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  • Students Civic and Democratic Engagement

    Enrique Ramos & Brett Perozzi

    NASDEV Winter School 2014

  • Overview

    Drawing heavily from a publication of the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracys

    Future

    Knowledge, skills, values, and action items; key items

    Discussion of programs in our countries and at our institutions; unique and well-respected.

  • A Framework for 21st Century Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

    Knowledge

    Historical and sociological understanding of several

    democratic movements, both US and abroad

    Understanding ones sources of identity & their influence on

    civic values, assumptions, and responsibilities to a wider public

    Exposure to multiple religious traditions and to alternative

    views about the relation between religion and government

    Knowledge of the political systems that frame constitutional

    democracies and of political levers for influencing change.

  • A framework for 21st Century Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

    Essential Skills

    Critical inquiry, analysis, and reasoning

    Quantitative reasoning

    Gathering and evaluating multiple sources of evidence

    Seeking, engaging, and being informed by multiple

    perspectives

    Deliberation and bridge building across differences

    Collaborative decision making

    Ability to communicate in multiple languages

  • A Framework for 21st Century Civic Learning and Democratic Engagement

    Values

    Respect for freedom and human dignity

    Empathy

    Open-mindedness

    Tolerance

    Justice

    Equality

    Ethical integrity

    Responsibility to a larger good

    Collective Action

    Integration of knowledge, skills, and examined values to inform actions

    taken in concert with other people

    Moral discernment and behavior

    Navigation of political systems and processes, both formal and informal

    Public problem solving with diverse partners

    Compromise, civility, and mutual respect

  • Contributing to Community

  • Key Recommendations

    Foster a civic ethos across all parts of campus and educational culture

    Make civic literacy a core expectation for all students

    Practice civic inquiry across all fields of study

    Advance civic action through transformative partnerships, at home and abroad.

  • American Civic & Democratic Engagement

    Civic engagement not yet fully embedded in U.S. culture

    In 2007, U.S. ranked 139th in voter participation, out of 172 world democracies

    14,000 college seniors scored 50% (an F) on a civics test (less than half of U.S. states require civic education in primary school.

  • Weber State University

    Center for Community Engaged Learning

    Mission: To engage students, faculty, and staff members in a process which combines community service and

    academic learning in order to promote civic participation, build community capacity, and enhance

    the educational process

    Carnegie Classification for Community Engagement!

  • Faculty Engagement

    Sociology faculty member has release time to direct CCEL Dual supervision from Academic & Student Affairs

    Infusion into the curriculum

    81 professors teaching 227 CEL classes

  • Student Engagement

    7,905 total CEL Students; 31.6% of student population

    WSU students gave 147,921 hours of service in 2012-13. Thats 16 years, 10 months, and 15 days; and the equivalent for service hours of $2.7 million USD

    Grade Point Average of community engaged students is 3.3, compared to 2.8 GPA of WSU general population.

  • Student Participation

    0

    1000

    2000

    3000

    4000

    5000

    6000

    7000

    8000

    9000

    2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

    CEL Students

    CEL Students

  • Community Engagement

    118 community partnerships

    Tracking and reporting of hours

    Use of OrgSync software

    Students swipe their Wildcard

    Web-based permissions/access granted to students, staff, faculty, and community agencies

    Many community agencies have purchased their own card reader!

  • Cultural Infusion/Promotion

    Assist in coordinating curricula and helping faculty members with syllabus development and implementation

    Service built into many aspects of Student Affairs, for example, leadership programs and student employment

    Living Learning Community in residence halls

    American Democracy Project.

  • Many institutions of higher education share a common mission and purpose: to contribute to

    the public good by educating socially responsible citizens.

    In Mexico, where 52 percent of the population lives below the national poverty line, the higher education system plays a key role in promoting

    change by educating professionals who can improve economic and social conditions.

    Civic & Democratic Engagement

    in Mexico

  • Mandatory Social Service

    Mexico is one of the few countries that have a mandatory service component for students enrolled in higher education

    This requirement benefits marginalized sectors of society while raising students awareness and deepening their sense of social responsibility.

  • Mandatory Social Service (cont)

    Mexicos mandatory service requirement was established in the national constitution in 1910.

    Service should align with students majors.

    Most students are required to engage in 480 hours of work, students majoring in health science are required to perform one thousand hours of service.

    According to Mexicos Ministry of Public Education, approximately 780,000 higher education students complete more than 374.4 million hours of service every year.

  • Mandatory Social Service (cont)

    Mexicos National Association of Higher Education Institutions (ANUIES) and its Higher Education Commission for Social Service (CISS) help manage the service component, but each university defines its own norms and processes for compliance.

    Each institution determines for itself the characteristics required of programs where students complete their hours.

  • The Tecnolgico de Monterrey Case

  • We educate citizens who are ethical,

    with humanistic values, an international

    outlook, and with entrepreneurial culture.

    TEC DE MONTERREY TECNOLGICO DE

    MONTERREY SYSTEM

  • Presence

    TEC DE MONTERREY TECNOLGICO DE

    MONTERREY SYSTEM

    LIAISON OFFICES

    31

    22

    CAMPUSES IN

    MEXICO

  • students enrolled in high school, undergraduate, and graduate programs

    students studying abroad

    foreign students

    of the high school and undergraduate students have some type of financial aid

    faculty members

    TEC DE MONTERREY TECNOLGICO DE

    MONTERREY SYSTEM

    Students and Faculty

    102,586

    5,746

    4,516

    52%

    8,448

  • 59 undergraduate programs 39 international undergraduate programs 17 medical specializations 10 specializations in other disciplines 50 masters degrees

    10 Ph.D. programs 4 high school programs

    TEC DE MONTERREY TECNOLGICO DE

    MONTERREY SYSTEM

    It is accredited by The Federation of Private Institutions of Higher Education in

    Mxico (FIMES) and by The Commission on Colleges of Southern Association

    of Colleges and Schools in the United States (SACS).

    Academic Programs

  • The Quality Enhancement Plan

    The Tecnolgico de Monterrey has established a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) to strengthen the ethical

    commitment and citizenship competencies that will constitute hallmarks of students professional

    lives.

  • The Quality Enhancement Plan

    The topic selected for the QEP was Ethics and Citizenship Education

    This selection was based on the broad consultation in redefining Tecnolgico de Monterreys 2015 Mission,which involved 14,815 members faculty, students, alumni and Board of Directors.

  • Desirable characteristics for graduates

    0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 50%

    High professional and personal ideals

    Respect for individual differences and multi-cultural outlook

    Entrepreneurial

    Sense of responsability

    Capacity to identify and solve problems

    International outlook

    Knowledge and clear awerness of the social and economic realities

    Solid citizenship, ethical and moral education

    15%

    15%

    16%

    19%

    19%

    21%

    27%

    49%

  • The QEP objective

    The primary QEP objective is to strengthen ethics and citizenship core competencies of Tecnolgico de Monterrey students so that they will transcend the university period and constitute a hallmark of their long term professional life.

    This objective is to be achieved through the institutions curricular and co-curricular programs which offer students learning experiences in these areas.

  • Curricular programs

    Curricular Programs

    Include distinct courses in ethics and citizenship which are part within of the general education core of the curricula. Ethics, Self, and Society. Mandatory course

    Ethics, Profession and Citizenship. Mandatory course