was suggested a man’s show would be a good idea.

She recently put out a call for men to submit their own art for the show, and there will be over 20 artists on display for the show which opened yesterday. The opening reception is on Mar. 2 at 7 p.m.

“There is a full range of skills and ages and diversity,” said Kafer about what people can expect. “There are people coming from Haida Gwaii all the way to Prince George too.”

She said the show will help to identify men as artists. Lots of men, she said, work using various crafting skills but those are always used in tradi-tional ways.

“I did ask that

people step outside of that rather than building their typical things,” she said.

With a wide range of mediums, people can expect to come away seeing a little of everything.

Man Art runs to Mar. 31. The gallery is open Tuesdays to Saturdays, noon to 4 p.m.

The fourth annual Scrabble tournament was held at the Smithers library last Friday evening, as a group of 11 wordsmiths challenged each other for lexical dominance.

Cameron Orr/Interior News

SCRABBLE ROUSERS

Page 16: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

A16 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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Page 17: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

Any questions? Call the above or [email protected]

Gitxsan Hereditary Chiefs1650 Omenica St., Hazelton, V0J 1Y0 Ph: 250-842-6780 Fx: 250-842-6709

February 22,2012

Where are we?

Last week I tried to shed light on our stance regarding land negotiations, and

to point out what governments want for us. To see their ulterior motives, one only has to look at the state of our reserves. All negotiations invite opposition to what is negotiated—this is why rules are agreed to at the outset. Teams from Canada, B.C., the B.C. Treaty Commission and the Gitxsan all look out for their own interests. But they work towards what will be a historical document—a treaty setting out how we will live together forever more. The law says we, the Gitxsan hereditary chiefs, are the title holders. Meanwhile, the Gitxsan Unity movement is adamant that the negotiators and staff have to go. Together with the bands, they Art Wilson

want to take over negotiations. Gitxsan and Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs started with band leadership, but they abandoned that setup because it meant being puppets of the government and suing themselves. I can’t imagine moving under the bands in 2012. Will we talk about 70 instead of the 33,000 square kilometres laid out in Delgamuukw?Bands set up a vote to trounce the Gitxsan Hereditary chiefs and the GTS. They ran

a telephone campaign to get voters out. They say they got 749 votes to 81. What about the 8,000 other eligible Gitxsan who did not feel the sky was falling in and did not care to vote? Treaty making is done in stages. Towards the end, our negotiators will bring an “agreement in principle” to all Gitxsan. Until the Gitxsan ratify it, it is not a full agreement. Any treaty benefits must provide better lives for all Gitxsan, and accurate stats will be needed to

document this. Our efforts are being clouded by negative comments from our opposition. In any case, we are tangled in courts. We hope we get through this one way or another, for the good of all.

I welcome your comments on this or any other article.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 Proudly Serving Hazelton, New Hazelton, South Hazelton, Gitsegukla, Kispiox, Kitwanga and Glen Vowell www.interior-news.com y,Wednesday, yFebruary 29,, 2012 y g , , , g , p , gProudly Serving Hazelton, New Hazelton, South Hazelton, Gitsegukla, Kispiox, Kitwanga and Glen Vowell www.interior-news.com

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTBirthing challenges at Wrinch

By Shannon HurstHazelton / Interior News

Wrinch Memorial Hospital has recently been sending expecting mothers to surround-ing hospitals due to renovations.

However, delivering babies has been an on-going issue at the hos-pital for many years.

Long time Hazelton doctor, Charlie Eck-feldt, said they have had three doctors who could deliver but there are other challenges that come in to play.

“We’ve had three doctors doing deliv-eries for the past few years: Dr. Kim, Dr. Mawhorter and my-self, not to mention having the help of sev-eral Family Practice Residents,” he said.

“The Residents are in their final year of their training and have already done quite a few deliveries while in Prince George at the [university hospi-tal]. However, staff-ing continues to be a challenge with our small pool of regis-tered nurses. If one is away for holiday or illness we have trouble finding someone who hasn’t just finished a 12 hour shift or isn’t already slated to work on the ward or emer-gency room. Having an extra third RN for the delivery room is considered the stan-dard of practice now, to ensure safety for the mom and her baby. Yet the North-ern Health Authority is scrambling to pro-

vide services with far less money than they have had in previous years so we can’t hire more full time nurses right now.”

In addition to al-ready tight and restrict-ed financial demands, Hazelton residents recently learned that both Dr. Laskowski and Dr. Eckfeldt are retiring and that is a great concern as to what will happen to the obstetrical services at Wrinch.

“Dr. Laskowski is moving from family medicine to practicing anesthesia in Smithers, but remains commit-ted to the Hazeltons and will try and pro-vide anesthesia for us about half of the year,” Dr. Eckfeldt said.

See MOMS on p. B2

Shannon Hurst/The Interior News

A NEW LOOKCountry Herbs health food store in Two Mile has undergone renovations this winter and added a new fl oor, more fl oor room, a new freezer and a whole new look. For owner Lorna McLeod the hard work of her husband to create an improved store is greatly appreciated. “I feel like I have a whole new lease on my business and to be able to offer more to my customers is very meaningful to me,” she said. She continued, “I am really grateful to my community and it’s not just Hazelton, I have customers from Smithers and Terrace and Stewart and without their support, none of this would be possible.”

Page 18: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTB2 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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I read because . . .

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I love a good story.- Regina Saimoto

“ ”

“I have stopped my family medicine prac-tice as of October and will concentrate on pro-viding anesthesia for Wrinch Hospital and the other half of the year not covered by Dr. Laskowski. I want to stay involved in obstet-rics with the MORE OB program and seeing prenatal patients and do-ing deliveries whenever possible. I’m really not retiring, just changing focus,” said Eckfeldt.

In the meantime,

Wrinch’s doctor clinic is looking for two new per-manent family doctors who will be expected to do deliveries as well, Eckfeldt said.

As for why so many mothers are being sent elsewhere to deliver their babies such as Smithers, Terrace, Prince George and Vancouver and the risks related to that, Eckfeldt said it all de-pends on the situation.

“The studies show that women with ‘low risk’ pregnancies are better off and their

babies are better off if they can deliver in their home community even in smaller communi-ties that regularly de-liver babies and many don’t have C-Section capabilities,” he said. “Those moms and their babies seem to benefit from familiar surround-ings and better support from their families and they have more natural deliveries with fewer complications and few C-Sections. However, the safety of mom and baby is the most impor-

tant factor in deciding where to deliver. The doctor will decide who is low risk and will re-fer this of higher risk to deliver where there is quick access to an oper-ation room and a paedi-atrician. Also, if a baby is less than 35 weeks old or the mom has had previous C-Sections it’s safer to deliver in Smith-ers and Terrace.”

While the challenges seem stacked against doctors at Wrinch Me-morial right now, Dr. Eckfeldt said it’s still

worth it to try and de-liver as many babies as possible locally.

“It is worth it be-cause it is important to our community and af-ter all, most pregnancies and deliveries go well,” he said.

For now, expecting mothers can be rest as-sured that Wrinch Me-morial Hospital will continue to do as much as they can for them and their families despite current challenges and set backs in the medical profession.

MOMS from p. B1

Important to keep deliveries local for moms

The Interior News 250-847-3266

Page 19: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com B3

Affi liated with the PAOC

Meeting in the Historic St. Stephen’s Church

1620 Highway 16 in Telkwa

Pastor Margaret Powell

Sunday Morning Worship 10 am

For information e.mail [email protected]

Phone 250-643-1586

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

Sunday Worship Services10 am & 6 pm

1471 Columbia [email protected]

Sunday School - Ages 3-6Junior Refl ection - Ages 7-8

during morning worship services.

Phone 250-847-2333Pastor Dan Hoogland

“Back to God Hour”on The Peak at 9:30 am Sundays

on CJFW at 9:30

Visitors Welcome

EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCHRev. Dwayne GoertzenPastor Trevor Brawdy

250-847-2929Email: [email protected]

Website: www.smithersefc.orgFirst Service 9 a.m.

Sunday School 10-11Second Service 11:15

1838 Main St.

Welcomes you to worship with us

10 am & 4 pm every Sunday

3115 Gould

PlaceSmithers

Pastor Lou Slagter

250-847-2080

CANADIANREFORMED CHURCH

Come worship with us at

FAITH REFORMED CHURCH OF TELKWA

Pastor James Folkerts

(URC-NA)

1170 Hwy 16, Telkwa

Services at 10 am & 2:30 pm

Listen to

“Whitehorse Inn program”

Sundays at 9 am on

The Peak 870 am

FAITH ALIVE

Upper fl oor Fitness Northwest

Centre, Broadway Ave.

10-12 noon Sundays

Youth meeting Fridays at 7 pm

Rev. Don Mott,Phone 250-847-3864

Christian Fellowship

Welcomes You!Sunday School (for all ages) – 9:45 a.m.

Sunday Worship – 11:00 a.m.Pastor Jim Raddatz

Corner of Upper Viewmount Rd & Hwy 16250-847-2466

www.mvaonline.orgwww.mvaonline.org

FELLOWSHIPFELLOWSHIPBAPTIST CHURCHBAPTIST CHURCH

on the corner of

Queen St. and 7th Ave.

Morning Worship 10:45 am with Junior Church

and Nursery

Pastor Chris Kibble

250-847-3725

Mount ZionLutheran Church

Bahá’í Faith250-877-6099

For information

www.bahai.orgSaturday Service

• New Members Welcome •

Seventh Day AdventistContact 250-847-5983

3696 4th Avenue

SMITHERS UNITED CHURCH

250-847-3333

Rev. Alyssa AndersonSunday 10:00 AM

Worship & Children’s Program

At the corner of Queen St. & 8th

ST. JAMESANGLICAN CHURCH

Sunday10:00 am - Service and Sunday School

4th Sunday2:00 pm service at

St. John the Divine, Quick

250-847-6155 • Quick250-847-9881 • Smithers250-847-5625 • Fax phone

1636 Princess StreetRev. Daphne Moser

Pastor James Slaa2788 Upper Viewmount Rd.

All welcome to attend!Contact number 250-847-5879

www.smitherscanrc.org

Sunday WorshipServices

10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.

BETHELREFORMEDCHURCH

Join us for Services. Renew your FAITH!Join us for Services. Renew your FAITH!

We welcome visitors and new members. We welcome visitors and new members.

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Credit union gives boost to hospitalBy Shannon HurstHazelton / Interior News

The Wrinch Memo-rial Hospital received some much needed help last week when mem-bers of the Bulkley Val-ley Credit Union pre-sented it with a cheque for $6,500.

The money will be used to help provide extra training for two nurses, Line Vienneau and Elena Raykov, who are enrolled in the Surgi-cal Skills course.

The money will allow the two to take an extra six months of training and return to the Hazel-tons which, for Medical Director of the United Church Health Services Doctor Peter Newbery, is greatly appreciated.

“Their new skills will make it possible for our [operating room] to provide 24 hour avail-ability,” he said. “The evidence from across Canada and around the world is that as rural operating rooms close — something that has been happening in-

creasingly in the name of efficiency — the small community loses not only an operating room but the added skills to deliver better emergency room, hos-pital service as well as higher level nursing. In turn, without the oper-ating room, it becomes more difficult to recruit doctors and nurses to small communities.”

Health Services Ad-ministrator Edward David and Director of Care Sue Livingston formulated a plan for supporting the train-ing of new Operating Room nurses, Dr. Char-lie Eckfeldt said.

“The credit union funds will be supple-mented by other sourc-es including the Wrinch Hospital Auxiliary, the United Chruch’s Grace Dempster Educational Fund for Nurses, the United Church Health Services Society, the Wrinch Foundation, and Dr. Marlowe Haskins and myself who will continue to support local surgical

and maternity care,” he said. “Having these nurses who are commit-ted to our community will also help our ma-ternity services that will be stronger since we’ll be better able to provide C-section back up for women delivering here. Nursing and doctor shortages have made it a challenge to provide this service over the past year, but we clearly hear the message from the patients that they wan to continue delivering babies here.”

Dr. Eckfeldt added that the additional help from the Bulkley Valley District Hospital, Ter-race’s Mills Memorial, and Kitimat General Hospital tht will to go towards practicum op-

portunities for Hazel-ton nurses is greatly ap-preciated.

In addition to the training for the nurses, the Wrinch Memorial Hospital’s emergency room has been under renovations for the past month, David said.

“The Northern Health Authority has provided funding for emergency room reno-vations, including some improvements to the Sterile Supply Depart-ment and Operating Room,” he said. “NHA is supportive of Wrinch

continuing low risk ob-stetrical care as well as a surgical facility for re-visiting specialists such as general surgery, ear, nose, throat, dentistry, urology and gynecol-ogy.”

While current reno-vations have made it a challenge to provide their previous level of care, Eckfeldt said the disruption of service is only temporary.

“The administration and hospital staff have worked hard to keep the reduction of service to a minimum,” he said.

Submitted

Presenting the cheque for BVCU was board member Janet Willson, staff member Rene Chandler, and Branch Manager Tamia Hatler.

Publications purchased withIn Memoriam Donations will be recognized

by Commemorative Inscriptions

(Tax receipt will be issued)

Box 55, Smithers, BC250-847-3043

Advertising space donated by The Interior News

Page 20: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTB4 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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WE’LL BE IN SMITHERS, EXCHANGING THE OLD BC HYDRO METER ON YOUR HOME WITH A NEW SMART METER.

For 50 years, BC Hydro has been providing clean, reliable electricity to you. Today we are planning for the next 50 years by investing in new projects, upgrading existing facilities and working with you to conserve energy through Power Smart.

BC Hydro is upgrading homes and businesses with new smart meters. Moving to a more efficient, modernized grid will help us meet the growing demand for electricity while continuing to deliver safe, reliable power throughout the province.

Here’s what you can expect:

Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. PST.

logos on their trucks and uniforms, and photo identification badges.

have safe and clear access to your meter—please remove any physical modifications that prevent a meter exchange.

60 seconds.

For more information about the smart meter installation process, visit bchydro.com/smartmeterinstall.

We have an immediate opportunity for acommitted broadcast sales person to grow a

list of advertisers in the Bulkley Valley market.As a retail sales account manager for four radio sta-

tions and one TV station, you will work in unison with the market management team to develop advertising cam-paigns specifi c to an established list of experienced cli-ents. Must have a vehicle and valid BC Drivers licence.

This position offers an attractive guarantee and com-petitive commission compensation plan with benefi ts.

Your working and practical knowledge of business software systems; candid and honest approach in deal-ing with people; skilled forcasting ability and questioning nature will enhance your ability to manage this position optimally.

By setting the tone for the day, you will be responsible to meet and exceed performance benchmarks consistent with the Astral Radio & Television group of stations.

You will live in one of the world’s most picturesque located where the world class fi shing and skiing are sur-passed only be the regions beauty.

Please direct resumes:Brian Langston/General Manager

[email protected]: 250-638-6320 or mail to:

4625 LAZELLE AVE., TERRACE, BC V8G 1S4We thank you for your interest. Only applicants selected for an

interview will be contacted. Astral Media endorses the principle of Employment Equity and is committed to ensuring that our

workforce is representative of the public we serve.

As the snow begins to melt thoughts of summer are spring-ing up and with them comes the plans to start playing softball for Ha-zelton children and resi-dents. Registration for the two children’s teams, age 4-7 and age 8-12 as well as for the women’s team and two mixed adult teams will start in March. Registra-tion forms will be avail-

able around town or by emailing the South Ha-zelton Community As-sociation. They would like to start looking at numbers of players in the next few weeks and are asking anyone who is interested or would like their children to play or is willing to volunteer or coach to please con-tact the SHCA via email at [email protected].

After the great suc-cess of the Missoula Children’s Theatre production last year, Barb Janze is bring-ing back the talented young group back to the Hazeltons. This year’s musical will be called the The Wiz of the West and rehearsals will start on May 7-12 after school. Anyone who is between the ages

of 5 and 18 is invited to come out and join in the fun. Janze does need to know how many people are in-terested in participat-ing and she has asked parents and students to email her to let her know.

For more informa-tion and to sign up please email Janze at [email protected].

Get ready for some softball

Missoula theatre to bring back the music

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TTHE HE IINTERIOR NTERIOR NNEWSEWS

During the week of Feb. 20 to 27, the New Hazelton RCMP re-sponded to 46 calls for service.

On Feb. 22, the RCMP received a com-plaint of a sand truck that had been stolen from the Gitanmaax Band Office. The ve-hicle was a white GMC. It was located a short time later on Highway 62 near the Hagwilget Bridge. The vehicle was seized and towed to a compound where Forensic Identification Section examined the vehicle for fingerprints. The investigation is still ongoing as of this date. Anyone with informa-tion on any suspects or witnesses to the theft of this vehicle are asked to contact New Hazelton RCMP.

On Feb. 24, the RCMP received in-formation of a male

involved in trafficking cocaine at a liquor es-tablishment in Hazel-ton. As a result of the information, an inves-tigation was conducted and two plain-clothes officers arrested the male for possession for the purpose of traf-ficking cocaine. The male was found with a quantity of cocaine in his pocket and later re-leased with a court date in June The suspect, a 21-year-old male from the Gitanmaax area is well known to police. The name is not be-ing released pending approval of charges and the RCMP are re-questing the public’s assistance in identify-ing individuals who are suspected of trafficking drugs. Anyone with in-formation can contact the RCMP at 250-842-5244 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

Police round-up

Page 21: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

B5 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

BRITISH COLUMBIA AND YUKON DIVISION

RELAY FOR LIFEOur committ ee is accepting lett ers of interest from food vendors to take part in our Relay for Life 2012 celebration. Non-profi t and licenced vendors are invited. For information package please email [email protected]

S.S.S. Reunion!Students and teachers who attendedStudents and teachers who attended Smithers Secondary School from Smithers Secondary School from September 1970 to June of 1975; September 1970 to June of 1975; we are having a reunion August 4we are having a reunion August 4thth of this year. If you are interested in of this year. If you are interested in receiving an invitation, e.mail to : receiving an invitation, e.mail to : [email protected] smithe[email protected] or call 250.846.5580or call 250.846.5580

Fu

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La Z boy Comfort Sale

Heartstrings pays the taxes

Home Décor, Furniture & Gifts250-877-7778

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Discovery House Day CareDiscovery House Day CareLocally owned and operated

WinterRegistration

Special for 2-1/2 to 5 year olds

$200 Discount for 2nd month full time

registration

$100 Discountfor 2nd month half time

registration.

Contact Bridgette at 250-847-0036

Our beautiful and well equipped centre is a

‘Home away from home’

Growing Together Playhouse

Government Licensed

WHERE HAPPINESS IS LEARNING & LOVING

We take pride in caring for the most

important little people in your life!

Experienced Early Childhood & Infant-toddler Educators.

First-Aid Certified.

Providing quality care for infants-toddlers, 3-5 year olds & pre-kindergarten.

250-847-5581

Donations in memory of the late Oscar J. Hidber may be mailed to the Smithers Lions Club at Box 925, Smithers, B.C., V0J 2N0. We will forward on to Easter Seals in Vancouver, who will acknowledge your donation.

Announcements

Obituaries

HELEN CLAUDIA DUTCH

June 5, 1929 –February 12, 2012

Helen left us peacefully surrounded by her family after sharing a lifetime of love and laughter with everyone she knew. She will be well remembered for her love of animals and the amazing artistry she put into her painting, crafting, cooking and fl ower arranging. Helen also loved spending time in the outdoors while RV’ing with her friends from the Good Sam Club. Her patience, love and giving spirit meant she could never pass by a charity raffl e without buying a few, but would never look to see if she won because it didn’t matter. She leaves be-hind the love of her life husband Harold, her brother, her children, grandchildren and count-less friends far and wide who loved her.

In lieu of fl owers send donations to Cowichan Hospice Society or the SPCA.

Friends gathered with the family on Monday, February 27 from 12noon to 3pm at the Chemainus Legion.

Weddings

Announcements

Coming Events

NORTHERN Root Community Garden Annual General Meet-ing March 7th @ 6:30pm Please email: [email protected] or call 250 847 9371 for details. If you are interested in garden-ing, have new ideas or won-dering what we’re all about please join us!

Information

AA MEETING, HAZELTONSundays, 7 p.m. Wrinch Me-morial Hospital, Christine Wesley Room. Closed for Dec. Will start again in January. For information phone 250-842-5694

AL-ANONPhone Jean at 250-847-3749 or Lori at 250-847-3884. Meet-ings 7 p.m. Thursdays at Smithers United Church, cor-ner of Queen St. and 8th Ave.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUSIf you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, that’s ours.

Local Calls: 250-643-0794Toll-free: 1-877-644-2266SMITHERS MEETINGS:

Sun., 7 p.m. Ranger Park, 3736-16th Ave.; Mon., 12 noon Courthouse, 3793 Alfred Ave., Main Floor Conf. Rm.; Tues., 7 p.m. Men’s Meeting, Ranger Park, 3736-16th Ave., Wed., 7 p.m. Evangelical Free Church, corner 15th & Main; Thurs., 12 noon Courthouse, 3793 Alfred Ave.,Main Floor Conf. Rm.; Thurs., 7 p.m. Ranger Park, 3736-16th Ave.; Fri., 7 p.m. Evangelical Free Church, corner 15th & Main; Sat., 7 p.m. BVD Hospital, 3950-8th Ave., Conf. Rm.

ARE you pregnant and dis-tressed? Phone Smithers Pro Life 250-847-2475 or 1-800-665-0570. Offi ce hours Mon-Wed-Fri 10:30-1:30. Free pregnancy testing, non judg-mental lay counseling and adoption information.

Narcotics AnonymousHave drugs taken over your life? Do you have a desire to stop using? We can help. Nar-cotics Anonymous Meetings Smithers Friday 12 noon at the Courthouse, 3793 Alfred Ave., Main Floor Conference Room. 250-847-1726.

Weddings

Announcements

Information

THE Livestock Pedigree Act forbids selling a dog as pure-bred if unregistered. It pro-vides fi nes of up to two months imprisonment for any-one who sells a dog as pure-bred and does not provide the Canadian Kennel Club regis-tration papers.

TOPS MEETING (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) every Mon-day evening 7 p.m. in the Bap-tist Church basement, Smith-ers. Everyone welcome. Call 250-847-9614 or www.tops.org for info.

Personals

DATING SERVICE. Long-Term/Short-Term Relation-ships, Free to try!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversa-tion, Call: #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1. Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

GET PAID To Lose weight. $5,000 for your success story. Personal image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. [email protected]. www.mertontv.ca.

Coming Events

Travel

Travel

HAWAII ON The mainland, where healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica “the most friendly coun-try on earth”! 1-780-952-0709; www.CanTico.ca

Employment

Business Opportunities

Be Your Own Boss! Attention Locals! People req. to work

from home online. Earn $500-$4500+ P/T or F/T. Toll Free 1.877.880.8843 leave mess.

DON’T MISS this opportunity. 30 year manufacture expand-ing across Canada. Fencing, decks and docks. Expanding your business or start new. 1-800-465-9968.Email: [email protected] www.friendlyearth.com.

Obituaries

Coming Events

Daycare Centers Daycare Centers

Your community. Your classifi eds.

250.847.3266

fax 250.847.2995 email classifi [email protected]

Classifi ed Ad Rates

The Interior News3764 Broadway Avenue

Box 2560,Smithers, B.C., V0J 2N0

847-3266Fax 847-2995

Standard Term Agreement - Classifi ed & Display

Advertising

The Interior News reserves the right to classify ads under appropriate headings and to set rates therefore and to determine page location.The Interior News reserves the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answer directed to the News Box Reply Services, and repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental. Box replies on “Hold” instructions not picked up within 10 days of expiry of an advertisement will be destroyed unless mailing instructions are received. Those answering Box Numbers are requested not to send original of documents to avoid loss.It is agreed by the advertiser requesting spaces that the liability of the Interior News in the event of failure to publish an advertisement, or in the event of an error appearing in the advertisement as published, shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for only one incorrect insertion or the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect or omitted item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event greater than the amount paid for such advertising.All claims of errors in advertising must be received by the publisher within 20 days after the fi rst publication. All advertising is subject to the approval of the publisher.The Interior News reminds advertisers that under provincial legislations, no person shall use or circulate any form of applications for employment, publish or cause to be published an advertisement in connection with employment or prospective employment, or make any written or oral inquiry of an applicant that (a) expresses, either direct or indirectly any limitation, specifi cation or preference as to race, religion, colour, sex, marital status, age, ancestry or place of origin, or (b) requires an applicant to furnish any information concerning race, religion, colour, ancestry, places of origin or political belief.

ALL CLASSIFIED DEADLINES ARE ONE DAY EARLIER PRIOR

TO HOLIDAY WEEKENDS.

Index in BriefFamily Announcements

Community Announcements, Travel

ChildrenEmployment

Business ServicesPets & Livestock

Merchandise For SaleReal Estate, RentalsAutomotive, Marine

All classifi ed and classifi ed display ads must be prepaid by either cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. When phoning in ads, please have your card number ready.CLASSIFIED LINE/SEMI-DISPLAY DEADLINE: 11:00 a.m. on the Friday preceding publication.CLASSIFIED DISPLAY AD DEADLINE: 3:00 p.m. on the Thursday preceding publicationRATES start at $13.70 + HST for 3 lines in a 1 week package (The Interior News and The Northern Daily).

Obituaries

Mail "In Memoriam"donations to:

Box 965, Smithers, B.C.,V0J 2N0

British Columbiaand Yukon Division

THEARTHRITISSOCIETY

Ad space donated by The Interior News

After 75 years of continuous service the Canadian National Institute for the Blind is still here today because we’re needed... but we’ll be here tomorrow ONLY if you care. Please give when our canvasser calls.

The Canadian Institute for the BlindB.C. - Yukon DivisionCNIB

Help Wanted Help Wanted

Highway 16 West Smithers

• Licenced automotive technician • or 3rd/4th year apprentice

This position is full time and includes a competive wage

and benefi ts package .

Interested applicants can forward resume to:

email - [email protected] or call Glenn at 250-847-4266

FRONTIER CHRYSLER DODGE JEEPF

Page 22: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTB6 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

We’re matching skills to jobs by bringing together schools, industry, labour and small business in BC communities. And that helps keep families close to home. To learn more about the BC Jobs Plan, or to share your ideas, visit BCJobsPlan.ca

Engagecommunities.

Build careers,

right hereat home.

Train locally.

Sausage Factory 250-847-2861250-847-2861

BeefSmokies

BeefSalami

BratwurstSausage

BeefPatties

Boneless Pork Chops$3$37979

/lb

$4$49999/lb

$4$49999/lb

$3$39999/lb

$3$36969/lb

B l P k Ch

Lean Ground Beef $279/lb (25 lbs or more)$289/lb (Retail)

Beef Chuck Roast $3$38989/lb

Sides of B.C. Pork $1$15959 /lbAdd .60/lb for Cutting and Wrapping - Curing,

smoking & sausage extra

Sausage FactoryFebruary Specials

Beef

Smoked Pork Chops$4$49999

/lbChicken Breast

$29$294 kg Box

Bulkley Valley Beef / Quality MeatsBulkley Valley Beef / Quality Meats

On a wing and a prayer

In early April last year, a crow was hit by a vehicle in

New Hazelton and was found hopping around in the parking lot by the Bulkley Valley Credit Union.

A fellow South Towner pointed out the bird in distress and the two of us corned it and caught it. We put the crow in a box and as I delivered papers fed it popcorn.

I called the animal shelter later at home and asked about what to do and was informed that sadly, they couldn’t help as crows were just too common. This frus-trated me, although I understood the shelter’s situation, and turned to other alternatives but even the vet said there was nothing they could do unless I was willing to spend a lot of mon-ey.

Still determined to figure something out, I decided that for the time

being the crow would just have to hang out with us. We put a large tree branch in sand in a bucket which the bird quickly perched on con-tently. Within hours, we had named it Charlie. Researching everything I could on crows, I was astounded to learn that they are the smartest species on the planet next to humans and researchers world wide were amazed about

what they were learn-ing when it came to the Candace Savages.

A few days later I was told about Dr. Dea-gel, a well known and well-loved local doctor who had apparently had success helping in-jured birds. Thankfully he graciously agreed to meet Charlie. However after assessing Charlie’s injury he concluded that the wing was broken at the shoulder and there was little one could do. He did try to set the bone for us and off Charlie and I went back home. It seems I had a new friend for a few years we thought and although it was illegal to keep Charlie, I wasn’t about to kill him.

As the months passed, he quickly be-came part of the family living in his tree beside my bed and adapted to life inside in strange ways.

He learned to eat out

aftinjthethewad

MY TOWNMY TOWNShannon HurstShannon Hurst

See CROW on p. B11For news items or advertising • The Interior News • 250-847-3266

Page 23: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

The Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com B7

Material Damage/Estimating ManagerTerrace or Smithers, BCFull Time Permanent

Position Highlights: As a Material Damage and Estimating Manager for a geographic area (Terrace, Smithers and Prince Rupert), you will lead a team of Estimators to achieve our mandate to provide hassle free claims service for our customers. Our leaders are accountable for communicating corporate and divisional goals to their teams and managing their performance and providing the training needed to achieve these targets. You will combine your extensive estimating skills and industry knowledge with demonstrated skill in leading a team of Estimators. Our Estimators handle all types of vehicles, including specialized heavy equipment and non-typical commercial vehicles.

Position Requirements:

Your experience includes several years of related industry experience as a Manager or Estimator. You have strong management experience and a sound understanding of theoretical principles and concepts related to material damage handling, adjusting and settling. This position's primary location will be in Terrace or Smithers, BC. Travel will be required.

In joining ICBC, you will be part of an organization with a long history of community participation and social responsibility, and strong financial performance. We have now embarked on a corporate transformation program that is focusing our strategic efforts on streamlining our processes and systems and enabling customer-centric pricing, products and services. Position Information: As a valued member of the ICBC team, you'll thrive in a performance-driven environment that emphasizes employee leadership and accountability for delivering results. Anticipate a competitive salary, comprehensive benefits and a challenging work environment. If you’re ready to join a driven team, we’d love to hear from you. For full details on this and all other current positions visit www.icbc.com. ICBC is a welcoming, equal opportunity employer, and invites applications from all qualified candidates.

We’re driven to ensure the well-being of drivers. We’re working to keep rates low and stable, providing hassle-free service, and proactively partnering to reduce crashes and loss.

DRILLER’S HELPER COURSE - MAY 2012Are you looking to start a career in the Diamond Drilling Industry?

We are looking for strong, fi t people who…• Are interested in performing hard physical work in remote camp settings• Enjoy working in a team environment with a progressive and growing company that

offers opportunity for growth and advancement• Are able to refrain from alcohol & drugs while working• Can work 12 hours a day, with 28 days in/14 days out shift rotations• Have good judgment, mechanical aptitude; strong work ethic and computer

experience are preferred

The Driller’s Helper Course is a comprehensive pre-employment program that prepares individuals to be able to work in the fi eld of diamond drilling. At the end of the program you will have knowledge of:

Understanding of Safe Work Practices • WHMIS Certifi cate• Occupational First Aid Level 1 • First Aid Transportation Endorsement • Spill Response Training Certifi cate • Bear Awareness• Connection & Use of Construction Headers Propane Certifi cate • Hands on experience from a Hy-Tech drill set up in our yard• Supply pump set up and maintenance • Ontario Common Core Surface Training• Chainsaw Operation • Drill assembly• Hose Line • Helicopter Safety• Drill tear down and helicopter moves • Site clean-up and environmental responsibility• Safe operation of power tools and equipment (track vehicles, ATV’s, skidders)•

For more information and to obtain an application please visit our Website at: hy-tec[email protected] or email us at [email protected]

Application Deadline: April 9th, 2012

The award-winning Interior News is seeking a part time offi ce assistant to join our community newspaper.

This position is part-time, and fi ll-in replacement.

The successful applicant must be computer literate. You must be a team player and able to work in a fast-paced, deadline driven environment.

Duties include dealing with the public, reception, handling cash, data entry and other general offi ce tasks as assigned. Training will be provided.

Please submit your resume and cover letter in confi dence to:Grant Harris Publisher / Sales ManagerBox 2560, Smithers, B.C.V0J 2N0Email: [email protected]

Offi ce Assistant

www.blackpress.ca

Only qualifi ed applicants will be contacted for an interview.

DISPATCHERLOCATION: Smithers, BC

Bandstra Transportation Systems Ltd. is looking for an experienced Dispatcher for its Smithers operation. The successful applicant will be responsible for dispatching equipment and personnel to the proper work locations. In addition the Dispatcher will be responsible to supervise the driving staff to ensure compliance of regulatory and company policies.

QUALIFICATIONS:Dispatch experience an asset• Supervisory experience an asset• Ef ciently utilize computers and various software • programsComfortable using electronic tracking system to locate • drivers and communicate with driversRepresent the company professionally at all times • Highly organized and able to multi-task in a fast paced • environmentAble to work additional hours as needed• Experience with billing and reports are preferred• Must be dependable and able to function independently• Solid understanding of Hours of Service regulations for • professional drivers.

REMIT RESUMES TO: Bandstra Transportation Systems Ltd. Attn: Smithers Branch [email protected] Ph: (800) 571-2057 Fax: (250) 847-0107

B.V. Home Centre Telkwa is looking for a fulltime, year-round, in-store sales person to start in March. Experience in retail building supply or construction industry a defi nite asset but will to train the right individual.

We’re looking for a team player who can handle the occasional stress associated with providing excellent customer service. Must be capable of learning our computer system. Competitive wage and benefi t package.

Please drop-off or email a resume and covering letter to [email protected] or fax to 250-846-5807BV Home Centre Telkwa

Inside Sales Opportunity

HELP WANTED

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE/DETAILER

Responsibilities include: Clerical Duties, Renting and Detailing Vehicles.

Applicants must be available to work evenings and weekends.

No experience necessary, full training is provided.** All applicants must present a valid drivers licence**

Candidates are to bring resumes into the Smithers Airport or

Mail to: NATIONAL CAR AND TRUCK RENTALBox 2949, Smithers, B.C. V0J 2N0

ATTN: STEPHANIEPh: 250-847-2216Fax: 250-847-2448

Applications are being accepted for part-time

Studentsare encouraged

to apply.

A full time Assistant Front Store Manager is required for Shoppers Drug Mart beginning immediately. References required and supervisory experience a must. Drop resume off ATTN: Angela or email to:

[email protected]

Help Wanted Help Wanted

Employment

Career Opportunities

SPROTT-SHAW RCA training info session Feb 28th, 12-6pm at Mariposa Gardens. Bring this ad and your registration fee will be waived! Find out how to save an additional $800 on tuition! Call 250-495-8124 for more info.

Education/Trade Schools

Become a Psychiatric Nurse - train locally via distance edu-cation, local and/or regional clinical placements and some regional classroom delivery. Wages start at $30.79/hr to $40.42/hr. This 23 month pro-gram is recognized by the CRPNBC. Gov’t funding may be available.

Toll-free 1-87-STENBERGwww.stenbergcollege.com

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIP-MENT OPERATOR SCHOOLLocations in Alberta & BC. Hands on real world training. Full sized equip. Job place-ment assist. Funding Avail. www.iheschool.com 1-866-399-3853

TRAIN TO be an Apart-ment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of gradu-ates working. 31 years of suc-cess! Government certifi ed. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-8339, 604-681-5456.

WORK FROM Home. Largest Medical Transcriptionist em-ployer in Canada looks to CanScribe for 100 more Mt’s. We need more students! En-roll today! 1-800-466-1535www.canscribe.com [email protected]

Help WantedASPHALT PAVING Personnel required: Paving contractor in Kamloops area requires Fore-man and personnel for Asphalt Lay-down. Applicants should have minimum 1 years’ experi-ence in commercial and resi-dential paving, although candi-dates with construction experience will be considered. Training and benefi ts will be available to the successful ap-plicants. Please forward re-sume to:[email protected].

CHEF, COOK Helper, EMT, and camp attendant for hire, June-August, 25-man trailer camp, pay DOE. Level III First Aid and gourmet pref. Serious inquiries only please. Email: [email protected].

Education/Trade Schools

Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Page 24: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

B8 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

Terrace Office is HIRING

Home Support WorkersCare Aides,

LPN’s and RN’sfor Terrace, Smithers, Hazelton,

Kitimat & Prince RupertPlease respond by March 15th, 2012 to

Cindy Mangnus RN, Client Care Managerat 250-641-2211 or 250-635-2274

or mail resumesATT: Linda Preston, Office Manager,

#106B - 4741 LakelseSkeena Mall, Terrace, BC V8G 4R9

Smithers Community ServicesAssociation Job Posting

Part-Time / ReliefCoverage Emergency Shelter

Support WorkerCompetition #286

Position Summary: The Emergency Shelter Support Worker will work directly with home-less persons who are seeking shelter. The facility is designed to serve up to nine clients at a time. The support worker will do intake with clients, Data Entry, serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, cleaning of bedrooms, bathrooms, laundry/shower facilities, common room and staff area. This position will consist of days, evenings, nightshift and weekends. It will also include connecting clients to other service pro-viders and resources. Successful application will be able to multi-task, have a high energy level and provide self-care. A thorough knowledge of the community and First Nation Culture is an asset.

Qualifications: Continuing Post Secondary Education, University or have certificate/dip-loma in Social Service Worker, Human Service Worker, or Community Support Worker. Must have Food Safe and willing to be trained in Non-violent Crisis Intervention, WHIMIS, First Aid, Suicide Intervention, Universal Health Precautions and Cultural Awareness training. Starting wage is $18/hr.

Apply with resume and cover letter (state competition #286 on resume) to:Smithers Community Services Association3715 Railway Ave., SmithersMail to: Box 3759, Smithers, BC V0J 2N0Fax: 847-3712Email: [email protected] date: Friday, March 2, 2012

Job Description available by request @ SCSA or visit website: www.scsa.ca

A Part / Full time Merchandiser Cashier is needed for Shoppers Drug Mart beginning immediately. Drop resume off ATTN: Angela or email to:[email protected]

Employment OpportunityP/T Order Assembler

(5 Positions) Bulkley Valley Wholesale (BVW) is looking to ll part time positions to support it’s growth.

Ideal candidates can comfortably lift 50LB, are responsible, reliable and work well in a team setting.

Accuracy, safety and speed are the right attributes to be successful in this role. Duties include picking and preparing outgoing loads for delivery to our custom-ers in the northwest.

What we offer is exible part time work during the evenings. Typically shifts will begin after regular store hours and last 4-6 hours depending on business needs and your availability.

If this quick paced environment and evening shift provides a good t for you, please apply with your resume in to the main of ce at BVW. Make sure to include “P/T Order Assembler” in the heading.Apply to: Ian Ricketts, Manager, BV Wholesale, Smithers, 250-847-3313

OFFICE ASSISTANT

Looking for casual legal of ceassistant to work on Fridays and holiday relief in a quiet country

of ce. Legal and of ce experience would be an asset.

Please forward your resume [email protected]

or fax to 250-847-8920.

JOB OPPORTUNITYSALES CLERK

A part-time sales clerk is required (14 to 28 hours per week including some Saturdays).Duties include customer service, restocking, general cleaning, and teaching Kids’ Craft classes. It is import-ant that applicants have good organizational skills and be able to work independently without much super-vision.Interested parties should submit their resume, with ref-erences, by Wednesday, March 7 at 5:00 pm to Arlene deGelder, Memory Makers Scrapbooking & Crafts, 3773 - 3rd Avenue, Smithers, BC.

Capri Motor Inn is now accepting resumes for

Line CookMust have experience, able to multi task, work on own and have food

safe. Drop resume off at front desk or email to:

[email protected]

Capri Motor Inn

Now HiringPart-Time

CUSTOMER SERVICE AGENTSmithers

Basic Purpose of Position:to provide exceptional customer service by greeting • and serving passengers at airport counters and gates

Key Activities: using an airline computerized system• customer service and answering inquiries from • passengersmake reservations and assessing fares• ticketing and complete daily sales reports• passenger check-in• check, weigh the baggage, calculate any excess • baggage charges and process payment

Quali cations:minimum of one year customer service experience • experience working with computers• must have a high school diploma or equivalent• excellent interpersonal and communications skills • English language required• French language is considered an asset•

To view the full job description or to apply tocurrent openings in advance, please visit:

www. yjazz.ca/careers

Credit SupervisorReporting to the CFO you will supervise credit and collections for thirty-four retail and wholesale locations. You will be responsible for credit checks, reconciling A/R accounts, approval and processing of credit applications, reviewing outstanding receivables, setting collection targets, determining bad debts and third party collection requirements.

AWG Northern Industries Inc. offers a wage based on qualifications and experience and has an excellent benefit package. This is a full-time position based in Smithers. All interested applicants should forward their resumes in confidence to:

Laura Stanton, VPAWG Northern Industries Inc.Box 850, 3424 Highway 16 E.,

Smithers, B.C. V0J 2N0E-mail: [email protected]

Fax: 250-877-7610www.all-westglass.com

PRT Summit Nursery

Looking for work? Are you a Team player, Energetic and Active?

If soWe offer

Flexible work hours, Great Working Environment inside

our GreenhousesHigh Earnings for Motivated People

Be Part of Reforestation Come Join the Green Team

Seasonal work starting immediately Apply in person at our nursery located

On Skillhorn Rd in TelkwaPhone 846-5882

Employment EmploymentHelp Wanted Help Wanted

Help Wanted Help Wanted

Employment

Help WantedASPHALT PAVING PersonnelRequired: Paving contractor inthe beautiful BC Interior re-quires paving personnel for allaspects of Asphalt Lay-down. Applicants should have mini-mum 1 years’ experience inHighway, commercial and resi-dential paving, although candi-dates with construction experi-ence will be considered for training. Please forward re-sume to:[email protected].

DIRECT SALES REPRESEN-TATIVES. Canada’s premierehome automation and SecurityCompany is NOW hiring April-August. No experience neces-sary. Travel Required. E-mailresume: [email protected]: www.vivint.ca

GENERAL LABOURER /CARPENTER required. 40hrs/week. March and part of April 2012. Must have carpen-try skills and references. $15 - $20/hr depending on skills. E-mail Mike Sanborn:[email protected]

HHDI RECRUITINGis hiring on behalf of

Baker Hughes

Baker Hughes Alberta - based oilfi eld services company is currently hiring;

DRIVEREQUIPMENT

OPERATORS &SERVICE

SUPERVISORS

Class 1 or 3 Drivers License required.

HD MECHANICS3rd or 4th apprentice or Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanics with their Red Seal and CVIP License to work in Red Deer & Hinton.

Please call 250-718-3330 or Fax: 1-888-679-0759

For more information or send your resume &

current drivers abstract to:[email protected]

SERVICE MANAGER - HannaChrysler Ltd. (Hanna, Alberta).Opportunity in a perfect familyenvironment. Strong team,competitive wages, benefi ts,growth potential. Fax resume:403-854-2845. Email: [email protected].

Income OpportunityEARN EXTRA Cash! - P/T,F/T Immediate openings formen & women. Easy computer work, others positions areavailable. Can be done from home. No experience needed.www.HWC-BC.com

Trades, TechnicalFABRICATOR/WELDER. Thisposition is full time. Broadwa-ter’s fabrication shop operates under a collective agreement with I.W. 712. Wages and fullbenefi ts including medical,dental, extended care andpension are provided. Broad-water is a growing company servicing the Northwest Re-gion of BC. If you would like to be part of our fabrication team,send resume to: BroadwaterIndustries (2011) Ltd Fax: 250-624-5668 Email: [email protected]

Required Immediately! Jour-neyman RV Technician forKamloops largest RV Dealer-ship. Jubilee RV Centre offersexcellent wage compensation,medical & dental benefi ts, on-going industry training and year round employment.Come join our team in sunnyand warm Kamloops, whereyou will be appreciated, loveour climate and enjoy all ouroutdoor activities! Please for-ward your resume to [email protected] Atten-tion Steve Joyce - ServiceManager

WEBCO LEDUC - division ofSun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset JourneymanPressman. 15 unit Goss Com-munity. Competitive rates andbenefi ts. Email resume:[email protected].

WEBCO LEDUC - division ofSun Media, requires Full-time Heatset/Coldset 1st & 2ndPressmen. 15 unit Goss Com-munity. Competitive rates andbenefi ts. Email resume:[email protected].

Page 25: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

The Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com B9

FURNACE & DUCT CLEANING PROFESSIONAL

BLOWN-IN ATTIC INSULATION“CLEAN AIR & QUALITY SERVICE IS OUR PRIORITY”

250-847-4550

New!

JOB POSTINGLake Babine Nation

PRACTICING LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSE

JOB SUMMARY: Seeking an energetic practicing Licensed Practical Nurse [aka Registered Practical Nurse] to work with a team of Nurses and Home Care staff. Position is required to monitor and drive clients, gather health vital information, develop care plans, and share infor-mation with registered nurse/doctor/nurse practitio-ner to determine best care for the clients.

DEADLINE: March 9, 2012 at 12:00 PM

SUBMIT RESUME & CERTIFICATION TO: Vincent Joseph, Health Director Lake Babine Nation P.O. Box 297, Burns Lake, B.C. V0J 1E0 Fax: 250-692-4792

“Only those selected for interview will be contacted.”

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALSCOORDINATOR

The Village of Telkwa is seeking the services of a Coordinator to create an “Age-Friendly Plan” for the Village.

Some of the Coordinator activities would be to:review the existing World Health Organization age-• friendly standards;review the Village of Telkwa’s current plans, • policies, maps, etc.;engage local seniors groups and conduct public • meeting and survey to determine the needs and wants for aging in place;examine and summarize the results of these • consultations;Prepare a fi nal report on fi ndings; and• Produce an age-friendly action plan•

The hourly rate offered to the successful proponent is $25.00. The Village of Telkwa has a total of $4,000 to contract this service, made possible by a grant from the Union of BC Municipalities, the Seniors Housing Support Initiative, and the Ministry of Health. The duration of this contract is anticipated to be approximately 160 hours spread over a period of 3 months (March, April, May).

If you are interested in this contract opportunity, please submit a written proposal including your experience no later than 4:00 PM, March 9, 2012 to:

Jane StevensonBox 220, 1415 Hankin Avenue, Telkwa, BC V0J 2X0 Ph: 250-846-5212; Fax: 250-846-9572;email: [email protected] (460-07)

EXAMS IN THE COMFORT OF YOUR PET’S HOME!

Exams & VaccinationsQuill & Abscesses

Minor SurgeryAcupuncture

Herbal Formulas

250-847-5321

SKEENA DECORSKEENA DECORBlinds of all kindsBlinds of all kinds

New New ·· Repairs Repairs ·· Cleaning CleaningBob Swift 250-847-3051

Lunan Handyman Services

250-847-4829Gavin Then

Welding and Fabrication Business opportunity or equipment for sale

from prior business in Smithers area.

Equipment noted,Accupress, Accushear,

milling machine, lathes, total package,inquire @ job 250-847-7928,

cell 250-877-2434.

Welding & Fabrication BusinessWelding & Fabrication Business

5 Bedrooms, 2 Full Baths, 2,100 sq. ft., 9’ Ceilings, Double Carport, Covered Porch, Sundeck, Heated, wired shop, Woodshed, Green-house, Gardens, 1 acre fenced & landscaped, 2008 New Home Warranty approved. Call 250-846-9585

1325 Elm Street1325 Elm Street $325,000$325,000

HOUSE FOR SALEHOUSE FOR SALE

Blinds & Drapery

Cleaning Services

Help Wanted

Blinds & Drapery

Cleaning Services

Handypersons

Veterinarian Services

Heavy Duty Machinery

Handypersons

Veterinarian Services

Heavy Duty Machinery

Services

Health ProductsHERBAL MAGIC - With Her-bal Magic lose up to 20 pounds in just 8 weeks and keep it off. Results Guaran-teed! Start today call 1-800-854-5176.

Financial ServicesDROWNING IN Debt? Helping Canadians 25 years. Lower payments by 30%, or cut debts 70% thru Settlements. Avoid bankruptcy! Free con-sultation. Toll-free 1-877-556-3500 www.mydebtsolution.com

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For Sale By Owner

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ContractorsI CAN build your Straw Bale Home or Cabin. Call Dave at 250-643-1467

Pets & Livestock

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Firewood/FuelFIREWOOD for sale. Dry pine by the cord. $130 round or $165 split. Delivered Smithers area. Phone 250-847-5779.

FurnitureFLIP-OUT double sofa bed, $200 obo. 250-847-9794

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Real Estate

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Help Wanted

SHOPSHOPLOCALLYLOCALLYWe encourage you

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Single column - 2x3 picture ad – $32.50 (plus tax)

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Payment required at time of placementAny questions call 847-3266. The h

omeowner was

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

l three have been

ewith author-

rison and

rned y

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

25. dy

The homeowner w

as

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

Crown said.

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ties, and M

orrison and

nFowler

turned

s in when they

lice were

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

t Study As

Crown counsel

d the court,

on Apr.

tlyafter

mid-

First Natio

n

wn the

n’s

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

Crown said.

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

king for them

.

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

eakfast Study

Stoppers at

1-800-

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

unlawful co

nfinement.

As Crown counsel

told the c

ourt, on A

pr.

22 shortly after

mid-

night three

First Natio

n

males kick

ed down the

t door of a

person’s

Kitwanga. T

he

enwatc

h-

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

She felt

that the a

c-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

nkey Breakfast Study

ge A20

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

told the c

ourt, on A

pr.

22 shortly after

mid-

night three

First Natio

n

males kick

ed down the

front d

oor of a

person’s

home in Kitw

anga. The

trio had been

watch-

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

She felt

that the a

c-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

on Monkey Breakfast Study

see page A20

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

/Interio

r News

Valley C

hristia

n School (l

-r: K

irk

d and Daniel E

wald) work th

e

ol’s a

nnual Litte

r-a-T

hon

males kick

ed down the

front d

oor of a

person’s

home in Kitw

anga. The

trio had been

watch-

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

She felt

that the a

c-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

Results on Monkey Breakfast S

tudy

… see page A20

Check yo

ur money: co

unterfeits

making rounds

should you wish to

remain anonymous.

The Smith

ers

RCMP follo

wed

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

circulatin

g Smithers

They reminded

the public to

be vigi-

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

website.

from th

e Bulkley V

alley C

hristia

n School (l

-r: K

irk

nner, Caleb G

roud and D

aniel Ewald) w

ork the

part of t

he school’s

annual L

itter-a

-Thon

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

Despite

their co-

operatio

n, Judge

Eh-

rcke,

presiding

over

from a Vancouver c

ourt

room, found th

e sever-

ity of the crime and

the proximity of their

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

GST)GST))

New Results on Monkey Breakfast S

tudy

… see page A20

Check yo

ur money: co

unterfeits

making rounds

RCMP administ

ra-

tion lin

e at 250-842-

5244 or Crimesto

p-

pers at 2

50-847-9666

should you wish to

remain anonymous.

The Smith

ers

RCMP follo

wed

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

circulatin

g Smithers

businesse

s.

They reminded

the public to

be vigi-

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

website.

gth

e highway,

part of t

he school’s

annual L

itter-a

-Thon

ing the h

ouse to en

sure

The homeowner w

as

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

Despite

their co-

operatio

n, Judge

Eh-

rcke,

presiding

over

the group’s

joint bail

hearing through video

from a Vancouver c

ourt

room, found th

e sever-

ity of the crime and

the proximity of their

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

them in jail.

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

$1.25 (INC. GST)

(INC.(

GST))

EWSRUGBY VICTORY

Secondary

girls ru

gby

New Results on Monkey Breakfast S

tudy

… see page A20

Check yo

ur money: co

unterfeits

making rounds

c l e rk s / e m p l oy e e s

should call the New

Hazelton R

CMP via

If anyone has any

informatio

n about

these counterfe

it

bills,

please call

the New Hazelton

RCMP administ

ra-

tion lin

e at 250-842-

5244 or Crimesto

p-

pers at 2

50-847-9666

should you wish to

remain anonymous.

The Smith

ers

RCMP follo

wed

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

circulatin

g Smithers

businesse

s.

They reminded

the public to

be vigi-

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

website.

trio had been

watch-

ing the h

ouse to en

sure

there was o

nly one per-

All had their

faces

concealed

with make-

The homeowner w

as

tied to

a chair w

hile be-

ing robbed, th

e robbers

search

ing for money

The homeowner w

as

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

Crown said.

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

Despite

their co-

operatio

n, Judge

Eh-

rcke,

presiding

over

the group’s

joint bail

hearing through video

from a Vancouver c

ourt

room, found th

e sever-

ity of the crime and

the proximity of their

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

them in jail.

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

OTAL $1.25 (INC. GST)

OTAL $1.25 (INC.(

GST))

EWS/A18

RUGBY VICTORY

The Smithers

Secondary

girls ru

gby

team wins b

ig on

home territ

ory.

New Results on Monkey Breakfast S

tudy

… see page A20

Check yo

ur money: co

unterfeits

making rounds

look out for

these

fake bills.

Business

c l e r k s / e m p l oy e e s

should call the New

Hazelton R

CMP via

911 immediately if

these bills are en-

countered during a

If anyone has any

informatio

n about

these counterfe

it

bills,

please call

the New Hazelton

RCMP administ

ra-

tion lin

e at 250-842-

5244 or Crimesto

p-

pers at 2

50-847-9666

should you wish to

remain anonymous.

The Smith

ers

RCMP follo

wed

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

circulatin

g Smithers

businesse

s.

They reminded

the public to

be vigi-

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

website.

22 shortly after

mid-

night three

First Natio

n

males kick

ed down the

front d

oor of a

person’s

home in Kitw

anga. The

trio had been

watch-

ing the h

ouse to en

sure

there was o

nly one per-

son home.

All had their

faces

concealed

with make-

shift masks m

ade from

t-shirts

and were arm

ed

with various weapons:

a knife, a baseb

all bat

with nails in it,

and one

had a six-inch sp

ike and

The homeowner w

as

tied to

a chair w

hile be-

ing robbed, th

e robbers

search

ing for money

and drugs.

The homeowner w

as

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

Crown said.

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

Despite

their co-

operatio

n, Judge

Eh-

rcke,

presiding

over

the group’s

joint bail

hearing through video

from a Vancouver c

ourt

room, found th

e sever-

ity of the crime and

the proximity of their

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

them in jail.

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

By Cameron Orr

Interior News

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

103RD YEAR - WEEK 18

SMITHERS, B.C.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 2010

interi

or-ne

ws.co

m

SINGLE COPY • T

OTAL $1.25 (INC. GST)

D YEAR - WEEK 18

SMITHERS, B.C.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 2010

interi

or-ne

ws.co

m

SINGLE COPY • T

OTAL $1.25 (INC.(

GST))

TTHE HE IIN

TERIOR

NTERIOR NEWS

EWS

HEALTHY HEART

Two new programs

at the hosp

ital a

im

to keep your ti

cker

tocking.

COMMUNITY/A18

IIII NNNNNNNNNNNN SSSSSSSSSS II DDDD EE

The Bulkle

y Valle

y

The Bulkle

y Valle

y

Christian

School

Christian

School

prepare

s for a

big

prepare

s for a

big

showshow

Page A19

Page A19 GUYS AND DOLLS

RUGBY VICTORY

The Smithers

Secondary

girls ru

gby

team wins b

ig on

home territ

ory.

SPORTS/A13

COOKING

The Annual Volunteer

Barbeque sizzl

ed in

Hazelton.

THREE RIVERS/C1

New Results on Monkey Breakfast S

tudy

… see page A20

NEWS NEWS

A2

OUR TOWN A5

OPINION

OPINION

A6

LETTERS

LETTERS

A7

SPORTS

SPORTS

A11

ENTERTAINMENT

ENTERTAINMENT A17

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY A18

THREE RIVERS

THREE RIVERS C1

CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS C4

HIGH: 1

1

LOW: 0

HIGH: 1

1

LOW: 4

HIGH: 1

4

LOW: 1

HIGH: 1

5

LOW: 1

HIGH: 1

4

LOW: 3

WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWEEEEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTHHHHHHHEEEEERR

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Check yo

ur money: co

unterfeits

making rounds

Counterfeit m

oney

has been circulatin

g

through the Bulkley

Valley, S

mithers

and

Hazelton R

CMP are

reporting.

The New Hazelton

RCMP issued an ad-

visory to the public

that there has been

counterfeit

Cana-

dian currency being

circulated through-

out the H

azeltons.

Counterfeit

five

dollar b

ills have been

passed at l

ocal busi-

nesses in

the past t

wo

weeks. Sgt.

Hector

Lee said th

e bills re

-

semble the new bills

but do not bear the

metallic holographic

strip on the fro

nt,

and the bills also

bear the se

rial n

um-

ber HOH8286864.

The New Hazel-

ton RCMP would

like to advise

the

local business

com-

munity and general

public t

o be on the

look out for

these

fake bills.

Business

c l e r k s / e m p l oy e e s

should call the New

Hazelton R

CMP via

911 immediately if

these bills are en-

countered during a

transactio

n.

If anyone has any

informatio

n about

these counterfe

it

bills,

please call

the New Hazelton

RCMP administ

ra-

tion lin

e at 250-842-

5244 or Crimesto

p-

pers at 2

50-847-9666

should you wish to

remain anonymous.

The Smith

ers

RCMP follo

wed

shortly

after

with

reports

that fake

five dolla

r bills

were

circulatin

g Smithers

businesse

s.

They reminded

the public to

be vigi-

lant in identify

ing

the money’s

security

features before ac-

cepting th

e currency.

Anyone in

the

Smithers

area with

informatio

n about

the counterfeit m

on-

ey is asked to

call the

detachment at 250-

847-3233 or Crim

e

Stoppers at

1-800-

222-8477.

See the

follow-

ing page (A2) for a

diagram highlightin

g

the security features

of the curre

nt run of

Canadian currency,

also viewable on th

e

Bank of Canada’s

website.

Cameron Orr/Interio

r News

A clean-u

p crew fr

om the B

ulkley Valle

y Chris

tian S

chool (l-r:

Kirk

Hillaby,

Ms. E

unice Penner, C

aleb Gro

ud and Daniel E

wald) work th

e

ditch a

long the h

ighway, part

of the s

chool’s a

nnual Litte

r-a-T

hon

last week.

The three men who

allegedly tied

up and

robbed a man in Kit-

wanga will rem

ain in jail

while they aw

ait their

trial.The

three accu

sed

are Stev

en Morrison

and brothers Simon and

Howard Fowler.

Each have

been

charged with

identi-

cal counts of robbery

,

breaking and enteri

ng

a dwelling, disguisin

g

their faces

with intent to

commit an offen

ce and

unlawful co

nfinement.

As Crown counsel

told the c

ourt, on A

pr.

22 shortly after

mid-

night three

First Natio

n

males kick

ed down the

front d

oor of a

person’s

home in Kitw

anga. The

trio had been

watch-

ing the h

ouse to en

sure

there was o

nly one per-

son home.

All had their

faces

concealed

with make-

shift masks m

ade from

t-shirts

and were arm

ed

with various weapons:

a knife, a baseb

all bat

with nails in it,

and one

had a six-inch sp

ike and

hammer.

The homeowner w

as

tied to

a chair w

hile be-

ing robbed, th

e robbers

search

ing for money

and drugs.

The homeowner w

as

understandably shaken

when talking to

RCMP

after the incid

ent, the

Crown said.

All three have been

cooperative w

ith author-

ities, a

nd Morris

on and

Simon Fowler turned

themselv

es in when th

ey

heard the police were

looking for them

.

Despite

their co-

operatio

n, Judge

Eh-

rcke,

presiding

over

the group’s

joint bail

hearing through video

from a Vancouver c

ourt

room, found th

e sever-

ity of the crime and

the proximity of their

homes to th

e complain-

ants was en

ough to hold

them in jail.

“The alleg

ations

against the

three ac-

cused are

heinous,”

she

said, befo

re orderin

g

them all t

o be deta

ined

until the matte

r is dis-

posed of through the

court.She f

elt that

the ac-

cused would not b

e ef-

fectively

separat

ed from

the complainant given

the size

of the c

ommu-

nity. Their next c

ourt ap-

pearance will

be on

May 25.

By Cameron Orr

Smithers

/Interior N

ews

Accused

invaders rem

ain in jail

THE

THE

CLEANERS

CLEANERS

eo

ourt

sever-

me and

of their

complain-

ough to hold

il. allegatio

ns

three ac-

us,” she

ing

$$4343 including HST including HST

for 52 weeksfor 52 weekslocal arealocal area

s Stut Stut Sdy dydy dy

is-the

the ac-

ot be e

f-

rated fro

m

ainant given

f the c

ommu-

eir next c

ourt ap-

ance will

be on

ay 25.

Senior and out of areaSenior and out of arearates availablerates available

M… see

250-847-3266250-847-3266

Bringing the NEWS home!

ART

Subscribe today!Subscribe today!

THE INTERIOR NEWS

Page 26: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

B10 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

“DEVELOPMENT OF A PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN”A Pest Management Plan (PMP), unique identifi er # CFP HSTN 2012-2017, has been proposed by Canadian Forest Products Ltd., Forest Management Group, Houston Division.

The Houston Offi ce mailing address is: Post Offi ce Box 158, 1397 Morice River Road, Hous-ton, British Columbia, V0J 1Z0 or Telephone number: (250) 845-5103, Fax number(250) 845-5294, E-mail [email protected]. Copies of the proposed PMP and map may be examined @ the above noted location by appointment with the Walter Tymkow, RFT or or by accessing the Plan from our ftp site using the following address and password.

ftp://ftp.canfor.com/outgoing/houston/PMP/ userid: EcoSystem password: F0rest4Tr33s

This proposed PMP covers Canfor’s managed silviculture obligations in the Nadina Forest District. This includes the following communities: Burns Lake, Houston and Smithers.

The herbicides listed below are proposed for use within the context of this PMP for vegetation control using ground based application methods.

Herbicide Trade Active Ingredient Application Pesticide Control

Name Usage Ground Products Act #

Vision, Vision Max glyphosate common yes 19899, 27736, Vantage Forestry, 26884, 29009 Weed-Master

Release, Garlon triclopyr new yes 22093, 29334 RTU

This proposed PMP shall be in force for a fi ve year period (2012-2017) from the date that the Pesticide Use Notice has been confi rmed by the BC Ministry Environment (MOE).

A person wishing to contribute information about a proposed treatment site, relevant to the development of the PMP, may send copies of the information to the applicant at the address above within 30 days of the publication of this notice.

HOUSTON TOWNHOMES

FOR RENTFOR RENT

• Newly Renovated• New Furnaces• New Roofs• New Flooring

• 2 Bedrooms• Ample Parking• New Hot Water Tanks• New Windows

• New Paint• Fully Eco Insulated• Washer/Dryer Fridge/Stove

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY!!$550 per month - LOW HEAT COST!

For all enquires call Doug Caya at 250-845-0031or email [email protected]

2002 Chevy CavalierAutomatic, black, 2-door,

sunroof, 146,000kms. Great condition.Excellent on fuel.

$4,500 250-877-0724

Panoramic Views - Beautiful 1 Acre Lot

www.smithershomes.com

1723 Tower Street ~ Telkwa3 Bedroom 3 Bath Executive Style Rancher.

Full Walk Out Basement.Vaulted Ceilings, Wrap Around Sundeck.$319,500 MLS # N213608

Ron Lapadat

Cell: 250.847.0335Office: 250.847.5999

Bulkley Valley

“A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIESWITHIN OUR REGION”37, 3RD Avenue,

PO Box 820,Burns Lake, BC V0J 1E0

www.rdbn.bc.ca

PH: 250-692-3195TF: 800-320-3339FX: 250-692-3305

E-MAIL:[email protected]

Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako

Parcel Tax Roll Review PanelThe Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako has established a Parcel Tax Roll Review Panel to receive any complaints about the preparation of the tax rolls used in the collection of parcel taxes.In the Smithers area, the Regional District uses parcel taxes for both the Glacier Gulch Water Diversion and Lake Kathlyn Aquatic Weed Harvesting services.The parcel tax rolls for these services may be inspected from February 16, 2012 to March 2, 2012 at the offi ces of the Regional District (37 Third Ave., Burns Lake, B.C.) during regular offi ce hours (8:30 am - 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday). In order for a complaint to be heard, it must be received in writing by 4:30 pm on March 2, 2012. If any complaints are received, the Parcel Tax Roll Review Panel will sit at 1:00 pm on Thursday March 8, 2012 in the Board Room of the Regional District of Bulkley-Nechako (37 Third Ave., Burns Lake, B.C.) to consider written complaints received by the deadline.Further information can be obtained by phoning Hans Berndorff, Financial Administrator of the Regional District (toll free at 1-800-320-3339) or by visiting the Regional District offi ces during regular offi ce hours.

“Home of a Million Parts”• Eco Friendly & money saving• Preserve natural resources

• Save valuable land ll• Provide tested OEM repair parts

at a fraction of the priceHARRIS AUTO WRECKERS LTD

3471 Old Babine Lake Road Smithers, BC V0J 2N6

Phone: 847-2114 Fax: 847-1445Email: [email protected]

Will

2002 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer Edition259,000 hwy kms, V6, auto, fully loaded, 8 leather seats, 2 heated, p/mirrors, programmable driver seat memory, dual climate, running boards, fog lights, cruise, 6 CD, tow pkg, roof rack, one owner, good condition. Studded tires for sale if interested.

$6,900 obo 250-847-2640

JACK POT at 3178 Railway Ave.

FOR SALEFOR SALEBY OWNERBY OWNER

2,046 sq. ft. Renovated House5 Lots + Mortgage Helper

Storage / Workshop (24 x 24) • Wood shedGarden shed (8 x 10) • Fenced Yard • RV Parking

10 appliances • All window coverings includedMature, low maintenance landscapingTo view call: 250-847-2559

or check us out at www.highway16.com

$297,500$297,500

OPEN HOUSESat., Mar. 3rd 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Real EstateReal EstateReal Estate

Houses For Sale

.

Lots

BUILDING LOT FOR SALEon Schibli Street. Last One! 250-846-5993

Mobile Homes & Parks

FACTORY DIRECT WHOLESALE

modular homes, manufactured homes, and park models. New homes starting as low as $37,209, 16 wides $49,183, and double wides $70,829. www.hbmodular.com or 877-976-3737 The Home Boys.

Rentals

Apt/Condo for RentSMITHERS upper 2 bdrm, Clean unit. Balcony, sep. stor-age rm. Ref’s req’d. Very quiet bldg. $695/m. (250)847-4453.

Cottages / Cabins

FURNISHED Cabins & Cot-tage, 1 or 2 rooms - starting at $225 week all utilities includ-ed, Off Season Rates. WiFi, Sat TV, 8 kms West Smithers 250-847-3961

Homes for Rent

3 BDRM house on Kidd Rd. Fenced yard, c/p, el. heat, n/s, n/p, f/s/w/d. $750/mo. 250-635-2839 or 250-635-0367.

4051 7TH AVE Immaculate updated 3 bdrm rancher. $1300/mo. Apr 1st. 1yr lease. n/p n/s. Ph: Sonia 847-0937

Rentals

Homes for RentCOZY 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home for rent in Telkwa. Quiet dead end street near school. All new appliances. Fully reno-vated. Custom kitchen. Lrg decks, fenced yard, lrg shed, garden space. $1200/mo (not including utilities). Call Dan or Jen @ 250-846-5295

Offi ce/RetailPRIME RETAIL / OFFICE space for lease #1-3767 2nd

Ave. in downtown Smithers. Extensive parking areas. 2190 sq. ft. Avail. April 2012. $12/sq. ft. triple net for one year lease. $11/sq. ft. for three year lease. For more info call 250-847-0831

Transportation

Auto Financing

YOU’RE APPROVED Poor, Good, OR No Credit

at AUTO CREDIT NOW Details and APPLY onlineautocreditwithbarrie.com

OR TOLL FREE 1-877-356-0743

Real Estate

Townhouses

Transportation

Scrap Car Removal

SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from

cars & trucks & heavy equipment. $4.00 each. Free pick-up

anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Call Toll Free 1.877.334.2288

For Sale By Owner

Real Estate

Townhouses

Real Estate

Cars - Domestic

Sport Utility Vehicle

Real Estate

Townhouses

Real Estate

Cars - Domestic

Sport Utility Vehicle

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Wrecker/Used Parts Wrecker/Used Parts

Transportation Transportation

Legal Notices

Sex and the Kitty

A single unspayed cat can

produce 470,000 offspring

in just seven years.

Be responsible -

don’t litter!

www.spca.bc.ca

Page 27: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

He learned to eat out of our hand on day two, the cat and him worked out their differences on day three and within a few weeks he decid-ed that if my alarm didn’t go off at 7 a.m. he would kindly be-come the alarm.

The more I learned about Charlie, the more I was amazed at how intelligent and intuitive he was. People who came by always stopped to say hello to Charlie and although there is a two year old crow at the University of New York that has a 67,000 word vocabu-lary, Charlie wasn’t going to be speaking any sentences any-time soon.

I soon learned that they become very at-tached to their rescu-ers and researchers said he would not do well if separated from me. This con-cerned me a tad as

we like to travel and I wasn’t sure how that was going to work. At the end of the summer I built Char-lie an outside cage off my bedroom win-dow so he could go out and in at his lik-ing but I really want-ed to see if he could fly. After discussing it with many people they suggested may-be not trying incase he couldn’t and then got re-injured. But he flew through the house so I decided I would keep him for the winter and release him in the spring.

However, Charlie had other ideas and in late September he decided he was ready on his own and made a perfectly round hole in the cage and flew away one day. I was so happy and so relieved and yet I was also worried but took comfort in the fact that it was in nature’s hands and I had done my part.

For the past five months I have looked at every crow I saw and wondered if he was okay. Then miraculously last Wednesday I was loading up the papers at Chevron when I heard a squawk and looked down to see a crow with a slightly deformed wing at my feet. I knew instantly it was Charlie and promptly said “Hello Charlie, love ya pret-ty bird.”

With that he gave one more little squawk and flew up to the top of the Chevron sign where his family was wait-ing.

There really aren’t words to describe how happy I was, how relieved I was and how honoured I was.

While many peo-ple will call me crazy, I wanted to share our unique story about Charlie. I wanted to let people know that

sometimes a little help goes a long way, that sometimes the little things and showing compassion can pay off in ways you nev-er expected and also that while there are a lot of crows in the world, they are far wiser than we know.

I told the children that it didn’t matter what colour Charlie was, how big or small

he was or the fact there were millions of birds in the world just like him, every-one and every life is special and deserves a chance.

So if you happen to be in New Hazel-ton and notice a crow with a right wing that won’t quite fold up, say ‘hi’ to Charlie, and you never know, he may say hi back.

THREE RIVERS REPORTTHREE RIVERS REPORTThe Interior News Wednesday, February 29, 2012 www.interior-news.com B11

Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate Real Estate

250-847-5999 Located in the Log Offi ce at 3568 Hwy. 16Each Offi ce Independently Owned & Operated

Bulkley Valley Real Estate

Pick up your FREE copy of our map of the Bulkley Valley

View extra colour photos of our listings on the internet at www.remaxsmithersbc.ca

or EMAIL US at [email protected] Peter Lund

Res. 847-3435Donna Grudgfi eld

Res. 847-3787Leo Lubbers

Res. 847-3869Ron Lapadat

Cell. 847-0335Dave Barclay

Cell. 847-0365Sonia ApostoliukCell. 847-0937

Sandra HinchliffeCell. 847-0725

Charlie McClaryCell. 877-1770

Alida KyleRes. 877-6050

Karen BensonCell. 847-0548

Jeff Billingsley877-0838

$279,900

4120 Second AvenueWell maintained, 3 bdrm, 2 bath•

Vaulted ceilings, new paint•

Large shop, gardens, paved drive•

Visual tour @ www.askmel.ca•

Dave & Sonia mls n215881

$479,900

17800 Woodmere RoadCustom built timber frame•

115 acres, energy effi cient•

Large gravel reserve, timber•

Visual tour @ www.askmel.ca•

Dave & Sonia mls n215875

$249,900

1472 Columbia Drive4 bedroom, 2 bathroom home•

65x116 landscaped lot•

Includes a 20x28 shop•

Visual tour @ www.askmel.ca•

Dave & Sonia mls n215490

$314,500

4024 Walnut DriveUnique design, central location•

Large lot, 5 bedrooms, 3 level•

Spacious rooms, sunken living rm•

Vaulted ceilings, fi replace•

Peter Lund mls n210889

$159,500

17747 Grantham Rd, Smithers8 acres, creek, pond•

2 bedroom home, huge porch•

Greenhouse, chicken coop, storage•

Huge 32x50 workshop•

Donna Grudgfi eld mls n214789

$59,500

4571 Tenth Ave, New HazeltonThriving dvd/blueray rental/sales•

Incl equipment, fi xtures, shelving•

Incl comp, scanners, inventory•

Owner will train new buyer•

Donna Grudgfi eld mls n4505130

$189,500

3913 Alfred AvenueExcellent investment, 2 houses•

75x125 lot, 1-2 bdrm, 1-1 bdrm•

Main has newer vinyl siding•

Huge wraparound sundeck•

Donna Grudgfi eld mls n210158

$279,000

1475 Chestnut St, Telkwa3 bedroom, 2 storey home•

2 bathrooms, den on main fl oor•

Family and rec room in basement•

Huge private deck, detached shop•

Donna Grudgfi eld mls n214552

$299,000

5995 Old Babine Lake Road2 acre, 3 bdrm, bsmt, outbuildings•

16x32 three stall barn, fencing•

Paved rd, good view, gardens•

www.realestatesmithers.com•

Leo Lubbers mls n211554

$1,000,000

2969 Nineteenth Avenue5 acres zoned M-2 industrial•

Highway exposure, good access•

Drilled well septic•

www.realestatesmithers.com•

Leo Lubbers mls n4503223

$42,500

# 76 HB Mobile Home Park3 bedroom with mud room addition•

Newer furnace, vinyl windows•

Some newer fl ooring, newer HWT•

Quick possession is available•

Ron Lapadat mls n216068

$189,500

1549 Chestnut Crescent 3 bedroom, 1½ bath rancher•

Bright and open layout•

Heated fl oors in both baths•

Big half acre lot, patio, gardens•

Ron Lapadat mlsn215029

$349,500

1461 Driftwood Cres, SmithersImmaculate Silverking home•

Bright open layout, big kitchen•

3 bdrm + den, main fl oor master•

Manicured yard with gardens•

Ron Lapadat mlsn215594

$298,000

3844 Henry Road, Smithers3.34 acres highway frontage•

Commercial zoning, retail•

Service station, offi ce…or?•

Visual tour @ www.askmel.ca•

Dave & Sonia mls n4504683

$79,900

Lot 9 Whistler Road+/- 5 acre building lot•

Established driveway•

Minutes from town•

Mobiles allowed•

Sandra Hinchliffe mls n201902

$255,000

545 Columbia Street2 acres, riverfront•

4 bedroom, 2 bathroom home•

Excellently maintained, updated•

3 tier deck, great landscaping•

Sandra Hinchliffe mls n208936

$234,900

5091 Lk Kathlyn Rd, Smithers2010s.f. fam home on 2.439 acres•

New nat gas furnace, heat pump, fp•

Vaulted ceilings, heated kitch fl oor•

Close to Lake Kathlyn•

Karen Benson mls n215152

$75,000

Purposed Lot A Second Ave6282 square feet•

R-1 zoning•

View of Hudson Bay Mountain•

Close to high school, rec center•

Jeff Billingsley mls n214712

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

NEWPRICE

SOLDSOLD

Canadian Cancer Society

Relay for Life 2012May 26 & 27 , 1 pm to 7 am

The day light challengeWith a burning light to keep the night

Remembering cancer never sleeps

The change worked well last year so we are continuing the pattern

We can make this relay better then ever

Our challenge to you is to bring someone new to our Relay

A new team captain!A new survivor!

A new care giver!A new volunteer!

A new corporate sponsor!

Attention Team CaptainsThe Team kick off for Relay is on March 6th at 7 pm at the

Cancer Society on Main street. We would like to invite anyone

in the community that may be thinking about volunteering to

come out that night and get some information from us.

We step forward to sayWe celebrate survivors, we remember loved

ones lost and we fi ght back!

For more info contact the Smithers’ offi ce 250 847 0230

[email protected]

I read because . . .

Praise-A-Reader Monthin Support of Literacy in Smithers

I read because I just learned to read and now I can learn about horses by myself.

- Melissa Pesch

“ ”

CROW from p. B6

Charlie mended his wings, learned to fl y away

For news items or advertising

The Interior News250-847-3266

Page 28: Smithers Interior News, February 29, 2012

B12 www.interior-news.com Wednesday, February 29, 2012 The Interior News

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