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  • Slide 1
  • Strand A: How Can We Make Intensive Intervention Happen? Considerations for Knowledge Development, Implementation, and Policy Strand Leaders: Louis Danielson, Ph.D. Rebecca O. Zumeta, Ph.D. National Center on Intensive Intervention (NCII) American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC
  • Slide 2
  • 2 Strand Objectives Understand how intensive intervention may be applied to academic and social behavior contexts. Learn about a tool for monitoring implementation, and common implementation barriers and solutions Connect intensive intervention to current education policy initiatives, including Results- Driven Accountability (RDA)
  • Slide 3
  • 3 Todays Sessions (Download slides at www.intensiveintervention.org)www.intensiveintervention.org TimeSession Title 8:009:00 a.m.What Do I Do Now?: Intensifying Academic Interventions When Standard Approaches Flop 9:1510:15 a.m. Practical Solutions: Using Intensive Intervention to Improve Behavioral Outcomes for Struggling Students 10:3011:30 a.m. From Know-How to Action: Assessing and Improving School-Level Implementation of Data- Based Individualization 1:302:30 p.m. Improving Results for All: The Role of Intensive Intervention in Federal Education Policy
  • Slide 4
  • What Do I Do Now?: Intensifying Academic Interventions When Standard Approaches Flop Rebecca O. Zumeta, AIR Devin M. Kearns, University of Connecticut Nicole Hitchener, Coventry School District Lynn S. Fuchs, Vanderbilt University
  • Slide 5
  • 5 Todays Presentation Rationale for intensive intervention Overview of the data-based individualization (DBI) process Examples from the field
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  • 6 What is Intensive Intervention? Intensive intervention addresses severe and persistent learning or behavior difficulties. Intensive intervention should be: Driven by data Characterized by increased intensity (e.g., smaller group, expanded time) and individualization of academic instruction and/or behavioral supports
  • Slide 7
  • 7 What Intensive Intervention Is Individualized based on student needs More intense, often with substantively different content AND pedagogy Comprised of more frequent and precise progress monitoring Is Not A single approach A manual A preset program More of the same Tier 1 instruction More of the same Tier 2 instruction
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  • 8 Why Do We Need Intensive Intervention? Low academic achievement Dropout rates Arrest rates
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  • 9 Why Do We Need Intensive Intervention? More Help Validated programs are not universally effective programs; 3 to 5 percent of students need more help (Fuchs et al., 2008; NCII, 2013). More Practice Students with intensive needs often require 1030 times more practice than peers to learn new information (Gersten et al., 2008).
  • Slide 10
  • 10 Who Needs DBI? Students with disabilities who are not making adequate progress in their current instructional program Students who present with very low academic achievement and/or high-intensity or high-frequency behavior problems (typically those with disabilities) Students in a tiered intervention system who have not responded to secondary intervention programs delivered with fidelity
  • Slide 11
  • 11 What is NCIIs Approach to Intensive Intervention? Data-Based Individualization (DBI): A systematic method for using data to determine when and how to provide more intensive intervention: Origins in data-based program modification/experimental teaching were first developed at the University of Minnesota (Deno & Mirkin, 1977). It is a process, not a single intervention program or strategy. It is not a one-time fix, but an ongoing process comprising intervention and assessment adjusted over time.
  • Slide 12
  • 12 DBI Assumptions Students with disabilities who require special education need specially designed instruction to progress toward standards. A data-driven, systematized approach can help educators develop programs likely to yield success for students with intensive needs.
  • Slide 13
  • 13 DBI Assumptions DBI is a distinctively different and more intensive approach to intervention, compared to primary preventions (Tier 1s) core program and secondary preventions (Tier 2s) validated, supplementary programs (NCII, 2013). In a longstanding program of field-based randomized controlled trials, DBI has demonstrated improved reading, math, and spelling outcomes, compared with business-as-usual special education practice (e.g., Fuchs, Fuchs, & Hamlett, 1989).
  • Slide 14
  • 14 DBI: Integrating data-based decision- making across academics and social behavior
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  • 15 Intensive Intervention and Results Driven Accountability All components of an accountability system will be aligned in a manner that best support States in improving results for infants, toddlers, children and youth with disabilities, and their families. Shift from Compliance to Results + Compliance Slide adapted from: OSEP Slides to Explain Results Driven Accountability (RDA) Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/rda/index.html
  • Slide 16
  • SSIP 16 Conduct root cause analysis (including infrastructure) to identify contributing factorsConduct root cause analysis (including infrastructure) to identify contributing factors For each contributing factor, identify both barriers and leverage points for improvementFor each contributing factor, identify both barriers and leverage points for improvement Conduct root cause analysis (including infrastructure) to identify contributing factorsConduct root cause analysis (including infrastructure) to identify contributing factors For each contributing factor, identify both barriers and leverage points for improvementFor each contributing factor, identify both barriers and leverage points for improvement Search/evaluate evidence- based solutions (Exploration Phase)Search/evaluate evidence- based solutions (Exploration Phase) Develop action steps (address barriers/use leverage points)Develop action steps (address barriers/use leverage points) Develop Theory of ActionDevelop Theory of Action Develop Plan for Improvement (Implementation Framework)Develop Plan for Improvement (Implementation Framework) Search/evaluate evidence- based solutions (Exploration Phase)Search/evaluate evidence- based solutions (Exploration Phase) Develop action steps (address barriers/use leverage points)Develop action steps (address barriers/use leverage points) Develop Theory of ActionDevelop Theory of Action Develop Plan for Improvement (Implementation Framework)Develop Plan for Improvement (Implementation Framework) Initiate Data AnalysisInitiate Data Analysis Conduct broad Infrastructure AnalysisConduct broad Infrastructure Analysis Identify problem areaIdentify problem area Initiate Data AnalysisInitiate Data Analysis Conduct broad Infrastructure AnalysisConduct broad Infrastructure Analysis Identify problem areaIdentify problem area Evaluation of progress annuallyEvaluation of progress annually Adjust plan as neededAdjust plan as needed Evaluation of progress annuallyEvaluation of progress annually Adjust plan as neededAdjust plan as needed How well is the solution working? What is the problem ? Why is it happening? What shall we do about it? SSIP Phase I SSIP Phase I and II SSIP Phase III SSIP Phase I Slide from: OSEP Slides to Explain Results Driven Accountability (RDA) Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/rda/index.html
  • Slide 17
  • 17 Intensifying intervention when standard approaches flop: lessons from the field
  • Slide 18
  • What to do when standard approaches flop? Overview of strategies Systems: Set your district and school up for success Conduct team meetings efficiently and effectively Data-based individualization: Create strong intensive intervention plans Monitor progress correctly Diagnose carefully Adapt thoughtfully and track meticulously Iterate
  • Slide 19
  • Systems: Set your district and school up for success
  • Slide 20
  • Keys to District Success Have a rigorous readiness checklist making sure the team is ready to implement Start small with potentially successful buildings and scale up slowly Determine how to help children as they transition from elementary to middle school (still a problem for many schools) Make sure key personnel buy in (SpEd director, superintendent, curriculum director)
  • Slide 21
  • Coventry Public Schools and NCII School A 2012-2014 School B 2012-2013 Administrators indicated interest Self-assessment Set goals Streamlined NCII work with current initiatives Relied on school-based team support ELA focus Initially willing, but lacked readiness School-based team unable to support After starting training, decision was made to discontinue involvement in the NCII initiative School A 2014-2015 School C 2014-2015 School D 2014-2015 Whole school indicated interest Self-assessment Set goals Build capacity through team membership changes Behavior focus Streamlined NCII work with current initiatives Relied on school-based team support ELA focus Moved at schools pace Streamlined NCII work with current initiatives Relied on school-based support ELA focus Moved at schools pace
  • Slide 22
  • Keys to School Success Make Intensive Intervention a central focus for the building Avoid Christmas Tree syndrome (Fullan, 2001) Introduce all staff to Intensive Intervention init