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UPW URBAN PRO WEEKLY MARCH 10 - 16, 2016 VOL. 5 NO. 24 Hamburg “riot” was really military-style terror attack & T ruthe Institute Credit/Financial Counseling Accurate Credit History May Not Be Erased 706-664-7093 Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800 SPRING IS IN THE AIR AND WARM-WEATHER SPORTS TAKE CENTER STAGE: AR Johnson’s Cleopatra Elam (L) moves the ball down the field as Hephzibah’s Takenya Harris defends (R) during a soccer match held at Laney stadium. (March 8, 2016) Photo by Vincent Hobbs

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The CSRA 's free weekly - featuring entertainment, arts, news, sports, and political commentary.

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Page 1: UPW  Urban Pro Weekly

UPWURBAN PRO WEEKLY MARCH 10 - 16, 2016 VOL. 5 NO. 24

Hamburg “riot” was really military-style terror attack

&Truthe Institute

Credit/Financial Counseling

&Truthe InstituteTruthe InstituteTAccurate Credit History May Not Be Erased706-664-7093Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800Eddie Bussey 706-772-9800

SPRING IS IN THE AIR AND WARM-WEATHER SPORTS TAKE CENTER STAGE: AR Johnson’s Cleopatra Elam (L) moves the ball down the field as Hephzibah’s Takenya Harris defends (R) during a soccer match held at Laney stadium. (March 8, 2016) Photo by Vincent Hobbs

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COMMENTARYHISTORICAL

Continued on page 5

By Frederick Benjamin Sr.Urban Pro Weekly Staff Writer

AUGUSTAOn Sunday, March 6, some folks

from the North Augusta Heritage Council dedicated a monument to those citizens, black and white who died in connection with a very histori-cally significant event which happened on July 8, 1876 known as the Hamburg Riot.

To be sure the incident was not a riot. The violent shootout, and subse-quent execution of black militia men by white supremacist militants was a well coordinated military-style assault on blacks whose only crime was that they defended themselves with guns.

At the end of the carnage, seven blacks and one white lay dead.

To the white citizens, the dead man, McKie Meriwether, was a hero who perished during the “riot” in defense of white civilization. In 1916, a monument was erected in John C. Calhoun Square in North Augusta. None of the names of the seven blacks, — Allen Attaway, Jim Cook, Albert Nyniart, Nelder Parker, Moses Parks, David Phillips or Hampton Stephens appeared on the monument.

The new tributes, an historical mark-er and a memorial stone (See sidebar - this page and on page 5) includes the seven blacks as well as Mr. Meriwether.

The significant fact about the inci-dent was that the assault, the violent militaristic posture, was part of a cal-culated political strategy to enforce a new era of white supremacy. In order for it to be successful it had to be nec-essarily ruthless and violent. The aim was to keep white Republicans from seeking office and to keep blacks from going to the polls in support of them.

Hamburg was a small mostly black town across the Savannah River from Augusta. Traders or travelers coming

2016

1916

The first monument to McKie Meriwether. Just one name appears on this monument of the “Hamburg Riot.”

The new monument names all of those killed and refers to the incident as the “Hamburg Massacre.”

The Hamburg MassacreMore than just an isolated violent clash between the races, the 1876 incident forever destroyed the political cohesion in the black town and signaled the beginning of the end of black self determi-nation in South Carolina and across the South. The incident was a systematic, cold-blooded, preemptive strike for white power.

“Nothing but bloodshed and a good deal of it could answer the

purpose of redeeming the state.” The idea was to set about “terrorizing the negroes at the first

opportunity,” and “having the whites demonstrate

their superiority by killing as many of them as was

justifiable.” — Ben Tillman, Edgefield

County Planter and participant in the murders at Hamburg. Tillman was never punished for his crime, but rather ascended to become Governor of South Carolina

and a U.S. Senator

from Augusta had to pass through the town.

To really understand what happened and why, it is important to understand the historical context of the period.

In 1876 less that 10 years after the formal cessation of hostilities between the armies of the United States and the Confederate States of America, formerly enslaved African Americans were freed and under the watchful protection of federal troops, they set about trying to survive and thrive.

The Republican Party (the party of Lincoln) and its federal and state agen-cies and officers were despised by the white southerners because they supported complete civil rights for the freedmen.

The Republicans protected the newly freed blacks and gave them the right to vote. This political Reconstruction gave blacks political power for the first time.

Whites had to suffer the indignity of yielding to black politicians who were making laws, black law enforcement officers who were in the position to fine, tax and jail white offenders.

Black officials in Hamburg even had the nerve to tax whites who either dis-turbed the peace or committed crimes there.

This was too much for avowed white racists like Ben Tillman, an Edgefield County land owner, who later became governor of the state and a U.S. sena-tor, who vowed not to sit idly by while blacks exercised political control over whites.

Tillman and like-minded whites had watched carefully what was transpir-ing in Mississippi at the time. There, whites had successfully embarked on a campaign of terror and intimidation to keep blacks from exercising their right to vote.

On July 8, 1876, the white citizens armed themselves. The shock troops among the whites were led by mem-bers of the so-called Sweetwater Sabre Club, of which Tillman and Meriwether were members. The Sabre Club was composed of 45 young white men from Edgefield and Aiken Counties who bought themselves uniforms, sabers, army pistols, along with the improved carbines and Winchester rifles and shotguns. They were organized and could assemble on very short notice.

They operated under the premise that “one ounce of fear was worth a pound of persuasion.”

The decided to “seize the first oppor-tunity that the negroes might offer them to provoke a riot and teach the

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RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION PROJ. NUM. B-14-033-0390Bond Issue Program PROJECT NAME: Spirit Creek Middle School Renovations

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYINVITATION TO BID

Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Spirit Creek Middle School Renovations by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, April 12, 2016, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. local time in the Media Center at Spirit Creek Middle School, 115 Dolphin Way, Hephzibah, Georgia 30815

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Johnson Laschober & Associates, 1296 Broad Street., Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $200.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding material will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low base bid or the low adjusted base bid should the Owner accept any or all additive alternates number one (1) thru three (3). Alternates may be taken in any order by the Owner. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 35 days after time has been called on the date of opening.

Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. If your company wishes to remain on our bid list, we must receive a response either through a bid or by a no bid response. If we do not receive a response, your company’s name will be removed from our bid list. Please call the bidoffice at 706-826-1298 if you fail to receive a post card.

To promote local participation, a database of Sub-contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826-1127 for location to review and obtain this database.

Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Angela D. PringleCounty Board of Education of Richmond CountyAdministrative Office864 Broad StreetAugusta, Georgia 30901c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires

The Latina Expo will be held on Friday, March 11 from 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm and Saturday, March 12 from 10 am to 4 pm at the Augusta-Richmond County Public Library

System Headquarters Branch on 823 Telfair St., Augusta.

The Latina Expo organizers are excited to expose the CSRA to some of those businesses that are right here

in our community.The public will get the opportunity

to meet Latina entrepreneurs, busi-nesswomen, and change agents at this free, bilingual event.

The Expo’s exhibitor showcase begins on Friday, March 11 at 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm and features Latina entrepreneurs and businesswomen as well as local social service agencies.

First Latina Expo to showcase Hispanic Women Entrepreneurs

Cher’s Sisters Only Club and 96.3 Kiss FM will host the 10 year anniversary of the “SHERO Awards” Luncheon Sat. March 26th 2pm at the Legends Club presented by Nicholson Revell LLP, Attorneys at Law.

This year the featured guest speaker is Dr. Angela Pringle, Superintendent of Richmond County Schools.

Twenty-three women have been nominated for these pres-tigious awards. Additionally, in honor of the 10 year anniver-sary of the awards program, Mrs. Ann N. Johnson has been named “Shero of the Decade”. This year’s nominees are: Priscilla Gary, Tara Blair, Falana Steadman-Gardner, Caroline F. Caesar, Cheryl Bryant, Tonia Gibbons, Stacy Simpkins, Monique Braswell, Selina Hamby-Davis, Shonta Chambers, Jennifer Heath-Banks, Cassandra Brinson, Lillian Isrreal, Brittany Bush, Stacey King, Beverly Maner, Donna Moore Wesby, Dr. Deldra McCord, Dr. Sherri Cunningham, Ashley Flanigan-Lee, Dr. Vonda Calhoun and Young Shero nominees, Imoni Wallace and Elizabeth Harkins.

The public is invited to meet the nominees and min-gle with professional com-munity women at the annual Shero Award Mixer, Thursday March 10th 5-7pm at Acura of Augusta in the showroom (1760 Gordon HWY).

C o m p l i m e n t a r y hor’derves will be provided. Tickets to the Shero Awards may be purchased at the mixer or by calling (706) 951-1244.

2016 SHERO Awards!2016 Shero Award Nominees Announced and Shero of the Decade Named

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RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION PROJ. NUM. B-14-033-0390Bond Issue Program PROJECT NAME: Spirit Creek Middle School Renovations

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYINVITATION TO BID

Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Spirit Creek Middle School Renovations by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, April 12, 2016, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held Tuesday, March 22, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. local time in the Media Center at Spirit Creek Middle School, 115 Dolphin Way, Hephzibah, Georgia 30815

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Johnson Laschober & Associates, 1296 Broad Street., Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $200.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding material will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low base bid or the low adjusted base bid should the Owner accept any or all additive alternates number one (1) thru three (3). Alternates may be taken in any order by the Owner. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 35 days after time has been called on the date of opening.

Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. If your company wishes to remain on our bid list, we must receive a response either through a bid or by a no bid response. If we do not receive a response, your company’s name will be removed from our bid list. Please call the bidoffice at 706-826-1298 if you fail to receive a post card.

To promote local participation, a database of Sub-contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826-1127 for location to review and obtain this database.

Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Angela D. PringleCounty Board of Education of Richmond CountyAdministrative Office864 Broad StreetAugusta, Georgia 30901c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires

WE TAKE • Georgia medicaid • Insurance plans• Charge cards • WIC vouchers

MEDICAL VILLA PHARMACY

Marshall Curtis,Pharmacist/OwnerBaron Curtis, Pharmacist

FREE DELIVERY SERVICE

706-722-7355

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

OF RICHMOND COUNTYThe Richmond County School System will accept bids and request for proposals until 3:00 p.m., Wednesday, April 13, 2016, for the following:

1. Boiler & Machinery Insurance RFP#16-7492. Bread RFQ#16-7423. Fuel Management Service RFP#16-8884. Fresh Produce and Eggs 2016-2017 RFQ #16-7465. Frozen Treats RFQ#16-7446. Grocery RFQ#16-7437. Kitchen Exhaust Hood System cleaning RFP#16-7398. Milk, Dairy Products and Water RFQ #16-7479. Paper Products RFQ#16-74510. Property Insurance RFP#16-748

Bid specifications may be obtained by contacting Cecilia Perkins in the Business Office at [email protected] or 706-826-1298, on our web site at www.rcboe.org, or at Richmond County School System, Central Office 864 Broad Street, 4th Floor, Augusta, GA 30901.

The Richmond County School System reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYBy: Dr. Angela D. Pringle, Secretary

negroes a lesson.” They agreed, as Ben Tillman later

recalled, that “nothing but bloodshed and a good deal of it could answer the purpose of redeeming the state.” The idea was to set about “terrorizing the negroes at the first opportunity,” and “having the whites demonstrate their superiority by killing as many of them as was justifiable.” The idea was to force the hand of the whites of South Carolina who were holding back.

The events that led up to the massa-cre had to do with an alleged “insult” suffered by two white travelers who suffered the indignity of having to have their trek from Augusta delayed while black militiamen were parading down Hamburg’s main street during a July 4 celebration.

No one was hurt during that initial incident. It was in the succeeding days when a hearing was to be held that Tillman and the others decided to act.

The incident with the wagon and the subsequent hearing provided the perfect opportunity for Tillman and his “red shirts” to once and for all, put an end to “negro rule in Hamburg.”

Hamburg Massacre from page 3

On the day in question, Tillman’s militants were supported by contin-gents of whites from Augusta who were well aware of the political situa-tion in South Carolina.

To Tillman and his Democrats (the official racist party of the 1870s through the 1970s), white Republicans were despised almost as much as the blacks whose rights they cham-pioned. Dubbed as “radicals,” any Republicans, white or black, who advocated that blacks exercise their voting rights, risked bodily injury or even death.

Tillman and others had watched carefully how a reign of terror in Mississippi resulted in the collapse of the Republican regime in Mississippi.

So successful was the strategy in Mississippi, that the tactics were writ-ten down and spread throughout the south.

In the Augusta area, Edgefield and Aiken Counties in South Carolina, they were ready to hear the good news from Mississippi.

After surrounding the building where the black militia men were hold up, the hundreds of whites opened fire. Blacks returned fire kill-ing Meriwether.

The enraged whites sent to Augusta

for reinforcements and heavier armaments.

With the use of the cannon, and explosives, some blacks were killed or wounded outright. Others man-aged to escape, but a couple of dozen were captured. Of those, they selected four of the “most trouble-some” of the blacks and executed them by shooting them in the back of the head. ‘Then they terrorized the residents of Hamburg by going door to door, ransacking homes.

Indeed, there was a Hamburg Riot, but is wasn’t the blacks who were doing the rioting.

The new memorial stone dedicat-ed to the victims of the Hamburg Massacre was dedicated on Sunday, March 6, 2016.

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LETTERS

MAKIN’ A DIFFERENCE COMMENTARY by Ken MakinGOVERNMENT FAILURES ARE BOILING OVER

Urban Pro Weekly2746 Willis Foreman Road

Hephzibah, GA 30815

Publisher URBAN PRO MEDIA

[email protected]

CEO / SalesFREDERICK BENJAMIN SR.

[email protected]

ContributorsVINCENT HOBBS

Photography & New Media

KEN MAKINcontributing columnist

UPW URBAN PRO WEEKLY

Sales PartnerSHAQUANA RICHARDSON

706-910-4357

The political awareness of Americans reaches its peak every four years, around the time we are ready to elect a president. This is so pro-foundly wrong, and it centers around this adage: “all politics are local.”

While people argue over political rhetoric and ideas they know little about, local/state/federal government and its subsidiaries continue to let us down by failing to upgrade and/or maintain city services.

Case in point? The importance of water filtration.

Six weeks ago, I wrote a col-umn in Urban Pro Weekly entitled “Environment Racism – Hazardous To Your Health,” which expressed my disappointment with the handling of water and utility services in Flint, Mich. Since I wrote that column, there have been two boil-water advi-sories — one in Richmond County and one in Aiken County (S.C.).

Most people don’t see that as a big problem. Local news and media out-

lets will talk to city officials and/or environmental representatives, and those figureheads will assure us that everything is OK.

The truth is, everything is NOT OK.We have a big problem in this

country, and that problem is failing infrastructure. It’s not as popular as conversations about race. It’s not as profound as conversations about eco-nomic disparities. Yet it is an import-ant conversation, one that candidates on any level of government rarely engage.

As I said six weeks ago, clean water is a basic human right. Therefore, it should be among the top priorities of elected officials. When we hear about a boil water advisory or any incident relating to utilities, city represen-tatives must be on the front lines to address these important issues. Beyond that, we need representatives to be proactive in ensuring that water filtration and other city services are not neglected, nor outdated. A num-

ber of people saw what happened in Flint as an isolated incident, but the breakdown in Michigan was a result of political, social and racial dynam-ics that we should not ignore across this country.

We have to be very careful about politicians who would rather bick-er than talk about these and other important issues. When we as citi-zens see our elected officials as enter-tainers and not leaders, we all lose.

Augusta is no different. The focus of each and every one of our com-missioners should be city services. The work of previous Commission councils to decimate and cut away at important resources through privat-ization and profit should be undone. If the goal is to improve our city, then we must do so through infrastructure and transit, plain and simple.

This burden of responsibility should also rests with the individuals who are running for public office. This is a very important week in

Richmond County, as the qualifying process for both the Commission and school board are coming to a close. These individuals will undoubtedly have a lot to say to earn your vote. But what are they saying about infra-structure?

Conversations like these under-score the importance of being polit-ically aware all of the time, and not just every four years. When we fail to hold elected leaders accountable, it’s only a matter of time before the failures of government begin to boil over.

Ken J. Makin is the host of “Makin’ A Difference,” an online radio pro-gram available on iTunes and Soundcloud (soundcloud.com/mak-inadifference). Updates on the show are available at facebook.com/mak-inadifferenceshow. You can also reach Ken by email at [email protected], or via Twitter @differencemakin.

Water warnings show urgent need for infrastructure repair

Forbes’s 2016 Magazine listed over 1800 billionaires worldwide. Those billionaires have a total net worth of approximately $65 trillion. Yet, hun-ger and poverty persists.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that about 795 million people, or

one in nine, were suffering from chronic undernourishment in 2014 -2016. In addition, as of 2015, the World Bank has estimated that there were just over 1 billion poor people in developing countries who live on $1.25 a day or less (worldhunger.org). It is obvious the rich and poor

have a toxic symbiotic relationship. The rich depend on cheap labor and sweat; the poor depend on the crumbs and meager wages.

Russian author Leo Tolstoy described the attitude of the rich when he wrote, “I sit on a man’s back choking him and making him

carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am very sorry for him and wish to ease his lot by all pos-sible means—except by getting off his back.”

Kevin Palmer, Martinez, GA, (706) 231-1831

Billionaires everywhere, but the poor and hungry multiply

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Richmond County, as the qualifying process for both the Commission and school board are coming to a close. These individuals will undoubtedly have a lot to say to earn your vote. But what are they saying about infra-structure?

Conversations like these under-score the importance of being polit-ically aware all of the time, and not just every four years. When we fail to hold elected leaders accountable, it’s only a matter of time before the failures of government begin to boil over.

Ken J. Makin is the host of “Makin’ A Difference,” an online radio pro-gram available on iTunes and Soundcloud (soundcloud.com/mak-inadifference). Updates on the show are available at facebook.com/mak-inadifferenceshow. You can also reach Ken by email at [email protected], or via Twitter @differencemakin.

Evans High School tennis player

Rachel Harden hits a forehand during

a singles match against Richmond

Academy’s Katharine Sherman at Newman Tennis

Center. (March 8, 2016 -

Augusta, GA) Photo by

Vincent Hobbs

SPORTS HS Tennis

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Augusta University’s Gisela Font serves the ball during a singles match against North Georgia’s Mathilde Baartvedt at Newman Tennis Center. Font defeated her opponent 3-6, 6-4, 6-4. Overall, the Lady Jags were overcome by the Lady Nighthawks with a score of 6-3. (March 1, 2016 - Augusta, GA) - Photo by Vincent Hobbs

Augusta University’s Moritz Gelhaus returns the ball during a doubles match against North Georgia at Newman Tennis Center. Gehlhaus and Thomas Sevel vanquished Nighthawks’ play-ers Alexander Reinauer and Joe Klokow to win 9-8. The Jaguars defeated North Georgia 5-4 over-all.(March 1, 2016 - Augusta, GA) - Photo by Vincent Hobbs

SPORTS A.U. Tennis

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SPORTS HS Soccer

AR Johnson’s Tori Ferguson (R) battles for control of the ball against Hephzibah’s Michaela Alton (L) during a soccer match held at Laney stadium. (March 8, 2016 - Augusta, GA) - Photo by Vincent Hobbs

Hephzibah’s Sheila Duarte takes control of the ball during a soccer match against AR Johnson at Laney stadium. (March 8, 2016 - Augusta, GA) - Photo by Vincent Hobbs

HephzibahvsA.R. Johnson

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T&Y Tax and Accounting Solutions, LLC

Phone/Fax: 706.228.4880email: [email protected]

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JEWELRY, SHOES, ACCESSORIES

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Former Tabernacle Leader honored by NAACP

The Rev. Dr. Otis Moss III (left), was the main speaker at a Washington, DC-area church Tues., March 1. Moss spoke at the Alfred Street Baptist Church, the historic church organized in suburban Alexandria in the mid-1800s. Moss, the former pastor of Augusta, Georgia’s historic Tabernacle Baptist Church, is pictured with the Rev. Dr. Howard-John Wesley, pastor of Alfred Street Baptist. Both Moss and Wesley were recently acknowledged by the NAACP’s National Board of Directors during the organization’s nationally-televised, 47th annual NAACP Image Awards. The Los Angeles-based event lauded both pastors with the prestigious 2016 Chairman’s Award, touting the ministers as “out-standing trailblazing leaders under the age of 50.” Photo by Tim Cox

Invites you to attend our

14th Annual Banquet

Saturday, March 19, 2016 @ 6:00pm

2016 Edgefield Senior Council Building 15 Center Spring Road Edgefield, SC

Theme: Helping Our Children Spread Their Wings

For more information call (803) 637-2010

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Circle K store In Augusta

Tuesday, March 15, 2016 – Regular Board Meeting – 6:00 P.M.Friday, March 18, 2016 – Spring School Board Retreat – 11:00 A.M. (Room 110-GLRS)

Richmond County Board of Education MeetingsThe following

meetings have been scheduled for the

Richmond County Board of Education:

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RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION PROJ. NUM. B-14-038-1064Renovations-Bldg. No.2010 PROJECT NAME: CT Walker Magnet School

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYINVITATION TO BID

Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the CT WALKER MAGNET SCHOOL RENOVATIONS by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Thursday, March 31,2016, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held Thursday, March 17, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. local time in the Media Center at CT Walker Magnet School, 1301 Wrightsboro Road, Augusta, Georgia 30901

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Johnson Laschober & Associates, 1296 Broad Street., Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $200.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding material will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low base bid or the low adjusted base bid should the Owner accept any or all additive alternates number one (1) thru three (3). Alternates may be taken in any order by the Owner. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 35 days after time has been called on the date of opening.

Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. If your company wishes to remain on our bid list, we must receive a response either through a bid or by a no bid response. If we do not receive a response, your company’s name will be removed from our bid list. Please call the bid office at 706-826-1298 if you fail to receive a post card.

To promote local participation, a database of Sub-contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826-1127 for location to review and obtain this database.

Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Angela D. PringleCounty Board of Education of Richmond CountyAdministrative Office864 Broad StreetAugusta, Georgia 30901c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires

CSRA Business League Banquet to celebrate 46 years of serviceThe CSRA Business League,

Inc will celebrate 46 years of providing service to the CSRA, on Friday, 18 March 2016 at the Augusta Marriott Hotel & Suites, with the Senior Pasto/Teacher of the Historic Tabernacle Baptist Church Rev. Dr. Charles E. Goodman, Jr., as the keynote speaker. During the banquet small business owners and individuals around the CSRA will be honored with various awards and recognitions.

Nominees for this year awards are;

Harvey L. Johnson Small Business of the Year – Bussey Auto Glass, Amando Pizzera, Good Sense Realty and Wright One Paine & Body Shop

Henry H. Howard Public/Elected Official – Sen. Harold Jones, Rep. Earnest Smith, Solicitor Kellie Kenner McIntyre, Commissioner Marion Williams

Women Entrepreneur of the Year – Accu Tax Services, LNH Realty, Fyne Foot Foot care, Dr. Deborah Makerson General Dentistry

Not for Profit of the Year

The Secret Lives of Women: Researching Female Ancestors Using the Sources They Left Behind

On Wednesday, March 16, the Georgia Heritage Room will host a free Legacy Family Tree webinar with genealogist and women’s history scholar, Ms. Gena Philibert-Ortega. This webi-nar will go over the spe-cific heirlooms women left behind, including signature quilts, community cook-books, journals, and diaries.

The program will be held at the Augusta Public Library HQ bldg at 823 Telfair Street, downtown, Augusta. The program starts at 2 p.m. Registration is required.

Call 706-826-1511 to register.

– Head of the Giant Ministry, Golden Harvest Food Bank, 100 Black Women of Augusta, Dream Builders, Inc.

The community is asked to either become a sponsor, purchase an advertise-

ment in the souvenir journal or purchase tickets to the banquet. Proceeds will be used to assist us in continuing our services to small, minority, disadvantaged, veteran and women owned businesses and youth

in the CSRA.For informatin, contact 706 722 – 0994,

Ms. Shirmaine Ivey at [email protected] or Ellis Albright at [email protected].

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RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION PROJ. NUM. B-14-038-1064Renovations-Bldg. No.2010 PROJECT NAME: CT Walker Magnet School

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYINVITATION TO BID

Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the CT WALKER MAGNET SCHOOL RENOVATIONS by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Thursday, March 31,2016, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held Thursday, March 17, 2016, at 10:00 a.m. local time in the Media Center at CT Walker Magnet School, 1301 Wrightsboro Road, Augusta, Georgia 30901

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Johnson Laschober & Associates, 1296 Broad Street., Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $200.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding material will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low base bid or the low adjusted base bid should the Owner accept any or all additive alternates number one (1) thru three (3). Alternates may be taken in any order by the Owner. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 35 days after time has been called on the date of opening.

Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. If your company wishes to remain on our bid list, we must receive a response either through a bid or by a no bid response. If we do not receive a response, your company’s name will be removed from our bid list. Please call the bid office at 706-826-1298 if you fail to receive a post card.

To promote local participation, a database of Sub-contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826-1127 for location to review and obtain this database.

Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Angela D. PringleCounty Board of Education of Richmond CountyAdministrative Office864 Broad StreetAugusta, Georgia 30901c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires

RICHMOND COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION PROJ. NUM. B-14-041-0294Bond Issue Program PROJECT NAME: Tobacco Road Elementary School

COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION OF RICHMOND COUNTYINVITATION TO BID

Sealed proposals from Contractors will be received for the Tobacco Road Elementary School Renovations by the County Board of Education of Richmond County at the address below until 3:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. No extension of the bidding period will be made.

A Pre-Bid Conference will be held Tuesday, March 15, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. local time in the gym at Tobacco RoadElementary School, 2397 Tobacco Rd, Augusta, GA 30906.

Drawings and project manual on this work may be examined at the Department of Maintenance and Facilities, Richmond County Board of Education, 1781 15th Street, Augusta, Georgia 30901.

Bidding documents may be obtained at the Office of the Architect: Johnson Laschober & Associates, 1296 Broad Street., Augusta, GA 30901. Applications for documents together with refundable deposit of $200.00 per set should be filed promptly with the Architect. Bidding material will be forwarded (shipping charges collect) as soon as possible. The full amount of deposit for one set will be refunded to each prime contractor who submits a bona fide bid upon return of such set in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bids. All other deposits will be refunded with deductions approximating cost of reproduction of documents upon return of same in good condition within 10 days after date of opening bid.

Contract, if awarded, will be on the low base bid or the low adjusted base bid should the Owner accept any or all additive alternates number one (1) thru three (3). Alternates may be taken in any order by the Owner. No bid may be withdrawn for a period of 35 days after time has been called on the date of opening.

Bid must be accompanied by a bid bond in an amount not less than 5% of the base bid. Personal checks, certified checks, letters of credit, etc., are not acceptable. The successful bidder will be required to furnish performance and payment bonds in an amount equal to 100% of the contract price.

The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive technicalities and informalities.

BID LIST: The Richmond County Board of Education maintains a bid list for many categories that are let for bid each year. If your company wishes to remain on our bid list, we must receive a response either through a bid or by a no bid response. If we do not receive a response, your company’s name will be removed from our bid list. Please call the bid office at 706-826-1298 if you fail to receive a post card.

To promote local participation, a database of Sub-contractors, Suppliers, and Vendors has been developed by the Program Manager, GMK Associates. Contact Jeanine Usry with GMK Associates at (706) 826-1127 for location to review and obtain this database.

Bids shall be submitted and addressed to:

Dr. Angela D. PringleCounty Board of Education of Richmond CountyAdministrative Office864 Broad StreetAugusta, Georgia 30901c/o: Mr. C. Gene Spires

in the CSRA.For informatin, contact 706 722 – 0994,

Ms. Shirmaine Ivey at [email protected] or Ellis Albright at [email protected].

AUGUSTAFor the second year in a

row, Augusta University has been awarded a grant from GenCyber to host the 2016 GenCyber Camp start-ing in June.

The almost $110,000 grant will allow 60 rising junior and senior high school stu-dents to attend the camp for free. Registration is open, and students can submit their application until March 27.

Participants will be immersed in hands-on activ-ities building, using code to defend and attack program-mable robots. As part of the fun, students will also be required to solve cyber prob-lems, better preparing them for college coursework and career opportunities.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for young minds and teachers to get a head start in the cybersecurity field,” Director of Augusta University Cyber Institute Joanne Sexton said. “Our university and our Cyber Institute are committed to helping increase interest in this field and build the next generation of cyber warriors. To do so, we have to start their education early. This is what we are trying to accom-plish with our GenCyber camps.”

The summer cyber camps are the result of Augusta University’s work with GenCyber, a program funded by the National Security Agency in collab-oration with the National Science Foundation.

Now in its third year, GenCyber offers young peo-ple interested in cybersecu-rity careers opportunities to learn first-hand about the latest technology in a univer-sity setting; it also provides opportunities for teachers to develop cyber curriculum for their classrooms.

“We are proud to host this summer program once again and help advance cyber education in our region and beyond,” said Gretchen

Augusta University opens registration for 2016 GenCyber CampCaughman, executive vice president for academic affairs and provost at Augusta University.

Augusta University College of Education also received a GenCyber

grant of about $94,000 to support the development of cyber learning in fourth through eighth grades.

The 2016 GenCyber Camp is a teacher

camp—a first for Augusta University—that will help develop the cyber pipeline at an early age.

For more information, visit www.augusta.edu/academy.

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6

I’ve been to a lot of concerts in my day – rap, R&B, gospel, you name it.

I was pleasantly surprised when I made my way to the front row at last Friday’s Lecrae concert at the Bell Auditorium – I shared the space with a couple of elementary and mid-dle-school kids.

You read that right. Kids. Young people who practically knew all of the words to the Grammy-winning artist’s songs.

At one point during the show, Lecrae engaged those young people through conversation and a handshake. More than anything, his actions showed the range and influence of a much-needed message for today’s youth.

The versatility of Lecrae’s hip-hop, contemporary gospel style does not come without controversy. Anytime you have a DJ playing old school hip-hop (think Montell Jordan’s “This Is How We Do It”) with new-school records such as Drake and Future’s

“Jumpman” at a urban gospel concert, there will be some side-eyes.

That shouldn’t take away from what Lecrae has to say. In short, he has the ears of young people willing to listen. And those ears are safe from profanity, misogyny and negativity.

Like the name of his last studio album, Lecrae is truly an “Anomaly.” Most of the songs during his over 90-minute performance were from the album, including songs such as “Welcome To America,” “Say I Won’t,” “Outsiders” and “Timepiece.”

The romp was not only energetic and seemingly effortless, it was effer-vescent. “Crae” performed like some-one with a new lease on life – some-one who was truly born again.

It’s that energy and inclusion that brings in people from all walks of life – regardless of age, race, or denomi-nation.

I’d heard of Lecrae before the tour, even before I bought “Anomaly” in

2014. What really drew me in was his latest mixtape – “Church Clothes 3.”

It is, in short, a mixtape for the Black Lives Matter movement. While the talented young artist has not shied away from social and spiritual con-cerns in the past, he takes them on full-fledged with the “Church Clothes 3” project.

He only performed one song from the tape – “Deja Vu.” That’s my only “gripe” with a flawless concert – and that’s more fan bias than anything.

The introductory lyrics from “Deja Vu” are so jarring and relevant: “Yeah, the whole world’s gone crazy, peo-ple riot in the streets, killin’ unborn babies, catchin’ shots from police.”

It’s the type of spiritual and social message that we desperately need from today’s pulpits. And verily, a young artist will lead them.

That might be the most refreshing thing of all. Too often, we hear lyr-ics coming from the lips of children

that are sinful, shameful and socially damaging. But how empowering is it to hear our children share messages of hope, unity and enlightenment. Imagine lyrical content that glorifies God and glorifies personal and public victories of our lives.

And if that message is urban or hip-hop, so be it. It’s an idea Lecrae conveyed through the last song of the night, “Say I Won’t.”

“Why you scared to be different? … Say I won’t, and I bet I will. I might just do it to show you.”

Ken J. Makin is the host of “Makin’ A Difference,” an online radio program available on iTunes and Soundcloud (soundcloud.com/makinadifference). Updates on the show are available at facebook.com/makinadifference-show. You can also reach Ken by email at [email protected], or via Twitter @differ-encemakin.

Lecrae’s ‘Higher Learning’ tour hits Augusta

KEN MAKINREVIEW

Contemporary hip-hop gospel artist Lecrae performs during a performance from his “Higher Learning” Tour, which stopped through Augusta’s Bell Auditorium on Friday, March 4. Photo by Ken Makin

Contemporary Christian artist’s message reaches all ages

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StressPhysical Inactivity

Family History of Cardiovascular diseaseObesityDiabetes

High Blood PressureHigh Cholesterol

Cigarette Smoking

ARE YOU AT RISK?

HEART ATTACK • BRAIN ATTACK • PREVENT ATTACKEast Central Health DistrictHypertension Management Outreach Program

Richmond County 706.721.5800

Lecrae’s ‘Higher Learning’ tour hits Augusta

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