united states constitution

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The United States Constitution Framing Our Nation Events Leading into Creating a New Government The Articles of Confederation 1777 Shays Rebellion 1786 The Ordinance of 1785 The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 The Constitutional Convention 1787 The Virginia and New Jersey Plans 1787 The Great Compromise 1787 Three-fifths Compromise 1787 Flaws of the Articles of Confederation (State 9 Flaws) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Shay’s Rebellion After the American Revolution the U.S. was in debt Congress printed paper money backed by European loans Inflation shot up Army officers were furious that they were not paid In Massachusetts Continental Army Officers were not given the right to vote Farms were seized to pay off the debt Daniel Shay’s Rebellion ___________________________ a former Continental Army officer gathered 700 men and marched into ___________________ to protest these developments A small skirmish took place and most of Shay’s men ran. Many of the men were later arrested, tried and hung ____________ died of poverty in 1788 The men achieved there goal in Mass.: (State 3 things achieved) 1. 2. 3. The Ordinance of 1785 What did it do and how?:

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Page 1: United States Constitution

The United States Constitution Framing Our Nation

Events Leading into Creating a New Government •The Articles of Confederation 1777 •Shays Rebellion 1786 •The Ordinance of 1785 •The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 •The Constitutional Convention 1787 •The Virginia and New Jersey Plans 1787 •The Great Compromise 1787 •Three-fifths Compromise 1787 Flaws of the Articles of Confederation (State 9 Flaws) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Shay’s Rebellion •After the American Revolution the U.S. was in debt •Congress printed paper money backed by European loans

•Inflation shot up •Army officers were furious that they were not paid •In Massachusetts Continental Army Officers were not given the right to vote •Farms were seized to pay off the debt

Daniel Shay’s Rebellion •___________________________ a former Continental Army officer gathered 700 men and marched into ___________________ to protest these developments •A small skirmish took place and most of Shay’s men ran. •Many of the men were later arrested, tried and hung •____________ died of poverty in 1788 The men achieved there goal in Mass.: (State 3 things achieved)

1. 2. 3. The Ordinance of 1785 •What did it do and how?:

Page 2: United States Constitution

The Northwest Ordinance of 1787

What did it do and How?: The Constitutional Convention •Took place in __________________ from May to September _____________ •__________ delegates attended from every state but ___________________ and they were never there all at the same time. •It was also too hot that summer and there were many flies and terrible smells that made many of the delegates ill. The Virginia Plan •Writer: ___________________ •Describe: The New Jersey Plan •Writer: _______________________ •Describe: The Great Compromise •What did it do:

•A ___________________________ legislature would be created. •The House would represent the ideas of the ___________________ plan •The Senate would represent the ideas of the ___________ ________plan The Three-Fifth Compromise •Being that the House would be based on population, how would they count the numerous slaves in the __________________________ •A compromise was reached which stated that all slaves would be counted, but then the total would be divided by ________________ and that number would be used to determine representation in the House •Father of the Constitution •_______________________ is known as the Father of the Constitution for several reasons: State 3 reasons

Page 3: United States Constitution

The United States Constitution •Although the constitution was finished on _____________________ it was not ratified until _________________________ •______________ states were needed for ratification. The 9th state was __________________ •The only state that waited till 1790 to ratify was ___________________________. The Legislative Branch (State two houses) 1. _________________ 2. _________________ The Legislative Branch •The Constitution grants Congress "all ___________________ powers" in the national government. •Article_____, Section ________, of the Constitution lists a wide range of congressional powers, including: (state 7) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. The Legislative Branch •Congress has authority to investigate and oversee the _________________ branch and its agencies(state 2)

• •Congress also holds hearings on matters of general public concern •Congressional powers also include ability to ________________ an official and ____________ the Constitution. The House of Representatives (State 4 requirements)

1. 2. 3. 4. •There are a total of _____________ members in the House of Representatives. •Each member represents an area of a state, known as a _________________________. •The number of representatives is based on the number of districts in a state •Each state is guaranteed __________________ seat. •Every _____________ years, the U.S. __________________ Bureau counts the population of the states to determine what number of districts should be in each state. •The House has special jobs that only it can perform. It can:

Page 4: United States Constitution

The Senate •Senators are elected for ______________-year terms (State 3 requirements) 1. 2. 3. •There are a total of ___________ members in the Senate. •The Constitution states that the __________________ has formal control over the Senate –He is referred to as the __________________ of the Senate. •The Senate has special jobs that only it can perform. It can: (State 3) 1. 2. 3 The Executive Branch •When the delegates to the Constitutional Convention created the executive branch of government, they gave the president a limited term of office to lead the government. •The delegates feared too much power in the hands of one person •With a system of ____________________________ included in the Constitution, they allowed for a single president to manage the executive branch •The ________________ is the head of the Executive Branch The Executive Branch (Define)

•President: •Vice President: •Departments: •Executive Agencies: •Independent Agencies:

•The powers of the President of the United States are set forth in ____________ of the Constitution. •Some of these powers the President can exercise in his own right, without formal legislative approval. •Others require the consent of the Senate or Congress as a whole.

The President •The President and Vice-President, are the only officials elected by the __________________. •Requirements (State 3) 1. 2. 3. •Before 1951, the President could __________________________________.

•After two terms as President, __________________________ chose not to run again. •All other Presidents followed his example until ______________________successfully ran for office four times. •He, however, did not complete his fourth term of office because he died in __________. •Six years later, Congress passed the _____________ Amendment, which limits Presidents to two terms.

Page 5: United States Constitution

Duties of the President of the United States: National Security Powers: (describe) Legislative Powers: (describe) Administrative Powers: (describe) Judicial Powers: (describe) The Judicial Branch •The judicial branch of government is established in Article _________ of the Constitution with the creation of the ______________________. •The ______________________ is the highest court in the country and is empowered with the judicial powers of the government. –There are lower Federal courts but they were not created by the Constitution. –Congress saw them as necessary and established under the elastic clause The Supreme Court •The Supreme Court’s responsibility is: ________________________________________. •The Court decides if a law or government action violates the ______________________.

Page 6: United States Constitution

–This is known as judicial review. (Describe Judicial Review) •Since the Supreme Court stands as the ultimate authority in constitutional interpretation, its decisions can be changed only by a ___________________________. The Supreme Court •The Supreme Court is made up of ______________ Justices. –One of these is the Chief Justice (Who is the current Chief Justice) _______________________ •They are appointed by the ___________________ and must be approved by the ______________. • Justices have their jobs for life, unless: 1. 2. 3. •There are no official qualifications for Justices, but all have been trained in the law. •Many Justices served as members of Congress, governors, or members of the President's Cabinet.

The Many Hats of the President

Read each scenario and determine which hat the President wore when he executed his power.

1. President Clinton oversaw the signing of a new accord in September, 1993 between Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. Clinton and his administration hosted this historic compromise at the White House. Which hat did Clinton wear while hosting?

2. President Grover Cleveland in his first term (1885-1889) received a controversial bill approved by the House of Representatives and the Senate, he chose to "reject" the bill. IN fact, Cleveland "rejected" more bills in this first term than all preceding presidents combined. Which hat was Cleveland sporting?

3. Once in office, Clinton quickly set about starting the reforms he had promised during his campaign. To achieve his vision of change, Clinton put together the most racially diverse and gender-balanced cabinet in U.S. history. Those hand picked by Clinton were Henry Cisneros as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Ron Brown Secretary of Commerce, Jocelyn Elders as Surgeon General, and Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers. Which hat was Clinton wearing while making these official changes?

4. North Korean people are starving. They are in desperate need of food and other supplies. They have asked the United States for help. They also have several weapons that could be used against us if they fell into the wrong hands. If Clinton decides to send food and aid in the interest of keeping North Korea on our side, which hat would he be wearing?

5. Richard Nixon was part of the Watergate Affair which involved such criminal acts as burglary, illegal wiretapping, perjury, conspiracy to obstruct justice, and misuse of campaign funds. Gerald Ford, Nixon's successor, "excused" him which allowed him to be immune from prosecution. Which hat did Ford have on?

6. George Bush's experiences during WWII contributed to his strong interest in foreign affairs. During his presidency, terrible memories about WWII resurfaced when he felt it necessary to send troops to Kuwait during Operation Desert Storm. When he executed this plan to aid Kuwait and bombard Saddam Hussein, which hat was he wearing?

Page 7: United States Constitution

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Page 10: United States Constitution

“The Almost Painless Guide to the U.S. Constitution” © 1999 Northwest TeleproductionsDistributed by AGC/United LearningAll rights to print materials cleared for classroom duplication and distribution.

Name_____________________________________

THE FEDERALISTS AND ANTI-FEDERALISTS

Directions: After reading the following passages, determine whether the speaker was a Federalistor an Anti-Federalist. Underline the statement or statements which led you to draw that conclusion.

Anti-Federalists - Persons who opposed the adoption of the Constitution between 1787 - 1788; they were infavor of adopting the Bill of Rights as well as strong state governments.

Federalists - Persons who supported the adoption of the Constitution in 1787 - 1788; most of them becamemembers of the Federalist Party after the Constitution became adopted. They believed in a strong federal

government.

James Wilson: _________________________The gentlemen tell you that they expect the States will not possess any power. But, I think there I reasonto draw a different conclusion. Under this system, their respectability and power will increase with thatof the general government. I believe their happiness and security will increase in still greater proportion.

In order to keep republics together, they must have a strong binding force, which must be either externalor internal. The situation of this country shows, that no foreign force can press us together; the bonds ofour union ought therefore to be indissolubly strong.

If it is meant that the general government will destroy the government of the States, I will admit thatsuch a government would not suit the people... But that description does not apply to the system beforeyou. This, instead of placing the state governments in jeopardy, is founded on their existence. On thisprinciple, its organization depends; it must stand or fall, as the State governments are secured or ruined....

What is the interest of the whole, must, on the great scale, be the interest of every part. It will be the dutyof the State, as of an individual, to sacrifice her own convenience to the general good.

Patrick Henry: ___________________________Here I would make this inquiry of those worthy characters that composed a part of the late federalConvention... I have the highest regard for those gentlemen; but sir allow me to demand - What righthad they to say, “We the people”? ... Who authorized them to speak the language of “We, the people”Instead of “We, the states”? States are the characteristics and the soul of the confederation. If the statesare not the agents of this agreement, it must be one great consolidated national government of thepeople of all the states.

It was expressly declared in our Confederation that every right was retained by the states, respectively,which was not given up to the government of the United States. But there is not such thing here. You,therefore, by a natural and unavoidable implication, give up your rights to the general government.

If you give up these powers, without a Bill of Rights, you will exhibit the most absurd thing to mankindthat ever the world saw - government that abandoned its powers of direct taxation, the sword, and thepurse. You have disposed of the to Congress, without a Bill of Rights - without check, limitation, orcontrol.

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Article No. Section No. Clause No. Amendment No. 1.

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Page 13: United States Constitution

CONSTITUTION SCAVENGER HUNT Directions: Locate the phrase in the constitution and indicate what article and section it came from and it there is a clause number as well. If it is an amendment simply put in the amendment number. Have fun and good luck ☺ Remember you can work in pairs!

1. The President may pardon people of offenses committed against the United States.

2. The presiding officer of the House is the Speaker of the House.

3. The right to vote cannot be denied because of sex.

4. All state and federal officials are under oath to support the Constitution.

5. The President is limited to two terms in office.

6. Treason is levying war against the United States, adhering to our enemies, or giving them aid and comfort.

7. The practice of slavery can never be legal in the United States.

8. Congress has the power to borrow money on the credit of the United States.

9. Amendments may be ratified by three-fourths of the legislatures of the states.

10. A person cannot be tried twice for the same crime.

11. The Constitution was ratified by conventions in nine states.

12. Unreasonable search and seizures are forbidden.

13. Judicial proceedings in each state are given full faith and credit in every other state.

14. The President has the power to appoint members of the Supreme Court with Senate

approval.

15. The Vice President is the presiding officer of the Senate.

16. A representative must be a citizen for seven years, tweny-five years old.

17. A person has a right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the state.

18. Congress has the power to establish a uniform rule of naturalization.

19. The Constitution is the highest or supreme law in the United States.

20. The President and Vice-President are elected for a four-year term.