verb moods

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Verb moods indicate a state of being or reality. Shows the speaker’s attitude. . They show the manner in which the action or condition is intended. Verb Moods. Indicative Mood. Indicative states an apparent fact. This is the way verbs are normally used in English. Indicative Mood. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Verb MoodsVerb moods indicate a state of being or reality. Shows the speakers attitude.. They show the manner in which the action or condition is intended.

  • Indicative MoodIndicative states an apparent fact. This is the way verbs are normally used in English.

  • Indicative Moodexamples: (Choose 1)Last year, I ate a sandwich for lunch almost every day.Mrs. Freeman drives a very nice car.Bernie's cat likes to sit on a piano bench.

  • Interrogative Moodindicates a state of questioning. In the interrogative, the subject-verb order is inverted.examples:Will Dad take out the trash tomorrow? (Interrogative of: Dad will take out the trash tomorrow.)

  • Imperative MoodImperative states a command or request. Frequently, the subject does not appear in the sentence, but it is implied.examples: (Choose 1)(You) Wait and watch before crossing the street.Come here.Hang on!

  • Subjunctive MoodSubjunctive expresses a doubt, desire, imaginary situation, or condition contrary to fact. The subjunctive typically takes these verbs:ask, demand, insist, move, order, pray, determine, prefer, recommend, regret, request, require, suggest, wish* It is not true, or you are being wishful.*Clues- Would, could, and if

  • Subjunctive Moodexamples: (Choose 1)If I were you, I would study very hard for Friday's test.I prefer Mom to drive me to the store instead of my cousin Bob.Principal Andrews insists that we students walk on the right side of the hallway.

  • Subjunctive MoodNOTE): The subjunctive mood of the verb "to be" is "be" in the present tense and "were" in the past tense regardless of the subject.

  • Conditional MoodConditional indicates a conditional state that will cause something else to happen. It is marked by the words "might," "could," and "would."

  • Conditional Moodexamples:If we use our time wisely, we might get to go home early. If the people use their time wisely (conditional state), they might get to go home early ("going home early" will happen).

  • Inappropriate shiftAn inappropriate shift or inconsistency in the verb of a sentence confuses the reader. Shifts in a verb mood can make reading difficult and obscure the sentence's meaning. To correct the shift, both clauses in the sentence should be in the same mood.In complex or compound sentences, the verb tenses should be the same.

  • Inappropriate shiftI

    Inappropriate ShiftCorrectionEat ice cream, and you will jog around the playground. (imperative) (indicative)Eat ice cream and jog around the playground. (imperative) (imperative)You could eat ice cream, but why couldn't you jog around the playground? (indicative) (interrogative)You could eat ice cream, and you could jog around the playground. (indicative) (indicative)If you were to eat ice cream, you will jog around the playground. (subjunctive: hint "if/were") (indicative)If you were to eat ice cream, you would jog around the playground. (subjunctive past form "were") (subjunctive past form "would")

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