the bemidji daily pioneer (bemidji, minn.) 1920-09-27 [p 6]

1
1 I W'A \ i V \ I 4 ' Xr » f •'ft , • I 'v yj»;/v~-^»i^^W»:f¥^ ; r4^ J f-^ ! ' T?. 1HE BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1920 BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER , v p a u n n s 3BYMT AFTWUTOOM UOIfT SinriMLT <"• rcf f l i m s n vxovaam vraunucnui oc> "a. E CARSON, Pres B. H. DENU. Sec. and MgT. i, , G. W. HARNWELL, Editor •u?* ' Telephone 923 ,>* Sintered at the postofftae at Bemidji. Minn, as second- olfss matter under Act of Congress of March 3, 18T9. 'r* " ' ' ' ^=i- »jKo attention paid to anonymous contributions. Writer's name must be known to the editor, but* not biecessarlly tor publication. Communications for the Weekly Pioneer must reach this office not later than Tuesday of each week to insure publication in the current issue. i SVBSCBOTXOV SATS* ay x»n One Tear 15.00 Six Months S-50 t\, By Ovnlw One Tear $«.00 fix Months x.OO Three Months 1.60 One Month 66. . *. One Week 15 Three Months 1.M THE WEAKLY PIONEER—Twelve pafces, -published every Thursday and sent postage paid to any address for. in advance, 92-00 omaxAX, comrrr AJTD pjipr vaoosaiuves FRANCE—THE PROPU€TIVE NATION. America, always ready to concede to herself the reputation of being the greatest nation on earth to do big things and get things done on a huge scale, in the midst of her attempt to get back to pre-war basis of production and values, may well turn her eyes to France and examine the record that war-bled and devastated country has made since the signing of the armistice., The end of the -Franco-Prussian war found France a defeated and devastated country, de- pressed over the loss of Alsace-Lorraine and con- fronted with an indemnity of a billion dollars to be paid to Germany. Instead ot crippling France as Had been thought, this indemnity to be paid qff only stimulated the^ natural ability -of the French people to produce-and save, 'with the result that in just twenty-six months the entire indemnity had been paid.' At the end of the world war France stood vic- torious, though badly wounded, joyfully welcom- ing the return of her lost provinces and looking forward to the receipt of a huge indemnity from Germany. A recovery from a four-year war must naturally take longer than from a conflict lasting less than a year, but France has attacked the problem with indomitable courage and is again calling upon the thrift and endurance of her people to restore the former wealth and industrial power of their country. The problem of rebuilding over half a million homes and thirty-eight hundred factories was the , first to confront the nation. By means of a loan from the French government 76 per cent of the thirty-eight hundred factories which had been de- stroyed were rebuilt and operating by June 1st, 1920. Houses capable of sheltering 870,000 have been built .since the armistice and 5,345 schools of the 6,445 destroyed have been rebuilt. Of the 265,000,Q00 cubic yards of trenches, 156,000,000 have been filled in and 200,000*000^ square yards of land cleared" of barbed wire. Thirteen thousand smiles of highways have been completely repaired. Of the railroad system, 1,810 miles of double track railroad had been destroyed. These have been en- tirely rebuilt together with 1,510 bridges, 12 tun-, nels and 5£6 railway stations. _, " During the period of time American railroads re-% quired to argue with the government for their release and the granting of loans to resuscitate them,French Vailroads got the money from-their government, rebuilt the roads, bridges, stations, etc., and got back close to normal. * This surely is a lesson to Americans and shows what can be ac- complished when a nation is really willing to work and cease playing politics. Developments of a similar nature have followed in all other lines of industry. The ^exports of France for the six months ended June, 1920, were more than six billion francs, in excess of the same period in 1919! and the imports about two billion francs more. < All this has been brought about by the willing- ness of the French people to work long and hard, and instead of* a i m i n g at reducing the working hours of the day "they have been aiming at making more of the products to live with. PRESS COMMENTS-THATS ALL (By BXOHAV0B BDXTOB) Governor for Hiram Cox dished Johnson in out a warm line of taffy California. He probably reasons that after that Hiram will deal more kindly with him and his advocacy of the Wilson treaty. Hiram is some clever politician himself, and when he dissects Cox's argument on this document, Cali- fornia is quite likely to show Maine what a real republican majority is —St Cloud Journal Press —o— November 2, next, will be the fiftieth birthday of Senator Warren G Harding, the day on which he will be elected president of the United States. It is also significant that his running mate, Governor Calvin Coolidge, was born on 7 July 4th, and it looks like the handwriting of fate. Harding was born on November 2, 1865, and Coolidge on July 4, 1872.—St. Cloud Journal Press. Harding says he would rather "break the heart of the world than to destroy the soul of America." If we must do one thing of the two, the next presi- dent is right. Article X of^the league covenant, unmodified, surely would wipe out America's in- dependence of the rest of the world.—Red Wing Republican. Doing fairlv well Out of eight men tried as being guilty of the hanging of the three negroes at Duluth by a mob, three have been found guilty and deserve a similar fate Four were acquitted and the jury disagreed on the other.—Stillwater Gazette r What has become of the old-fashioned man who stopped his newspaper and then j. aited to see the announcement that the publisher had failed.—St. Ofoud Daily Times. Pictures of both Harding and Cox displayed« in the same home window tell a story without* words of a family divided politically against itself. —Northern Light. —o— It has almost reached the point where a brick- layer or a plumber is about the only person who can afford the luxury of sandv/uhes.—St. Cloud Daily Times. Marrying for either love or money alone is some- what risky, but marrying-for love and money seems to have its advantages.—St Cloud Daily Times. —o— Well, if mother does not make any more misr takes in voting than father has been doing for some years, there is r<j neo'l to v.crry—Ex> I *- —o— ' t It is hoped the country will be given a little rest before somebody starts an agitation for the twen- tieth amendment.—Ex. ^ Corns on a girl's feet may keep her from church, but they never keep her from going to a jazz dance.—Ex. TWENTY YEARS AGO Last winter, A T Wheelock's employment agency fumisheu ovei 1 000 iiien to trie various lodging camps around Bcmdji, anJ there is, perhaps, no better authority on labor conditions than he He says there will be a demand for at least 5,000 men this winter in the camps within thirty-five miles of Bemidji At least five hundred men are needed at once in the building of roads and camps. Basing his estimate on lasfc winter's work and the present plans of the loggers, Mr. Wheelock makes the following estimate of the amount of work to be done around here this season' T. B Walker, 200,000,000 feet employing 2,000 men and operating thirty camps; Blakeley and Farley, 100,000,000 feet, 1,000 men, fifteen camps; Brain- erd Lumber company, 75,000,000 feet, 750 men, eight camps; Scanlon and Gipson, 40,000,000 feet, 300 men, number of camps undecided; Halvorson & Richards, 25,000,0TJ0 feet, 300 men, four camps; Clay & O'Mally, 20,000,000 feet, 200 men, two camps; James Dempsey, 15,000,000 feet, 150 men, two camps; S A Bagley; 20,000,000 feet, 300 men and foui camps; Carver Bros., 30,000,000 feet, 300 men, three camps Then there are a number of smaller contiactots \vho will log independently or fcr ethers Many of these firms will m whole or in part make Bemidji their headquarters this winter. Wages promise to be as high as last winter—common laborers, $25 to $30; teamsters, $30 to $40; load- ers, $40; blacksmiths and cooks, $40 to $60. Wages at present are $26 per month and board for com- mon labor and the demand exceeds the supply about five to one. ^ All of the lumbermen, from boss'to foremen, say the result of the election will largely determine the amount to be done this winter. And they are all praying for the re-election of Congressman Morris and a republican victory. The election of free traders like Truelsen would certainly have a demoralizing effect upon the lumbering interests of this section. REGISTRATION IS HEAVY AT FARGO "AG" SCHOOL Fargo, Sept 27—Registration 40- day indicated attendance records would be broken this year at the agri- cultural college Room shortage has been a problem Last year 300 short term students were turned away be- cause they could not find living ac- comodations . A wide variety of courses are of- fered In addition to college courses, which include complete courses in agricultuie se\eral courses in engi- neering, chemistry, science litera- ture, home economics, etc four vears of high school for students from towns where they have only one or two years high school facilities age given In addition there are five in- dividual industrial courses, drafts- man, and builders, farm husbandry, homemaking, power machinery and practical pharmacy These are short term courses from Oct 18 to March 20 tending the University College vaca- tion schools Men and women of every national- itv are attending London University or one of its affiliated colleges and tl P increase in students from abroad is considerable, especially from Nor- way, Sweden and Denmark There aie also a large number of students fiom Indian and China, the most pop- ular course with these students being economics and political science A great number of American chil- dien are to be found in English schools today It is a common thing for- American parents trayelling in Europe to leave their children for a j ear or eighteen months at English schools tyany applications from Spain, Italy, Hungary and the Brit- ish colonies are still outstanding. SUBSCRIBE FOR THE DAILY PIONEER WORLD'S STUDENTS GOING TO ENGLAND '-" % " (By United Press) * London (By Mail )—England is , rapidly becoming the educational * center of the world A statement "'to this effect made by H A L Fish- er, the Minister of Education ,is amp- ly supported by evidence The war- denj>f the Student Movement House in fqbgsell Stfuare told the United Press innt they <bad entertained as man^y* xis^ 200 -students in a day, the .majority being foreign students at- Farmers! ATTENTION! When you begin digging your potatoes I would like to have you communicate with me.. I will pay you highest market prices and 1 can arrange for you to load at your nearest railroad station. Be sure to see me before you sell. A. KRUEGER ' With the Potato Growers' Exchange Phone 807 - -* Clifford's Warehouse .O BEMIDJI 1 All Size, and Styl— Money-Back. Cartridges * U. S. Cartridges are sold with the broadest guar- antee ever made on ammunition. It is simply this: if you don't like them, get your money back. Every dealer who carries U. S. Cartridges is author- ised to refund, on demand,.the price of the whole box to anyone who doesn't like them, and returns the unused part of the box. IDGES For. all tcnafces of firearms There 11 no 22 Long Rifle cartridge as accurate at distances from 50 to 250 yards as U.S. 22 N. R. A. Long Rifle Lesmok Cartridges. This is 50 more yards of accuracy* than has hitherto been possible with 22 rim-fire ammunition. Solid bullet for target work. Hollow-point bullet for small game. Cost no more. UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY, New York, Manufacturer, 1 Crane in and got « oojpy ot 77io U. S. Goto* Law Bdak—FREE. We make exactly the same guarantee wjth They have reached such a nigh state of perfection — in water- proofing, in speed, in power, andinuniformity —that we can guaran- tee them without limit. You van get your pet load for every kind of shooting, in smokeless or black powders, in The Black Shells, and your money back if you want it. - . I - v* A. B. Palmer; Bemidji, Minn.- Charles E. Rattles, Bemidji, Minn. x r -z *.<ft»«|aifu'J^; !^ i^gaji^ ^^. IfrftS^f $EPTEMBE/U/MS* Eight days of opportunity for you to see and study the wonderful fuel-saving CaloriC Pipeless Furnace. —to learn how you can save % to X A your fuel. / «?*: h 11 ft Learn how you can have summer warmth (70° guaranteed) in your home in coldest weather—how you can banish the dirt and drudgery of old-style heat- ing methods. Beginning Saturday, September 11th, and continuing eight days, .we will hold special CaloriC "Prepare for Winter'* exhibits at our store. Everybody welcome! Come— we'll be looking for you. The ever-rising cost of fuel makes scientific CaloriC heating a modern necessity. Used in over 100,000 homes. The CaloriC guarantee— "Your satisfaction or money back." Given Hardware Co. Bemidji, Minn. II! u; i ^"'p^WA^^IPEtEis FURHACE TlgfagcAsWO PATEHr • tMQTka **.£.< =f

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1 I

W'A

\ i

V \ I

4 ' Xr

» f • ' f t ,

• I

'v yj»;/v~-^»i^^W»:f¥^;r4^Jf-^!'T?. 1HE BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER

MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1920

BEMIDJI DAILY PIONEER , v p a u n n s 3BYMT AFTWUTOOM UOIfT SinriMLT

<"• rcf f l i m s n vxovaam vraunucnui oc> "a. E CARSON, Pres B. H. DENU. Sec. and MgT. i, , G. W. HARNWELL, Editor

•u?* ' Telephone 923 ,>* Sintered at the postofftae at Bemidji. Minn, as second-olfss matter under Act of Congress of March 3, 18T9.

' r * • • " ' ' ' ^=i-

»jKo attention paid to anonymous contributions. Writer's name must be known to the editor, but* not biecessarlly tor publication. Communications for the Weekly Pioneer must reach this office not later than Tuesday of each week to insure publication in the current issue.

i SVBSCBOTXOV S A T S *

a y x » n One Tear 15.00 Six Months S-50

t\, By Ovnlw One Tear $«.00 f i x Months x.OO Three Months 1.60 One Month 66. . *. One Week 15 Three Months 1.M

THE WEAKLY PIONEER—Twelve pafces, -published every Thursday and sent postage paid to any address for. in advance, 92-00

omaxAX, comrrr AJTD pjipr vaoosaiuves

F R A N C E — T H E P R O P U € T I V E NATION. America, always ready to concede to herself the

reputation of being the greatest nation on earth to do big things and ge t things done on a huge scale, in the midst of her attempt to ge t back to pre-war basis of production and values, may well turn her eyes t o France and examine the record that war-bled and devastated country has made since the s igning of the armist ice . ,

The end of the -Franco-Prussian war found France a defeated and devastated country, de­pressed over the loss of Alsace-Lorraine and con­fronted with an indemnity of a billion dollars t o be paid to Germany. Instead ot crippling France a s Had been thought, this indemnity to be paid qff only stimulated the^ natural ability -of the French people t o produce-and save, 'with the result that in just twenty-six months the entire indemnity had been paid.'

A t the end of the world war France stood vic­torious, though badly wounded, joyful ly welcom­

ing the return of her lost provinces and looking forward to the receipt of a huge indemnity from Germany. A recovery from a four-year war must naturally take longer than from a conflict last ing less than a year, but France has attacked the problem with indomitable courage and is again calling upon the thrift and endurance of her people to restore the former wealth and industrial power of their country.

The problem of rebuilding over half a million homes and thirty-eight hundred factories w a s the

, first to confront the nation. B y means of a loan from the French government 7 6 per cent of the thirty-eight hundred factories which had been de­stroyed were rebuilt and operating by June 1st , 1920. Houses capable of sheltering 870,000 have been built .since the armistice and 5,345 schools of the 6,445 destroyed have been rebuilt. Of the 265,000,Q00 cubic yards of trenches, 156 ,000,000 have been filled in and 200,000*000^ square yards of land cleared" of barbed wire. Thirteen thousand

smiles of highways have been completely repaired. Of the railroad system, 1,810 miles of double track railroad had been destroyed. These have been en­tirely rebuilt together with 1,510 bridges, 12 t u n - , nels and 5£6 railway stations. _, "

During the period of time American railroads re-% quired to argue with the government for their release and the grant ing of loans to resuscitate them,French Vailroads got the money f rom-the ir government, rebuilt the roads, bridges, stations, etc. , and g o t back close to normal. * This surely is a lesson to Americans and shows what can be ac­complished when a nation is really wil l ing to work and cease playing politics.

Deve lopments of a similar nature have fol lowed „ in all other lines of industry. The ^exports of France for the s ix months ended June , 1920, were more than s ix billion francs, in excess of the same period in 1919! and the imports about two billion francs more. <

All this has been brought about by the wil l ing­ness of the French people to work long and hard, and instead of* aiming at reducing the working hours of the day "they have been aiming at making more of the products to live with.

PRESS COMMENTS-THATS ALL (By BXOHAV0B BDXTOB)

Governor for Hiram

Cox dished Johnson in

out a warm line of taffy California. He probably

reasons that after that Hiram will deal more kindly with him and his advocacy of the Wilson treaty. Hiram is some clever politician himself, and when he dissects Cox's argument on this document, Cali­fornia is quite likely to show Maine what a real republican majority is — S t Cloud Journal Press

— o —

November 2, next, will be the fiftieth birthday of Senator Warren G Harding, the day on which he will be elected president of the United States. It is also significant that his running mate, Governor Calvin Coolidge, was born on7July 4th, and it looks like the handwriting of fate. Harding was born on November 2, 1865, and Coolidge on July 4 , 1872 .—St . Cloud Journal Press.

Harding says he would rather "break the heart of the world than to destroy the soul of America." If we must do one thing of the two, the next presi­dent is right. Article X of^the league covenant, unmodified, surely would wipe out America's in­dependence of the rest of the world.—Red Wing Republican.

Doing fairlv well Out of eight men tried as being gui l ty of the hanging of the three negroes

at Duluth by a mob, three have been found gu i l ty and deserve a similar fa te Four were acquitted and the jury disagreed on the other.—Stil lwater Gazette

r

What has become of the old-fashioned man who stopped his newspaper and then j . aited to see the announcement that the publisher had fai led.—St. Ofoud Daily Times.

Pictures of both Harding and Cox displayed« in the same home window tell a story without* words of a family divided politically against itself. —Northern Light.

— o — It has almost reached the point where a brick­

layer or a plumber is about the only person who can afford the luxury of sandv/uhes.—St. Cloud Daily Times.

Marrying for either love or money alone is some­what risky, but marrying-for love and money seems to have its advantages .—St Cloud Daily Times.

— o — Well, if mother does not make any more misr

takes in voting than father has been doing for some years, there is r<j neo'l to v .crry—Ex>

I *- — o — ' t It is hoped the country will be given a little rest

before somebody starts an agitation for the twen­tieth amendment .—Ex. ^

Corns on a girl's f ee t may keep her f r o m church, but they never keep her from going to a jazz dance .—Ex.

TWENTY YEARS AGO

Last winter, A T Wheelock's employment agency fumisheu ovei 1 000 iiien to trie various lodging camps around Bcmdj i , anJ there is, perhaps, no better authority on labor conditions than he He says there will be a demand for at least 5,000 men this winter in the camps within thirty-five miles of Bemidji At least five hundred men are needed at once in the building of roads and camps.

Basing his estimate on lasfc winter's work and the present plans of the loggers, Mr. Wheelock makes the following estimate of the amount of work to be done around here this season' T. B Walker, 200,000,000 feet employing 2,000 men and operating thirty camps; Blakeley and Farley, 100,000,000 feet, 1,000 men, fifteen camps; Brain-erd Lumber company, 75,000,000 feet , 750 men, eight camps; Scanlon and Gipson, 40 ,000,000 feet , 300 men , number of camps undecided; Halvorson

& Richards, 25,000,0TJ0 feet , 300 men, four camps; Clay & O'Mally, 20 ,000 ,000 feet , 200 men, two camps; James Dempsey, 15,000,000 feet , 150 men, two camps; S A Bagley; 20 ,000,000 feet , 300 men and foui camps; Carver Bros., 30 ,000,000 feet , 300 men, three camps Then there are a number of smaller cont iactots \vho will log independently or fcr ethers

Many of these firms will m whole or in part make Bemidji their headquarters this winter. Wages promise to be as high as last winter—common laborers, $25 to $ 3 0 ; teamsters, $30 to $40; load­ers, $40 ; blacksmiths and cooks, $40 to $60. Wages at present are $26 per month and board for com­mon labor and the demand exceeds the supply about five to one. ^

All of the lumbermen, from b o s s ' t o foremen, say the result of the election will largely determine the amount to be done this winter. And they are all praying for the re-election of Congressman Morris and a republican victory. The election of free traders like Truelsen would certainly have a demoralizing effect upon the lumbering interests of this section.

REGISTRATION IS HEAVY AT FARGO "AG" SCHOOL

Fargo, Sept 27—Regis tra t ion 4 0 -day indicated attendance records would be broken this year at the agri­cultural college Room shortage has been a problem Last year 300 short term students were turned away be­cause they could not find l iving ac­comodations .

A wide variety of courses are of­fered In addition to college courses, which include complete courses in agr icul tu ie se \eral courses in engi­neering, chemistry, science litera­ture, home economics, etc four vears of high school for students from towns where they have only one or t w o years high school facilities age given In addition there are five in­dividual industrial courses, drafts­man, and builders, farm husbandry, homemaking, power machinery and practical pharmacy These are short term courses from Oct 18 to March 20

tending the University College vaca­tion schools

Men and women of every national-itv are attending London University or one of its affiliated colleges and tl P increase in students from abroad is considerable, especially from Nor­way, Sweden and Denmark There a i e also a large number of students f iom Indian and China, the most pop­ular course with these students being economics and political science

A great number of American chil-

d ien are to be found in Engl i sh schools today It is a common th ing for- American parents trayel l ing in Europe to leave their children for a j ear or eighteen months at Eng l i sh schools tyany applications from Spain, Italy, Hungary and the Brit­ish colonies are st i l l outstanding.

SUBSCRIBE FOR THE DAILY PIONEER

WORLD'S STUDENTS GOING TO ENGLAND

'-"% " ( B y United Press) * London (By Mail )—England is

, rapidly becoming the educational * center of the world A statement "'to this effect made by H A L Fish­

er, the Minister of Education ,is amp­ly supported by evidence The war-denj>f t h e Student Movement House in fqbgsell Stfuare told the United Press i n n t they <bad entertained as man y* xis^ 200 -students in a day, the

.majority being foreign students at-

Farmers! ATTENTION! When you begin digging your potatoes I would like to have

you communicate with m e . . I will pay you highest market prices

and 1 can arrange for you to load at your nearest railroad station.

Be sure to see me before you sell .

A. KRUEGER ' With the Potato Growers' Exchange

Phone 807 - -* Clifford's Warehouse . O BEMIDJI

1

All Size, and Styl—

Money-Back. Cartridges * U. S. Cartridges are sold with the broadest guar­

antee ever made on ammunition. It is simply this: if you don't like them, get your money back.

Every dealer who carries U. S. Cartridges is author­ised to refund, on demand,.the price of the whole box to anyone who doesn't like them, and returns the unused part of the box.

IDGES For. al l tcnafces of f i rearms

There 11 no 22 Long Rifle cartridge as accurate at distances from 50 to 250 yards as U.S. 22 N. R. A. Long Rifle Lesmok Cartridges. This is 50 more yards of accuracy* than has hitherto been possible with 22 rim-fire ammunition.

Solid bullet for target work. Hollow-point bullet for small game. Cost no more. UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY, New York, Manufacturer,

1 Crane in and got « oojpy ot 77io U. S. Goto* Law Bdak—FREE.

W e m a k e e x a c t l y

t h e s a m e guarantee

wjth

T h e y have reached such a nigh state of perfection — in water-proofing, in speed, in power, andinuniformity —that we can guaran­tee them without limit. You van get your pet load for every kind of shooting, in smokeless or black powders, in The Black Shells, and your money back if you want it. —

- . I

-

v *

A. B. Palmer; Bemidji, Minn.-Charles E. Rattles, Bemidji, Minn.

x r - z *.<ft»«|aifu'J^; !^ i^gaji^ —

^ ^ .

IfrftS^f

$EPTEMBE/U/MS* Eight days of opportunity for you to see and study

the wonderful fuel-saving CaloriC Pipeless Furnace.

—to learn how you can save % to XA your fuel.

/

«?*:

h 11 ft

Learn how you can have summer warmth (70° guaranteed) in your home in coldest weather—how you can banish the dirt and drudgery of old-style heat­ing methods.

Beginning Saturday, September 11th, and continuing eight days, .we will hold special CaloriC "Prepare for Winter'* exhibits at our store. Everybody welcome! Come— we'll be looking for you.

The ever-rising cost of fuel makes scientific CaloriC heating a modern necessity. Used in over 100,000 homes. The CaloriC guarantee— "Your satisfaction or money back." —

Given Hardware Co. Bemidji, Minn.

II! u;

i ^"'p^WA^^IPEtEis FURHACE TlgfagcAsWO PATEHr

• tMQTka **.£.<

=f