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THL Stakeholder Engagement and Communication Plan TINA RIVER HYDROPOWER DEVELOPMENT PROJECT SECP Rev. 7 PAGE 1 OF 136 Stakeholder Engagement and Communication Plan REV DATE DESCRIPTION PREPARED CHECKED APPROVED 1 01 Aug 2019 Initial Draft For THL Review Hoa Tran Sabrina Genter Cristina Pellegrino 2 14 Aug 2019 Initial Draft for Lender review Hoa Tran Alison Mratovich Cristina Pellegrino 3 16 Aug 2019 Final Draft (Version 1) Hoa Tran Alison Mratovich Cristina Pellegrino 4 1st October 2019 Final Draft (Version 2) Hoa Tran Alison Mratovich Craig Reid 5 17 Aug 2020 Draft (Version 3) for THL & PO review; Access Road construction J Grinter N Taylor 6 26 Aug 2020 Final Draft (Version 3) for Lenders’ Review and approval; Access Road Construction J Grinter N Taylor 7 03 Nov 2020 Version 3 resubmitted for Lenders’ approval (Access Road) J Grinter N Taylor

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REV DATE DESCRIPTION PREPARED CHECKED APPROVED
1 01 Aug 2019 Initial Draft For THL Review Hoa Tran Sabrina
Genter
Cristina
Pellegrino
2 14 Aug 2019 Initial Draft for Lender review Hoa Tran Alison
Mratovich
Cristina
Pellegrino
3 16 Aug 2019 Final Draft (Version 1) Hoa Tran Alison
Mratovich
Cristina
Pellegrino
Alison
5 17 Aug 2020 Draft (Version 3) for THL & PO
review; Access Road construction J Grinter N Taylor
6 26 Aug 2020
Lenders’ Review and approval;
THL
1.1 Project overview ................................................................................................................................................... 10
1.2 Context of this Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Plan (SECP) ......................... 14
1.3 Scope, Purpose and Objectives ..................................................................................................................... 15
1.4 Environmental and Social Risks and Impacts ......................................................................................... 18
1.5 Gender-based actions and objectives ........................................................................................................ 18
1.6 Current Stage of the Project ........................................................................................................................... 20
1.7 Structure of this Plan .......................................................................................................................................... 22
2 Summary of Previous Stakeholder Engagement .............................................................................................. 23
3 Key Standards and Legislation .................................................................................................................................. 26
3.1 National Legislation ............................................................................................................................................ 26
3.2 International Standards ..................................................................................................................................... 28
3.2.2 Asian Development Bank Safeguard Policy ........................................................................................ 29
3.2.3 EDCF Safeguard Policy ................................................................................................................................. 29
3.2.4
The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) Guidelines on Social Impac
t Assessment ..................................................................................................................................................................... 30
4.1 THL .............................................................................................................................................................................. 34
4.2 Project Office ......................................................................................................................................................... 38
5.1.1 Project-Affected Parties ................................................................................................................................ 40
5.1.3 Vulnerable Groups .......................................................................................................................................... 48
5.1.4 Stakeholder Mapping .................................................................................................................................... 50
6 Stakeholder Engagement Program ......................................................................................................................... 55
6.1 Pre-Construction Engagement....................................................................................................................... 56
6.1.3 Strategy for Consultation and Communications .............................................................................. 59
6.1.4 Strategy for Vulnerable Groups ................................................................................................................ 63
6.1.5 Stakeholder Feedback and Reporting Back ........................................................................................ 64
6.2 Construction Engagement ............................................................................................................................... 65
6.2.2 Incorporating Stakeholder Feedback and Report Back ............................................................. 68
6.3 Engagement during Operational Phase .................................................................................................... 69
6.3.1 Incorporating Stakeholder Feedback and Reporting Back ...................................................... 69
6.4 Communications and Media Protocol ..................................................................................................... 70
6.4.1 Communications activities lead by PO .............................................................................................. 71
7 Grievance Redress Mechanism ................................................................................................................................. 75
8 Stakeholder Engagement Management Database .......................................................................................... 77
8.1 Use, storage and protection of data........................................................................................................... 77
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9.3 Reporting Back ...................................................................................................................................................... 84
ANNEX A – TRHDP Communications and Media Protocol (2020) ................................................................... 86
ANNEX B – Identified social risks and impacts associated with the Project ................................................ 87
ANNEX C – 2009-2011 Stakeholder Engagement Activities .............................................................................. 100
ANNEX D – Engagement strategies for each Project phase ............................................................................. 103
ANNEX E – Stakeholder Engagement Management Database - Template ................................................ 134
Table of Figures
Figure 1-1 Overview of the Project extent, and local villages ......................................................................... 13
Figure 4-1 Conceptual framework for social safeguards implementation ................................................. 32
Figure 4-2 Architecture for social safeguards implementation ....................................................................... 33
Figure 5-1 Stakeholder Mapping ............................................................................................................................... 51
Figure 7-1 GRM process for the Project .................................................................................................................... 76
List of Tables
Table 5-2 Project Stakeholders – Potentially Vulnerable Groups .................................................................. 49
Table 5-3 Key Stakeholder Concerns, Opportunities and Needs .................................................................. 52
Table 6-1 Engagement Stages ....................................................................................................................................... 55
Table 6-2 Consultation Methods .................................................................................................................................. 61
Table 6-3 Summary of activities featured in the Project Communications Plan (led by PO) .......... 72
Table 9-1 Engagement Performance Indicators .................................................................................................... 80
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CESMP Construction Environmental and Social Management Plan
CLA Community Liaison Assistant
CLO Community Liaison Officer
CBSP Community Benefit Sharing Program
CFO Chief Financial Officer
DIA Direct Impact Area
ED Energy Division
EIS Environmental Impact Statement
ESIA Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
ESMP Environmental and Social Management Plan
ESMS Environmental and Social Management System
ESS Environmental and Social Standard
EVAW Elimination of Violence Against Women
FAQs Frequently Asked Questions
GAP Gender Action Plan
GFP Gender Focal Point
GRM Grievance Redress Mechanism
HRLMP Human Resource and Labour Management Plan
HSE Health, Safety and Environment
IA Implementation Agreement
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K-water Korea Water Resources Corporation
LALRP Land Acquisition and Livelihood Restoration Plan
MMERE Ministry of Mines, Energy and Rural Electrification
NGO Non-Governmental Organisations
OE Owner’s Engineer (Stantec New Zealand)
PAP Project-Affected Parties
PO Project Office
SECP Stakeholder Engagement and Communications Plan
SIEA Solomon Islands Electricity Authority
SIG Solomon Islands Government
THL Tina Hydropower Limited
TMP Traffic Management Plan
WB World Bank
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Definitions
DIA The DIA is the direct physical footprint of the Project being the land on which
all Project-related infrastructure will be located and all construction will be
undertaken. The DIA consists of:
• Core Area – 428 Ha site acquired by SIG in 2014 encompassing all
land required for the construction and operation of the dam, reservoir,
power station, and the portion of the access road from Managikiki
Village to the powerhouse and dam site (also known as Access Road
Lot 2). The Tina Core Land Company (TCLC) owns the Core Area,
including the access road. The company is a joint venture between
customary landowners and the Solomon Islands Government (SIG).
=Figure 1-1 below shows the extent of the Core Area in red.
• NB: The Core Area acquisition in 2014 also included the customary
land component of the Infrastructure Corridor (IC), however this area
of land acquired for the road and transmission line was defined as
part of the IC for the purposes of assessing impacts in the Project
Environmental and Social Impact Assessment (ESIA).
• Infrastructure Corridor (IC) – Encompasses a 50 metre corridor from
Managikiki Village to the Black Post Turnoff. The IC accommodates the
access road and dual 66kV transmission lines, and the transmission
line route from Black Post Road to the existing Lungga Power Station.
Downstream
Area
The Downstream Area is the area downstream of the dam to tide-water, (i.e.,
dam to the confluence with the Toni River, where the Tina and Toni Rivers
then become the Ngalimbiu River, and beyond to where the river enters Iron
Bottom Sound). The downstream area may be affected by changes in the Tina
River flow pattern and water quality. Over the long term, erosion and
deposition of materials on the riverbanks may modify the way the river is used
for such purposes as household water supply, and exploitation of gravel
deposits.
Infrastructure
Area
The Infrastructure Area is the geographical area within which people and
communities are likely to be affected by the IC (modifications to, and use of,
the access roads and transmission line corridor, plant, site offices, staff and
workers’ accommodation, and ancillary facilities: .It extends beyond the DIA to
include villages or communities that may be impacted by noise, dust, waste,
traffic electricity safety concerns, health or any other type of community
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impacts, .
Stakeholder This SECP uses the definition of “stakeholder” defined within the IFC WB
Environmental and Social Framework (2017), which includes:
“…individuals or groups who:
(a) are affected or likely to be affected by the project (project-affected
parties); and
(b) may have an interest in the project (other interested parties).”
Upstream Area The Upstream Area is the portion of the Tina River Catchment located
upstream of the dam and reservoir. Impacts considered in this area include
impacts on migratory fish and other aquatic species and impacts of potential
reduced access to the hunting and fishing grounds of local communities.
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1.1 Project overview
The Tina River Hydropower Development Project (TRHDP or “Project”) is a 15 MW (installed
capacity) hydroelectricity Project that will have a total annual output of 78 GWh when fully
implemented. The Project is located on the Tina River, approximately 30 km south east of Honiara,
at the upstream end of the Ngalimbiu River Basin, in Central Guadalcanal. The Project seeks to
reduce the Solomon Islands’ dependence on oil, uncertainty associated with global oil markets,
and the cost of electricity production.
The Project is managed by a dedicated Project Office (PO) under the national Ministry of Mines,
Energy and Rural Electrification (MMERE); it is owned, and will eventually be operated by, Tina
Hydropower Limited (THL).
THL was established by Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-water) and Hyundai Engineering
Corporation Limited (HEC). THL will Build, Own, Operate and Transfer (BOOT) the Project under an
Implementation Agreement (IA) and a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) with the Solomon Islands
Government (SIG) and Solomon Islands Electricity Authority respectively. The BOOT concession is
expected to last for a 30-year period, following commissioning.
HEC will be responsible for the Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) of the Project,
while THL will be responsible for the Operation and Maintenance contract. THL will sell electricity
to the Solomon Islands Electricity Authority (SIEA), the state-owned power utility which trades as
Solomon Power, for the duration of the concession. At the end of the concession, the hydropower
infrastructure will be transferred to the SIG or SIEA.
Figure 1-1 provides an overview of the Project extent, and key features.
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Key components of the Project include:
• Dam: 71.5m dam (from the foundation), located on the Tina River approximately 11.7 km
upstream from the Toni River, the point at which the river then becomes the Ngalimbiu
River.
• Reservoir: The Tina River valley will be inundated along a distance of approximately 2.6
km upstream of the dam structure, with the water level reaching up to 150 metres above
sea level. The reservoir will hold 7 million m3 of water (7,000 megalitres).
• Tunnel: an approximately 3.3m diameter, 3.3 km long headrace tunnel to connect the dam
to the powerhouse.
• Powerhouse: will be equipped with 3 turbine/generator units, each with a capacity of
5MW and is located about 5.4km downstream from the dam.
• Transmission lines: dual 66 kV transmission lines in a 50 m corridor from Managikiki
Village to the Black Post Turnoff, as well as transmission line route from Black Post Road to
the existing Lungga Power Station.
• Road: construction of permanent and temporary access roads to the powerhouse, dam,
intake portal, dam base, mini-hydro, quarries, and Black Post Road reserve, amounting to
a total of approximately 21.5 km (divided into three ‘Lots’)..
• Staff and Workers’ Accommodation: workers’ camps will be located approximately four
kilometres south of the Black Post Junction turn off (refer to figure 1-1).
• Site offices and ancillary facilities: consist of site offices, stores, batch plant, crushing
areas and pug mill, fly ash warehouse, and explosives storage facilities.
Construction activities will last three (3) years, and all construction activities will take place on land
acquired for the Project in 2014, known as the “Core Area”, as well as along the Black Post Road.
Construction will begin with Lots 1,2 and 3 of the Access Road in 2020.
The World Bank (WB) provided financial support to MMERE to complete an ESIA during the
detailed design study, and preparation of bidding documents for the Project. As such, the Project
is required to comply with relevant IFC WB social and environmental safeguard policies. As key
development partners, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Export-Import Bank of Korea
(Korea-EXIM Bank) also require compliance with their safeguard policies.
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There are no communities residing in the Direct Impact Area1 where the construction of the
proposed dam, storage reservoir, headrace tunnel, and powerhouse, as well as any borrow areas,
set down areas, and yards, etc. (Core Area) will take place. Nor are any communities located in the
50-metre-wide access road and transmission line corridor (Infrastructure Corridor2). The Senge
Community (Choro, Koropa, Senge villages,) in the upper Downstream Area are the villages
located closest to the proposed construction activities. There are other Indigenous and non-
Indigenous communities residing in the Downstream Area who are likely to be affected by
changes in the river water quality, volume, or availability during the construction or operation of
the hydro scheme – downstream of the power station site. Similarly, there are communities in the
Infrastructure Area who are likely to be affected by modifications to, and use of, the existing or
new access road/s, and transmission line corridor and other plant and facilities but who are not
located within the Direct Impact Area. These communities are identified in Section 5 Project
Stakeholders.
1 The DIA is the direct physical footprint of the project being the land on which all project related
infrastructure will be located and all construction will be undertaken. Refer to the Acronyms, Abbreviations
and Definitions at the beginning of the SECP for details.
2 Refer to the Acronyms, Abbreviations and Definitions at the beginning of the SECP for details.
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Figure 1-1 Overview of the Project extent, and local villages
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(SECP)
This document forms the SECP (P3) for the pre-construction, construction, operational and
decommissioning phases of the Project. The SECP is built upon and supersedes the Stakeholder
Engagement Plan (October 2012), and stakeholder engagement activities that have been
undertaken since Project inception to date. The SECP identifies the Project stakeholders and
describes how these stakeholders will be engaged throughout the Project lifecycle. The SECP is a
“living document” that will be updated as the Project progresses so that the SECP can continue to
be fit for purpose in the operation phase..,.
This SECP outlines the safeguards that will be implemented to manage social impacts that could
potentially arise as a result of the Project; it is complementary to and is implemented in
conjunction with all other management plans under the Project Environmental and Social
Management Plan (ESMP) framework. Specific plans which are particularly relevant, and directly
integrated with operation of this this SECP include:
• Human Resources and Labour Management Plan (HRLMP; P4)
• Influx Management Plan (IMP; P5)
• Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM; P6)
• Worker’s Health and Safety Plan (WHSP; P8)
• Workers’ Code of Conduct (WCC; P9)
• Community Health and Disease Vector Management Plan (CHDVMP; P10)
• Social Impact Monitoring Plan (SIMP; M4)
This SECP also incorporates relevant requirements and approaches described in the Project
Gender Action Plan (GAP; 2017) and the Land Acquisition and Livelihood Restoration Plan (LALRP;
2017) which were initially established (and are currently administered) by the Project Office. It is
also integrated with the Communications and Media Protocol included in Annex A to this SECP.
Relevant aspects of the protocol are summarised in Section 6.4.
All these plans provide measures and management approaches to avoid, reduce or mitigate social
impacts associated with the Project from pre-construction and mobilisation through to the
operation phase and beyond. They are implemented in conjunction with this SECP.
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Stakeholder engagement refers to a process of communicating information and knowledge,
seeking to understand and respond to the concerns of stakeholders, and building constructive
and responsive relationships that are important for successful management of a Project’s
environmental and social impacts and risks.
Activities which will be undertaken as part of the Project, and which will require ongoing
involvement and engagement with PAPs and other stakeholders, will broadly include (but not
necessarily be limited to):
generally led by PO)
• Seeking input to, and feedback on the monitoring, mitigation and management of all
types of project impacts, reporting on implementation and outcomes, and any revisions
and further development of ESMPs for construction and operation phases.
• Community health surveys and awareness programs
• Community Benefit Sharing Program activities and allocations
• Recruitment and employment of local workers, from CBSP communities, the wider
Guadalcanal Province, other islands across the Solomon Islands group, and foreign
countries.
• Procurement from CBSP communities, the wider Guadalcanal Province, and other islands
across the Solomon Islands group
• Implementation of security and safety related measures
• Negotiating access via existing and new roads, and to drinking water supplies
• Providing updates on the progress of the Project, positive outcomes, and any adverse
events (e.g. via social media; local print media; the Project website maintained by PO;
television and radio; and in community meetings)
• Capacity building initiatives, such as promoting women’s development and small
enterprises in the Project area.
• Interaction between Project workers and local communities, NGOs, public services and
facilities (such as entertainment venues, retailers, accommodation providers, primary
health care centres, schools and training providers, etc)
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funding partners to seek input and feedback on Project implementation.
Good international industry practice (GIIP) attempts to move beyond simply providing information
to stakeholders (i.e. a ‘top-down’ approach). Rather, GIIP requires two-way dialogue to develop
partnerships and enable people and communities, including vulnerable people, to play an active
role in shaping developments to meet their own needs. Community and stakeholder participation
is integral to a successful project and professional organisations such as the International
Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) stress that the outcomes of consultations/participation
should be incorporated into project design and into the monitoring, assessment, management
and mitigation of social and other impacts.
The World Bank Performance Standard 1 requires clients to develop and implement a Stakeholder
Engagement Plan and Performance Standard 7 requires clients to undertake an engagement
process with the Affected Communities of Indigenous People.
Tina Hydropower Limited (THL) and Project Office (PO) are committed to undertaking a
development process that delivers an inclusive dialogue with the Project stakeholders, when
undertaking the types of activities listed above.
Objectives of the SECP
• To establish a systematic approach to stakeholder engagement that will help THL build
and maintain a constructive relationship with stakeholders, especially Project affected
parties.
• To maintain broad community support for the Project and to enable stakeholders’ views to
be taken into account in Project design and environmental and social performance.
• To provide a means for effective and inclusive engagement with PAPs throughout the
Project life cycle on issues that are affecting them.
• To provide a means for all stakeholders to be part of the process of identifying social and
environmental impacts of the project when they happen; to help to devise mitigation
strategies and responses, and to help to evaluate those responses through project
management.
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• To ensure that appropriate Project information on environmental and social risks and
impacts is disclosed to stakeholders in a timely, understandable, accessible and
appropriate manner and format.
• To provide PAPs with accessible and inclusive means to raise issues and grievances, and
allow PO, THL and HEC to respond to and manage such grievances.
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The environmental and socioeconomic issues considered in the ESIA were identified through
scoping, and later verified through environmental and socioeconomic studies and field surveys,
with the final ESIA issued in July 2019. Wider risks to the project and associated impacts are
covered across the various ESMPs for the project; a guide showing how the risks and impacts will
be managed through each plan is given in the Construction ESMP (P1).
A list of the social, cultural, political and economic risks and impacts associated with the Project
which have been identified to date is provided in Annex B. This SECP seeks to mitigate these
identified impacts of the project. The list presented in Annex B should not be considered as
exhaustive; new risks and impacts may be identified as the project progresses and this SECP (and
the wider Environmental and Social Management framework for the Project) establishes a
procedure for proactively reducing the risk of new issues arising, and provides a framework of
reference for managing them if they do eventuate.
1.5 Gender-based actions and objectives
Previous studies (such as those informing the Land Acquisition and Livelihoods Restoration Plan
(LALRP) and ESIA published in 2017) established that woman and girls within Project-affected
communities are largely (and sometimes solely) responsible for household and family
maintenance activities, livestock care, planting and cultivating food gardens, harvesting crops,
marketing, purchasing of supplies, and care of household finances. However, they do not yet have
a significant role in land-related decision making, even though land is inherited matrilineally.
Patriarchy (men making the majority of important decisions) has increasingly become the norm in
traditional Solomon Islands communities that become involved in projects involving commercial
resource exploitation, such as this Project.
Gender-based violence is also a significant issue in the Solomon Islands, including in the Project-
affected communities, with a reported high prevalence of violence (physical, sexual and emotional)
against women by intimate partners. This behaviour has persisted due to multiple factors
including widespread acceptance of violence against women in society, and frequent use of
physical punishment to discipline women who are seen as transgressing their prescribed gender
roles, and a lack of formal support services which makes it difficult for women to seek help. All of
these conditions have established a baseline of gender-inequality in the community.
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A Gender Action Plan has been established for the Project (2017) to ensure that women and girls
are not adversely impacted by Project activities (directly or indirectly). The GAP seeks to avoid
exacerbating the issues already experienced by women and girls in the community (described
above) and promote their development and active involvement in community decision-making,
along with their general wellbeing. The GAP promotes the mainstreaming of gender into the
Project, and equal opportunities for women and men to participate in project benefits. It focuses
specifically on mitigating the impact of the Project on the lives of communities within the
immediate footprint (identified in this SECP as Project-affected parties; see Section 5.1.1).
A significant factor in achieving these objectives will be to create safe and open spaces for
women to actively participate in decision making and receive benefits from the Project,
particularly through engagement and communication activities
This SECP incorporates actions from the GAP relevant to the engagement and development of
women and girls, and the promotion of gender mainstreaming. The Project is also required to
report against a range of indicators (including performance against agreed targets) to implement
effective gender mainstreaming by the ADB, and these have been incorporated into Section 9 of
this SECP, and other ESMPs as relevant.
The IMP describes controls to reduce and eliminate the negative impacts of influx (in-migration of
outsiders into the Project area) on women and other vulnerable groups as a result of the Project.
Additionally, the HRLMP outlines requirements in relation to recruitment of female workers,
gender targets for the Project workforce, and addressing harassment and/or exploitation (see
Section 2.7 of the HRLMP). . It is also noted that the Land Acquisition and Livelihoods Restoration
Plan (LALRP; 2017) established targeted measures to promote gender diversity and mainstreaming,
including:
• Requiring a minimum of three women to sit on each of the seven-member Executive
Committees established by Co-operative Societies (set up to receive distributed payments
from the Project’s Community Benefit-Share Program). At least one of the women shall
hold an executive officer’s position such as Chair, Vice-Chair, Secretary or Treasurer.
• Establishing a Matrilineal Membership Committee, which serves as an open space for
women to discuss the operations of societies.
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• Equal weighting of votes for women at general meetings, and on average the majority of
women in each tribe would need to support a vote in order for it to be successful.
As such, all four plans (LALRP, SECP, IMP and HRLMP) will be implemented in parallel to achieve
the gender-based objectives and targets identified for the Project.
1.6 Current Stage of the Project
The Project ESIA (including Project ESMP) was updated in July 2019. Development Consent for the
Project was granted by SIG on 25 July 2019 under Section 22 of the Environment Act 1998. THL
and HEC have subsequently drafted all ESMPs required for pre-construction and construction of
the Access Road, and submitted various draft versions for review by Lenders. As of October 2020,
approval has not yet been granted by Lenders for construction of the Access Road to proceed.
This version of the SECP is designed to manage the social impacts and risks presented by the
construction of the Project (including the Access Road Lots 1-3 and the main Dam), in
combination with the other ESMPs implemented for the Project (including a Social Impacts
Monitoring Plan which will be finalized by the end of December 2020). It is anticipated that
further revisions of this SECP are conducted as necessary prior to main Dam construction, and
prior to commencement of the operations phase, at minimum. This is to allow for an adaptive
management approach; it is anticipated that many lessons will be learned and practices adapted
as THL and HEC initiate and establish their relationship with PAPs and other key stakeholders for
the Project.
Consistent with the objective of engaging stakeholders throughout the life cycle of the Project
and the ongoing monitoring of project impacts, stakeholder engagement activities within the
construction stage will focus on:
• Disclose the final ESIA and CESMP
• Communicate the range of mitigation measures and management approaches which will
be implemented to safeguard the environment and local communities from potential
impacts identified for the Project.
• Provide updates on engagement activities that will occur during construction, in particular
for any new activities that may cause disruptions to local people and communities), such
as changes to construction schedules, design or mitigation measures.
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• Communicate any changes in the key points of contact within the Project team (all roles
described in Figure 4-2, in Section 4 of this SECP)
• Provide updates on safeguards compliance (including making Quarterly Safeguards report
publicly available via both online and print sources); i.e. examine how successful
implementation of mitigation measures has been, and seek feedback from stakeholders on
any improvements that need to be made to improve the Project’s reputation and increase
levels of trust in the community.
• Engage with government departments regarding construction permits and licenses and
provide regular Project progress and updates
• Conduct ongoing consultation related to mitigation of asset compensation and livelihood
restoration
• Identify new issues, concerns, impacts, risks or needs of the Project affected communities
related to construction, and address them promptly
• Provide information on the resolution of community complaints in accordance with the
Grievance Mechanism (GRM) (Refer to Section 7)
• Implement Community Awareness programs which focus on a variety of aspects including
environmental protection; safety; gender sensitisation; work opportunities, financial and
business development skills; productive use of electricity (including household budgeting);
supporting the development of women and young people; and community health
initiatives. These programs will be jointly developed between THL and PO, and
implemented by THL with support from PO as required.
• Assess the effectiveness of environmental and social mitigation measures by participatory
monitoring, and social monitoring in communities and direct feedback, including on
mitigation measures. Particular attention will be paid to compensation and resettlement
and access to resources (such as crops, and safe drinking water) as these have previously
been identified as major issues of concern for the key stakeholder groups. The monitoring
combines participatory, expert-based assessment and uses qualitative and quantitative
methods.
• Identify opportunities for the Project to make a sustainable contribution to local
communities and their environment within the Project site and the region.
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Refer to Section 6 for detailed stakeholder engagement plan for the current stage of the Project
development.
The structure of the SECP is as follows:
• Section 1: Introduction (as above)
• Section 2: Summary of Previous Stakeholder Engagement
• Section 3: Key Standards and Legislation
• Section 4: Resources and Responsibilities
• Section 5: Project Stakeholders
• Section 8: Stakeholder Engagement Management Database
• Section 9: Monitoring and Reporting
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2 Summary of Previous Stakeholder Engagement
Stakeholder engagement for the Project has been ongoing since the planning and development
began in 2009.
In the earliest stages, stakeholder engagement was undertaken in order to:
• Provide Project information and proposals to stakeholders
• Obtain input and feedback from stakeholders to identify any potential risks and issues to
be addressed in the future
• Resolve stakeholder concerns and/or grievances
• Develop a relationship between the Project team and stakeholders.
Stakeholder engagement undertaken in 2009-2011 is outlined in Annex C to this SECP and
included:
• Engagement activities focussed on communities in the Tina River Catchment in the first
instance, prior to attaining sufficient information for meaningful consultation.
• In 2009, 27 tribes were identified as having land or interests that may be impacted by the
Project. Community meetings were undertaken to provide Project information and seek
the election of representatives on a Landowner Council – Tina River Hydro Land Council
(the ‘Council’).
• In March 2010, the Council entered into an Access Consent Agreement with the Solomon
Islands Government, for the purposes of conducting a Feasibility Study for the Project.
• Workshops were conducted over two days in June 2010 with the Council to explain the
Feasibility Study in detail.
• Some members of the Council were trained and presented Project information to their
communities in August 2010. Discussion groups occurred after the presentations, and
matters of interest or concern were discussed and recorded.
The 2011-2016 period was the most intense period of planned public participation for the Project.
Over 250 stakeholder engagement activities were undertaken to consult on and implement land
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acquisition arrangements, inform and receive feedback on the ESIA, design community benefit
sharing arrangements, and give regular community updates. This is summarised in Annex 14 of
the Environmental Impact Statement (Updated from ESIA 2017), July 2019. The public
participation process during this time aimed to:
• Disclose relevant Project information to help affected communities and other stakeholders
understand the risks, impacts, and opportunities for the Project in a timely,
understandable, accessible and appropriate manner and format
• Provide the affected communities and stakeholders with opportunities to express their
views on Project risks, impacts, and mitigation measures
• Solicit stakeholders’ ideas, opinions, and recommendations on various alternatives
• Assess the level of stakeholder interest and support for the Project and to enable
stakeholders’ views to be taken into account in Project design and environmental and
social mitigation measures as well as development benefits and opportunities.
Key outcomes from 2011-2016 stakeholder engagement activities (detailed further in Annex C)
include:
• Multiple meetings to provide information prior to field visits/surveys
• Establishment of Community Liaison Assistants (CLAs) in 2012 to assist with:
o Culturally-safe access to local women
o Local language translation skills
o Liaison with local leaders.
• Socio-economic field surveys from August to September 2013 to develop a social profile
of the affected population and determine key potential impacts
• Conducting multiple meetings to inform the community of mitigation and entitlements of
the Project (in line with IFC WB and ADB policies on resettlement and Indigenous
Peoples)
• Informing the affected communities and other parties of the land acquisition and
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resettlement process, and undertaking engagement for land acquisition with the affected
tribes
• Developing an interim Grievance Redress Mechanism (GRM) for the Project
• 15 mitigation workshops conducted over four weeks in February 2014, held at Ghaobata,
Malango and Bahomea. A total of 512 participants attended, 45% of whom were women.
Mitigation workshop attendance and minutes are provided in Annex 12 and 13 of the
Environmental Impact Statement (Updated from ESIA 2017), July 2019. The ESIA was
updated following the receipt of feedback from the mitigation workshops and other
stakeholder consultation activities
• Acquire land required to undertake the Project by identifying owners of customary land,
negotiation and execution of the Process Agreement between SIG and the five customary
tribal groups owning the Core Land.
Following disclosure of the revised ESIA in 2016, additional stakeholder engagement was
undertaken with target communities and key stakeholders in October/November 2016, in Honiara,
Bahomea, and Ghaobata. A summary of feedback and incorporation of the feedback in the ESIA is
provided in Appendix N of the Environmental Impact Statement (Updated from ESIA 2017),
July 2019.
Following completion of the August 2017 version of the ESIA, the PO continued to undertake
regular community awareness visits from September to December 2017 to provide updates on
Project activities. During 2018, the main focus for the PO was the ongoing negotiation of the
Implementation Agreement, the Power Purchase Agreement, and other Project Documents. Also,
during 2018, as there were fewer activities on which to provide updates, community and
landowner engagement focused on smaller group meetings in the PO. Following the signing of
the PPA in December 2018, community engagement entered the next phase (Pre-construction).
Key stakeholder engagement activities during this stage are provided in ESIA Section 6.1 Pre-
construction Engagement.
The majority of the people living in the Project affected area are Indigenous Peoples. Community
engagement at the planning stage has been undertaken in line with the IFC WB’s Free, Prior and
Informed Consent (FPIC) for the Project (refer to Environmental Impact Statement (Updated
from ESIA 2017), July 2019 Section E.6.3 for details). The land used for the Project construction
and operational activities “Core Area” was acquired with the prior, written, negotiated consent of
the identified customary land-owning tribes.
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The SECP for the pre-construction, construction and future stages of the Project was developed to
ensure continuous informed consultation with Indigenous Groups, with specific measures to
remove obstacles for them to have meaningful participation in the Project.
While the Project Office and other government and funding partners have taken the lead on
communication and stakeholder engagement activities and the development of the overall
engagement strategy/direction in the early stages of the Project, from December 2019 there has
been an onus on THL to take responsibility for implementation. A transition period (mainly
through pre-construction/mobilisation and early stages of construction) is necessary so that THL
has support from PO and a transfer of knowledge occurs. The need for this support will decrease
over time as THL and HEC build their respective capacity to manage social safeguards
implementation.
THL is ultimately responsible for establishing and maintaining strong relationships with
Project stakeholders, and implementing this SECP for the life of the Project. The roles and
responsibilities of all parties involved in stakeholder engagement and communications for the
Project are further defined in Section 4: Resources and Responsibilities.
3 Key Standards and Legislation
The Project will conform to the legal and administrative requirements of the Solomon Islands
Government, and relevant international standards, particularly the International Association for
Impact Assessment (IAIA) Guidelines on Social Impact Assessment, World Bank (WB)
Environmental and Social Framework, the Asian Development Bank Safeguard Policy Statement,
and the Export-Import Bank of Korea Safeguard Policy. A number of Corporate Policies also apply.
3.1 National Legislation
participation that apply to the Project include:
• Elimination of Violence Against Women (EVAW): Administered by the Ministry of
Women, Youth, Children and Family Affairs. The EVAW complements the National Gender
Equality and Women’s Development Policy (NGEWD), other government policies and the
Solomon Islands’ Constitution and International agreements. It reflects earlier and current
activities to eliminate violence against women and will benefit all of the stakeholders in
the elimination of violence against women by helping them to work together more
effectively and with less duplication.
THL
• Environment Act 1998: Administered by the Environment and Conservation Division
(ECD) of the Ministry of Environment, Climate Change, Disaster Management and
Meteorology. ECD will evaluate the environmental and social impact assessment for the
Project, conducting community consultation and issuing the development consent for the
Project.
• Environment Regulations 2008: Procedures for the preparation of an Environmental
Impact Statement (EIS) are outlined in the Environment Regulations 2008. They include a
requirement to undertake public participation, and to notify the public of an EIS
application.
• Family Protection Act 2014: Administered by Ministry of Women, Youth, Children and
Family Affairs. The objects of the Act are to ensure the safety and protection of all persons
who experience or witness domestic violence; to provide support and redress for all
victims of domestic violence; and to facilitate programs for victims of domestic violence to
assist their recovery and ensure that they are able to lead a safe and healthy life; and to
facilitate the issue and enforcement of police safety notices and protection orders to stop
domestic violence; and to implement certain principles underlying the Convention on the
Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and the Convention on the
Rights of the Child; and to create offences in relation to domestic violence and provide for
increased sentences for persons convicted of such offences where certain aggravating
factors are present.
• Land and Titles Act 1970: Administered by the Ministry of Lands, Housing and Survey,
and relates to the management of land, including ‘customary lands’ in the Solomon
Islands. The Land and Titles Act 1970 states that stakeholder engagement is required as
part of the land acquisition process.
• National Development Strategy 2016-2035: Administered by the Ministry of
Development Planning and Aid Coordination. The National Development Strategy seeks to
improve the social and economic livelihoods of all Solomon Islanders. It outlines five
objectives, where objective one relates to “sustained and inclusive economic growth”,
which has medium term strategies such as “expand and upgrade weather resilient
infrastructure and utilities focused on access to productive resources and markets and to
essential services”. A policy/programme to achieve this is to “strengthen energy sector
planning and policy implementation through an integrated approach supported by
appropriate capacity and dissemination of energy related information through school
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regulations”.
• National Gender Equality and Women’s Development (NGEWD) 2016-2020:
Administered by the Ministry of Women, Youth, Children and Family Affairs. The NGEWD
provides a framework for the implementation of the Solomon Island’s international and
regional commitments to gender equality, which are based on priorities expressed by the
women and men of the Solomon Islands. The series of priorities is identified in order to
progress gender equality in Solomon Islands and includes targets to improve health and
education, economic status of women, equal participation in decision-making and
leadership, as well as the elimination of violence against women and an increase in the
capacity for gender mainstreaming.
3.2 International Standards
This SECP has been developed in accordance with relevant international standards and GIIP,
particularly the WB Environmental and Social Framework (including Performance Standard 1:
Assessment and Management of Environmental and Social Risks and Impacts, 1 January 2012); the
ADB Safeguard Policy Statement, and the International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA)
Guidelines on Social Impact Assessment.. As major funding partners for the Project, the
requirements set by the WB and ADB are of paramount importance.
3.2.1 The World Bank Environmental and Social Framework
World Bank Performance Standard 1: Assessment and Management of Environmental and Social
Risks and Impacts July 1, 2012 provides for the management of environmental and social
performance throughout the life of a project. The establishment of an effective Environmental and
Social Management System (ESMS) appropriate to the nature and scale of the project incorporates
eight requirements, including (8) the stakeholder engagement plan.
The Standards identify effective stakeholder engagement as the foundation for building strong,
constructive, and responsive relationships essential for the successful management of a project’s
environmental and social impacts. Stakeholder engagement is an ongoing process that may
involve stakeholder analysis and engagement planning, disclosure and dissemination of
information, consultation and participation, grievance mechanisms, and ongoing reporting to
affected communities. The nature, frequency, and level of effort involved in stakeholder
engagement may vary depending on the phase of the Project and nature of activities being
undertaken, and will be commensurate with the project’s risks and impacts.
THL
implementation of a Stakeholder Engagement Plan tailored to the characteristics and scaled of the
project risks, impacts and development stage. Disclosure of relevant project information helps
affected communities and other stakeholders understand the risks, impacts and opportunities of
the project. A requirement is to undertake a process of consultation in a manner that provides the
affected communities with opportunities to express their views on project risks, impacts and
mitigation measures. For projects with potentially significantly adverse impacts on affected
communities and/or indigenous peoples such as this Project, an Informed Consultation and
Participation (ICP) process is required.
3.2.2 Asian Development Bank Safeguard Policy
The ADB’s Safeguard Policy Statement 2009 (SPS) sets out the ADB’s expectations with regards to
impact identification and management for new operations, including requirements relating to
stakeholder engagement. The SPS aims to promote sustainability of Project outcomes by
protecting the environment and people from a Project’s potential adverse impacts by avoiding or
minimize adverse impacts of Projects on the environment and affected people and helping Project
proponents to strengthen their capacity to manage environmental and social risks.
Each of the three safeguard requirements for environment, involuntary resettlement, and
indigenous Peoples contains objectives, scope and triggers, and policy principles. All three
safeguard requirements apply to the Project. Meaningful and ongoing engagement with
stakeholders from the Project inception to closure is a policy principle that applies to all three
safeguard requirements.
3.2.3 EDCF Safeguard Policy
The Export-Import Bank of Korea (Korea Exim Bank) has created a Safeguard Policy that seeks to
ensure environmental and social sustainability of Economic Development Cooperation Fund
(EDCF) funded Projects.
Under the EDCF Safeguard Policy, the borrower must hold meaningful consultations with the
stakeholders and Project relevant information shall be disclosed throughout the Project cycle. The
borrower must ensure relevant environmental and social information of the Project is made
publicly available to enable transparent decision-making. Consultation must be a free, prior,
informed, and gender-inclusive process and reflect the needs of disadvantaged and vulnerable
groups. The views of affected people and stakeholders collected through consultations shall be
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mitigation measures, and allocation of development benefits and opportunities.
3.2.4 The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA)
Guidelines on Social Impact Assessment
The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) Guidelines on Social Impact
Assessment, state that the following considerations need to be made when designing a
participatory approach to SIA/social safeguards, to meet international best practice standards:
• Was there a genuine attempt to identify and engage with a wide range of stakeholders, to
inform them about the proposal and its implications, and to invite their input?
• Is there evidence that the input of stakeholders was utilised in the ESIA and the planning
and development of a proposal?
• Were lists provided of the groups who were approached and took part in the ESIA?
• Were diverse engagement methods used to ensure inclusivity, and especially to ensure the
participation of women, vulnerable groups, and Indigenous peoples if present?
• Were participatory processes established early in the ESIA so that the input from these
processes could be used to influence the ESIA and the design of the proposal?
• Were adequate resources available to support the participation of all stakeholders?
• Was engagement continuous, with adequate reporting back and validation of information?
While designed to inform impact assessment processes, these questions are valid for continual
review and improvement purposes throughout Project delivery. As such, these questions have
been considered in the development and review of this SECP.
THL
4 Resources and Responsibilities
THL holds the ultimate responsibility and ownership for the implementation of this SECP for the
life of the Project, as described in Section 2 above. However, there are a number of parties which
also hold contractual and practical responsibilities within the Project, and effective stakeholder
engagement can only be achieved within a focused and coordinated teamwork. This section sets
out the expectations for all parties in implementing this SECP, and defines the responsibilities and
relationships which will be maintained to support engagement activities.
A diagram (Figure 4-1) helps to represent the key relationships and functions between major
parties involved in social safeguards implementation for the Project. Figure 4-2 goes into further
detail, depicting the formal social safeguards architecture and reporting hierarchy. This hierarchy
illustrates how counterparts in each organisation operating locally (PO, THL, HEC and OE) will
work together to effectively implement this SECP and other ESMPs focused around social
safeguards (including P6-GRM, P4-HRLMP, P5-IMP, P6-CHVMP and P9-WCC). The responsibilities
of the key parties (THL, HEC, and PO) are described in more detail in Sections 4.1 through 4.3
below.
THL
THL
THL
4.1 THL
The THL Environmental and Social Team will lead implementation of the SECP, with ultimate
responsibility for compliance with ESMPs and Lenders’ requirements held by the THL Chief
Financial Officer (See Figure 4-2).
E&S Manager
THL’s E&S Manager will coordinate implementation of the SECP ‘on the ground’, and report up to
the THL CFO. The E&S Manager serves as the first and central point of contact on any E&S
safeguards-related issues across the entire Project. They are the primary person responsible for
completing all compliance reporting (such as monthly and quarterly safeguards reporting) and
participating in audits conducted by PO and external parties such as OE and Lenders’ Technical
Advisors.
Tasks specific to this SECP to be completed by the E&S Manager include:
• Coordinating any stakeholder engagement activities (including interactions with
government departments, develop information disclosure packages and consultation
materials, and training of staff) and seeking assistance from PO and HEC where needed.
• Responding to requests for information on project activities from the PO Communications
Team (and coordinating with other THL and HEC staff as required)
• Supporting PO in implementing the Japanese Social Development Fund (JSDF) project
during the construction phase. The involvement of the THL E&S Manager in this program
will help THL to develop and gain a social license in working with Project affected
communities. This support will develop into implementing/supporting the Community
Benefit Share Pilot program once the Project transitions into the Operational phase.
• Keeping a regular (multiple times per week) communication channel open with their
counterparts in PO and HEC
• Ensuring the Stakeholder Engagement Management Database is up-to-date
• Monitoring and reporting on the SECP, including updates, as required, to the stakeholder
identification, analysis and mapping of results.
THL
E&S Assistants
An E&S Assistant (Social) will be appointed as the central contact for any grievance-related issues,
and be responsible for administering the GRM Register (previously held by PO). All grievances
received for the Project, by any Party (and by any means of communication), shall be immediately
notified to this person, who will then facilitate the GRM process. Further details regarding this
process are contained in the GRM (P6). The E&S Assistant (Social) is supported by one other
assistant, who is responsible for liaising with their counterparts in PO and HEC regarding CBSP
and GRM issues (to add further capacity to the team) under the direction of the E&S Assistant
(Social) and THL Governance Lead. Additional support will be provided where necessary by further
resources such as the E&S Assistant (Health and Safety) and Finance Assistant.
Further tasks specific to this SECP to be completed by the E&S Assistant (Social) include:
• Providing a written record and verbal update of stakeholder feedback and grievances to
THL management team, the PO management team and HEC during weekly meetings
(the record could be in the form of a summary in meeting minutes).
• Regular interaction with CLOs and CLAs, including those from PO and HEC as required
• Assistance to PO with the coordination and operation of the ‘Pop up’ Project information
booths
• Communicating urgent issues and grievances to the PO and THL management in a timely
manner
Community Liaison Officer(s) (CLOs)
CLOs are full time employees of the Project (in this case, of THL) who provide a consistent contact
point for local community leaders and key contacts, to obtain and receive information about the
project, and for the coordination of stakeholder engagement activities in affected communities.
They are usually local people, based for the majority of the time in or near local communities
(rather than in Honiara). If based in Honiara, CLOs will visit different local community groups on a
regular basis (at least one or two groups per week) to maintain networks and relationships. CLOs
will also work with Community Liaison Assistants (CLAs); people living in communities who
provide assistance to implement engagement activities and serve as a contact point. CLAs receive
an allowance for time spent assisting with the Project but generally don’t work full time. Most of
the CLAs currently involved in the project have been engaged previously by PO.
THL will employ at least one paid Community Liaison Officer, to interact with their counterpart(s)
in PO and HEC, and coordinate stakeholder engagement activities. This person shall be a female,
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to enable THL to fulfill their obligations under the GAP (2017) and ADB requirements for gender
mainstreaming, to facilitate the empowerment and development of women in local communities.
Having at least one female CLO and/or female member of the E&S Team will allow THL also to
lead female-only community meetings and workshops where women and girls can have the
chance to have their voices heard in an open and unrestricted forum. Helen Kekea is currently
being trained to undertake the CLO role for THL, with assistance from Helen Dolaiano in PO.
4.1.1 Temporary ‘Governance Lead’ role
Since the mobilisation of THL and HEC staff to Honiara (from approximately November 2019
onwards), it has become apparent that several issues have emerged, including a high turnover of
local staff employed for the Project, and contrasting expectations around contractual
requirements, hours of work (including break times), seniority and reporting protocols, and
general staff wellbeing and empowerment. It is anticipated that over time these issues will resolve,
as the Korean workforce become used to the way of life in Honiara, and vice versa. However in
the meantime, the issues represent a significant risk to successful delivery of the Project, and are
therefore of concern to Lenders.
To facilitate a quicker transition to an integrated workforce as depicted in Figure 4.2
(encompassing the most positive aspects of both Solomon Islands and Korean workplace cultures,
and to ensure that social safeguards are thoroughly and effectively implemented without bias) the
Owner’s Engineer and Project Office have advised THL to engage a local, independent
professional within their organisation to assume the role of “Governance Lead - GRM and social
implementation”. They will report to the THL CFO but will be considered independent, or at an
equal level of responsibility. This person will have the following qualities and experience:
• A professional person, preferably with a background in a position of authority as an
experienced and well-respected public servant within SIG or relevant professions or NGOs
• Legal, financial, policy, or other implementation-related background
• Strong connections with local communities, ideally within Guadalcanal Province
• Strong integrity, and esteemed within local professional circles
• A solid understanding of the political, cultural and economic motivations and relationships
which exist in the local region, to provide necessary context to grievances received by the
Project
THL
tribal council proceedings (and familiarity with protocols)
THL is currently canvassing to find a potential candidate for this role (October 2020). The role will
be filled by commencement of Lot 2 Access Road construction.
The Governance Lead will provide internal oversight over GRM processes and social safeguards
implementation within THL, including HR and labour practices and CBSP-related activities. They
will also have a responsibility to ensure that gender bias is minimised on all project interactions,
and uphold the commitments made by THL to implement the GAP. The Governance Lead will also
mentor the E&S Assistant (Social), supporting them in the facilitation of GRM processes and
delegation of grievances to PO and HEC. More details on this interaction are given in the GRM
(P6). The objective will be to help the E&S Assistant develop into their role and take on greater
responsibilities as the project moves towards the end of the construction phase. Eventually, if this
approach is successful, the Governance Lead will no longer be required, preferably before
construction of the main dam is complete.
4.1.2 Regular interactions between Parties
THL has a head office within the Alvaro 2 building at Mendana Avenue in Honiara, Solomon
Islands, which is located near the respective offices of HEC and Project Office. This close proximity
makes it convenient for representatives from all three organisations to meet regularly. A meeting
is held weekly between THL and HEC; this provides a regular forum for safeguards issues and
general progress/challenges associated with construction to be discussed. A separate meeting will
be held between THL and PO to discuss any ongoing SECP and GRM implementation issues each
fortnight, and unscheduled meetings can be held as necessary to address very urgent issues. The
following agenda items will be discussed at the weekly meetings between THL and HEC:
• Most recent communications and stakeholder engagement activities, including
observations, lessons learned and any further actions required
• Urgent grievance issues (Level 2 or 3 grievances, according to the GRM protocol outlined
in P6-GRM)
• CBSP updates and actions required (for example, relating to compensation payments;
recruitment activities for the whole project)
• Upcoming project activities which will involve or potentially impact (directly or indirectly)
PAPs
THL will lead the meetings, including confirmation of the venue and agenda in advance, and
THL
recording and timely distribution of meeting records (detailed minutes including confirmation of
agreed actions and persons responsible).
4.2 Project Office
The PO will provide support through effective communication and collaboration with its available
human resources and stakeholder engagement expertise to assist THL in implementing the SECP.
The E&S Safeguards Manager will be responsible for:
• Coordinating the PO activities to support THL in implementing the SECP
• Ensuring responsible officer/s enters stakeholder engagement/feedback and grievances
into the Stakeholder Engagement Management Database with respect to all Management
Plans and community benefit sharing activities, in coordination with the THL E&S Manager.
A Community Liaison Assistant (CLA) network and capacity building resources to help the PO
communicate and identify grievances from the community has been in operation since 2011. The
CLAs were nominated by communities throughout the Project area and employed by the PO. They
act as a bridge, liaising on behalf of the communities regarding issues to PO on behalf of SIG. PO
will continue to maintain these relationships during the construction phase of the Project, and
work with THL to ensure continued support of CLAs into the operations phase.
4.3 HEC
HEC’s involvement in the implementation of the SECP will be directed and supported by THL, with
occasional support from the PO as required (and in coordination with THL). This involvement will
be limited to the pre-construction, mobilisation and construction phases of the Project only.
Detailed responsibilities for specific roles within HEC are included below.
E&S Supervisor
• Implementing all aspects of the Stakeholder Engagement Program (detailed in Section 6
of this SECP) that are allocated to HEC
• Development and implementation of all social safeguards-related training required for the
Project (including cultural awareness, worker’s behaviour, and gender sensitisation training
delivered to HEC employees and subcontractors; the Community Environmental and
THL
Safety Awareness Program, and any other training and education activities described in
this SECP)
• Collating any stakeholder feedback received by HEC employees and subcontractors, and
passing it to the THL E&S Supervisor in a timely manner
• Informing the THL E&S Assistant (Social) of any grievances received by HEC employees
and subcontractors, and assisting THL in keeping the details for each grievance up to date
in the GRM register.
• Responding to requests for information on project activities from the PO Communications
Team (and coordinating with other HEC and THL staff as required)
• Keeping a regular (multiple times per week) communication channel open with their
counterparts in PO and THL
• Undertaking compliance reporting (e.g. weekly and monthly compliance reports) on E&S
safeguards, including the maintenance to complete and accurate records demonstrating
effective implementation of ESMPs (including this SECP)
• Cooperating fully with audits undertaken by THL and other external parties (such as OE
and Lenders’ Technical Advisor) when required
All HEC employees
Stakeholders will need to be regularly and actively engaged from commencement of construction,
to ensure that their feedback on construction activities is received and acted upon in a timely
manner, and that stakeholders (and particularly PAPs) consider they have an active part in the
Project. THL will remain in charge of all engagement activities and implementation of the SECP,
and will assign responsibilities to HEC to undertake consultation and disclosure activities as
required, particularly regarding construction schedule updates, local job opportunities and
emerging issues related to their scope of work.
HEC workers are likely to have direct contact with PAPs and other stakeholders while working in
the Project area, and so are also most likely to receive feedback and grievances. All HEC workers
must report any such interactions to the HEC E&S Supervisor immediately (within two hours).
Accordingly, the HEC E&S Supervisor shall then inform the THL E&S Supervisor, who will record
the interactions in the Stakeholder Engagement Management Database (see Section 8).
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THL, PO and HEC will work closely to ensure that communications are consistent and that
information is provided on hiring opportunities and practices, local workforce training, worker
camps and codes of conducts, and upcoming construction activities in a timely manner to
maximise the opportunities for local communities to benefit from the construction activities.
HEC will also be responsible for the implementation of the Community Environmental and Safety
Awareness Program, with support from THL. PO will be kept informed about the planned
implementation of this Program in advance of any activities, and progress will reported during
weekly Project team meetings by the HEC E&S Supervisor..
5 Project Stakeholders
This section describes the results of the stakeholder mapping process.
5.1 Stakeholder Identification and Analysis
This SECP uses the definition of “stakeholder” defined within the IFC WB Performance Standard
and Environmental and Social Framework (2017), which includes:
“…individuals or groups who:
(c) are affected or likely to be affected by the project (project-affected parties); and
(d) may have an interest in the project (other interested parties).”
For both these groups, special consideration will be given to stakeholders that may be
disadvantaged or vulnerable.
Stakeholder identification for the Project was undertaken in the Stakeholder Engagement Plan
2012 and further defined through the ESIA processes since then, as described above (Section 2).
Stakeholder analysis and mapping will continue to be revised according to the ongoing receipt of
comments and input from local, national and international stakeholders directed to the Project.
5.1.1 Project-Affected Parties
According to the IFC WB guidelines, individuals or groups that are affected or likely to be affected
by the Project will be identified as ‘Project-affected parties’ (PAPs). The PAPs for the Project are
discussed in Table 5-1 below.
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Stakeholder Group Stakeholder
Population
Communities located in the Direct Impact Area 3 and the Infrastructure Area
(including any borrow areas, set down areas, yards, workers’ camps, offices, plants
etc. (Core Area), and any communities located in the 50 meters wide access road and
transmission line corridor (Infrastructure Corridor) who may be affected by the
construction and operation of the proposed dam, storage reservoir, headrace tunnel,
and powerhouse..
No physical communities or residences were identified in this area or in the
Upstream Area above the reservoir but customary owners retain rights for
logging, fishing and hunting and recognize sites of spiritual significance.
Indigenous Groups claiming ownership of the Core Area. In 2015, the Commissioner
of Lands identified five tribes as the customary collective owners of the Core Area:
• Roha tribe (171 ha) – 161 registered members
• Buhu-Garo tribe (two lineages combined, (161.5ha) – 65 registered members
• Kochiabolo tribe (65.7 ha) – 109 registered members
• Uluna-Sutahuri tribe (two lineages combined, 29.9 ha) – 537 registered members
• Viurulingi tribe (14.0 ha) – 4 registered members
The people and communities in the Downstream Area who are likely to be affected
by changes in the river geomorphology, water quality, volume, or availability during
the construction or operation of the hydro scheme, downstream of the power station
site. Both customary landowning and non-customary/settler groups are considered in
this group.
Within this group, the Senge Community in the Bahomea District are the villages
located closest to the Direct Impact Area, and include the following customary
landowning communities:
Other customary landowning communities’ settlements in the Bahomea District
downstream area include:
• Habusi, Pachuki, Namopila, Komureo, Vatunadi, Tahaurasa, Tina, Valebebe 1 &
3 Refer to the Acronyms, Abbreviations and Definitions at the beginning of the SECP for definition of Direct Impact Area,
Downstream Area, Core Area, Infrastructure Area and Infrastructure Corridor.
THL
In Ghaobata area (plains), the following customary landowning communities are
impacted:
• Popolo 1 & 2, Old Selwyn, Ngalimera, Selaghoghoro, Pokasou, Siroigha,
Kadavu, Ravu area, villages on Tenakaro Road, and riverside road to Tetere
between main road and the mouth of Ngalimbiu River
Non-customary/settler communities within the Downstream Area include:
• Horohotu 1, New Birao, Guadalcanal Plains Palm Oil Ltd (GPPOL) Village
Communities participating in the Community Benefit Share Pilot (CBSP) program
include all villages in Malango and Bahomea cultural areas (both in Malango Ward,
and including some communities along the Tina River that will be subject to impact
mitigation/livelihood restoration measures of the Project). There are 88 CBSP villages
in total.
The communities in the Infrastructure Area who are likely to be affected by
modifications to, and use of, the existing or new access roads, and transmission line
corridor and other construction activities but who are not located within the Direct
Impact Area include the following customary landowning communities in the
Bahomea District:
Non-customary/settler villages in the Infrastructure Area, in the Bahomea District
include:
• Verakabikabi, and Namanu area
Northern Infrastructure Corridor owned by a combination of private and public
owners:
• Commissioner of Lands (including joint owners such as Nathanial Boboli, Timothy
Urobo, Nesta Besta, Daniel Sekani, Selwyn Boboli, and Church of Melanesia Trust
Board)
• HEC’s Worker’s camp
People whose livelihoods could be affected by loss of access to the Core Land and
Lower Infrastructure Corridor for hunting, fishing and gathering, and agriculture
include:
People located near the campsite.
Uluna-Sutahuri tribal group, the land owners of the Chupukama rain gauge site.
THL
Population
The people and communities who use or have ownership rights to land and
resources in the Project area and downstream, but do not necessarily reside in the
Tina-Ngalimbiu River valley. These were designated as belonging to the Wider Impact
Area (WIA).
This includes:
• The communities of Malango area and Belaha area, in the Malango District
Regional
Communities
People residing in proximate regions who are not included in the first two categories
(Directly and Widely Affected Population). These stakeholders may include, for
example, people who may experience the effects of incoming workers (e.g. increased
traffic congestion, increased cost of living), other non-workers coming into the region
to provide goods and services as a result of the project (e.g. hospitality business
operators, small retail business owners, market stall holders), and increased job and
business opportunities in the region due to the Project development.
This includes the people in other regions in Guadalcanal.
5.1.2 Other Interested Parties
Other individuals or groups that may have an interest in the Project defined by the IFC WB as
‘other interested parties’ and are outlined in Table 5-2 below.
Table 5-2 Project Stakeholders – Other Interested Parties
Stakeholder Group Stakeholder
• Ministry of Infrastructure and Development
• Ministry of Finance and Treasury
• Ministry of Development Planning and Aid Coordination
• Office of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
• Attorney General’s Chambers
Meteorology
• Ministry of Health and Medical Services
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• Ministry of Lands, Housing and Survey
• Ministry of Police, National Security and Correctional Services
• Ministry of Women, Youth, Children and Family Affairs
• Ministry of Fisheries and Marine Resources
• Ministry of Commerce, Industry, Labor and Immigration
• Ministry of Culture and Tourism
• Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Development
• Public Solicitors Office
o Hon. Amziah Keith – Provincial member for Malango Ward
• Town and Country Planning Board – grants planning consent
• Business license issuing authority to developer and sub-contractors
• Women’s Development Desk
The SIG Project Steering Committee will consist of key Government
Ministries.
Electricity Providers Solomon Power (trading name of Solomon Islands Electricity Authority) who
purchases and distributes power generated from the Project. Solomon Power
entered into the Power Purchasing Agreement (PPA) with THL and is
intended that through the PPA, Solomon Power will have contractual rights
to enforce THL’s obligations under the ESIA.
State Owned Enterprise Solomon Water (trading name of Solomon Islands Water Authority),
Solomon Islands Ports Authority, Solomon Islands Broadcasting Cooperation
Elected Politicians Peter Shanel Agovaka (Member of Parliament, Central Guadalcanal
Constituency)
Non-Governmental
involvement in Benefit distribution and nature of agreements between
communities, landowners and investor)
empowerment at rural level)
• The Nature Conservancy – (Ecosystem conservation management –
promotion of protected area and may involve in advocacy in terms of
environmental impacts)
and may involve in education and awareness on the potential
environmental impact on community livelihood, leaderships and on
gender inclusion)
• Solomon Islands Red Cross – (Protecting human life and dignity,
advocate on social and health issues, and may involve in training on
health issues & opportunities from the project)
• National Council of Women – (Women participation as equal partners for
development)
• Guadalcanal Provincial Council of Women – (Supports women, girls and
boys affected by violence and discrimination)
• World Vision Solomon Islands - (Community based development for
overcoming poverty)
• Save the Children – (working on issues facing children such as sexual
abuse, exploitation, violence and child labor)
• Oxfam - (Emphasis on gender justice, capacity building advocacy and
community engagement)
early development to adolescence regardless of gender and age)
• Women’s Right Action Movement (WRAM) – (Action movement for
gender equality)
• Australian Government (Education, health and Gender Equality sectors)
• New Zealand Government
government’s developing partner)
Community Organisations • Church groups, e.g. women‘s fellowship groups, Men’s fellowship groups,
singing & music bands/groups, Sunday School groups and youth clubs
• Upper River Catchment Community
• Bahomea SSEC Church Association
knowledgeable Bahomea elders.
• Moro or Gaena’alu Movement group
• Seventh Day Adventist – women, youth and children groups, e.g.
Namanu
Ngalimera & Good Shepard churches & their respective women, men,
youth & children groups
• Sports groups – Soccer team groups, Futsal team groups, Netball women
team, Basketball men & women team groups, Rugby teams

Sabaha tribes/clans)
Koenihao, Sutahuri, Uluna tribes/clans)
Sudungana tribes/clans)
Chacha, Kochiabolo tribes/clans)
Salasiva tribes/clans)
tribes/clans)
• Settler communities (Guadalcanal Weather Coast clans)
Media • Solomon Islands media – Island Sun, Solomon Star, Sunday isles (printed)
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news/Parliament meetings (television broadcasting media), Project
Facebook page and Project Office web-page.
• International media - World Bank web-page & ADB web-page
Investors in Guadalcanal (in
• Gold Ridge Mining Ltd (GRML) – Close proximity to project, villagers
receive royalties from GRML or work for GRML.
• Guadalcanal Plains Palm Oil Ltd (GPPOL) – Close proximity to project and
villagers work for GPPOL.
• Rate Community High School
• School run by Seventh Day Adventist Church, located in Namanu
• St Joseph‘s (boarding school located in Tenaru)
• Ngalimbiu Primary and High School in Nguvia, attended by downstream
communities such as Ravu, Popolo, the GPPOL workers village
• Gaobata Community High School located at GPPOL 1
• Valesala kindergarten
• Vuramali Kindergarten
Training institutions Don Bosco Academy (Tertiary) in Henderson and Honiara
Churches • South Sea Evangelical Church
• Roman Catholic
• Christian Mission Fellowship
• Ngalibiu clinic
• Clinics in Honiara - Mataniko clinic, Rove Clinic, Kukum Clinic
• The National Referral Hospital (NRH) in Honiara is the main hospital
Internal Stakeholders • Korea Water Resources Corporation
• Hyundai Engineering Co. Ltd
• Includes but not limited to: Community Liaison Officers, supervision
consultants, suppliers, Contractors, sub-contractors, petty contractors, etc.
Project Financiers and
point through the Australian High Commission.
• Australian Infrastructure Financing Facility for the Pacific (AIFFP), within
the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
(DFAT; funding the transmission line).
• Economic Development Cooperation Bank of Korea (EDCF)
• Green Climate Fund (GCF)
• Australia – Pacific Islands Partnership (APIP)
5.1.3 Vulnerable Groups
Potential vulnerable groups were also identified during the stakeholder identification process.
IFC WB Guidance Note 7 (2012) states the following in relation to vulnerable groups:
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“…social groups with identities that are distinct from mainstream groups in national
societies, are often among the most marginalized and vulnerable segments of the
population. In many cases, their economic, social, and legal status limits their capacity to
defend their rights to, and interests in, lands and natural and cultural resources, and may
restrict their ability to participate in and benefit from development.”
Vulnerable groups are those PAPs (individuals or groups) who, because of their particular
circumstances (outlined in Table 5-3), may be disadvantaged or vulnerable. Identification of the
vulnerable groups helps the Project further identify individuals and sub-groups who may have
different concerns and priorities about Project impacts, mitigation mechanisms and benefits, and
who may require different, or separate, forms of engagement.
Table 5-2 provides a summary of the potentially vulnerable Project stakeholders.
Table 5-2 Project Stakeholders – Potentially Vulnerable Groups
Vulnerable Groups Details
Women Women in the Directly and Widely Affected Population make up approximately 47-
48% of the population. Some disadvantages experienced by women include:
• Poor access to healthcare
• Less education than men
• Less rights to decision-making than men
Their interest and roles in land issues are marginalised. Most vulnerable women are:
• Single women headed households
• Women in low income households
Children Children are often seen as not mature enough to contribute adequately to
discussions and are often not involved in decision making processes on issues that
affect their lives.
Teenagers
Young people/teenagers with poor literacy skills and not easily employable as a
result. This, in turn, leads to early marriage and child bearing among girls, and
antisocial activities among boys.
• Teenage mothers and their infants are among the most vulnerable
• Approximately 31 % of the population in Malango Ward are youth (15-29).
Number of teenagers (15-19 years old) is unknown at this stage.
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Needs (PSN)
Due to their state and difficulty in mobility, this group of people tend to be kept at
home. The PSNs are often seen as people who cannot participate fruitfully in
meetings. The Solomon Islands in general do not have adequate facilities to
accommodate this group of people in a manner that protects their decency. They are
disadvantaged in terms of getting access to information and participation on issues
that affect thei