sooke news mirror, june 19, 2013

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OLIVER KATZ Personal Real Estate Corporation 250 642 6480 JUNE MARKET UPDATE Market Overview & Summary VREB Statistics Pricing & Days to Sell Featured Listings Development Updates Insert in this week’s MIRROR Derek Parkinson 250-642-0405 Variable 1.75% PRIME currently 2.45% 5 year term 3.20% TALL ORDER The Tall Tree Festival is getting ready to rock Port Renfrew. Page 13 PLAY BALL! Fastpitch softball successes cover the age spectrum. Page 21 Classifieds P18 • 75 ¢ COMMUNITY NEWS MEDIA Black Press Wednesday, JUNE 19, 2013 Editorial Page 8 Entertainment Page 13 Sports/stats Page 21 Agreement #40110541 SOOKE NEWS MIRROR Sooke shines Pirjo Raits photos The past weekend was full to bursting with activity in Sooke. Above, Lisa Greig holds turned wooden bowls made from storm wood. Middle bottom, a swan glides effortlessly on the Sooke River. Right, Daniel Lapp performs on Friday night at the Sooke River Bluegrass Festival. Above Sooke’s Adam Dobres plays with Daniel Lapp and Adrian Dolan.Top left, square dancers have a blast at the bluegrass fes- tival on Saturday night, right, The Sweet Lowdown. Centre, a basket of flowers and produce from the Sooke Country Market. Middle left, Matthew serves up coffee and bev- erages from the Earth Club Factory.

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June 19, 2013 edition of the Sooke News Mirror

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  • OLIVER KATZ Personal Real Estate Corporation

    250 642 6480

    JUNE MARKET UPDATE Market Overview & Summary

    VREB Statistics Pricing & Days to Sell

    Featured Listings

    Development Updates

    Insert in this weeks MIRROR

    Derek Parkinson250-642-0405

    Variable

    1.75%PRIME currently 2.45%

    5 year term 3.20%

    TALL ORDER The Tall Tree Festival is

    getting ready to rock Port Renfrew.

    Page 13

    PLAY BALL! Fastpitch softball successes

    cover the age spectrum.

    Page 21

    Classi eds P18 75C O M M U N I T Y N E W S M E D I ABlack PressWednesday, JUNE 19, 2013

    Editorial Page 8

    Entertainment Page 13

    Sports/stats Page 21

    Agreement#40110541

    SOOKE NEWSM I R R O R

    Sooke shines

    Pirjo Raits photos

    The past weekend was full to bursting with activity in Sooke. Above, Lisa Greig holds turned wooden bowls made from storm wood. Middle bottom, a swan glides effortlessly on the Sooke River. Right, Daniel Lapp performs on Friday night at the Sooke River Bluegrass Festival.

    Above Sookes Adam Dobres plays with Daniel Lapp and Adrian Dolan.Top left, square dancers have a blast at the bluegrass fes-tival on Saturday night, right, The Sweet Lowdown. Centre, a basket of flowers and produce from the Sooke Country Market. Middle left, Matthew serves up coffee and bev-erages from the Earth Club Factory.

  • 2 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    PRODUCE5-A-Day for Optimum Health

    PRODUCE

    AD PRICES IN EFFECT JUNE 19 THRU JUNE 25, 2013

    www.westernfoods.comSeniors Day Thursdays Save 10% on Most Items

    Plain or Garlic

    RoastBeef

    DELIHealthy Choices in our

    DELI

    Remember Your Calcium

    DAIRYDAIRYIsland FarmsLight Cream 473 ml ....................

    2/300Island FarmsChocolate Milk 2 L ........................

    $349Kraft PhiladelphiaCream Cheese 250 g ......................

    $349Armstrong MeltsCheese Slices 1 kg .. .....................

    $599

    AD PRICES IN EFFECT

    SOOKE6660 Sooke Road

    Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

    We reserve the right to limit quantities

    SEATreats From the

    SEA

    Your Community Food Store

    Noirthridge Farms AAA

    Sirloin TipRoast$8.80/kg..............

    $399/lbMaple Leaf Regular or

    Maple Bacon

    500 g ...................$499

    Maple Leaf Frozen

    SausageRounds500 g....................

    $399

    Fresh, Great Tasting Meat

    BUTCHERS BLOCKBUTCHERS BLOCK

    FreshGrey CodFillets

    Fresh Canadian

    Pork SideRibs$5.93/kg ...............

    $269/lbMaple Leaf Original or

    BBQ TopDogs450 g ...................

    $399Maple Leaf Prime

    ChickenCordons284 - 340 g............

    $499

    + dep

    Campbells Beef, Vegetable or Chicken Broth 900 ml $199

    Christies Bits & Bites Snacks 200- 225 g ....... 2/400

    Maxwell House CafeInternational Coffee 125 - 283 g $349

    Jell-O Jelly Powders 85 g .......................... 69

    Dasani Remineralized Water 1.5 L ......... 2/300

    Gold Seal Smoked Oysters 85 g ................. 99

    General Mills Gluten Free Chex Cereal 365 - 395 g $399

    El Paso Stand N Stuff Taco Kit 300 g ......... $399

    Frys Cocoa 250 g ................................................ $369

    Heinz White Vinegar 4 L .............................. $389

    Orangina Sparkling Orange Beverage 6 x 355 ml $299

    Unico Tomato Paste 156 ml .............................69

    General Mills Lucky Charms or Cinnamon Toast Crunch 330 - 360 g $399

    Dempsters Multigrain or Canadian Century Grain Bread 600 g $269

    Olafsons Original or Wholewheat Tortillas 8-10s $279

    Lumberjack Sun ower, Wheatberry or 7 Grain Bread 680 g .. 2/400

    Cesar Gourmet Dog Food 100 g ................. 4/300

    Whiskas Original or Seafood Cat Food 1 kg $399

    WC Cat Litter 5 kg .......................................... $349

    Glad Garbage Bags 40s ................................ $899

    Charmin Double Roll Bathroom Tissue 12 $699

    Bounty Select A Size Paper Towels 6s ... $699

    A&H Xtra Liquid Laundry Detergent 2.2 L .. $299

    Northridge Farms AAA

    Sirloin Tip Steak $8.80/kg .....................................................

    Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974

    Quality and Convenience

    FROZEN FOODSFROZEN FOODS

    Bassilis Best Meat & Cheese

    Lasagna1.5 kg .................................

    $899Maple Leaf Ready Crisp Slices or Pieces

    Bacon65 - 85 g ..............................

    $399

    $189 $229 $459

    $169

    For Your Healthy Lifestyle

    NATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODS

    Kicking Horse Organic

    Fair Trade Coffee 400 g $1199

    CLIF

    Crunch Granola Bars 210 g .$269

    Tru Roots

    Organic Quinoa 340 g ....2/700

    Simply Natural

    Organic Mustards 330 ml ...$179

    Superslim

    Brown Rice Crisps 100 g ....$229

    Kiwa

    Vegetable Chips 200 g ........$299

    $189

    6s

    BulkFoodsBulkFoodsChocolate CoveredAlmonds 100 g ........

    $119Jelly Beans100 g .......................................59Pecan Halves or Pieces

    100 g .......................................$289

    CrystalizedGinger 100 g ..................99

    BAKERYBAKERY

    Per 100 g

    El MontereyChimichanges or Burritos 907 g

    $299McCainPremium French Fries 650-900 g

    $339Europes Best

    Frozen Fruit 600 g ...................$449

    Island Farms Frozen Yogurt,Sherbet or Ice Milk 1.65 L

    $459

    89

    470 ml

    FreshRainbowTrout

    $139

    Alpine GrainBread454 g $239

    CarrotsMuf ns

    Lemon MeringuePie$399 $499

    /lb

    LANGFORD772 Goldstream Ave.Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

    We reserve the right to limit quantities

    lb

    German PotatoSalad

    Simply Natural Organic Salsa

    Go Greenuse

    Western Foods Cloth Bags

    Panini Buns $199

    $2291 L

    540 ml

    $199Campbells Healthy RequestSoup

    2 L

    All VarietiesCoca Cola

    2/300

    99 1 L

    Sunrype Unsweetened Red LabelApple Juice

    1.82 L

    Motts Natural Apple Juice

    Bicks MainlineDill Pickles

    120 - 150 g

    99

    Shake N BakeCoating Mix113 - 192 g

    $199

    U.S. Red or Golden DeliciousApples

    OrganicKiwi Fruit

    2/500

    79B.C. White

    Nugget Potatoes2.18/kg.............................99Peruvian

    Satsuma Orange3lb bag .........................

    2/700Fuyu

    Persimmons..................................

    2/400Popeye

    Cello Spinach10 oz................................

    2/400Organic Starwberries

    California

    Bi Colour Corn..........................................................................

    Organic BabyPeeled Carrots

    2/400

    4/200$399CaliforniaBunchBroccoli

    Spanakopita SmokedGouda

    Gourmet Chef

    Assorted Jelly

    + dep.

    Triple ChocolateCake Bars $399 567 g

    99B.C. GrownGreenOnion

    $159 Machine PealedShrimp

    Barbs BakeryCheesePuffs

    155 - 198 g

    $169

    /ea

    Come in Every Wednesday for our

    Secret Super Saver Specialsin all departments

    HOT!! HOT!!

    1lb

    ea

    2/700

    $199

    375 ml

    $449Billy Bee LiquidSqueeze Honey

    All VarietiesPepsi Cola2 L

    3/500

    6s

    /ea

    39/ea

    /lb

    72s

    $449 Tetley Orange PekoeTea Bags

    500 ml

    $389 KraftPure Jam

    400 ml

    2/500

    $179

    180 g

    Lays XLPotato Chips

    Frenchs SqueezeMustard

    /ea

    /ea

    $169

    /ea

    Kelloggs NutrigrainCereal Bars295 g

    2/500

    326 g

    $499Maxwell House RoastedCoffee

    /100g

    + dep

    2/500

    1lb

    Costa Rica Pineapple

    /lb /lb

    Per 100 g

    6s6s

    $1.74/kg $2.18/kg

    4 oz. Per 100 g ea220 g

    /ea

    + dep

    + dep

    ea2/800

    Ristrorante Thin Crust

    Pizza325 - 390 g

    Island Farms

    MultipackYogurt12 x 125 g

    $529

    KnorrPasta N Sauce

    Old Dutch Cheese Pleesers orCrunchies285 - 310 g

    2/500

    HOT!!

    + dep

    + dep.

    /100g

    /lb

    /100g

    1lb

  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 3

    Up Sooke

    Thumbs up

    Volunteers needed

    Anyone who wishes to help volunteer for the sooke Fine Arts show can call and register for time slots.

    Go to www.sookeFineArts.com or call the sFA office at 250-642-7256.

    move in For the annual sooke Fine Arts show begins on July 5 and thats where volunteers are urgently needed.

    Get hypnotizedFundrAiser For

    sooke options for community Living, with hypnotist scott ward and illusionist sean watson.

    ritchie mAc wArms up the audience at 5:30, magic at 7 p.m. at emcs, saturday, June 29.

    tickets At Pemberton holmes, sdm, emcs office.

    proMote sooKe

    tAsk Force invites individuals to attend the mayors task frce, 7 pm. tonight, municipal hall council chambers. call 250-642-1634 for more info.

    to everyone who takes down their garage sale signs after the event is over.

    Pirjo Raits photo

    A new loggers pole is in place at the Sooke River Campground. The pole symbolizes the loggers sports at All Sooke Days, which is now a thing of the past. The old loggers pole was removed from the town centre at Evergreen mall after it was found to be rotten and posed a danger.

    look up, look way up...Tribute for heroes

    Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    One of the volun-teers from the JDF Search and Rescue, a group based in Sooke that provides inland waters and ground search and rescue ser-vices to the entire JDF electoral area, has been nominated as a military hero.

    Nicholas Kerr, who was raised in Metcho-sin and currently lives in Langford, is one of three Canadian final-ists selected to repre-sent the Toronto Blue Jays at the 2013 All-Star Game.

    There were calls out to nominate people who we thought of as military heroes for the contest, wrote in Erin Wilson. I nominated Nicholas to represent the Toronto Blue Jays (his favourite team).

    Nick, he is a true warrior that has a heart of gold, Wilson continues. Nick is car-ing, able, and capable of helping people in need. He recognizes these attributes in him-self and has acted upon them countless num-bers of times. For the amount of time that I

    have known Nick, he has been constantly learning to further his skills in search and res-cue, first aid, etc. It is truly admirable when you meet a person who does everything they can to be prepared to help strangers. I am in absolute awe of Nick for what he has done and continues to do for our country.

    Submissions were qualified by judging cri-teria that included per-sonal and professional accomplishments, mili-tary service and acts of heroism, and contribu-tion to the community.

    Successful contes-tants were selected based on personal and professional accom-plishments, military service and acts of her-oism, and contribution to the community.

    According to the Major League Base-balls contest website, Kerrs contributions include saving a civil-ians life after a car accident, serving as a member of Princess Patricias Canadian Light Infantry and win-ning several Canadian Forces National Sports awards. He served in Afghanistan and joined

    the Avalanche Con-trol Operation Palaci (AVCON). He is a mem-ber of the Canadian Forces Reserves and volunteers extensively in the community.

    You can vote for Kerr at the Major League Baseball website at http://mlb.mlb.com/tribute/2013/. Voting runs until June 30th, and the winners will be announced on or about July 13 accord-ing to the Official Rules of the contest. The names of Contest Winners will be listed at www.tributeforheroes.com on or about July 12, 2013.

    Search and rescue volunteer nominated

    Facebook photo

    Nicholas Kerr in mid-flight during an Advanced Swiftwater Rescue course, taught jointly to the Juan de Fuca search and rescue team and the Cow Valley search and rescue team.

    Did You Know? We have seen a bit of action in the last 4 weeks. The first 15 days of June there have been 11 residential sales. Average sale price of $415,290 Average Days on Market: 124 It takes time to get a house sold. Sharp pricing can go a long way in achieving a SOLD listing. Enjoy the weather! Enjoy your family and friends Life is too short!

    Buying or Selling call me!

    MARLENE ARDEN

    Living Sooke... Loving Sooke...

    Selling Sooke! 250.642.6361

    www.sookelistings.com

    1900+sqft, 3BR, 2BA Easy one level living 9ft ceilings, hardwood

    floors, granite counters Large Kitchen w/Butlers

    pantry Spacious Master retreat w/

    Ensuite & walk-in closet Tons of natural light; amaz-

    ing views $499,900 MLS 318949

    2400sqft, 3BR, 3BA + Den & Loft

    Entertainment size Kitchen w/quartz counters

    Oversized windows maximiz-ing light & views

    Master w/loft area & deck Crawlspace for storage Flat, landscaped yard w/

    irrigation & micro drips $539,900 MLS 323264

    STUNNING STONERIDGE ESTATES!

    2383 Mountain Heights Dr. 2399 Mountain Heights Dr.

    HELPING PEOPLE LIVE BETTER LIVES

    Cedar Grove Centre 250-642-2226

    WA L K I N G C L U BWhat a Success!!!!

    Join us every Wednesday morning and take a casual walk around Sooke. We will walk at a comfortable pace and walk for about an hour. All participants will receive a bottled water before we leave and get a nice healthy snack when we get back. Register with me at the Pharmacy and I will explain the details. If you would like more details, come see me at the pharmacy or call 250 642-2226.

    Fun, healthy, new friends.....join us today.Debbie SulilivanPharmacist TechnicianDebbie Sullivan

  • 4 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    NOW OPEN UNTIL 10 PM EVERY DAY!

    /100g

    INFLATABLE SALTER BOAT in our May & June GiveawaySponsored by McCain Foods & Village Food Markets

    We e k l y S p e c i a l s i n E f f e c t , P r i c e s A d v e r t i s e d a r e C a r d h o l d e r P r i c e s We d n e s d a y, J u n e 1 9 , 2 0 1 3 - Tu e s d a y, J u n e 2 5 , 2 0 1 3 O p e n 7 : 3 0 a m - 1 0 : 0 0 p m , 7 d a y s a w e e k i n c l u d i n g h o l i d a y s # 1 0 3 - 6 6 6 1 S o o k e R o a d L o c a l l y O w n e d L o c a l l y O p e r a t e d

    B.C. Transit Bus Passes, Lottery Centre, Gift Certificates and Canada Postage Stamps We reserve the right to limit quantities Proud member of Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce

    Village Food Markets

    Fresh Meat

    SeaFood

    Bulk Foods

    Produce

    Deli

    Frozen Dairy NaturalFoods

    Bakery

    Check out all our Grocery Specials in our Instore Flyer!

    Old Fashioned

    Ham....................................................

    $129Hearth

    Bread 680g.................................................

    $269

    McCain Traditional

    Crust Pizzas416-433g.............

    2/$500

    Dairyland

    CottageCheese500g....................

    $289

    Knudsen

    Spritzers4 Pack..........................

    $299

    Mexican X-Large "Premium" Red Flame

    Grapes $4.14/kg................................. $188

    Sun-Rype Unsweetened

    Apple Juice1L...........................99

    Pepsi12 Pack.............

    3/$500Quaker

    LifeCereal425-455g...............

    $299

    Unico

    Pasta900g........................

    $169Gold Seal

    Pink Salmon

    213g....................... $199

    Old El Paso

    Taco Kits215-510g....................

    $399

    Gallo Extra Virgin

    Olive Oil500ml.........................

    $399

    Aunt Jemima

    Pancake Mix905g..........................

    $299

    Kokuho

    Sticky Rice1kg..............................

    $399

    China Lily

    Soya Sauce483ml......................

    $199General Mills

    Honey NutCheerios1.45kg......................

    $799 Bee Maid

    Liquid Honey750g..........................

    $499

    Del Monte Canned

    Vegetables341-398................. 99

    Nabob

    Coffee375-400g.....................

    $699French's Family Size

    SqueezeMustard 830ml.......................

    $249

    BeerSausage................................................................. $119YamPotato Salad.......................................... 89Double FiloneSandwiches................................................. $799

    Europe's Best

    Fruit or Berries 500-600g $499McCain Tasti Taters/Smiles or

    Superspirals 750g-1kg......$299

    Danone Activia

    Yogurt 650g........................ 2/$600Paradise Island

    Cheddar Cheese 560g 20%OFF

    Eating RIght

    Margarine 454g.....................$189Minute Maid

    Simply Juice 1.75L................ $379

    Kashi

    Snack Crackers 213-255g 2/$500Julie's Frozen Organic

    Sorbet Bars 4 Pack........ $399

    Ben & Jerry's Premium

    Ice Cream 500ml..................... $499Old South

    Juice Blends 283ml..... 2/$300

    Simply Natural Organic

    Salad Dressing 354g 2/$400Kashi

    Granola Bars 210g........... $299

    Bran

    Muf ns 6 Pack......................................................$439Apple

    Crumble 8x8sq.....................................................$449Montreal Beef..................................................................................................... $169

    GermanSalami.......................................................................................... $199

    Peanut Butter

    Cookies 12 Pack................................................$399Whole Wheat

    Bagels 6 Pack.......................................................$349

    Organic! California

    Strawberries

    1lb Size...............$298

    Organic!

    Avocadoes ..........................$100Organic!

    Fuji Apples $3.70kg.......... $168Organic!

    Bartlet Pears $4.37/kg...............$198

    California

    Blueberries

    312g......................$298

    Organic!

    Red Chard........................ 2/$300Organic!

    Cauli ower..............................$198 Organic!

    Spring Mix 142g.......................$348

    Previously Frozen Wild Coho

    SalmonFillets.................................

    $220 Grey Cod Fillets ......................$154Ahi

    Tuna Steaks................. $264

    Roasted Salted

    Pistachios........ $199Mountain

    Trail Mix......... 49

    Raisin Almond Cluster Granola............49Blanched Salted

    Peanuts............49

    Halves & Pieces Walnuts................$209Dan D Pack Goji Omega Boost

    Oatmeal 1kg.......$619

    Extra Lean

    GroundBeef$6.59/kg...................

    $299Alberta Beef A.A. or Better Top Sirloin

    Grilling Steaks $11.00/kg $499Freybe

    Dry Pepperoni .....................$500Camp re

    Bacon 500g......................................2/$600

    B.C.

    ChickenLegs$4.39/kg.....................

    $199 Thick Cut Pork

    Sirloin Cutlets $6.59kg...... $299Freybe European Wieners or

    Bavarian Smokies 375g $400Mitchell's Cheddar or Mesquite

    Smokies 450g.............................2/$900

    B.C. Grade 'A'

    Roasting Chickens $4.39/kg $199

    /100g

    /100g

    /100g

    eaea

    ea +dep

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    /lb

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    /lb

    /lb /lb

    ea

    Fresh

    FRESH

    Fresh

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    /100g

    /100g

    ea

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    /lb

    Enter to Win an

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    +dep

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    All Varieties

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com BUSINESS 5

    Silver Sprays latest incarnationSooke Point buildings rising on Possession PointPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    Perched on the craggy out-cropping at Possession Point is a small cottage, the show home for Sooke Point at Silver Spray.

    The cottage is not large by resort stan-dards (800 sq. ft.), but it is big enough to buf-fet the wind and waves while providing a front row seat to the drama on the sea.

    Developer Michael Thorntons catch phrase for Sooke Point is, Where Victoria Meets the Wild West Coast.

    Thornton has been working at develop-ing the seven-hectare property since 1996. Thornton has seen success and opposi-tion to his visions for the property. He sold $15-million worth of lots in the initial stages of developing the East Sooke site. He has seen some opposition to his dream over the years with court cases and environmental con-cerns but he has per-severed and now his latest plan is getting off the ground. Right now there are workers all over the site, working on cottage sites, a rock wall for privacy screen-ing, trails, all kinds of pick-and-shovel work as well as the trades working on the show cottage.

    Im more passionate about this concept than

    any other on the site, said Thornton. There is something resonat-ing with this site, its the right time, the right people, the right place.

    He envisions 95 vaca-tion cottages, two res-taurants, fitness facili-ties and 100 people employed at the Point. Other options are for investors to build a boutique hotel to add to the strata amenities.

    Ive been talking to a lot of hoteliers, said Thornton. This would mean a $3-5 million investment for a hotel which could draw on $36-million worth of

    properties and the accompanying owners and guests.

    He wants this devel-opment to be world-class, based on resorts he has seen around the world.

    This could be the gem in Sooke, he said.

    The property is tak-ing shape and the vision is easier to see with the walking paths being put in and the trees shaped for viewscapes. Thorn-ton is excited at the possibilities and the work done so far. He sees this place as his mark in life, a legacy.

    Where possible, I

    kept the really neat old trees, the idea is to keep whats here, he said.

    And viewscapes there are. The Strait of Juan de Fuca is literally at the doorstep. Sec-retary Island is part of the view as are the fish-ing boat out for salmon and halibut. Sealife and the sea are the enter-tainment.

    He has a lot of ideas and one that he is floating about is giv-ing money to charity for any referrals made by Sooke residents. He said he wants to give Sooke people the first

    chance because, weve been through battles.

    In May District of Sooke council granted a variance to allow Thornton to build to within five metres of the ocean.

    He has most of the cottage sites planned out. Many will appear to be hanging off the cliffs, but in essence they are firmly anchored in rock.

    He is looking for sig-nificant sales over the summer and would like to be open for business next spring or summer. The cottages will range in price from $299,000 up. All of the cottages will be fully furnished down to the cutlery and bed linens.

    It is expected that most owners will be occupying their units only part of the year and they will place their cottages in a rental pool. Thornton is also thinking of another idea where the cottage owners could opt for a 10-year buy back option with a $40,000 incentive on a $400,000 cottage and if they exercise the option another $40,000 would be essentially be taken off the original price. Thornton said this could result in a 22 per cent profit in the investment.

    The land and the ocean is the compel-ling thing, the drama of it all, that is the value and charm of the cot-tages, and throw in the economic thing and you could make 22 per cent, stated Thornton.

    I have to do this, said Thornton. This has got to be some-thing. I want my tomb-stone to say, at least he tried, I wont stop pur-suing this vision.

    Pirjo Raits photos

    Above, the paths along the Sooke Point property, below, Michael Thornton relaxes on a deck overlooking Secretary Island.

    Build Your Dream Home This ocean view parcel on Mt. Matheson is a must see for those seeking exceptional views. Enjoy the snow-capped peaks of Mt. Baker, Victorias shoreline and Roche Cove Regional Park from your 1.64ac haven. This property has multiple options for building and septic installation, plus plenty of level space for the principal residence & garage. Driveway is already roughed in and services are to the lot line. Consider building your dream home or special vacation get away in this area of newer, executive dwellings. $349,000

    Joanie Bliss

    2 (could be 3)BR, 1BA Recently renovated with

    new cabinets, counters, floors, plumbing, roof, gutters, drainage, and skirting

    Large fenced lot, great family park

    New price $73,900 MLS 320090

    2BR, 2BA Granite counters in

    Kitchen MBR w/walk-in closet &

    Ensuite w/soaker tub Cozy woodstove in LR Fully fenced, level, easy-

    care lot Pets ok w/park approval $64,900 MLS 322040

    Lorenda Simms

    Townsend Walk - Starting at $299,900 Developer says Lets Keep Things Moving

    NEXT 4 SALES ENTERED INTO DRAW FOR $20,000! 1 IN 4 CHANCE TO WIN!

    Designer interiors with 9ft ceilings, full appliance pack-ages, garages, covered patios and porches, 3BR, 3BA, with quality finishes, spacious MBR, walk-in closets and ensuite. Designed and built for comfortable family living. We have strategies for your down payment... Lets talk. OPEN HOUSES every Sat. & Sun. 2-4pm

    Marlene Arden Allan Poole

    Tim Ayres Marlene Arden Michael Dick Tammi Dimock Allan Poole Lorenda Simms Shelly Davis Managing Broker

    Joanie Bliss

    6739 West Coast Rd.

    www.rlpvictoria.com

    OPEN HOUSE - SAT. JUNE 22, 2-4pm 6947 Grant Rd. W. - Guardian Village MHP

    Lowbank Waterfront Property This sunny, 3 acre property is true paradise with the main house situated in the centre of meadow-like sur-roundings. The cottage, oozing with character is literally a stones throw from the water. In earlier years it was a hobby farm with laying chickens, pigs and cattle. The chicken house & barn are still in workable condition. Horses could be at home here on this cleared land. The sunny aspect would lend itself wonderfully to agricul-ture. You really have to see this to appreciate it, call to book your showing. $1,100,000 MLS 324706

    Visit my website:realestatesooke.com

    Ellen Bergerudcell: 250-818-6441 office: 250-479-3333Email: [email protected]

    Only Steps to Whiffin Spit Park! Solid 2026sf 3 Bd, 3 Bth Rancher on .46 acre has a lovely flow, generous sized rooms, PLUS an Over Height Double Garage & Private Fenced Back Yard. This is a solid 4x6 home with a huge 6 crawlspace in a wonderful walking area. You can hear the surf from here! Call Ellen to view!

    Up Otter Point Road left on [email protected] 250-642-5635

    Stick coffees available at many fine places!

    London Fish & Chips, DuMont Tire, Markus, Point no Point, DeJaVu in Jordan River, Tomis Home Style Cooking and at the Pacheedaht Campsite in Port Renfrew and at the Bavarian Bakery in Lake Cowichan.

    M-Th 6-6 FRI 6-9 Weekends 7:30-6

    Smoken Tuna, Sooke River Store,The Lazy Gecko, MaiMais,

    JOHN VERNONSookes Real Estate Professional

    Sookes #1 Re/Max Real Estate Agent Since 1991*TESTIMONIAL #217

    For the better part of twenty years John has proven to be an outstanding realtor to me and many of my friends. He exemplifies those qualities so important in a professional. John is knowledgeable, diligent, gentlemanly, positive and truly sensitive to the individual needs of each of his clients,. John always gives 100% to every client, whether one is a buyer or a seller. In essence, John is simply the best! C. WeilerCall John today for THOROUGH, COURTEOUS, PROFESSIONAL SERVICE and PROVEN RESULTS. - ALWAYS.

    www.johnvernon.com*Victoria Real Estate Board MLSe m a i l : J o h n @ J o h n V e r n o n . c o m

    JOHN VERNONB.A., C.H.A.

    250-642-5050camosun westside

  • 6 NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    BC Provincial Police: Bob OwensWell-liked though he

    was throughout the sparsely populated area west of Victoria in the early years of the 1900s, BC Provincial Police Inspector Bob Owens was not spared from threats to his life as he carried out the force of the law.

    A bullet hole in a wall of the 17Mile House stood witness to an altercation that took place during Ma Jacksons proprietor-ship, when the railway crews were working on the nearby CNR line, according to memo-ries of Duncan Lorimer, who grew up across the road. John Wilson recalls that when he was helping his dad Pete Wilson do renova-tions to the walls in the 1940s, he was told the shot had been fired at Inspector Owens.

    This 1930 photo shows Bob Owens enjoying one of the ben-efits of visits to Sooke in those days, when fish were so abundant that no one went with-out.

    Sookes Tommy Dixon spoke of that era as, Even the cat had sockeye salmon. When Sooke Harbour Fishing & Packing Companys packers went out twice a week to lift from the traps, it was a special thrill when guests were invited along, and burly Bob Owens was always pleased at the chance.

    A gravel road con-nected Sooke to Vic-toria, and the brown

    police cruiser would wend its way westward when a message was received in the BCPP Victoria headquarters, called in via one of the few telephones in the district at the time.

    It made a change from neighbourhood disputes, varied shoot-ings and searching out bootlegged caches of liquor around the harbour and Whiffin Spit. Its funny though, decades ago, when-ever I would ask about bootlegging, I would be met by a smile, know-ing looks and silence by those who appeared to have knowledge of such activities during B.C.s prohibition years, 1917 to 1921.

    Inspector Bob Owens was a familiar figure in Sooke and Victoria until the early 1940s when Constable Allan Quinn became Sookes first resident BC Police offi-cer. The exhibit open-ing next week at the Sooke Region Museum, resulting from the efforts of the Sooke Lions Club and Lorne Christensen, touches on the local police his-tory and transition from BCPP to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in 1950.

    Elida Peers, Historian

    Sooke Region Museum

    SRHS photo

    Salmon were so plentiful in Sooke at one time that even the cats fed on them.

    Sooke to Sidney

    380-2662Since 1969

    PromptService

    GUTTER CLEANING WINDOW CLEANING POWER WASHING

    CONCRETE ROOFING MASONRY SEALANTS

    GUTTER REPAIR GUTTER PROTECTION

    CARPET CLEANING ROOF DE-MOSSING

    Window Cleaning, Repair & Installation

    This schedule is subject to change. Please call 250-642-1634 to con rm meetings.

    Council meeting agendas may be viewed at www.sooke.ca

    WHATS NEW AT THE DISTRICT-CHECK IT OUT! At www.sooke.ca

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: [email protected]

    website: www.sooke.ca

    INVITATION TO COMMUNITY GROUPS AND INDIVIDUALSThe Mayors Promote Sooke Task Force would like to invite community groups, individuals and other stakeholders to attend a Promote Sooke workshop on June 19th, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. in the District of Sooke Council Chamber.The Task Force would like to provide an opportunity for local groups to share ideas and stories and to provide examples of projects currently promoting the community.If you are unable to attend the workshop but have something to share, please contact the District of Sooke of ce at 250-642-1634 or [email protected]

    Upcoming Public MeetingsMayors Promote Sooke Task Force

    Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 7:00 pm

    Regular Council MeetingMonday, June 24, 2013 at 7:00 pm

    Emergency Planning CommitteeTuesday, June 25, 2013 at 9:00 am

    Bike Skills Park Open HouseSooke Community Hall

    Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 6:30 pm

    Mayors Public Advisory PanelsThe public is invited to attend the Mayors Public Advisory Panel meetings at the Prestige Resort Meeting Room:- Economic Development - Steve Grundy, Chair 3rd Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm- Arts and Beauti cation - Brenda Parkinson, Chair 4th Thursday of each month at 7:00 pm - Community Health and Social Issues - Nicky Logins, Chair 2nd Wednesday of each month 7:00 pm

    Notice of Annual Meeting(pursuant to s. 99(3) of the Community Charter)

    The 2013 Annual Municipal Report was made available for public inspection on June 10th, 2013 and copies were made available on the municipal website (www.sooke.ca) and at the municipal of ce.

    Municipal Council will consider the 2013 Annual Municipal Report and submissions and questions from the public at an Annual Meeting to be held:

    In the Council Chambers 2205 Otter Point Road

    Monday, June 24, 2013 at 7:00 pmThe Annual Report will include: the municipality's audited annual nancial statements for

    2012; a statement of objectives and measures that will be used as

    the basis for determining the municipality's performance dur-ing 2013 & 2014;

    a list of the permissive tax exemptions for 2012; a report on the municipality's services and operations for

    2012; a progress report on the performance of the municipality with

    respect to established objectives and measures for 2012; the details of any declarations of disquali cation made against

    individual council members during 2012.

    The Royal Canadian LegionBr. #54 Phone: 250-642-5913

    Why not make it your Legion

    $12006:00-7:30 PM onLyFRIDAY Steak Night

    ANNIVERSARIES BIRTHDAYS GROUP PARTIES WELCOME!

    KARAoKEEvery Friday

    8:00 - 11:00 p.m.

    with Pete & Megan

    NASCAR 7:00

    MondAys

    TUEsdAys Pool League 7:00

    Euchre 7:00

    WEdnEsdAys

    MEAT dRAWEVERy sATURdAy @ 3:00 P.M.

    SUNDAY BREAKFAST BRUNCH 9AM - 1PM $5 Children Welcome

    DROP IN POOL TOURNAMENT EVERY 2ND SUNDAY OF EACH MONTH

    sUndAys

    ThURsdAys

    Cribbage 7:00

    NEW OPEN JAM SESSIONSat 6pm

    hAMBURGERs & hoT doGs AVAILABLE

    sATURdAysSUPPORT THE FOOD BANK By donating nonperishable food items

    SPECIAL MEAT DRAWSaturday, June 29

    (Anonymous)

    ARCTIC STAR MEDAL AND BOMBER COMMAND CLASPAwarded for service in World War II

    Eligibility and application forms at the Legion

    LEGION WILL BE OPEN STATUTORY HOLIDAYS

    Hosted ByR - Team

    RCL Branch #54 SookeLegion

    Open HOuse30 June 2013

    Free Family Pancake Breakfast 9 - 11am Free Hotdogs 12-2pm Hamburgers etc for sale 2pm - 5pm Karaoke 11am - 5pm Entertainment for the Kids Face Painting Alcohol free Zone except for Games Room Information Booths, Vintage Vehicles

    Come and see your Legion

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: [email protected]

    website: www.sooke.ca

    PROJECT MANAGERThe District of Sooke is seeking an individual that is an experienced Project Manager to ll a temporary contract that we anticipate will last for a minimum of one year with the potential to be extended further.The District of Sooke is embarking on an extensive road building program to enhance traf c movement in Sooke and we are seeking a proven individual that has experience managing and administering contracts and capital projects and delivering those projects on time and on budget.The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering and full membership in Association of Professional Engineers of BC or equivalent combination of quali cations and experience. A minimum of ve (5) years related experience, preferably in local government, is preferred.To view the full job description, visit the employment page of our website at www.sooke.ca. Please apply, by email, in con dence prior to 4:30 p.m. on July 4, 2013, with a detailed resume, cover letter and salary expectations to:

    Michael Dillabaugh, CADirector of Finance

    District of Sooke2205 Otter Point Road

    Sooke, BC V9Z [email protected]

    Please note that only those applicantsselected for an interview will be contacted.

  • Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    Want to help the environment, lessen the burden on dump sites, enrich the soil in your garden, do less work than is required if you compost, all while reducing your garbage collection costs? The jolly Green Cone can help you do just that.

    On June 15, the CRD sponsored a Food Waste Digester Distri-bution Event hosted by the Greater Victo-ria Compost Education Centre. Here, they edu-cated people on the value of a food waste digester, which is kind of like a composter, only not really.

    A composter you keep in the shade; a digester you put in the sun. A compos-ter requires a blend of food and yard scraps; a digester consumes only food-related matter. A composter requires regular turn-ing; a digester does not. A composter produces soil that can be turned into your garden; a digester produces water that seeps away unnoticed. And this last bit of information might help you decide where to place the Green Cone, as is outlined in the user manual, nutri-ent rich water enters

    the soil under the base of the digestion unit.

    The food waste digester available at Saturdays event is called the Green Cone. As described in their literature, this Green Cone digests food and is primarily reduced to water. This nutrient rich water enters the soil under the base and, unlike traditional composters, there is no need to manually turn the waste.

    In other words, after you install the Green Cone, you can add any kind of food scraps into it fish, meat, bones, grains, dairy, fruit and vegetables, teabags and, even though its not exactly a food scrap although

    food produced it, you can even add in animal excrement.

    Food scraps in the yard always raises questions about bear-proofing.

    Nothing is ever bear proof, said Marika Smith, from the Com-post Education Centre, (but) the activity that is happening here is not appealing to them. They are not attracted to it. Because this (indicating the basket base of the container) is underground, the rodents, bears and racoons tend to just leave it alone.

    She cant guarantee bears wont come to it, but research and anec-dotal evidence sug-gests wildlife tend not

    to bother with it.An accompanying

    fact sheet says it is important to establish the environment in the digester before adding large amounts of meat, bones and oily food scraps generally 4-6 weeks.

    The unit itself is com-pletely enclosed above ground, with a latch opening at the top. The base is buried under-ground.

    Additional informa-tion on wild animal management can be found at the Green Cones website at www.greencone.ca/Intro/whatabout.php

    According to the Cap-ital Regional Districts website, by January 1, 2015 kitchen scraps will be restricted from your garbage. In response, collection agencies are gearing up to pro-vide organic pick-up services. Alpine, for instance, begins its soft introduction of its organic pick-up pro-gram in various service areas earlier this year.

    Other organizations are providing educa-tion. Even the District of Sooke is in on the act, giving advise on kitchen-scrap manage-ment on their website page, www.sooke.ca/EN/main/government/devservices/environ-ment/waste_manage-

    ment.htmlOnce you remove

    organic matter from your household gar-bage, you both reduce its contents as well as reduce the smell. Which in turns means you might be able to

    reduce your curb-side pick-up service.

    Wendy Dunn of CRD Environmental Resource Management said that the CRD is tar-geting sales to regions that have private resi-dential collection ser-

    vices, and indicated Sooke is included in that group.

    The Compost Edu-cation Centre is mak-ing them available for $130 each until the end of September, or while supplies last.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 7

    Food waste digester saves in two ways

    Britt Santowski photo

    Marika Smith, from the Compost Education Centre, answers questions about using the Green Cone to reduce waste.

    PembertonHolmes.com | 26716 West Coast Road, Sooke | t: 250-642-3240

    For ALL your REAL ESTATE Needs!

    Jacquie JocelynMike WilliamsBrendan Herlihy Deana Unger Stacey Scharf

    Your SookeReal EstateProfessionals Nancy Vieira

    RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 250-889-5994

    GREAT VALUE!!!

    Sue DanielsManaging Broker

    BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM BUILT HOME ON 2 ACRES

    $499,900* 3 Bedrooms and 2 Baths

    * Polished concrete & hardwood oors with in- oor heating.

    * Towering vaulted natural wood ceilings in living room.

    *Exceptional kitchen features oak cabinetry, polished concrete counter-tops & high end stainless appliance

    package - gas stove.2405 CARPENTER ROAD

    BRENDAN HERLIHY

    2936 YOUNG LAKE ROADCharming Rancher on 2 Acres

    New 2 Stall Barn, wired, heated with water

    Manicured yard is fenced & cross fenced, close to miles of trails.

    Built in 2011 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths

    Separate 1 Bedroom suite. COME SEE FOR YOURSELF!www.mikesellsvictoria.com

    MIKE WILLIAMS

    7869C CHUBB RD$1700 Month + Utilities

    *Brand New Lake Front Home*4 Bedrooms - 2 Baths

    *Sundeck overlooks Kemp Lake*Almost 1 Acre Lot

    Available Immediately

    STACEY SCHARF

    $315,000* 4 Bedrooms and 2 Baths

    * 18,000 sq ft lot. Almost half an acre to grow your own food!

    * Detached double garage or workshop with 240 amps.

    * Zoned for possible duplex.* Close to school; walking distance to

    beach; on bus route!

    Let me show you this OUTSTANDING FAMILY HOME.

    STACEY SCHARF

    OPENHOUSESat 1-3

    OPENHOUSESat 2-4

    We Have Tickets!!!HYPNOTIC ILLUSIONS

    Saturday, June 296:30pm EMCS Theatre

    Camosun Westside 2042 Otter Point Rd.

    visit: OPENHOUSESVICTORIA.CA

    JOHN VERNON, PREC

    250-642-5050

    Photos: www.johnvernon.com

    INSPIRED, CUSTOM EXECUTIVE HOMEPRIVACY, OCEAN & MOUNTAIN VIEWS

    $479,5002193 FIRWOOD PlACE

    Stunning, inspired, custom, beautifully finished 3br, 3ba, 1944sf exec home w/generous use of natural materials & uplifting ocean & Olympic Mtn views. Soapstone, tile & genuine maple floors, vaulted ceilings, wood windows, updated kitchen & BAs. Gourmet kitchen w/quartz counters & brkfst bar. LR w/efficient Tulikivi soapstone thermal-mass woodstove. Vaulted DR w/2 walls of windows & French doors to deck w/pergola & brick outdoor FP w/b-i BBQ. Family room & sunroom too. MBR w/stunning views over Juan de Fuca Strait to Olympic Mtns has w/i closet w/organizer & lux ocean/mtn view 3pce ensuite w/2person jet tub. Garden & wood sheds, playhouse & lots of pkg. Private, masterfully landscaped, sunny SW-facing .48ac. A must see for the discerning buyer. MLS #325024.

    www.sookehomes.com

    BRUCE & LINDA MACMILLAN

    250-642-4100Tucked on the shores of the Harbour in the heart of Sooke, this unique property with a waterfront lot offers a rare opportunity to enjoy the best views of both Billings and Whiffin Spit and the shores of East Sooke. Custom built to provide comfortable living on 2 levels, this 3 bed 2 bath home is perfect for a couple or active family. Amazing views from the living, dining, kitchen and family room with a glass slider that opens to a sun room. The sunny property slopes down to Water Street and the waterfront lot that is part of this listing. Bring your kayaks, row boat and crab traps. First time on the market at $599000.

    SOOKE HARBOUR WATERFRONT

  • 8 EDITORIAL www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    EDITORIAL Rod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorBritt Santowski ReporterThe Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 112--6660 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

    B.C. Views

    After 34 NDP MLAs were sworn in to continue a stretch of opposi-tion that will reach at least 16 years, leader Adrian Dix took a few ques-tions about his future.

    The partys provincial council will meet June 21 to set the terms of reference for a review of the partys dismal election performance, Dix told reporters. He repeated that his performance wont be spared, and ticked off some conventional wis-dom about the NDP campaign.

    Dix mentioned the alleged lack of negative ads, the local campaigns (read candidates), the decreas-ing reliability of polls and, when pressed, his surprise decision to come out against the proposed twin-ning of the TransMountain oil pipe-line.

    Like last weeks hysteria over a tiny leak in that pipeline, these are great sound bites for the short atten-tion spans of the modern media. But they dont explain much.

    This all-powerful NDP provincial council is a case in point. A glimpse into its inner workings was pro-vided by a summary of an NDP pol-icy development workshop called Imagine Our Future that was leaked by the B.C. Liberals in the final days of the campaign.

    The workshop took place in November 2010, coincidentally at the same provincial council meet-ing where the revolt against former leader Carole James tumbled into the open. While 13 caucus members

    were knifing their leader for reasons they still cant or wont articulate in public a glaring problem in itself the backroom policy brainstorm revealed a deeper malaise.

    Among the dream tree notions put forward in the workshop was free post-secondary tuition and public transit, along with raising wages and lowering fees for day-care. This isnt a dream tree, its a money tree.

    Remember, this is the NDPs rul-ing body, not a high school social justice class or an Occupy Vancou-ver squat.

    Showing a glimmer of adult super-vision, the workshop table on equi-table tax policy even identified the problem. Its first recommendation: Increase our economic and finan-cial literacy to gain credibility.

    The public ownership table really got radical. Scrap public-pri-vate partnerships, the basis of most government construction today. Nationalize independent power projects, in the Venezuelan style of state seizure of private assets. And perhaps most incredibly, tear up the trade agreement between Saskatch-ewan, Alberta and B.C. that harmo-nizes transport truck regulations and so forth.

    In the real world, the four west-ern premiers met this week in Winni-peg. And the three-province project now called New West Partnership will continue to dismantle archaic inter-provincial barriers.

    Why would the NDP be secretly against that? Because its also a labour mobility agreement.

    This harkens back to a supposed golden age in Canada, when two corporate titans shared the beer business, producing identical bland lager from identical factories in iden-tical stubby bottles. Inter-provincial trade in these stubbies was strictly forbidden, requiring each province to have a big unionized brewery to make uniformly bad beer for the proletariat.

    This is the power of a monopoly union. And because of it, this was how governments tried to create jobs. Its a bygone era to which many core NDP supporters stub-bornly cling. This explains the par-tys revival of a job protection com-missioner for forestry.

    Which brings us to the prover-bial root cause of the B.C. NDPs woes. Its largest financial donor is the B.C. Government and Service Employees Union, which donated $1.4 million to the party in the past eight years, nosing out the Canadian Union of Public Employees and the Hospital Employees Union.

    Former HEU and BCGEU presi-dents now sit in the NDP caucus, critics for health and green jobs respectively.

    Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press andBCLocalnews.com

    [email protected]

    What ails the NDP? Plenty

    Getting your two cents worth

    OUR VIEW

    Since the end of the penny, it feels like we are actually paying more for items. The penny, as we know, is being phased out in favour of round numbers. The humble little copper is more expensive than its face value and the government doesnt want to deal with it anymore.

    We can no longer say, give me your two cents worth, a penny for your thoughts, or a penny saved is a penny earned. All of these sayings speak of economy and the value of the cent.

    When you pay cash these days, it seems that they end up rounding up our price more often

    than rounding it down. Its supposed to end up neutral, but it sure seems to go up rather than down more frequently, unless you use a government service like the liquor store or the

    post office. The retailers still persist in pricing everything ending in .99 and thats where the rub is. Your purchase costs you a penny or two more, while the price tag looks like you are saving. Now, one cent by itself is no big deal, people wont even pick one up off the street, they are worthless, stomped upon and neglected. We should still respect money, no matter how small and insignificant it seems. Remember how people would line up for gas when one station had gas one measly penny cheaper.

    That is the value of the penny, it shows how costs rise, its a barometer of the economy. If you add up all of those pennies salvaged by a large retailer, it does make a big difference to them. If a retail giant makes $100,000, thats $1,000 if they up each item by just one cent. Over a year it makes a huge difference. We could, of course, disperse with paying in cash to save the one cent, but how about retailers raise their prices by one cent so we dont feel robbed.

    Thats just my two cents worth.

    A penny saved is a penny earned.

    How to reach us:

    Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

    Rod Sluggett [email protected]

    Harla Eve [email protected]

    Pirjo Raits [email protected]

    Britt Santowski [email protected]

    Rod Sluggett, [email protected]

    [email protected]

    Steve Arnett [email protected]

    Frank Kaufman [email protected]

    Harla Eve, [email protected] Sluggett

    General:

    Publisher:

    Office Manager:

    Reporter:

    Advertising:

    Circulation:

    Production Manager:

    Creative Services:

    Classifieds:

    Editor:

    ANOTHER VIEW

  • Protect our park

    On June 26, in the Sooke Community Hall, at 6:30 p.m., Sooke council will hold an Open House, on the subject of the bike skills park proposed for John Philips Memorial Park.

    Many of us remem-ber the fight to save the golf course, all those years ago, and although we lost that battle to development, we did gain a significant por-tion of the golf course dedicated as park. The public hearing for that issue drew over two hundred Sooke resi-dents, and those same folks need to gather once again to preserve that park.

    The discussion will center on the bike park, youth, and all the famil-iar themes. However, the issue in this case is the park, and whether we carve it up, fence off areas for special inter-est groups, and lose forever the opportu-nity for a central park, where all are welcome, and all are equal.

    Look around our town. There will not be another property such as this, to which each of us has title. There are other venues for bike parks, horseshoes, dog parks, and all other worthwhile activities. This is about John Phil-lips Park, and its place in our future.

    Please come out on the 26. Speak up! Pro-tect our park.

    Gail HallSooke

    Shame on vandals

    I would like to thank the person or persons who vandalized the flowers at the Village Food Markets Store, Fri-day night, June 14.

    The owners, JCB Ltd., spends hundreds of dollars every year to try and beautify the area around the store and it only takes one person to ruin it for everyone else.

    You know who you are. Take responsibil-ity for your actions and

    come forward and be accountable.

    I would like to thank the employees of McDonalds for trying to replant the flowers after they were thrown throughout the parking lot.

    Pretty sad that this is what you do for fun.

    Murray LambertSooke

    Sense of privilege

    It appears that it did not take our gal Christy long to get

    back into her old ways and into the swing of things.

    In her first day in office after having being sworn in as premier, she gave her political henchmen a very over-generous pay hike. She could not have just thought of doing that during her first sev-eral hours in office. This had to have been pre-ordained. Is this what is referred to as a pay-it-forward event? I believe that it may be just that. Sure would go a long way to buy loyalty and keep her

    staff tight lipped about events that transpire in the next four years.

    Reports state that in one case the pay hike was approx. $30,000. This in itself would be okay, providing the cash came out of her pocket and not mine. This mi casa su casa has to end soon. This thing smells to high heavens and seems akin to the Duff Stuff to me.

    The next thing that will make the news four years from now will be Christys appointment to the Senate. Seems even Gordon Campbell was rewarded after his political screw up and resignation. He was sent to London as our representative. Shame.

    After a very short one-day learning curve our hogs learned where to line up to feed from the overflowing public trough. And feed they do.

    Further, I wish that our figurant Prime Min-ister Stephen Harper would grow a pair. He is long past due in stand-ing up in the house or addressing the nation and truthfully stating

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com LETTERS 9

    Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail [email protected] newsmirror.com.

    Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

    Letters

    letters

    We asked: What is your favourite event in Sooke?

    What used to be All Sooke Days at the Flats.

    Bryanne CassidySooke

    I quite like the Canada Day celebrations and I like the summer market. I find all

    the events pretty fun.

    Victoria SutherlandSooke

    All Sooke Day, when it was.

    Sean WilliamsSooke

    Sooke Fine Arts Show

    Myrna SewardSooke

    Contd on page 10

    Great kids, Good cause

    Submitted photo

    A group of girls from our Junior Youth spiritual empowerment program set up a cold drink stand on Whiffin spit road on saturday afternoon. they are ella, Angela and Crystal in the back with Makenna, Mackenzi and Amy in front. All the girls are in Grade 5 except Amy who is in Grade 3. they all go to saseenos.they collected donations for the sooke Food Bank and were able to raise $103.52.

    Feature listing

    Open House Saturday June 22

    Where? #65 5838 Blythwood Road

    When? Saturday June 22, 12-3

    View this very well kept 3 bedroom

    home on a hillside in popular

    Lannon Creek Park. You will love

    the Dining Area with floor to

    ceiling windows looking South over

    Sooke Basin & East Sooke. Cozy

    Woodstove in Family Room. See

    you Saturday! Questions? Call

    Michael at 250-642-6056.

    8 EDITORIAL www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    EDITORIAL Rod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorBritt Santowski ReporterThe Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 112--6660 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A5 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

    B.C. Views

    After 34 NDP MLAs were sworn in to continue a stretch of opposi-tion that will reach at least 16 years, leader Adrian Dix took a few ques-tions about his future.

    The partys provincial council will meet June 21 to set the terms of reference for a review of the partys dismal election performance, Dix told reporters. He repeated that his performance wont be spared, and ticked off some conventional wis-dom about the NDP campaign.

    Dix mentioned the alleged lack of negative ads, the local campaigns (read candidates), the decreas-ing reliability of polls and, when pressed, his surprise decision to come out against the proposed twin-ning of the TransMountain oil pipe-line.

    Like last weeks hysteria over a tiny leak in that pipeline, these are great sound bites for the short atten-tion spans of the modern media. But they dont explain much.

    This all-powerful NDP provincial council is a case in point. A glimpse into its inner workings was pro-vided by a summary of an NDP pol-icy development workshop called Imagine Our Future that was leaked by the B.C. Liberals in the final days of the campaign.

    The workshop took place in November 2010, coincidentally at the same provincial council meet-ing where the revolt against former leader Carole James tumbled into the open. While 13 caucus members

    were knifing their leader for reasons they still cant or wont articulate in public a glaring problem in itself the backroom policy brainstorm revealed a deeper malaise.

    Among the dream tree notions put forward in the workshop was free post-secondary tuition and public transit, along with raising wages and lowering fees for day-care. This isnt a dream tree, its a money tree.

    Remember, this is the NDPs rul-ing body, not a high school social justice class or an Occupy Vancou-ver squat.

    Showing a glimmer of adult super-vision, the workshop table on equi-table tax policy even identified the problem. Its first recommendation: Increase our economic and finan-cial literacy to gain credibility.

    The public ownership table really got radical. Scrap public-pri-vate partnerships, the basis of most government construction today. Nationalize independent power projects, in the Venezuelan style of state seizure of private assets. And perhaps most incredibly, tear up the trade agreement between Saskatch-ewan, Alberta and B.C. that harmo-nizes transport truck regulations and so forth.

    In the real world, the four west-ern premiers met this week in Winni-peg. And the three-province project now called New West Partnership will continue to dismantle archaic inter-provincial barriers.

    Why would the NDP be secretly against that? Because its also a labour mobility agreement.

    This harkens back to a supposed golden age in Canada, when two corporate titans shared the beer business, producing identical bland lager from identical factories in iden-tical stubby bottles. Inter-provincial trade in these stubbies was strictly forbidden, requiring each province to have a big unionized brewery to make uniformly bad beer for the proletariat.

    This is the power of a monopoly union. And because of it, this was how governments tried to create jobs. Its a bygone era to which many core NDP supporters stub-bornly cling. This explains the par-tys revival of a job protection com-missioner for forestry.

    Which brings us to the prover-bial root cause of the B.C. NDPs woes. Its largest financial donor is the B.C. Government and Service Employees Union, which donated $1.4 million to the party in the past eight years, nosing out the Canadian Union of Public Employees and the Hospital Employees Union.

    Former HEU and BCGEU presi-dents now sit in the NDP caucus, critics for health and green jobs respectively.

    Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press andBCLocalnews.com

    [email protected]

    What ails the NDP? Plenty

    Getting your two cents worth

    OUR VIEW

    Since the end of the penny, it feels like we are actually paying more for items. The penny, as we know, is being phased out in favour of round numbers. The humble little copper is more expensive than its face value and the government doesnt want to deal with it anymore.

    We can no longer say, give me your two cents worth, a penny for your thoughts, or a penny saved is a penny earned. All of these sayings speak of economy and the value of the cent.

    When you pay cash these days, it seems that they end up rounding up our price more often

    than rounding it down. Its supposed to end up neutral, but it sure seems to go up rather than down more frequently, unless you use a government service like the liquor store or the

    post office. The retailers still persist in pricing everything ending in .99 and thats where the rub is. Your purchase costs you a penny or two more, while the price tag looks like you are saving. Now, one cent by itself is no big deal, people wont even pick one up off the street, they are worthless, stomped upon and neglected. We should still respect money, no matter how small and insignificant it seems. Remember how people would line up for gas when one station had gas one measly penny cheaper.

    That is the value of the penny, it shows how costs rise, its a barometer of the economy. If you add up all of those pennies salvaged by a large retailer, it does make a big difference to them. If a retail giant makes $100,000, thats $1,000 if they up each item by just one cent. Over a year it makes a huge difference. We could, of course, disperse with paying in cash to save the one cent, but how about retailers raise their prices by one cent so we dont feel robbed.

    Thats just my two cents worth.

    A penny saved is a penny earned.

    How to reach us:

    Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

    Rod Sluggett [email protected]

    Harla Eve [email protected]

    Pirjo Raits [email protected]

    Britt Santowski [email protected]

    Rod Sluggett, [email protected]

    [email protected]

    Steve Arnett [email protected]

    Frank Kaufman [email protected]

    Harla Eve, [email protected] Sluggett

    General:

    Publisher:

    Office Manager:

    Reporter:

    Advertising:

    Circulation:

    Production Manager:

    Creative Services:

    Classifieds:

    Editor:

    ANOTHER VIEW

  • 10 OPINION www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    what is transpiring with our golden horde in Ottawa.

    I feel somewhat better now in having vented about being sick and tired of most of our elected and appointed individuals in government having a highlighted sense of privilege while approxi-mately 10 per cent of the local population of Sooke is dependent upon our food bank.

    If this was Japan, a number of our pundits with any sense of pride would fall on their swords.

    Can someone be recalled before they have won a seat in the Legislature? I hope she hurries up.

    Ray MostowySooke

    Misleading numbers

    In the pamphlet that came with our 2013 property tax notices, the District of Sooke states in bold letters Building on last years budget of a ZERO increase in taxes, this year we are keeping the increase down to 1.57%

    for new capital projects and improvements in the town centre.

    My research has found that this number is calculated by tak-ing the total amount of property taxes the District of Sooke col-lected in 2012 and com-paring this to the total that the district will collect in 2013. Refer-ring to the 2012 and 2013 Five Year Finan-cial Plans, the property taxes collected in 2012 were $5,919,812 and the property taxes that will be collected in 2013 are $6,008,987 (all totals exclude the Vancouver Island Regional Library

    (VIRL) share). Indeed by comparing these numbers the district is in fact collecting 1.5 per cent more taxes in 2013 than in 2012.

    Does this mean then that the individual municipal taxes each of us pay individually then have increased by only 1.5 per cent from 2012? Sadly this is not the case. Referring to the property tax notices from 2012 and 2013, beside the line item GENERAL Munici-pal, the residential municipal property tax rate for 2012 is 2.59319, and for 2013 is 2.78289. Comparing these two

    numbers shows that the municipal tax rate for 2013 is in fact 7.3 per cent higher than the rate for 2012. The actual amount you pay will vary depending on the value of your resi-dence, but making the assumption that your residence is exactly the same value this year as last year the municipal portion you pay this year is 7.3 per cent higher than last year.

    Please note that I have not included the Sewer Parcel Tax increase of $37 for residents in the Sewer Specified Area. I also could not compare 2012 to 2011 because the 2011 rate includes the VIRL share.

    Property taxes are necessary for the dis-trict to provide ser-vices, and I have consis-tently supported infra-structure upgrades for Sooke. I have no issues with a property tax rate increase if the District provides value for the taxpayer dollar. How-ever, I feel that market-ing the tax increase as 1.5 per cent although technically correct, is misleading to the Sooke taxpayers.

    Tom MyrickSooke

    LettersContd from page 9

    Judy Burgess photo

    A heron in the trees was captured by reader Judy Burgess.

    Yessirree babeeeee!You can still sign up for the

    GREAT Canada Day Raft RACE.Prizes will be awarded for best costumes, best looking raft and most unique design.

    Register at www.SookeRotary.com.Register by June 24th.

    Oh.eM.Gee. Theres still time!!!

    COMMUNITY CALENDAR DEADLINE: THURSDAY @ 3PMItems for Community Calendar must be non-commercial

    and free to the public. Please limit to 25 words.

    SHOPPERSDRUG MART

    250-642-5229

    All Community events which purchase a display ad will now appear in our current community event calendar at no charge. All FREE EVENTS will be listed at no charge. Space permitting.

    Whats Up in Sooke

    Thurs.June 20SEAPARCFree Community Adult Walking Group. Tuesdays & Thursdays 10-11 a.m. Preregistration required. Call 250-642-8000 for info.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONCribbage 7 p.m.PUBLIC ADVISORY PANELEconomic Development. 7 p.m. at the Prestige. Info 250-642-1634.

    Fri.June 21VITAL VITTLES CLOSEDNO Free lunch, CLOSED THIS WEEK

    ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION$12 Steak Night 6-7:30 p.m.Karaoke with Pete & Megan 8-11 p.m. NIGHT STICK @ THE STICKIts a lovely night for a drink, live music and some cheesecake! 6-9 p.m.SOOKE PHILHARMONICASolstice celebration, Sooke Community Threature, 6218 Sooke Rd. 7:30 p.m.

    Mon.June 24CALLING ALL QUILTERSKnox Pres. Church. All welcome. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Call 250-642-2484 for info.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONEuchre 7:00 p.m.ZEN OPEN HOUSEZen Open House at the Zen Centre, 4970 Naigle Rd 7 p.m free, open to all.MUNICIPAL COUNCIL ANNUAL MEETINGIn Council Chambers, 2205 Otter Point Rd 7 p.m.

    Sun.June 23ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONSunday breakfast brunch, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. $5.SOOKE FOOD CHI SOCIETYHelp grow food for the foodbank at Sunriver Community Garden. Sun & Wed 1 - 4 p.m.

    Tues.June 25BABY TALK 2013Vision Development, CASA building 10-11:30 a.m.

    SEAPARCFree Community Adult Walking Group. 10-11 a.m. Preregistration required. Call 250-642-8000.

    YOUTH CLINICYouth Clinic (13-25), 1300-6660 Sooke Rd, Family Medical Clinic, 4-7 p.m.DOG OBEDIENCE CLASSESSooke Dog Club, Tues nights info 250-642-7667.

    KNITTING CIRCLESooke Public Library, 6:308:00 pm. Free, all levels. Drop-in. 250-642-3022.

    ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONPool League 7 p.m.

    Wed.June 26STRAWBERRY TEAKnox Presbyterian Church, 2 to 4 p.m. Strawberries, cake and whipping cream $6.SOOKE FOOD CHI SOCIETYHelp grow food for the foodbank at Sunriver Community Garden. Sun & Wed 1 - 4 p.m.BIKE SKILLS PARKOPEN HOUSESooke Community Hall, 6:30 p.m. Meeting to receive public input on proposed bike skills park. Info 250-642-1634.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONNASCAR meet & pick 7 p.m.TOASTMASTERS Upstairs at Village Foods, 7p.m. For information, call Allan at 642-7520.

    Sat.June 22ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONMeat draw 3 p.m. Drop-in jam session 6 p.m.

    This Week

    Were here to help constituents with Federal government programs and services.

    address: A2100 Aldersmith Place Victoria V9A 7M8

    hours: 10am4pm, MondayThursday or by appointment

    phone: 250-405-6550 email: [email protected] fax: 250-405-6554

    follow us on facebook!

    Randall Garrison, MPESQUIMALTJUAN DE FUCA

    www.randallgarrison.ndp.ca

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  • The classes at Poirier have been going on some pretty interest-ing field trips. Some classes went to the beach, some to muse-ums and some to the Fire Hall. Both of the Grade 5 classes went to Chinatown and learned a lot and had a lot of fun. The English Grade 5s ate lunch at a Chi-nese restaurant and got to go into the never-ending store. They had tons of fun. Best school lunch ever! said Evan Pasemko. The French Grade 5s also went to Chinatown but at a different time. They went on the tour just like the English grade 5s but ate at the Spaghetti Factory. Both Grade 5 classes had blast at Chinatown and hope to do it again in middle school!

    This year Fun Day was awesome. The 2013 group of grade 5s are the leaders

    and it turned out just like we hoped it was the best of all their past Fun Days. There were fun events that included a lot of water. At the end the Grade 5s brought their water guns and got to squirt each other with them. At the same time we all got to put our bath-ing suits on and run through the sprinklers and play around with our friends. In the after-noon Magician Murray Hatfield entertained us with his amazing magic tricks. All of us kids at Poirier always look for-ward to Fun Day!

    Last week Poirier was represented at the Belmont track and field events. We had some great finishes and some bearable loses and we probably brought home 10-12 ribbons, but the main thing was that everybody had fun! We had many, many other schools and a lot

    of grades competing for ribbons. We only had 9, 10 and 11-year-olds. There were the 100 metre dash, 400 metre, 800 metre and 4x100 relay. Poirier was rep-resented well and we hope for the very best again next year.

    This year Grades 5 and 4 are going to Camp Thunderbird. At Camp Thunderbird we are going to do archery, canoeing and rock climbing and many more things. We will be sleeping there for two nights in a cabin. There will be many kids attend-ing this field trip in hope of having the best time ever. The great cooks at Camp Thunderbird wil be feeding us break-fast, lunch and dinner. At night we are going to have a fire and probably roast marshmallows. This trip sounds fantas-tic we just cant wait!

    Our final event for the year is the Bon Voyage

    Ceremony. It includes the whole school, but is mostly for Grade 5 stu-dents graduating from the elementary school and going to the middle school.

    This year we also have a staff member leaving. Mrs. Szad-kowski will be leaving this school and going to Journey middle school to be with us. We are very sad, but the Grade 5 kids going to Journey are very happy. The Grade 5s will be singing a song at the ceremony and they will move on to Journey after the summer. The Grade 5s are very excited and a little nervous to go to Journey.

    Have a wonderful summer everyone.

    Contributed by stu-dent reporters: Evan

    Pasemko, Aila Evans, Matthew Ryan, Nyla

    Morton and Bryanne Thomson

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com NEWS 11

    Poirier Panthers wrap up

    Celebrating 75 yearsMilnes Landing Brownie Camp celebrates its

    75th. Anniversary on July 21, 2013.We are planning a Celebration Party at the camp.

    As part of this celebration we would like to have a Book of Memories. To this end we invite all Guides and Guiders, past and present to record their memories, good or bad for this book. There must be lots of memories out of time spent at Milnes, thousands over 75 years; and thousands of girls who have been to Milnes, friends made, laughs remembered, sorrows regretted. Who knows, this might bring some of you back together who have lost touch over the tears. That could be fun.

    The intention is to have these memories in our archives. Please respond, by mail to Hurwood 2126 Corvis way, Sooke B.C V9ZOG1; or by e-mail to [email protected] lf you plan to attend please RSVP to Barb Kerr at: [email protected]

    Annual Open House

    & Salmon BBQ Sunday June 23rd

    11am4pm

    Official Ceremonies at 1pm

    Essay contest winner presentation

    Opening of our new temporary

    exhibit: Beach Day Call 250-642-6351 for more information

    Tom & Bev Powers and Joe & Georgia Medwedrich

    are proud to announce the marriage of their children

    Samantha Powers and Nick Medwedrich

    on June 1st. All the best in the future!

    Reserve tickets by phone at 250-642-3964 or visit us at1360-6660 Sooke Rd in the Evergreen Centre

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  • 12 NEWS www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Readers Photo of the WeekLauren Jerke photo

    Bear Beach was the subject of this shot by Sooke News MIrror reader Lauren Jerke.

    Readers Photo of the Week is sponsored by realtor Ellen Bergerud.

    Send your good q u a l i t y j p e g photos to: [email protected] and we will publish as space and colour considerations allow.

    Jason Dumont Automotive

    250-642-6665 | 2079 Otter Point Road

    Car Care Musts You Dont Want to Skip(Windshield Wiper Blades)

    Why: Windshield Wipers are easy to overlook until you nd yourself in a pound-ing rainstorm. When: Check your washer uid resevoir monthly and more o en when you use the washers frequently. Top it up with a washer solution formulated to aid in the removal of insects and other debris, and during winter, be sure to use a solution with antifreeze protection. Finally, test the washer spray nozzles for proper opera-tion and aim.Bottom Line: Whether your windshield becomes covered with bugs in the sum-mer or ice and salt in the winter, its critical to keep it clear for your safety.

    Questions &

    Answersfrom your local

    PROFESSIONALSQ A

    Kari Stauble Mortgages

    250-642-2228 | [email protected] Sooke Road

    Q: Why use a Licensed Mortgage Professional instead of my bank?While a bank only o ers the products from their particular institution, licensed mortgage professionals send millions of dollars in mortgage business each year to Canadas largest banks, credit unions and trust companies.Mortgage professionals work for you, and not the banks; therefore, we work in your best interest. From the rst consultation to the signing of your mortgage, our services are free. Whether youre purchasing a home for the rst time, taking out equity from your home for investment or pleasure, or your current mortgage is simply up for renewal, its important that you are making an educated buying decision with professional unbiased advice.

    Karen Mason Financial Services

    250-642-0776 | k [email protected] sonfinancial.net 6689 S ooke Road

    Q: I dont understand everything about my nancial situation. Can I still work with a nancial planner? A: Yes. Very few people understand all the complexities of their situation today. Actually, most people have a very limited understanding. You are busy, you have other interests, and the nancial, tax, legal, and regulatory environment is constantly changing. A nancial planner will help organize your situation, and help you understand it.

    John Kogel Home inspection

    1-855-342-3915 | Office 250-642-3915 Cel 250-812-0915

    Q: How should sellers prepare for a home inspection? A. We expect to see boxes and storage in the garage. Please leave some access to the electrical panel, so the inspector can safely remove the cover. Leave a clear path to the water heater, furnace, and other included utilities or appliances. Replace burnt-out light bulbs. Dont force the inspector to test the socket, be-cause this could make him cranky. Light the pilot light to the replace, even in summer. Install cover plates on switches and outlets. If the attic hatch is in a closet, clear o the top shelf. Put personal items and valuables away in drawers. Home inspectors have speci c duties and limited time to do them. When every-thing goes smoothly, the home buyers are reassured that theyre making a good choice, and everyone comes away smiling.

    Kyle Topelko Plumbing

    250-883-7271 | [email protected]

    Q: What sort of services do you provide and are you local?

    A: We are proud to o er expert services within all aspects of the plumbing trade! If its in or around your home or business we can look a er it. We have state of the art equipment - cameras, leak location and drain cleaning equipment to help us solve any plumbing problem our customers face e ciently, reliably and a ordably. Our plumbers are top notch, knowledgeable and award winning. Whether its simply clearing a blocked drain, or managing your entire bathroom renovation project, Plumb-Perfect can get the job done right the rst time, everytime! We have been proud members of the Sooke community for 22 years and o er same-day 24 hr service. For all your plumbing needs, call Plumb-Perfect!

    2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

    Fax: 250-642-0541email: [email protected]

    website: www.sooke.ca

    PUBLIC OPEN HOUSEFOR A

    BIKE SKILLS PARKWednesday, June 26th, 2013 at 6:30 pm

    Sooke Community Hall

    A public open house will be held on Wednesday, June 26th, 2013 at 6:30 pm in the Sooke Community Hall located at 2039 Shields Road, Sooke, BC. The purpose of this meeting is to receive public input on the proposed Bike Skills Park in John Phillips Memorial Park located at 2201 Otter Point Road.

    Please contact the District of Sooke at (250) 642-1634 if you have any questions regarding this project or visit www.sooke.ca for more information and to ll out the online feedback form.

  • Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    It may be the tall trees or the incredible views but most likely it is the music. Three days worth of perfor-mances by some of the best bands in Brit-ish Columbia and they are all converging on Browns Mountain in Port Renfrew.

    The Tall Tree Festival is for the hardy and the dedicated. Its a high up there on the moun-tain where the scen-ery competes with the music, visual artists, DJs and festival goers. For four years, the orga-nizers have been bring-ing in well-known and emerging artists, some from far and some from near.

    If youve heard of Juno-nominated Hol-lerado, Sunhawk, The Zolas, Pigeon Hole, The Washboard Union, Broken Down Suitcase or Mullet Man then this festival is for you. These arent your mom-mas bands, the festival is geared for those with a taste for alternative /techno sounds. There are 65 acts lined up for your listening enter-tainment. The festival is also about community and the environment.

    Not only is this years lineup the best yet, said Festival Direc-tor Mike Hann, but its the most unique venue youll ever see. If you havent been before, this is the year.

    Sunhawk seems to personify the types of bands heading to the stage at Tall Tree.

    Sunhawk is an ener-getic, sexy and elec-trifying three-piece band from Victoria, that burst onto the Island music scene in early 2010. The three bandmates are child-

    hood friends playing together in a base-ment since they were about 12-years-old. At Sasquatch in 2009 they decided to form a band and get on with it. The band isKeenan Murray (drums), Matt Longpre (vocals, key-boards, bass, gui-tar) and Ben Robert-son (vocals, guitar, bass). They expertly blend soaring harmo-nies, electronic key-boards and 70s-esque guitar riffs against a backdrop of power-ful, dance-inducing drumming.

    And thats just one of the bands performing at Tall Tree on the Can-ada Day long weekend, June 28-30.

    The combination of talented artists and respectful event goers mixed with the commu-nity spirit has resulted in this event being widely talked about and highly anticipated for 2013.

    A full list of perform-ers is online at www.talltreefestival.com or find them on Facebook.

    The festival is sup-

    porting the Ancient Forest Alliance (AFA), a British Columbian organization working to protect the endangered old-growth forests of B.C. and to ensure sus-tainable forestry jobs in the province

    You need to be aware that you MUST be 19 and able to prove it with two pieces of government ID or, no ID - no entry. Zero tol-erance for drinking and driving. There will be roadblocks. Forget about your credit card, cell phone, laptop or tablet theres no recep-tion and no ATM. Bring cash. No gas either in Port Renfrew, so fill up in Lake Cowichan or Sooke before head-ing up the mountain. Leave your pet at home along with any bottles or glass. Leave the fire-wood as well as theres no fires allowed. No drugs or outside alco-hol is permitted.

    Prepare your cos-tumes. Men in suits have been spotted at past festivals as have all kinds of crazy and goofy getups.

    Okay, now you have the rules, heres what else you need to do to prepare for Tall Tree:

    Be prepared for all weather: We can have sun and heat and also some rain. Prepare for it all.

    Be prepared for camping: Prepare your self to wake up to world class views! Be smart - Bring a flashlight (or two) for the evening. Bring water to stay hydrated. Sunproofing and waterproofing is smart. Bring something to keep you cozy if it gets chilly.

    Be ready to walk on uneven ground: Some nice sturdy shoes are a great idea. Gum

    boots are fun for pud-dle jumping on the off chance it rains.

    The parking area is separate from the camping area. All vehi-cles are parked at the base of the mountain and all festival attend-ees will be shuttled up to their campsites. If you car pool with more than three people, you get free parking.

    To purchase tick-ets online go to the McPherson Box Office website at: www.rmts.bc.ca. To purchase advance tickets in store go to Coastline Surf and Sport and Ditch Records & CDs. They are $129 in advance.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 www.sookenewsmirror.com ARTS 13

    Arts & EntertainmentMountain high at Tall Tree Festival

    File photos

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    1 ) S h e r i n g h a m Po i n t W t f r t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pe n d i n g2 ) We s t C o a s t R d 8 0 3 5 W t f r t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pe n d i n g3 ) G a l e n a 2 3 6 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ve r y C u t e ! . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3 3 7 , 9 0 04 ) D u fo u r 1 5 8 4 . . . . . . R a n c h e r / 1 / 2 A c re . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3 9 9 , 0 0 05 ) S o o k e R e s o r t / M a r i n a . . . . . . . . W t f r t ! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 7 9 , 0 0 06 ) C o m p a s s Po i n t e , B e a r M n t n L o t s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R e d u c e d7 ) We s t C o a s t R d 7 9 2 1 . . . WAT E R F RT. . . . . . R e d u c e d $ 7 6 9 K8 ) T i d e v i e w . . . . Wa t f r t L o t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pe n d i n g9 ) F i s h b o a t B a y R d . . . . W t f r n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 , 2 5 0 , 0 0 01 0 ) K a l t a s i n , 4 a c re M a r i n a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2 , 1 7 7 , 1 0 01 1 ) L o t 3 C o m p a s s Po i n t e , B r M n t n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pe n d i n g

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  • 14 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, JUne 19, 2013 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    E M C S 2013 G r a d u a t i o n

    First of all, I would like to say congratulations to all off my classmates who have success-fully completed high school and are here today.

    One key part of high school, or

    school in general, is how diverse it is. Although many people have taken the same classes, everyone has learned dif-ferent lessons. As a result of these dif-ferent lessons and experiences, every-one has different plans for the future that will be based in a different bank of knowledge. This means that it would be impossible to speak about what every-one has learned throughout high school