systems thinking workshop @ lean ux nyc 2014

Download Systems Thinking workshop @ Lean UX NYC 2014

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Slides with notes for my workshop at Lean UX 2014. This is an iterated version of my 2013 workshop - different exercise, slightly different content, but much is similar. Includes link to handout!

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  • Making sense of messy problems Johanna Kollmann @johannakoll ! Lean UX NYC 2014 Systems thinking for complex business models Illustration by David Wicks: http://www.ickr.com/photos/sansumbrella/467998944/
  • Intro about me: worked on a range of complex systems such as a voice communica;on system for the NASA, before learning more about systems thinking as part of my HCI degree in London. Interest in systems theory and organisa;onal structures remained when I was consul;ng, e.g. a large retailer who was reshaping their en;re business and data structure to enable mul;-channel. While geFng interested in business models and the startup world, I realised that systems thinking is also core to business models, lean manufacturing, and lean startup.
  • The next 3 hours of your life: Introduction to Systems Thinking Tools for modeling systems (collaborate!) Systems behavior over time Change ASK: Whats your current understanding of systems thinking - share with neighbour What are your expectations for today Ask a few people to share
  • Monitor changes in the system Understand peoples worldviews To reduce uncertainty NUTSHELL!!!!
  • Systems Thinking? Why you should care about it !Increasing complexi;es and dependencies require us to think holis;cally. We need to think dynamic and over ;me rather than sta;c and short-lived Technology and business context changes. !ST is relevant to both UX and LS.
  • http://visitmix.com/work/descry/awebsitenameddesire/ The systems we deal with in the world of a website Running a business is taking this to a dierent level - being a founder is taking the running around and coordina;ng to a dierent level!
  • In the past the man has been rst; in the future the system must be rst. ! ~ Frederick Winslow Taylor (1911) father of scien;c management and eciency movement
  • In the past the man has been rst; in the future the system must be rst. ! This in no sense, however, implies that great men are not needed. ! ~Frederick Winslow Taylor (1911) According to Eric Ries, forgeFng the human part has led to 2 problems: 1) overly rigid business systems that failed to take advantage of adaptability, crea;vity, and wisdom of individual workers 2) overemphasis on planning, preven;on and procedure, which enable organisa;ons to achieve consistent results in a stable world.
  • At the root of every seemingly technical problem is a human problem. ~ Taiichi Ohno
  • A system is ~ Donella Meadows a set of elements or parts o[en classied as its func;on or purpose. that is coherently organized and inter-connected in a pa]ern or structure that produces a characteris;c set of behaviors,
  • Peter Checkland Human activity systems Soft Systems Methodology Examples: hard system = thermostat, motherboard. so[ system = game of poker, soccer game, mee;ng, healthcare. Human activity systems, on the other hand are essentially complex, indefinable and purposeful. !He developed the so[ systems methodology, sugges;ng that most problems in systems are caused because human beings are hard to predict. He did not think that there were things you could x with systems thinking, instead there were situa;ons you could improve. !4 ac;vi;es of SSM: - Finding out about the situa;on - Making purposeful ac;vity models based on par;cular world views. - Using the models to ques;on the situa;on - Dening ac;on to improve the situa;on.
  • Peter Checkland Soft Systems Methodology Activities: Finding out about the problem situation Making purposeful activity models Using the models to question the situation Dening action to improve the situation Examples: hard system = thermostat, motherboard. so[ system = game of poker, soccer game, mee;ng, healthcare. Human activity systems, on the other hand are essentially complex, indefinable and purposeful. !He developed the so[ systems methodology, sugges;ng that most problems in systems are caused because human beings are hard to predict. He did not think that there were things you could x with systems thinking, instead there were situa;ons you could improve. !4 ac;vi;es of SSM: - Finding out about the situa;on - Making purposeful ac;vity models based on par;cular world views. - Using the models to ques;on the situa;on - Dening ac;on to improve the situa;on.
  • !
  • Leverage points places within a complex system where a small shift in one thing can produce big changes in everything. are often counterintuitive.
  • Systems Thinking & UX
  • 1) Modeling
  • 2) Behavior over time
  • 3) Change
  • 1) Modeling Models are tools for understanding complex situations. Models are tools for communicating complex situations.
  • ! Only by building a model of customer behaviour and then showing our ability to use our product or service to change it over ;me can we establish real facts about the validity of our vision. ~ Eric Ries
  • Personas from Design Jam London, by Je Van Campen http://www.ickr.com/photos/otrops/tags/designjamlondon/ This is where UX oers lots of tools: personas, customer journey maps; Lean Startups hypothesis-driven approach also is modeling.
  • Flickr User Model by Bryce Glass http://www.ickr.com/photos/bryce/58299511/ Models help us understand how things work.
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change Rich Picture 1. Construction of the Humber Bridge (adapted from Stewart and Fortune, 1994) The Open University 2. Distance Learning Situation Wood-Harper et al, Information Systems Denition: The Multiview Approach, Blackwell Scientic Publications 1985
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change Rich Picture elements Stakeholders Worldview Connections Conicts 2. Distance Learning Situation Wood-Harper et al, Information Systems Denition: The Multiview Approach, Blackwell Scientic Publications 1985 Worldview is a concept for empathy !Consider: - roles that people adopt in the situa;on (which may be formally recognised or quite informal); the norms which govern peoples behaviour; and the values they espouse. - poli;cal aspects of the situa;on, in other words recogni;on of the dierent interests that are represented and how these dierent interests are accommodated.
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change !
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change
  • Handout: http://bit.ly/OQzwza
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change Rich Picture elements Stakeholders Worldview Connections Conicts 2. Distance Learning Situation Wood-Harper et al, Information Systems Denition: The Multiview Approach, Blackwell Scientic Publications 1985
  • 1) Modeling 2) Behavior over time 3) Change Rich Picture applications Framing the problem: Checklands root denition Understanding and communicating a complex situation Uncovering assumptions and knowledge gaps Research planning Stakeholder risk matrix CATWOE 1. A system Transformation ie a clear relationship between system inputs and outputs. 2. A system Owner ie someone who is ultimately respons