the bemidji daily pioneer (bemidji, minn.) 1912-05-30 [p ]

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THE BEMIDJI VOLUME 10. NUMBER 28. ILY PIONEE BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, THURSD<AY EVENING. MAY 30. 1912. Thoughts of a Half Century Ago; At the Grave of a Former Comrade. Photo by American Press Association. ,. , . - , ^ Fifty jeais ngo on May 30, 1S62, General Halleck's Federal army took possession of Corinth Miss,, which had_ been e\.icu,>toil in the Confederate army, commanded by General P. G. T. Beauregard, after a month's siege. On that -dajr-alse to»k plate the nrsfr noted cavalry raid of the war i\t Booneville. Miss. CoJIonel W. L. Elliott's brigade. including Coionei Phil Shendan s regiment, destroyed railroads uud other pioperty within Coui'ederate territory. A Lyric For Memorial Day By JOEL BENTON ICopyright. 1912, by American Press Asso- ciation.] T IFT up once more the tinted bars. •" From tower and steeple give them sway On whose bosom shine the stars. Let freedom's flag the Kiss of May Feel in ail its folds today Jn state and town, in port and bay, Fling the nation's colors out. Let the bands of music play And pensive strains float ail about While speech and song and flowers gay Come to crown Memorial day. LATE NEWS. CLEARWATER DEMOCRATS. Bagley, Maj SO —Special to Pio- neer —The Democratic county con- \ention held here yesterday after- noon was one of the most harmoni- ous and enthusiastic ever held in the county Delegates present—Wm Mc- Glennon, Axel Ringborg and A Moen. Delegates elected to state convention, Rmgboig, McGlennon and Moen. Delegates to district convention— Moen, McGlennon and Ringborg. Delegates will go uninstructed. Alternate, E A Schneider, of Gon- \ ick, will attend state convention in place of A Ringborg. He is a Clark man 5ther two delegates are sup- posed to be favorable to Wilson. * Cass County for Wilson. Cass Lake, May 30.—Special—-The Cass county Democratic convention was held here last night and.Prank L Gorenflo of Cass Lake was made chairman, with J. G. Oman, secre- tary After the committee on cre- dentials reported favorably on all delegates present the convention went on record in supporting E. I. Burnett of Park Rapids as a delegate from this 'district to the national convention Delegates to the state convention which will convene at Dluth were named as follows: A. E Johnson of Pillager, Thos. Sheehy of Bena, Ely Wright of Walker, M. L Toole of Federal Dam and Frank L Gorenflo and J. C. Oman of Cass Lake The convention also went on record as sending their delegates in- structed for Woodrow Wilson for first choice and Champ Clark, second. In the isles of many a sea. On the mainland broad and free, Where'er a soldier's grave is found, With sweet blossoms wreathe it round, For here no scepter is nor throne- Here no tyrant rule Is known. Tell It so the world may know What today we surely owe ^ To the heroes of the past. May their sacred offering last In the memories that survive. In freedom's name they kept alive. And dow n the serried years to come. Haloed be their martyrdom! Robber Needed Shave. Cass Lake, May 29.—Special— Some time during Sunday night en- trance was forced into H. Mullen's hardwarestore here and a quantity of articles taken including two re- volvers, two pairs of shears, two ra- zors and the entire supply of shaving soap. The rear window was broken into. No clues have been found. Suspect Austrian of Robbing. Cass Lake, May 29.—Special.— The post office at Farris, located on the Great Northern five miles west of Cass Lake was broken into and robbed Wednesday night of all the stamps and money in the office be- sides several other articles. En- trance was gained through a rear window Suspicion pointed to an Austrian and a heavy set man who looked the part of a hobo who were seen hanging around town all day previous Early this morning tracks were traced for about a mile towards Cass Lake when all trace was lost The authorities at Walker, Bemidji and several other nearby towns have been notified Patriotism. You cannot analyze it. It is subtle, but it is true. It often "sleeps like the iamb, but roused from its lethargy breaks out with the strength of the ion." Never was patriotism more sub- line than in the soldier of '«1. „ ^ 0Vfe£*» [ith crepe upon our banner* And arm* reversed, we meet la memory of the soldiers Sepulchred at our feet. They are die voiceless heroes Who spoke where die field was Spoke when die captain ordered! "Fire from behind die dead." TfTW came from farm and village* ^ From crowded city and plain; They marched in the sultry sunshine. And pillowed their heads in rain. They heard the blast of the bugle. And quickly answered the calk "Form m line of battle- Infantry, troopers, all/* |Ome of these dropped by die wayside. Some while on picket wen s h o t - Some fell in the skirmish l i n e - Some where the battle raged hot But, alas, for the youthful soldier, Alas, for the veteran gray. Who languished in pitiless prisons Where the reaper. Death, held sway— Ireaming of sides they could not see— Hoping where hope was vain To break the guarded prison ban And breathe free air again. Yearning for wife or mother— Yearning to be caressed. Or longing with broken spirit T o be, like these, at rest. / A v e r these dead nine hundred Fold the Bag of the brave, While the marching column halts to plant A flag at each soldier's grave. Violets, pinks and dairies, - Roses and lilies bring. When the apple trees are in blossom, And the lark and the linnet sing. JWM rtad a Bra MmurlaiD^f Mjtmim SPECIAL TO SHOW FARM EXHIBITS Will Be in Bemidji Over Sunday and Open for Inspection on Monday Morning. TWO CARS OF LIVE STOCK. I One More Filled With Machinery and Two to Be Used as Lecture Rooms. - OPERATED BY THE RAILROADS. Being Taken Through the North Country in the Interests of Im- provement of Agrfeilture. 'Personal letters have been sent out by the University of Mipnesoty e-- • to i .i'i department caur^$ the a.Loii- ti iii of farmers and land inon t o the apucuiu lal special of th> .\. !• and .vt xna 1. which will he in Bevidji ••«• i tu'iday. The train rill bo open fiom '• '- m. to 12 o m %u Monday In the train will pe two coaches to be used as lecture rooms in case of bad weather and three baggage cars filled with exhibits. In one car will be good types of horses, cattle, sheep and swine; another will hold vari- ous breeds of poultihr and poultry appliances; the third will hold farm machinery. All cars will- be open for inspection Monday morning and attendants will bft.reja'dy With explan- ations. «*.»** % * a $, Supt. A. J. McGuire, o#the north- east experiment staticta; w. *H. Tom- have, of the agricultural extension division; F. H. Scribrier, of the U. S. department of agriculture; andR. M. W-ashbura^^« 4he *ia1*y- division of t n §v^asmoia^a4^cul*W4kl, college, will handle all live stock Subjects. *J. E. Chapman, of the extension divi- sion, and C. E. * Brown, poultry ex- pert of the northwest experiment sta- tion at Crookston, will take care of the poultry subjects. F. B. McLeran, of Wreshall, and A. J. McGuire, of Grand Rapids, will speak on meth- ods they (have found to be effective in clearing northern Minnesota land. C. E. Brown, of Elk River, employed as demonstration farm expert by the Minnesota agricultural college, will talk on soil management and pota- toes. Prof. Thomas Shaw, of the Great Northern railway, will talk on the growing of root and forage crops. P. W. Merrill, formerly silo expert of the U. S. department of agricul- ture, will give instruction, on the construction and use of silos. Special talks will be given for men, for women, and for children. Everything is free, the train car- ries nothing for sale, and,advertises nothing. It is conducted for the im- provement of agriculture in north- ern Minnesota. BAND CONCERT TONIGHT. A special concert in which Mem- orial Day jnusic will be featured will be played by the Bemidji band this evening at the city dock. The con- cert will begin promptly at 8 p. m. In order that the band may be heard to best advantage, Director Remfrey has requested that all motor boats and autos stop their engines during the numbers. As water carries sound for long distances, special attention is called to the fact that 'the ex- haust from the boats can be heard distinctly on shore when the boats are far out in the lake. Following is the program: t 1. March—The American Habit Scouton 2. Selections from "Miss Nobody From Starland" Howard 3. Medley Overture—War Songs of the Boys in Blue . .Laurendeau 4. Grand Fantasie—Auld Lang Syne Beaton 5. National March—Lost and Won -. Carl 6. Chanson Joyeuse Ravina 7. March—Lights Out McCoy *************** * DID YOU GET ONE! * * * ' , * *• • Do not be left in the lurch. * * The 1919 High School Annual * * is out and it's the beet published * * by any school of this size in the * * Northwest. u. * * PRICE $1.00. - ' * * -r May be had at Netzer's Store * * and the Bemidji Pioneer omce. * * Be loyal to the school and place > * your order early/ They wjll * * also be fq» sale at the commence- * * ment exercises Friday night. * *****$*********** STEPS OF VETERANS AREFALTERINGNOW But Hearts Beat as True as in the Days of Sixty-One When They Marched to the Front. DECORATION DAY BEAUTIFUL. Sun, Sky and Wind Combine to Make the Weather Conditions Glori- iously Pefect. CEREMONIES ARE IMPRESSIVE. Memorial Exercises Held Both in City Hall and at Cemetery Were Moving. With faltering steps and slow, but with hearts beating as true today as fifty years ago, the Bemidji veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic marched the block from the Post rooms to the city hall at 9:40 a. m. today. In a file behind them came their ladies, the women who had been left to care for the homes while the men went to the front and who now share Memorial Day equally with their husbands and brothers. Automobiles driven by members of the Automobile club were in wait- ing and while the Bemidji band played patriotic airs, the veterans and ladies were seated. At 10 o'clock the band moved to Fifth street where it formed* an open lane through which the line of autos passed on its way to the cemetery. At the cemetery brief, but impres- sive exercises were held. The old soldiers lined up by the side of the road and then marched into the cem- etery. 4}nce inside, they opened ranks and the ladies marched down the lane thus formed. There was a pray- er by the chaplain and a reading by Commander Smith before W. B. Ste- wart stepped forward to read an ad- dress written by the late Judge H. W. Bailey. Eleven years ago, the judge himself stood before the veterans and gave his address. It was short and to the point but reflected strongly the char- acter of the late veteran. While it was being read this- morning, the large number of people present in the cemetery listened attentively and many seemed to actually hear the voice of the judge again speaking to them. Miss Dorothy Clark read "Cover Them Over," an ode to the dead vet- erans written by Will Carlton. Then someone started "America" and it was taken up by the crowd. After the singing, the ladies decorated graves with flowers and the autos returned to town with their loads. At noon, the flags of the city were returned to full mast. At noon, a lunch was served in the^Post rooms and in the afternoon services were held in the city hall at which E. E. McDonald gave the ad- dress. The program was opened by band music and then Commander Smith read the orders of the day. Following a song and a prayer by Chaplain Martin, Adjutant Fuller called the roll of the deadfl Professor Stewart read Lincoln's famous Gettysburg speech of "Four score and seven years ago, our fa- thers brought forth upon this conti- nent a new nation." He was follow- ed by Mrs. H. W. Bailey and Mr. Mc- Donald. The exercises closed with "Marching Through Georgia" and an invocation by Chaplain Martin. This evening at 8 p. m. the Be- midji band will play a concert' in the band stand on the city dock. At the close of the concert, Director Rem- frey will play "Taps" as the closing event of Memorial Day. BASEBALL TODAY R.H.E. Minneapolis 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0—6 8 1 St Paul ~ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0—2 3 3 Louisville Columbus R.H.B. 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0l>—1 7 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 x—4 10 1 Milwaukee - " 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 *- R.H.E. -2 4 4 Kansas ..City. 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 x^—7 7 1 ft** R.H.E. Indianapolis Toledo 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 a 0 TEN CENTS PER WEEK. TheSPDflTof61 -1 v PEACE. Oh. draw aside the drapery of glodm And let the sunshine chase the clouds away And gild with brighter glory every tomb We decorate today. And In the holy silence reigning round. While prayers of perfume bless the atmosphere Where loyal souls of love and faith are found. Thank God that peace ts here! And let each angry impulse that may start Be smothered out of every loyal breast. And. rocked within the cradle of the heart. Let every sorrow rest. —James Whltcomb RUey. Wanted War to Go On. During the civil war in a car on a railroad which runs into New fork a dramatic scene was enacted. A per* son dressed as a gentleman, speaking to a friend across the car, said: "Well. 1 hope the war may last six months longer. If it does I shall have made enough money to retire from business. In the last six months I've made $100,000. Six months more and 1 shall have enough." ,• A lady sat behind the speaker and necessarily beard his remarks. When be bad finished speaking she tapped bim on the shoulder and said: "Sir. 1 bad two sons. One was killed at tbe battle of Fredericksburg, and the other was killed at the battle of Murfreesboro." She was silent for a moment, and so were all around wbo beard her. Then, overcome- by her indignation, she sud- denly slapped tbe speculator, first on one Cheek and 1 then on the other. Bev fore tbe fellow could say a word tbe passengers sitting near who had wit- nessed the whole affair seised him and >posbed aim from tbe car.. A SOLDIER'S GRAVE. By ALICE E. ALLEN A LITTLE old forgotten cemetery Where sunlight softly streams, Where birds and bees and blooms ef May make merry And winds are sweet with dreams) A few old fashioned monuments half broken, Around which grasses wave, No other sign of memory or token By which to mark a grave, th* ~-Ji Except an apple tree, which staepe and -\ . -A offers > - 3*^^^/f *;^ ,* ' '*$&> A branch of bloslioms gay &C&^£ * To on* lew mound, like some kind heart « ^ P « ^ that proffers &"*£&£& With love its best bouquet. - t yss? Through tears I read what Time, all else effacing ••>* By rain and frost and sun, "*•** Has left upon the atone in tender trsft.

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THE BEMIDJI VOLUME 10. NUMBER 28.

ILY PIONEE -»

BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, THURSD<AY EVENING. MAY 30. 1912.

Thoughts of a Half Century Ago; At the Grave of a Former Comrade.

Photo by American Press Association. ,. , . - , ^

Fifty j ea i s ngo on May 30, 1S62, General Halleck's Federal army took possession of Corinth Miss,, which h a d _ been e\.icu,>toil in the Confederate army, commanded by General P. G. T. Beauregard, after a month's siege. On that -dajr-alse to»k plate the nrsfr noted cavalry raid of the war i\t Booneville. Miss. CoJIonel W. L. Elliott's brigade. including Coionei Phil Shendan s regiment, destroyed railroads uud other pioperty within Coui'ederate territory.

A Lyric For Memorial Day

B y JOEL B E N T O N

ICopyright. 1912, by American Press Asso­ciation.]

T IFT up once more the tinted bars. • " From tower and steeple give them

sway On whose bosom shine the stars. Let freedom's flag the Kiss of May Feel in ail its folds today

Jn state and town, in port and bay, Fling the nation's colors out. Let the bands of music play And pensive strains float ail about While speech and song and flowers gay Come to crown Memorial day.

LATE NEWS. CLEARWATER DEMOCRATS.

Bagley, Maj SO —Special to Pio­neer —The Democratic county con-\ent ion held here yesterday after­noon was one of the most harmoni­ous and enthusiastic ever held in the county Delegates present—Wm Mc-Glennon, Axel Ringborg and A Moen. Delegates elected to state convention, Rmgboig , McGlennon and Moen.

Delegates to district convention— Moen, McGlennon and Ringborg.

Delegates will go uninstructed. Alternate, E A Schneider, of Gon-

\ ick, will attend state convention in place of A Ringborg. He is a Clark man 5ther two delegates are sup­posed to be favorable to Wilson.

*

Cass County for Wilson. Cass Lake, May 30.—Special—-The

Cass county Democratic convention was held here last night and.Prank L Gorenflo of Cass Lake was made chairman, with J. G. Oman, secre­tary After the committee on cre­dentials reported favorably on all delegates present the convention went on record in supporting E. I. Burnett of Park Rapids as a delegate from this 'district to the national convention Delegates to the state convention which will convene at Dluth were named as follows: A. E Johnson of Pillager, Thos. Sheehy of Bena, Ely Wright of Walker, M. L Toole of Federal Dam and Frank L Gorenflo and J. C. Oman of Cass Lake The convention also went on record as sending their delegates in­structed for Woodrow Wilson for first choice and Champ Clark, second.

In the isles of many a sea. On the mainland broad and free, Where'er a soldier's grave is found, With sweet blossoms wreathe it round, For here no scepter is nor throne-Here no tyrant rule Is known.

Tell It so the world may know What today we surely owe ^ To the heroes of the past. May their sacred offering last In the memories that survive. In freedom's name they kept alive. And dow n the serried years to come. Haloed be their martyrdom!

Robber Needed Shave. Cass Lake, May 29.—Special—

Some time during Sunday night en­

trance was forced into H. Mullen's

hardwarestore here and a quantity

of articles taken including two re­

volvers, two pairs of shears, two ra­

zors and the entire supply of shaving

soap. The rear window was broken

into. No clues have been found.

Suspect Austrian of Robbing. Cass Lake, May 29.—Special .—

The post office at Farris, located on the Great Northern five miles west of Cass Lake was broken into and robbed Wednesday night of all the stamps and money in the office be­sides several other articles. En­trance was gained through a rear window Suspicion pointed to an Austrian and a heavy set man who looked the part of a hobo who were seen hanging around town all day previous Early this morning tracks were traced for about a mile towards Cass Lake when all trace was lost The authorities at Walker, Bemidji and several other nearby towns have been notified

Patriotism. You cannot analyze it. It i s subtle,

but it i s true. It often "sleeps like the iamb, but roused from its lethargy breaks out with the strength of the ion." Never was patriotism more sub­line than in the soldier of '«1. „ ^

0Vfe£*»

[ith crepe upon our banner* And arm* reversed, we meet

la memory of the soldiers Sepulchred at our feet.

They are die voiceless heroes Who spoke where die field was

Spoke when die captain ordered! "Fire from behind die dead."

TfTW came from farm and village* ^ From crowded city and plain; They marched in the sultry sunshine.

And pillowed their heads in rain. They heard the blast of the bugle.

And quickly answered the calk "Form m line of battle-

Infantry, troopers, all/*

|Ome of these dropped by die wayside. Some while on picket wen s h o t -

Some fell in the skirmish l ine -Some where the battle raged hot

But, alas, for the youthful soldier, Alas, for the veteran gray.

Who languished in pitiless prisons Where the reaper. Death, held sway—

Ireaming of sides they could not see— Hoping where hope was vain

To break the guarded prison ban And breathe free air again.

Yearning for wife or mother— Yearning to be caressed.

Or longing with broken spirit T o be, like these, at rest.

/Aver these dead nine hundred ™ Fold the Bag of the brave, While the marching column halts to plant

A flag at each soldier's grave. Violets, pinks and dairies, -

Roses and lilies bring. When the apple trees are in blossom,

And the lark and the linnet sing.

JWM rtad a Bra MmurlaiD^f Mjtmim

SPECIAL TO SHOW FARM EXHIBITS

Will Be in Bemidji Over Sunday and Open for Inspection on Monday

Morning.

TWO CARS OF LIVE STOCK.

I

One More Filled With Machinery and Two to Be Used as Lecture

Rooms. -

OPERATED BY THE RAILROADS.

Being Taken Through the North Country in the Interests of Im­

provement of Agrfeilture.

'Personal letters have been sent out by the University of Mipnesoty e-- • to i .i'i department caur^$ the a.Loii-ti iii of farmers and land inon t o the a p u c u i u lal special of th> . \ . !• and .vt xna 1. which wil l he in Bev idj i ••«• i tu' iday. The train r i l l bo open fiom '• '- m. to 12 o m %u Monday

In the train wil l pe two coaches to be used as lecture rooms in case of bad weather and three baggage cars filled with exhibits. In one car wil l be good types of horses, cattle, sheep and swine; another wi l l hold vari­ous breeds of poultihr and poultry appliances; the third will hold farm machinery. All cars wil l - be open for inspection Monday morning and attendants will bft.reja'dy With explan­ations. «*.»** % *a$,

Supt. A. J. McGuire, o # t h e north­east experiment staticta; w . *H. Tom-have, of the agricultural extension division; F. H. Scribrier, of the U. S. department of agriculture; a n d R . M. W-ashbura^^« 4 h e *ia1*y- divis ion of tn§v^asmoia^a4^cul*W4kl, college, wil l handle all l ive stock Subjects. *J. E. Chapman, of the extension divi­sion, and C. E. * Brown, poultry ex­pert of t h e northwest experiment sta­tion at Crookston, wil l take care of the poultry subjects. F. B. McLeran, of Wreshall, and A. J. McGuire, of Grand Rapids, wi l l speak on meth­ods they (have found to be effective in clearing northern Minnesota land. C. E. Brown, of Elk River, employed as demonstration farm expert by the Minnesota agricultural college, wil l talk on soil management and pota­toes. Prof. Thomas Shaw, of t h e Great Northern railway, will talk on the growing of root and forage crops. P. W. Merrill, formerly silo expert of the U. S. department of agricul­ture, wi l l g ive instruction, on the construction and use of silos.

Special talks wi l l be given for men, for women, and for children. Everything is free, the train car­ries nothing for sale, and,advertises nothing. It is conducted for the im­provement of agriculture in north­ern Minnesota.

BAND CONCERT TONIGHT. A special concert in which Mem­

orial Day jnusic wil l be featured wil l be played by the Bemidji band this evening at the city dock. The con­cert wi l l begin promptly at 8 p. m. In order that the band may be heard to best advantage, Director Remfrey has requested that all motor boats and autos stop their engines during the numbers. As water carries sound for long distances, special attention is called to the fact that ' the ex­haust from the boats can be heard distinctly on shore when the boats are far out in the lake.

Fol lowing is the program: t 1. March—The American Habit

Scouton 2. Selections from "Miss Nobody

From Starland" Howard 3. Medley Overture—War Songs

of the Boys in Blue . .Laurendeau 4. Grand Fantasie—Auld Lang

Syne Beaton 5. National March—Lost and Won

-. Carl 6. Chanson Joyeuse Ravina 7. March—Lights Out McCoy

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * DID YOU GET ONE! * * * ' , * *• • Do not be left in the lurch. * * The 1919 High School Annual * * is out and it's the beet published * * by any school of this size in the * * Northwest. u. * * PRICE $1.00. - ' * * -r May be had at Netzer's Store * * and the Bemidji Pioneer omce. * * Be loyal to the school and place > * your order early/ They wjll * * also be fq» sale at the commence- * * ment exercises Friday night. * * * * * * $ * * * * * * * * * * *

STEPS OF VETERANS AREFALTERINGNOW

But Hearts Beat as True as in the Days of Sixty-One When They

Marched to the Front.

DECORATION DAY BEAUTIFUL.

Sun, Sky and Wind Combine to Make

the Weather Conditions Glori-

iously Pefect.

CEREMONIES ARE IMPRESSIVE.

Memorial Exercises Held Both in City Hall and at Cemetery

Were Moving.

With faltering steps and slow, but

wi th hearts beating as true today as

fifty years ago, the Bemidji veterans

of the Grand Army of the Republic

marched the block from the Post

rooms to the city hall at 9:40 a. m.

today. In a file behind them came

their ladies, the women who had

been left to care for the homes while

the men went to the front and who

now share Memorial Day equally

w i t h their husbands and brothers.

Automobiles driven by members of

the Automobile club were in wai t ­

ing and whi le the Bemidji band

played patriotic airs, the veterans

and ladies were seated. At 10 o'clock

the band moved to Fifth street where

it formed* an open lane through

which the l ine of autos passed on its

way to the cemetery. At the cemetery brief, but impres­

sive exercises were held. The old soldiers l ined up by the side of t h e road and then marched into the cem­etery. 4}nce inside, they opened ranks and the ladies marched down the lane thus formed. There was a pray­er by the chaplain and a reading by Commander Smith before W. B. Ste­wart stepped forward to read an ad­dress written by the late Judge H. W. Bailey.

Eleven years ago, the judge himself stood before the veterans and gave his address. It was short and to the point but reflected strongly the char­acter of the late veteran. While it was being read this- morning, the large number of people present in the cemetery listened attentively and many seemed to actually hear the voice of the judge again speaking to them.

Miss Dorothy Clark read "Cover Them Over," an ode to the dead vet­erans writ ten by Will Carlton. Then someone started "America" and it was taken up by the crowd. After the s inging, the ladies decorated graves wi th flowers and the autos returned to town wi th their loads. At noon, the flags of the city were returned to full mast.

At noon, a lunch was served in the^Post rooms and in the afternoon services were held in the city hall at which E. E. McDonald gave the ad­dress. The program was opened by band music and then Commander Smith read the orders of the day. Fol lowing a song and a prayer by Chaplain Martin, Adjutant Fuller called the roll of the deadfl

Professor Stewart read Lincoln's famous Gettysburg speech of "Four score and seven years ago, our fa­thers brought forth upon this conti­nent a new nation." He was follow­ed by Mrs. H. W. Bailey and Mr. Mc­Donald. The exercises closed wi th "Marching Through Georgia" and an invocation by Chaplain Martin.

This evening at 8 p. m. the Be­midji band wil l play a concert' in the band stand on the city dock. At the close of the concert, Director Rem­frey wil l play "Taps" as the closing event of Memorial Day.

BASEBALL TODAY

R.H.E. Minneapolis 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0—6 8 1 S t Paul ~ 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0—2 3 3

Louisville Columbus

R.H.B. 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0l>—1 7 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 x—4 10 1

Milwaukee - " 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 *-R.H.E.

- 2 4 4 Kansas ..City. 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 0 x^—7 7 1

ft**

R.H.E. Indianapolis Toledo

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 a 0

TEN CENTS PER WEEK.

TheSPDflTof61

-1

v

PEACE.

Oh. draw aside the drapery of glodm And let the sunshine chase the

clouds away And gild with brighter glory every

tomb We decorate today.

And In the holy silence reigning round.

While prayers of perfume bless the atmosphere

Where loyal souls of love and faith are found.

Thank God that peace ts here!

And let each angry impulse that may start

Be smothered out of every loyal breast.

And. rocked within the cradle of the heart.

Let every sorrow rest. —James Whltcomb RUey.

Wanted War to Go On. During the civil war in a car on a

railroad which runs into New fork a dramatic scene was enacted. A per* son dressed as a gentleman, speaking to a friend across the car, said:

"Well. 1 hope the war may last six months longer. If i t does I shall have made enough money to retire from business. In the last s ix months I've made $100,000. Six months more and 1 shall have enough." ,•

A lady sat behind the speaker and necessarily beard his remarks. When be bad finished speaking she tapped bim on the shoulder and said:

"Sir. 1 bad two sons. One w a s killed at tbe battle of Fredericksburg, and the other was killed at the battle of Murfreesboro."

She was silent for a moment, and so were all around wbo beard her. Then, overcome- by her indignation, she sud­denly slapped tbe speculator, first on one Cheek and1 then on the other. Bev fore tbe fellow could say a word tbe passengers sitting near who had wit­nessed the whole affair seised him and

>posbed aim from tbe car..

A SOLDIER'S GRAVE. B y ALICE E. A L L E N

A LITTLE old forgotten cemetery Where sunlight softly streams,

Where birds and bees and blooms ef May make merry

And winds are sweet with dreams)

A few old fashioned monuments half broken,

Around which grasses wave, No other sign of memory or token

By which to mark a grave,

th*

~-Ji

Except an apple tree, which staepe and -\ . - A offers > - 3 * ^ ^ ^ / f * ; ^ ,* ' '*$&>

A branch of bloslioms gay &C&^£ * To on* lew mound, like some kind heart « ^ P « ^

that proffers &"*£&£& With love its best bouquet. - t yss?

Through tears I read what Time, all else effacing ••>*

By rain and frost and sun, "*•** Has left upon the atone in tender trsft.