the british museum treasure annual report 2005/6

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"This is the eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the operation of the Treasure Act 1996. Like its predecessors, it lists all the finds that were reported as potential Treasure to the British Museum, the NationalMuseums & Galleries of Wales, and the Environment and Heritage Service, Northern Ireland. This Report contains details of 592 and 665 new cases reported during two years: 2005 and 2006. Of these cases, 282new Treasure finds have been, or are being, acquired by museums across the country, while 557 have been disclaimed, 206 were deemed not to be Treasure and 212 cases are still to be determined."

TRANSCRIPT

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  • 2 3

    Foreword 4

    Introduction 6

    Tables 7

    List of contributors 10

    Distribution maps of Treasure cases 14

    Catalogue

    England

    1. Artefacts

    A. Bronze Age 16

    B. Iron Age 54

    C. Roman 58

    D. Early Medieval 72

    E. Medieval 104

    F. Post-Medieval 134

    G. 18th20th centuries and Undiagnostic 170

    2. Coins

    A. Iron Age 184

    B. Roman 188

    C. Early Medieval 207

    D. Medieval 209

    E. Post-Medieval 215

    Wales 220

    Northern Ireland 231

    References 232

    Valuations 238

    Index 243

    Illustrations 269

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    Cover: Iron Age electrum torc (no. 82), c. 20050 BC. Found in Newark, Nottinghamshire, by Mr M Richardson while metal-detecting in February 2005.

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    I would also like to praise the contribution made by the staff of the British Museum and the staff of the National Museum Wales. The Treasure process requires input from their curators, conservators, scientists and a central treasure registry, all of whom continue to achieve high standards of service despite an increased workload.

    I am most grateful to the Treasure Valuation Committee for its provision of independent advice on the valuation of Treasure finds. I commend particularly the Chairman, Professor Norman Palmer CBE, for continuing to guide the work of the Committee with such an expert hand. In addition, Dr Jack Ogden, Mr Trevor Austin and Ms May Sinclair have continued to give freely and generously of their time and expertise. Mr Thomas Curtis and Dr Arthur MacGregor retired from the Committee during this period, after having given valuable service, and we now welcome the following new members to the Committee which has expanded from six to eight members: Messrs Peter Clayton and John Cherry, Professor Ian Carradice and Dr Tim Pestell.

    The work of the Committee receives vital support from the panel of expert advisers from whom the Committee commissions provisional valuations: Mr Michael Sharp of Dix Noonan Webb, Mr James Ede of Charles Ede Ltd, Mr Tom Eden of Morton and Eden, Mr James Morton of Morton and Eden, Ms Emily Barber of Bonhams, Ms Chantelle Waddingham of Bonhams, Mr Mark Bowis of Christies, Ms Judith Nugee of Christies, Mr Peter Clayton of Seabys, Ms Joanna van der Lande, Mr Richard Falkiner and Mr Peter Spencer. I would like to express my appreciation of their knowledge and advice.

    Funding bodies play an essential role in supporting the acquisition of Treasure finds by museums, particularly the Art Fund, the V&A/MLA Purchase Grant Fund, and the Headley Museums Treasure Acquisition Scheme (www.headleytreasures.org.uk), which operates in conjunction with the Purchase Grant Fund.

    In January 2006, my Department launched a new initiative to encourage finders and landowners to consider donating finds to museums, by giving certificates to all those who have waived their rights to a reward. It is very encouraging that in this Report interested parties have waived their rights to a reward in 25 cases in 2005 and a further 44 in 2006.

    Following a consultation by my Department we transferred the administrative responsibilities for Treasure to the British Museum in March 2007. The British Museum has recruited two full-time and one part-time post in order to deal with these additional responsibilities and both organisations believe that the delivery and efficiency of the process has improved as a result.

    Margaret HodgeMinister for Culture, Creative Industries and Tourism 2008

    This is the eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the operation of the Treasure Act 1996. Like its predecessors, it lists all the finds that were reported as potential Treasure to the British Museum, the National Museums & Galleries of Wales, and the Environment and Heritage Service, Northern Ireland. This Report contains details of 592 and 665 new cases reported during two years: 2005 and 2006. Of these cases, 282 new Treasure finds have been, or are being, acquired by museums across the country, while 557 have been disclaimed, 206 were deemed not to be Treasure and 212 cases are still to be determined.

    From 2007 there will be a single annual report on Treasure and Portable Antiquities. We feel that it makes sense to bring these two reports together and the combined report will provide a single complete reference for all the most important finds reported in 2007, whether they qualify as Treasure or not. Because the final disposition of some Treasure cases may not be known for a year, next years report will contain detailed summaries of the more important cases from 2007 together with a table listing all the Treasure cases from 2006 with a note of their disposition and valuation.

    The number of finds being reported as Treasure continues to increase rapidly: in 1998, the first full year of the Treasure Act, there were 201 cases and by 2002 that number stood at 240 cases, while in 2007 the total stood at 749. This is largely due to the expansion of the Portable Antiquities Scheme in 2003, when 21 new Finds Liaison Officers were appointed across the country. Finds Liaison Officers play a crucial role in the effective operation of the Treasure Act, encouraging finders to report their finds and guiding them through the Treasure process: 97 per cent of finds of Treasure are reported to the Finds Liaison Officer in the first instance.

    I would like to congratulate those finders who promptly report their finds in accordance with the Code of Practice on Responsible Metal Detecting. I am glad to record the results of their actions in this Report and to praise them for their enthusiasm for and commitment to the responsible practice of their hobby. 94 per cent of the finds in this Report were found by metal-detector users and I would like to acknowledge the role that the National Council for Metal Detecting has played, not only in disseminating advice and information to its members, but also in communicating the views and experiences of those members back to my Department.

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    TAbLE 1. ANALysIs oF 2005 FINDs by pERIoD AND TypE oF objECT

    objECTs ACquIRED DoNATED DIsCLAImEDNoT

    TREAsuRETo bE

    DETERmINEDToTAL

    Bronze Age 25 6 7 - 4 42

    Iron Age 5 2 1 - 8

    Roman 6 3 27 5 4 45

    Early Medieval 36 3 22 1 7 69

    Medieval 25 2 79 3 11 120

    Post-Medieval 34 4 94 2 4 138

    18th20th centuries

    - - - 53 - 53

    Undiagnostic - - 8 14 - 22

    Total 131 18 239 79 30 497

    Coins

    Iron Age 7 - 2 1 1 11

    Roman 13 4 23 5 7 52

    Early Medieval 3 - - - 1 4

    Medieval 6 2 6 - 3 17

    Post-Medieval 0 1 6 1 3 11

    Total 29 7 37 7 15 95

    Grand Total 160 25 276 86 45 592

    TAbLE 2. ANALysIs oF 2006 FINDs by pERIoD AND TypE oF objECT

    objECTs ACquIRED DoNATED DIsCLAImEDNoT

    TREAsuRETo bE

    DETERmINEDToTAL

    Bronze Age 0 6 8 2 17 33

    Iron Age 2 - - 2 1 5

    Roman 5 6 32 8 10 61

    Early Medieval 8 3 10 5 29 55

    Medieval 14 13 79 2 44 152

    Post-Medieval 11 7 107 3 37 165

    18th20th centuries

    - - - 61 - 61

    Undiagnostic - 1 6 28 - 35

    Total 40 36 242 111 138 567

    Coins

    Iron Age 2 - 7 1 4 14

    Roman 7 8 20 3 14 52

    Early Medieval 1 - - - 2 3

    Medieval 2 - 6 4 7 19

    Post-Medieval 1 - 5 1 2 9

    Undiagnostic - - 1 - - 1

    Total 13 8 39 9 29 98

    Grand Total 53 44 281 120 167 665

    uNREpoRTED FINDs oF poTENTIAL TREAsuRESince October 2006 MLA and the BM has had an agreement with eBay to monitor the site for unreported Treasure. During the first year 183 cases were questioned and the number of potential Treasure on eBay finds has declined markedly over the course of the year. One member of staff has become a Special Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police Services Art & Antiques Unit.

    It was also noted in the previous Treasure Annual Report that English Heritage, in partnership with

    other national heritage agencies and museums in the United Kingdom and the Crown Dependencies, had commissioned Oxford Archaeology to carry out a survey of illegal metal detecting. The data-gathering phase of this project is now complete and a report will be published later in 2008.

    Roger Bland, OBEHead of the Department of Portable Antiquities and Treasure, British Museum

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    CoRoNERs bILLIn the Treasure Annual Report 2004 it was noted that the Government had published a draft Coroners and Death Certification Bill which would include a number of amendments to the Treasure Act, including, most significantly, a single coroner who would deal with all cases of Treasure from England & Wales. The Government has now included this Bill in its Draft Legislative Programme 2008/09, published in May 2008.

    INCREAsE IN TREAsuRE CAsEsThis years Annual Report, which includes details of 592 cases from 2005 and 665 from 2006, compared with 506 in the 2004 Report and 427 in the 2003 Report, reflects the continuing increase in Treasure cases which is the consequence of the expansion of the Portable Antiquities Scheme in 2003.

    ACquIsITIoN oF TREAsuRE by musEums282 new Treasure finds have been, or are being, acquired by museums, while 557 have been disclaimed, 206 were deemed not to be Treasure and 212 cases are still to be determined. Index B lists those museums that have acquired finds.

    Over the past four years museums have acquired more cases of Treasure as the overall numbers of finds r