Water Safety Instructor Recertification ?· Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop…

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Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop Facilitator Guide for Instructor Trainers April 2010 March 2012 Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 2 Acknowledgements: The quality and success of the Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Program is due to the commitment and support of dedicated Water Safety personnel. The Canadian Red Cross would like to thank the following staff and volunteers in Western Canada for their contributions to this Facilitator Guide: Stephanie Eby, Lesley Anne Morley, Liana Thompson, Cathy Broadbent, Rhonda Parton, and Lee Adam Nelles The Canadian Red Cross also recognizes the Authorized Providers, Master Instructor Trainers, Instructor Trainers and Instructors who continue to provide feedback to Red Cross on all aspects of the Water Safety Program. Your input ensures we continue to develop quality programs. Thank you! Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 3 Water Safety Instructor Recertification Introduction Thank you for your interest in and support of the Red Cross Swimming & Water Safety Program. Please use this guide to assist you in facilitating Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshops. Thank you for facilitating this recertification workshop. Red Cross values your commitment and support of the Red Cross Instructor Development Program. The purpose of this guide is to ensure the content of Water Safety Instructor (WSI) Recertification Workshops is consistent across Western Canada. The suggested minimum time to complete the Recertification Workshop is four hours. Depending on the WSIs needs, you may want to add time to focus on particular skills or issues. For the 2010-2012 version of this recertification we are pleased to offer choices in the professional development content, with five modules and the option to choose two to teach. The Introduction (30 minutes) and Stroke Evaluation (30minutes) are mandatory modules that must be included in all Recertification Workshops. The outline for the recertification clinic is as follows: (For the professional development modules you may choose one topic from group A and one from group B:) Introduction 30 minutes Group A Customer Service session 90 minutes Foundations session 90 minutes Strokes & Progressions session 90 minutes Mandatory Stroke Evaluation session 30 minutes Group B Active & Wet session 60 minutes Adult Learning session 60 minutes Table of Contents: 1. Recertification Workshop Checklist Page 4 2. Frequency asked questions Page 5 3. Welcome and Introduction Page 6 4. Session A1 Customer Service Page 10 5. Session A2 Foundations of Swimming, Developing Swimmer Progrssions, and Water Comfort Activities Page 17 6. Session A3 Swimming Strokes and Progressions Page 22 7. Mandatory Stroke Session Page 32 8. Session B1 Active and Wet Page 32 9. Session B2 Adult Learning Page 40 Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 4 1. Recertification Workshop Checklist Before the Workshop: Select the three professional development sessions that you will facilitate Determine classroom and pool requirements Confirm audio visual equipment arrangements Create the resources needed to run the recert Order sufficient workshop materials (participant packages) from the Contact Centre. Workshop Materials: WSI (R) Facilitator Guide Resource templates for sessions Bathing suit and towel Flip chart paper or whiteboard, and pens One WSI Recert Guide per participant After the Workshop: Ensure course roster(s) are completed Collect feedback forms Complete workshop debriefing form Forward these materials to the Red Cross Contact Centre with in two weeks of the workshop date. Our mailing address is: Canadian Red Cross 305 11 Ave SW Calgary AB T3C 3P6 Material can also be faxed to: 1-800-811-8877 Upon receiving the roster from the WSI Recertification Workshop, the Red Cross will issue Water Safety Instructor Recertification Cards within two weeks to successful participants. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 5 2. Frequently asked questions 1. What if an Instructor has moved in the past two years? Remind Instructors who have moved to provide an updated address to the Red Cross Contact Centre. If the address in our database doesnt match the roster address for a WSI, the WSIs birthdate on the roster is used for verification and their roster information is entered into the database. 2. What if an Instructor has registered for the Recertification Workshop and their certification expired more than two years ago? Red Cross has a three-year grace period that allows Water Safety Instructors whose certification has expired less than two years ago to recertify by taking the Recertification Workshop. Instructors whose certification expired more than three years ago are no longer in the grace period and must retake a Red Cross WSI course or a splashback course to obtain current certification. 3. What if Instructors cannot provide a copy of their Water Safety Instructor Certification card? Ask the Instructor to call the Red Cross Contact Centre to confirm their certification status. The Contact Centre can then fax a proof of certification to the candidate. If the candidate requires a replacement certification then a fifteen dollar fee will apply. 4. What if an Instructor behaves inappropriately, arrives late, forgets their Instructor manual, fails to participate, or displays a lack of understanding about basic course material? Instructor Trainers can ask Instructors who behave inappropriately, display a lack of interest, or professionalism, to leave the workshop. Instructors who display a lack of understanding about basic course material should not be issued a certification card and should be directed to follow up with the local Red Cross Program Representative. Document any problem behaviours, discuss them with the Instructor, and submit the documentation with the course roster. 5. What if I am asked questions I cannot answer? Encourage the Instructor to contact Red Cross with those questions, either through their local Program Representative and/or the Contact Centre at 1-888-307-7997 or wz-contactcentre@redcross.ca. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 6 3. Welcome and introduction Suggested time: 20 minutes Session Objective: Introductions, Recertification Information and icebreaker Ensure you cover the following items in your Introduction: Verify WSIs pre-requisites for the Recertification Workshop. Check the WSIs certification card and ensure that the expiry date is no more than three years. If it expired more than three years ago, the WSI is required to complete a Splashback course to recertify. Fill in the course roster; remind WSIs to print clearly and record all required information to ensure accurate processing of their certification. Review the Instructor Recertification Philosophy and Objectives. Review workshop outline. Philosophy and Objectives Included in WSI Recert Participant Guide on page 3 The Canadian Red Cross trains and supports leaders to deliver Water Safety programs in communities across Canada. A critical component of instructor development is the on-going preparation, training and mentoring of Water Safety Instructors. The goal of the Recertification Workshops is to continue to build the strength, integrity and quality of the Canadian Red Cross Swimming and Water Safety Program. Workshop Objectives: Included in WSI Recert Participant Guide on page 3 Provide Water Safety Instructors with an opportunity to discuss concerns, resolve issues, share ideas and network Provide Instructors with updates from Red Cross Provide professional development sessions to enhance the WSIs instructional skills. Successful completion of this course involves attending and participating in 100% of the workshop; as well as demonstrating the required strokes according to Red Cross Swim Kids level 10 standards. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 7 Activity #1: Icebreaker - Red Cross Swim Truths and Myths Required Material: Flip chart paper (one piece for each group) Instructions: Break participants into groups of three or four Have them read and answer the questions in their participant guide found on pages 4-6 Ask each group to write down the answer they think is the truth from answers A,B or C Correct answers as needed with group, answering any questions as required. Activity #1 Answers: 1. In Red Cross Swim Kids Level 10, why is the endurance swim 500 m? A) Research shows us that the majority of boating incidents occur within 50 metres of shore. We train swimmers to be able to swim 500 in a flat-water pool because the energy used to swim 500 metres in a flat-water pool is about the same as a 50 metre swim in open water where temperature of the water, currents and stress bring on fatigue faster. (True) B) The Canadian Red Cross partnered with Swim Canada to encourage participation in the sport of speed swimming. The 500m swim is included to introduce swimmers to longer distances to prepare them for speed swimming sports. (False) C) Rates of childhood obesity in Canada have almost tripled over the past 20 years. To address this national problem, the Canadian Red Cross has included longer distance to help contribute to an overall increase in activity levels within the Learn to Swim program. (False) 2. Why do we teach forward rolls in the program? A) The forward roll is taught as a safe entry for deep water (False) B) The forward roll is a progression for the front dive. (False) C) The forward roll mimics the feeling a person experiences when they fall out of a boat during a boating incident. Teaching this skill will help prepare a person along with decreasing their chances of panicking in a real situation. (True) Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 8 3. Why do we teach elementary backstroke in the Red Cross Swim program? A) The elementary backstroke is taught as a survival skill (a resting stroke). If a swimmer is in deep water that is far from the shore, the elementary backstroke allows them to safely swim to shore with their face out of the water. (False) B) As a progression into breaststroke. (True) C) The elementary backstroke is introduced as a stroke for those swimmers who prefer to keep their face out of the water. (False) 4. What are the only three skills in the program that are taught dry? A) Rescue breaking, choking, and next steps (Red Cross Swim Kids level 10, further training, other aquatic activities) (False) B) Choking, rescue breathing, and site orientation (True) C) Next steps, rescue breathing, and site orientation (False) 5. What is the key factor in preventing toddler drownings? A) Ensuring that all back yard swimming pools are fenced and secured. (False) B) Teaching toddlers to roll on to their backs. (False) C) Proper vigilant adult supervision (True) 6. Approximately how many people drown each year in Canada? A) 40 (False) B) 400 (True) C) 800 (False) Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 9 7. Why do we teach weight transfer in the Red Cross Swim program? A) It is a progression for diving (True) B) Weight transfer teaches disorientation in the water. Teaching this skill will prepare a person should they ever become disoriented in the water and decrease their chances of panicking in a real situation. (False) C) It is a progression for surface dives. (False) 8. Why do we teach sculling in the Red Cross Swim program? A) The Canadian Red Cross partnered with Synchro Canada to encourage participation in the sport of synchronized swimming. Sculling is a basic skill that is required for this sport. (False) B) Sculling is a part of every stroke. As outlined below there is a sculling action in the power phase of each stroke: Front crawl Catch phase Back crawl Catch phase Elementary Back Catch phase Breaststroke First phase of the pull Butterfly Catch Phase Side Stroke Catch Phase. (True) C) It is a skill that is used in lifesaving, for example the reverse and ready position. (False) 9. Why do we teach the front glide/side glide combo skill? A) It is used to teach the rolling movement of front crawl/back crawl. (False) B) It is a developing swimmer skill used as a progression for rolling on their back. (False) C) As a progression for front crawl breathing (True) Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 10 4. Professional Development Modules, Group A: (Choose one of the three modules) Session A1: Customer Service Suggested time: 90 minutes classroom Session objectives: Define and identify professionalism Discuss manners and respect in the work place Review the Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Code of Conduct Develop the art of conversation with parents Review how to best manage difficult conversations with parents Resources: Code of Conduct, found in the Water Safety Instructor Manual Appendix B2 Equipment: Flip chart paper, stand and markers, or white board and markers Activity #1 Suggested Time: 20 minutes - Have candidates brainstorm the meaning of professionalism, manners and respect - Break into three groups - Give each a word from the brainstorm activity to define. - Discuss the following questions: What the meanings of each word are and what they mean to participants? Why participants think we are talking about this subject? Why it is important? What will happen if we dont discuss it? Activity #1 Definitions Answer Key Professionalism: Meticulous adherence to undeviating courtesy, honesty and responsibility in ones dealings with customers and co-workers. Plus a level of excellence that goes over and above normal requirements. Manners: A way of acting or behaving, proper conduct or behavior, politeness and courtesy. Respect: To show regard or consideration Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 11 Activity #2- Marooned Suggested Time: 15 minutes - Tell the candidates, They are marooned on an island and the only way to get off is to be a professional at work. - Break the candidates into groups to develop a list of ways to be professional at work. - Direct the groups to choose the five most important. - Ask, Do manners and respect come into play on your list? Discuss. - Review the master list below Activity #2 Master list of how to be professional at work 1. Be on time 2. Stand by your commitments 3. Be polite 4. Role model, always set the best example yourself 5. Show integrity convey the principles that you stand for through your own conduct 6. Set high standards, be the best in all that you do 7. Always relate to others in a positive manner, treat them how you wish to be treated yourself 8. Be respectful to co-workers, students and parents 9. Be trustworthy Activity #3 Suggested time: 15 min How you look, talk, act and work, determine your level of professionalism. - Give each group a word from the list below. - Ask them come up with ways to demonstrate that word at work. - Have the groups collect the first letter of the other groups words and race to unscramble the mystery word (IMPACT). Impressive Memorable Personable Approachable Conversational Teachable Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 12 Activity #4 -Code of Conduct True/False ActivityWSI Manual pg 2.3 Suggested time: 10 min - Instruct the candidates to complete the true and false quiz, found in the participant manual on page 7, Code of Conduct - Provide the students 10 minutes to work alone on this task without partners or resources. Then allow candidates to use the code of conduct and their fellow candidates to complete the quiz. - Review the correct answers and clarify any questions. - To wrap up this activity discuss the importance of following the code of conduct and the consequences if not. Activity #4 Code of Conduct, True/False Activity Answer Key 1. As a WSI you represent the Red Cross. T 2. The code of conduct has been established as the standard by which your behavior is measured. T 3. You are responsible to your employer for fulfilling your employment obligations. T 4. When you interact on a professional basis with parents and fellow instructors, your behavior reflects back on the Res Cross Society. T 5. Constantly displaying poor professional standards projects a favorable image of the Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Services. F 6. You may publicly criticize fellow Assistant Instructors, Instructors, Instructor Trainers, parents or participants. F 7. To be a professional you must assume your responsibilities in a serious and organized manner. T 8. You are not expected to follow through on your commitments to fellow instructors, swimmers or your employer. F 9. You may use profane, insulting, harassing or other wise offensive language in the conduct of duty. F 10. The Code of Conduct is your responsibility. T Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 13 Activity #5 Speaking practice Suggested time: 15 min - Have each person come up with a question to start a conversation that is related to swimming lessons. - With a partner, practice the art of conversation (listed below) using all four steps and their question from above. - Ask the participants to pair up with some one they dont know very well. - Have one person speak about themselves for one minute. - The other person will listen and not speak at all. Ask them to remember three things the speaker told them. The art of conversation: Starting a conversation with someone you dont know can be difficult, even scary, just remember its as easy as saying hello. There are four distinct parts to a conversation: What are they? Give examples 1. Contact: Hello, Hi, Excuse me, could I talk to you a minute 2. Introduction: My name is ______________I am _______________s swimming teacher. Know the childs name. (Discuss why this is important) 3. Speaking and listening: The best way to start the conversation is to ask an open ended question. Using the following words helps to create open ended questions: who, what, where, when, why, how or what if. Here are some examples below: Do you have any questions? When was the last time they took lessons? How old are they? Do they get any practice? What do you want to see them accomplish? Listening: Just as important as speaking. Listen to understand, you may gain real information from what is being said. 4. Ending: Good-bye, I will see you next time. Have a good day. Thank-you. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 14 Helpful conversation tips: Make a good first impression smile and listen, maintain eye contact. You are the professional. Be comfortable with your self and genuinely interested in getting to know the childs parent. It helps to remember the parent is genuinely interested in the progress of their child and are happy to engage in conversation and appreciates when some one else take the lead. They may not have any questions or concerns this time around but will feel comfortable enough next time to ask. Take the time to answer correctly, think before you speak. If you cant answer their question, make sure to find out the answer and get back to them as quickly as possible. Be honest, it will be appreciated. Activity #6 Suggested time: 30 minutes - Discuss the following statement, The one time I felt most stressed dealing with a parent was Ask the candidates to share their past experiences and how they worked through them. - Break the candidates into partners and have them role play the scenarios listed below. - Discuss successes and future suggestions after each role play. - Use the SOLVE acronym below to help remind yourself how to deal with difficult conversations. Discuss with WSIs. SOLVE can be found in the participant guide on page 9 S: Smile and Stay calm O: Be Open L: aLways Listen V: giVe options E: Expect to follow up Activity #6 Scenarios Scenario #1 Parent: On the first day of lessons you approach your childs instructor, with their report card. You are concerned because it is a split class your child will have to spend time reviewing skills that have been previously marked off. Instructor: It is the first day of lessons and you have a split class. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 15 Scenario #2 Parent: Your child is in a large Red Cross Swim Kids 6 class and your are worried they wont get enough attention. Instructor: You have a full class of ten kids for Red Cross Swim Kids level 6. Scenario #3 Parent: It is the last day of lessons for your child in a split 1/2 class. You receive your childs report card and realize they have completed level 1 but they are actually in level 2. Instructor: You have just handed out report cards for you level 1/2 class. You have nothing marked off for level 2. Scenario #4 Parent: While watching a skill demonstration, your child got behind the instructor and was kicked in the stomach. They are hurt and you are angry. Instructor: While demonstrating a skill, one of your students got behind you and you accidently kicked them in the stomach. They are hurt. Scenario #5 Parent: You have been watching your childs preschool class and are not happy about all the games that are being played, when they could be concentrating on swimming drills instead. Instructor: You have just finished teaching your preschool class. Scenario #6 Parent: You have just spent time in your childs class on parent day and wish to tell the instructor how pleased you are with the job they are doing. Instructor: A parent wishes to speak with you after participating in a parent day class. Scenario #7 Parent: Your child has been struggling with diving; you are impressed with the instructors patience, positive attitude and encouraging manner. Instructor: You have been working on diving consistently through the lesson set. It pays off! One of the children in your class who was struggling succeeds. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 16 Scenario #8 Parent: Your child has a shy, quiet instructor and you are not happy with their performance. After the last lesson you approach the instructor and inform them, in a very nasty way, that they are not a good teacher and shouldnt be working here. Instructor: You are a shy, new instructor this is your first lesson set. Scenario #9 Parent: You are watching your childs preschool class and notice two RCMP officers standing over the class. They speak with the instructor after the lesson is finished. You also speak to the instructor demanding to know what is happening. Instructor: You are approached at the end of a preschool class by two RCMP officers with questions about the appearance of one of your students (bruises on arms and face). After you have spoken with them a parent approaches. Scenario #10 Parent: Your child has the same instructor again. They did not complete last time with this instructor and you are concerned this will happen again. You want reassurances that this time your child will complete. Instructor: A child that you incompleted in the last session is in your class again. . Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 17 Session A2: Foundations of Swimming, Developing Swimmer Progressions, and Water Comfort Activities Suggested time: 90 minutes classroom Session Objectives: Experience and understand what makes individuals of varying ages afraid of the water. To help instructors teach participants to become comfortable with what their bodies can do in the water and in varying depths of water. Provide instructors with teaching skills that will help various age groups overcome fear. Explore how creative teaching of developing swimmer progressions encourage comfort and enable greater mastery of skills Resources: AWSI manual Equipment: Cards with the developing swimmer skills, worksheets for Red Cross Swim Preschool and Swim Kids levels, flip chart paper, and markers Activity #1 Suggested time: 10 minutes - Shallow Water, Chest Deep Water, and Deep Water. - Divide the class into groups. Have the groups come up with a definition for each of the headings. Ask each group to write their definitions on each under the appropriate heading. - Using the participant guide, page 9, have particpants write down definitions for: Shallow Water, Chest Deep Water, and Deep Water - Discuss definitions from the activity. - Using the definitions presented by all groups create a definition that encompasses the best points of each. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 18 Activity #2 Suggested time: 20 minutes - Divide the class into four groups. - Assign each group a level from the following groupings: Parented Red Cross Preschool, Unparented Red Cross Preschool, Red Cross Swim Kids levels 1-5, Red Cross Swim Kids levels 6-10. - Have each group work from the chart on page 10 in the participant guide.. Based on a ten lesson set for one, five and ten days, have each group decide how much time they would spend in each of the three water depths. Groups should look at items for each level in their grouping and be able to tell you what the appropriate depth is. *Emphasize that more time should be spent in shallow water when introducing and practicing new skills. Start the deeper water skills assisted as you would in shallow water. Unassisted deeper water activities should not be introduced until students are comfortable with that skill. In shallower water and in the case of preschool, unassisted skills should be taught at the shallowest workable depth suitable to the skills being taught. Activity #3 Understanding reactions Suggested time: 10 minutes - Split the class into groups. - Have each group do the following activities: 1. Using spray bottle, walk up and spray someone in the face. 2. Explain what you are going to do and spray someone in the face. 3. Using imaginative play have students imagine they are in a hot desert and they are so incredibly hot and they need to cool down (act it out). So, so hot and need water now. Oh no its so hot were all going to melt if we dont cool down. Does anyone see a way to cool down? Oh Look and then spray yourself and everyone should follow. I feel soooo much better now, how about you? Did you cool down? - Follow up with a discussion of what they thought when it was imposed on them vs. a request vs. the power of suggestion. What happens when you make it their choice? - Have participants answer the questions on page 11 of the participant guide-Understanding Reactions - Given your experience as an instructor, how does comfort affect teaching the fundamentals? - How do you encourage comfort of participants in your lessons? Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 19 Activity #4 Suggested time: 50 minutes - Assign participants into groups - Using 2 or more sets of the Developing Swimmer skills, teams race to place steps in the proper order under the main headings-see below for examples of developing swimmer skills. - Assign each skill of the developing swimmer to a group. Have them show the common errors that occur under their assigned Developing Swimmer skill. Have instructors use their AWSI books. Reference Swim Preschool pg. 4.16-4.39 and Red Cross Swim Kids pg. 5.5-5.34 - Have participants answer the following questions which are found on page 11 of the participant guide: How many of these errors relate to not yet being comfortable? Have each group demonstrate the correctives they would use for each of the errors discussed? Would the correctives used adequately address the issue of being comfortable? Remind them that there are 3 corrective methods that could be used. Physical Manipulation, Shaping and Over-correction. - Encourage students to review the tips on working with developing swimmers found on pages 12-14 of the participant guide Developing Swimmer Skills Getting Face Wet Blowing Bubbles and exhaling underwater Front Floats and Glides Back Floats and Glides Side Floats and Glides Tips for Working with Developing Swimmer General Most if not all skills can be introduced in shallow water. It is much easier for participants to learn if they feel at ease. They can concentrate on the task at hand rather than trying to stay safe. All swimmers need to understand what their bodies can do in the water in order to be comfortable. Comfort is easiest to create in an environment where the participant has the most control over what their body is doing. Therefore, the shallowest area of any pool is the perfect place to begin. Where there is no beach be sure to start them out easily and with holds that are secure and remain as close to you as possible. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 20 Remember that most peoples fear of putting their face in the water is a result of knowing that they cant breathe under water or of having water unexpectedly enter the mouth or nose. Try having them make noise, for as long as air is going out, no water should be coming in. To alleviate the discomfort of water in the eyes for beginners, be sure that they pull their hair off of their faces and tip their heads back slightly allowing excess water to roll away from the eyes rather than into the eyes. Strongly discourage rubbing of eyes as this creates further aggravation and discomfort. Medium to long hair should always be tied back when swimming. When using floatation devices for assistance be sure to use them correctly keeping in mind the buoyancy and distribution the devices provide. Be careful not to promote improper techniques early on. Parented classes Set the tone put the parents at ease, go through desired outcomes and tips for making the experience a positive one. Create an understanding parents are uncomfortable when their children are uncomfortable and vice versa. Parents should give lots of encouragement and celebrate every experience with lots of praise and affection. Create a fun atmosphere, children tend to be more open to new experiences as long as they are fun and a fuss is not created when a child should accidently gulp a mouthful of water or cry when water gets in their eyes. Properly demonstrate activities using the 4 Ds describe, demonstrate, do, debrief. Success builds confidence and confidence builds success. Un-parented preschoolers Start in the shallowest water available children need to experience the water how it feels and how it affects their movement. If knee deep is not available introduce a child to water in chest-deep. The ability to find stability in the water is key to a childs comfort level. Introduce deeper water activities in progressions. Teach basic physical principles using language and concepts they will understand. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 21 Using stairs, holds and/or a supporting wall can also work well, as long as cues are used to reinforce the movements required to re-establish a position of recovery. Have fun, play games that reinforce what they have learned. Try not to use songs that have little to no actions. Songs must be interactive and relevant to what they are learning. Dont be afraid to add new movements to old songs! Swim Kids Talk to parents and students about their fears concerning the water. As a rule most kids that are apprehensive around water have had a bad experience. Find out what that experience was. Give the parents tips and suggestions on how to make the situation comfortable, but above all remember to take your time and go slow. Teach basic physical principles using language and concepts they will understand. This will allow them to be more confident trying things on their own. Using stairs, holds and/or a supporting wall can also work well, as long as cues are used to reinforce the movements required to re-establish a position of recovery. Revert when needed to easier skills. Many children struggle with skills because they are tense. Create an understanding that if they relax the skills will become easier and they will discover that the skills require far less effort and expend far less energy. Again this is something that you could reinforce using basic physical principles. Talk to the parents about what their child can do to become more comfortable in the water so that mastery of skills can occur quicker. Teach in progressions even getting wet and submersion should be taught in progression. Remember what seems like a baby step to you can be a mountain to someone else! Children do not like the unexpected bucket of water dumped over their head, MAKE IT THEIR CHOICE!! ALLOW THEM TO INITIATE! Teens and Adults Remember that teens and adults like explanations of why certain actions cause others in the water. Make sure that you are well-versed on your physical principles and understand well enough to provide some-what detailed explanations. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 22 Session A3: Swimming Strokes and Progressions Suggested time: 90 minutes classroom Session Objectives: To understand basic physical principles that act on the swimmer To assist instructors in evaluating their own strokes To understand how proper use of equipment and physical manipulation can help a swimmers progress To assist the instructor in breaking down a stroke into its components as well as using progression as a form of correction Resources: Assistant Water Safety Instructor and Water Safety Instructor Manuals, Instructor Worksheets (Red Cross Swim Kids 1 - 10) Equipment: Flip chart paper, markers, tape, hula hoops, marshmallows (Barbells), noodles, sinkable toys, mats, black pipes, and PFDs Activity #1 Physical Principles Suggested Time: 10 minutes - Ask candidates to complete the crossword puzzle found on page15 of their participant guide. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 23 Activity #1 Crossword Puzzle Answer Key 2 ANWSER KEY 1 B U O Y A N C Y E 4 5 N 3 F O R M D R A G 6 S T A B I L I T Y E C R A T 7 R E S I S T A N C E C I O T O F I N 8 P M O 9 B 11 R A 10 N E G A T I V E M O V E M E N T S L N P S 12 P A C E U N R L C T S E I I A 13 O B L I Q U E N Clues Down 2 The point around which the weight of your body is evenly distributed 4 Reverse movements or tendencies 5 Something done or performed 8 The act or process of being propelled 9 A state of equilibrium 11 Matter retains its state of rest or velocity unless acted upon by an external force Across 1 A body in water is supported by a force equal to the weight of the water it displaces 3 The resistance caused by the shape of an object as it moves through the water 6 Firmness in position; continuance without change 7 The power offered by one thing, force to another 10 Actions that work against the desired momentum Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 24 12 A rate of activity; tempo 13 Neither perpendicular, nor parallel to a given line Activity #2 Taboo Suggested Time: 20 minutes - Cut out the Taboo cards located in appendix (insert appendix #) - Divide the group into two teams to play Taboo using the rules listed below: o The objective of the game is to get your teammates to say the keyword in bold at the top of the card without using any of the words listed below the keyword. o No part of the words or any variation of the words can be used. o No actions can be used. o If the speaker says a word that is on the card, they are buzzed and the next person comes up to try the next card. o Speakers can pass on their card and can try again after all other cards have been used. - Once participants have completed the game review each answers and see if the group knows in which Red Cross Swim Kids level each skill is first taught. - Discuss as a group Taboo Cards SITTING DIVE ENTRY STANDING HANDS CHIN WATER FRONT CRAWL FLUTTERKICK SIDE HORIZONTAL BREATHE ARM CIRCLES SIDE GLIDE FLUTTERKICK LEFT RIGHT LEADING ARM FLOATS FRONT BACK JELLY BEAN PENCIL Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 25 HEAD STARFISH WISE CHOICES SAFE DIVING DECISION HAZARDS RULES WHEN AND WHERE BACK GLIDE FLUTTEKICK FRONT SOLDIER ARMS TUMMY BACK WHIP KICK ELEMENTARY FRONT FLEXED FEET GLIDE REST RHYTHMIC BREATHING BUBBLES HEAD SIDEWAYS PATTERN UP AND DOWN SITE ORIENTATION FACILITY INSPECTION RULES WALK AROUND HAZARDS SCULLING HEAD ARMS ONLY FEET BACK FIRST SUN SMART SUNSCREEN HAT HOT CLOUDS BEACH BREASTSTROKE WHIP KICK PULL BREATHE GLIDE FRONT Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 26 RESCUE BREATHING ADULT UNCONSCIOUS LOOK, LISTEN, FEEL HEAD TILT VOMITTING TRAVELLING LEGS FITNESS ARMS WHIP FLUTTER EGGBEATER PEER INFLUENCE ALCOHOL DROWNING WATER BUDDY WISE CHOICES EGGBEATER TREADING WATER BICYCLE KICK ALTERNATING SITTING STRONG STRIDE ENTRY ABOVE HEAD STEP CLAP SURFACE VICTIM TYPE UNCONSIOUS WEAK NON-SWIMMER INJURED ASSIST SURFACE DIVE HEAD FEET FIRST SEARCH DEEP WATER REACHING ASSIST NEAR NOODLE THROWING BUOYANT VICTIM Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 27 Activity #2 Answer Key Sitting Dive Red Cross Swim Kids Level 3 Front Crawl Red Cross Swim Kids Level 3 Side Glide Red Cross Swim Kids Level 2 Floats Red Cross Swim Kids Level 1 Wise Choices Red Cross Swim Kids Level? Back Glide Red Cross Swim Kids Level 1 Back Whip Kick Red Cross Swim Kids Level 5 Rhythmic Breathing Red Cross Swim Kids Level 1 Site Orientation Red Cross Swim Kids Level 1 Sculling Red Cross Swim Kids Level 5 Sun Smart Red Cross Swim Kids Level 10 Breaststroke Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 Rescue Breathing Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 Travelling Legs Red Cross Swim Kids Level 9 Peer Influence Red Cross Swim Kids Level 9 Eggbeater Red Cross Swim Kids Level 7 Stride Entry Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 Victim Types Red Cross Swim Kids Level 6 Surface Dive Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 Throwing Assist Red Cross Swim Kids Level 6 Activity #3 Stroke Standards Suggested time: 30 minutes - Have the group decide how the following list of skills, found on pages 16 and 17 of the participant guide should be performed prior to being considered complete for the indicated level. - Ask participants to use the Red Cross instructor worksheets to revise their list for each skill based on the Red Cross evaluation criteria. Activity #3 Answer Key Front Float, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 1 Assumes stable floating position on front with face in the water Floats for at least 3 seconds in a relaxed manner Comfortably recovers to original position Back Glide with Kick, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 2 Performs back glide with basic flutter kick alternating in up and down motions Performs kick for at least 5m with body approaching horizontal Maintains near horizontal body position with arms resting alongside of body and hands at hips using effective propelling action Front Crawl, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 3 Maintains near horizontal body position, face in water, keeping head straight Flutter kick is at or near surface with relaxed feet Recovers arms above water in a controlled, alternating manner Takes one breath to the side as needed, exhaling underwater (may pause in side position for up to 2 seconds) Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 28 Rhythmic Breathing (Front crawl specific), Red Cross Swim Kids Level 4 Exhales through mouth and/ or nose underwater, head turned to side and inhales through mouth just above the surface Performs rhythmic and relaxed breathing with noticeable and effective exhalation and inhalation on each repetition Performs 15 repetitions on preferred side; ie standing with face in the water, while kicking on the edge, while kicking with a kickboard and while performing front crawl arm movements Back Whip Kick, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 5 - NOTE: Proper technique is taught and encouraged, but slight whip/ scissor kick is acceptable Body is in horizontal back glide position Keeps back, hips and thighs nearly straight Recovers legs symmetrically by bending and separating knees Pulls heels back Flexes feet and rotates outward Feet lead the movement drawing a circle (kick can be wide or narrow) Relaxed feet Breathes in a relaxed manner Glides until forward momentum slows Elementary Back, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 6 Maintains near-horizontal back glide position, face above the water at all times Keeps back, hips and thighs nearly straight Recovers legs symmetrically by bending and separating knees Pulls heels back Flexes feet and rotates outward Feet lead the movement drawing a circle (kick can be wide or narrow) Relaxed feet Slide palms slowly up the sides of the body At shoulder height, arms reach outward, fingers leading Presses hands toward feet as legs kick Breathes in a relaxed manner Coordinates symmetrical arm pull with kick, inhales during recovery phase and exhales during the power phase Glides until forward momentum slows Front Whip Kick, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 7 NOTE: Can be performed with a kickboard Arms stretched and extended over head Body is in horizontal glide position, face in water Recovers legs symmetrically by bending hips and knees Pulls heels towards buttocks, while separating knees just wider than the hips, ankles slightly outside knees Flexes feet and rotates outward Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 29 Feet lead the movement drawing a circle (kick can be wide or narrow) Whips feet and lower legs back to glide position with relaxed feet Glides until forward momentum slows Breaststroke, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 Body/ head remains at or near surface Recovers legs symmetrically by bending hips and knees Pulls heels towards buttocks, while separating knees just wider than the hips, ankles slightly outside knees Flexes feet and rotates outward Feet lead the movement drawing a circle (kick can be wide or narrow) Whips feet and lower legs back to glide position with relaxed feet Hands sweep together under chin, keeping elbows forward of shoulders Arms recover to full extension Presses extended arms/ palms apart slightly wider than shoulders Bends elbows and sweeps the forearms and hands downward and toward chest Coordinates symmetrical arm pull and whip kick Inhales during pull, exhales during kick Glides until forward momentum slows Back Crawl, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 9 Maintains near horizontal body in streamlined position with neck in line with spine Rolls body from side to side, keeping head stationary Kick is at or near the surface with relaxed feet Kick in a continuous manner Kicks from hips, knees below the surface Recovers arms in a straight and relaxed manner, no pause Recovers arms in alternating manner Arms enter water with baby finger first Arms enter and catch the water at 11:00 and 1:00 positions Extends the pull past the hips with thumb facing up Initiates pull with rigid hand and forearm (like a paddle) while keeping arm straight Continues pull with digging deep in the water, bending slightly at the elbow (gentle S pull) Breathes in a relaxed manner Coordinates body roll with recovery Front Crawl, Red Cross Swim Kids Level 10 Maintains near-horizontal body position, face in the water, keeping head straight Rolls body on long axis, no hip sway Flutterkicks from hips with relaxed feet Extends hand entry forward of head and in line with shoulders Recovers arms above the water in a controlled, alternating manner Keeps elbows high during recovery Hand catches the water at full extension point with shoulder rotation to initiate pull Executes bent arm pull Extends pull past hips Accelerates hands through the pull Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 30 Breathes to the side as needed (no pause), exhaling under water Coordinates relaxed breathing with alternating relaxed arm recovery above the water Activity #4 Stroke Standards Suggested time: 30 minutes - Discuss the following questions: 1. Were there discrepancies between what the teams decided? 2. Were key elements or evaluated criteria what the instructor worksheets listed as evaluated criteria for each skill? 3. Why do you think those discrepancies exist? 4. What problems are created when instructors do not follow the performance criteria when evaluating students? 5. What can participants do to help ensure their facility is following the guidelines properly? Activity #5 Physical Principles Suggested Time: 10 minutes -Break the group up in groups of two or three - Ask the groups to define the physical principles listed on page 17 of the participant guide. Also have them list a specific stroke that can be applied to each principle. - Once candidates have completed this, have each group share their definitions and their stroke example. - Review the definitions of each physical principle Activity #5 Physical Principles Definitions Inertia tendency of a body at rest to stay in rest (static) and a body in motion to stay in motion (dynamic) Pace a rate of activity, progress, growth, performance, etc; tempo Centre of Buoyancy the point around which the buoyant properties of your body are evenly distributed Balance a state of equilibrium; equal distribution of weight and amount Wave Drag is the resistance caused by turbulence Oblique neither perpendicular nor parallel to a given line or surface; slanting or sloping Propulsion the act or process of being propelled Frictional Drag the resistance caused by the texture of the objects surface as it moves through the water Resistance the act or power offered by one thing , force, etc to another Reaction reverse movement or tendency; an action in a reverse direction or manner Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 31 Action Something done or performed Buoyancy a body in water is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the water it displaces Centre of Mass the point around which the weight of your body is evenly distributed. Negative Movements actions that work against a desired momentum Stability firmness in position; continuance without change Form Drag the resistance caused by the shape of an object and its profile as it moves through the water Activity #6 Equipment and Progressions Suggested time: 20 minutes - Cut out the Combination Cards, located below, along the solid lines. - Split the participants into groups of four. - Give each group two combination cards. - Allow groups the time to create a three or four step progression for each card. Groups will be explaining their progressions to the other groups. - They can write the progression in their recertification guide and the group can choose which progression they will present to the rest of the participants. If time allows, each group can present both progressions. - Allow time for each group to receive feedback from the other participants on the progressions. While the groups are putting together their progressions, quickly set up four Stroke Error stations around the room. Place a peice of flip chart paper at each station with the following headings: Flutterboards, Noodles, Pull Buoys, Flippers - Using the same groups, assign each one to a station. - Have them come up with two drills for each stroke using the listed peice of equipment. - One drill should use physical manipulation and one should use shaping or over correction. - Groups will be given two minutes at each station. - Discuss answers with the whole group Combination cards: Skill Equipment Level ROLL-OVER GLIDE BLACK PIPE Red Cross Swim Kids Level 2 SIDE GLIDE SINKY TOYS Red Cross Swim Kids Level 3 FRONT CRAWL POOL MATS Red Cross Swim Kids Level 4 BACK CRAWL NOODLE Red Cross Swim Kids Level 5 ELEMENTARY BACK BARBELLS Red Cross Swim Kids Level 6 FRONT SCULL HULA HOOP Red Cross Swim Kids Level 7 EGGBEATER FLUTTERBOARD Red Cross Swim Kids Level 8 HEAD-FIRST SURFACE DIVE BALL Red Cross Swim Kids Level 9 Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 32 5. Mandatory Stroke Evaluation Session Suggested time: 30 minutes Session Objectives: To ensure WSIs can meet the Red Cross Swim Kids Level 10 Stroke performance criteria Resources: Stroke Chart and Red Cross Swim Kids 10 worksheets (one worksheet for every two candidates) Activity #1 Suggested time:20 minutes - Divide group into partners - Give each pair a Swim Kids Level 10 worksheet - Have instructors evaluate each others strokes and discuss with the WSIT any stroke challenges - Have each participant record the information on their own stroke on page 19 and 20 of their participant guide. Activity #2: Suggested time:10 minutes Group Discussion: Why do strokes deteriorate over time without practice and review Brainstorm ideas and activities that will help WSIs maintain their stroke standards (Ie: Masters swimming, Adult Lessons, lane swimming, etc) 6. Professional Development Modules, Group B: (Choose one of the two modules) Session B1: Active & Wet Suggested time: 60 minutes Pool Session Objectives: Understand the goal of Active & Wet Instill ideas for active and wet classes, Experience a host of activities and formations, Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 33 Understanding the use of at-edge activities to infuse water safety throughout your lesson Resources: Water Safety Instructor Manual Equipment: Laminated letters, laminated skills, word search mat, white board, white erase markers Activity #1 Suggested time: 10 minutes - Everyone, including the facilitator, gets in the water. - Ensure you are modeling active and wet behaviour listed below: o hair wet in the water o demonstrate o get your class moving! - Have a square circuit station set-up in the pool. Have students swim to each corner to the skill laminated station sign and get a letter repeat until all letters are collected. - Have the group spell out the words when finished: Active and Wet - The remainder of the session will be used to review ways to ensure your classes always stay active and wet. Activity #2: Laminated letters A C T I V E Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 34 A N D W E T Activity #2 Suggested time: 10 minutes - Tape a skill variation from appendix to differing aids. - Give each student one of the aids. - Before students begin ask them to think up the goal of this activity and share at the end of the lap. - Instruct students to complete a lap of the pool according to their instructions on their aid. Goal: To have students of all levels/skills swimming together; provide opportunities for success; enables participants to stay out of the formation Skill Variations Activity #2 Place the pool noodles under your arms and do the flutter kick. Hold onto the marshmallows in front of you. Blow bubbles under water while doing the flutter kick. Hold onto the kickboard and do catch-up front crawl. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 35 Using one marshmallow, do the flutter kick on your stomach while blowing bubbles. Roll to the side to take a breath. Lie with your upper body on a mat and perform the flutter kick. Do an entire lap without an aid using the 1-2-3 breathing technique. Activity #3 Suggested time: 5 minutes - Throw out sinkable toys with the laminated Top Ten Activities to do on the Wall skills taped to them. - Ask candidates to try each activity with a partner. - Next ask candidates to repeat the activity with the sinkable toys located at the edge of the pool. Top 10 Skills to Practice on the Wall 1. Underwater, yell to your friend your favorite color and see if they guess it correctly. (Skills used: submersion, exhale underwater) 2. Have a bubble war with your partner. (Skills used: exhale underwater) 3. Practice floating like different letters of the alphabet. (Skills used: buoyancy, floating) 4. Hold the opposite end of a kick board with your partner and have a flutter kick war. (Skills used: flutter kick) Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 36 5. Practice your pancake floats- your partner chooses when to flip you over. (Skills used: rollover floats, progressions to FC) 6. Lift your feet off the bottom and practice sculling with your hands to keep your head above water. (Skills used: sculling, BS arm action, surface support) 7. Hold on to the wall with both hands with your knees together against the wall, practice flexing your toes and turning out your feet. (Skills used: whip kick) 8. Sit on the wall and practice the motion of the whip kick. (Skills used: whip kick) 9. Dive down to the bottom of the pool like a dolphin. (Skills used: dolphin kick, BF) 10. Practice floating on your side. (Skills used: Side Stroke) Activity #4 Suggested time:10 minutes - Using a square formation, have candidates start in the corner and swim a skill of their choice around the square. - When they get back to the beginning, ask participants to state a safe or unsafe pool activity. As an alternate activity - Have participants state safe and unsafe behaviors at a pool Activity #5 Suggested time: 5 minutes - Using the staggered wave formation, have students swim out to you and grab a laminated picture. - When they get back to the wall have them find the pictuire that matches theirs Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 37 Laminated Pictures-Activity #5 Boat Lifejacket Sun Sunscreen Lifeguard Pool Shallow End No Diving Ice Ruler Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 38 DNS Throwing Aid Activity #6 Suggested time: 10 minutes - Set-up the students in a circle formation in deep water. - Instruct students to start five minutes of treading water. - Using the Teaching Tips word search, found on page 24 of the participant guide instruct students to search for the words that help people stay active and wet while treading water. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 39 Activity #7 Suggested time: 10 minutes - Break the group into two or three teams. - Instruct the students to start this activity in the deep end. - Have teams select a teammate to go first. This teammate must swim to the edge, climb out, and write one way they will make their lessons more active and wet on a white board. - The rest of the teammates must tread water or do vertical dolphin kick and cheer until it is their turn to go! Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 40 Session B2: Adult Learning Suggested time: 60 minutes Pool Session Objectives: To introduce candidates to the Multiple Intelligences To introduce candidates to the Red Cross Swim Basics Program for Adults and Teens To familiarize candidates with the Red Cross Swim Basics worksheet To allow candidates to plan a Red Cross Swim Basics activity to meet the needs of specific Multiple Intelligences learner types To allow candidates the opportunity to apply classroom learning in a pool setting To allow candidates to deliver a Red Cross Swim Basics activity which will meet the needs of a specific learner type from amongst the Multiple Intelligences Resources: Multiple Intelligences Chart-found on page 25 of participant guide Equipment: Red cross Swim Basics Worksheets, flip chart paper and markers Red Cross Water Safety Instructors have successfully integrated the needs of Auditory, Visual, Tactile and Kinesthetic learners in their Water Safety classes everyday. New research has identified has identified nine intelligences, called multiple intelligences, that are common to all human beings. Based on this research Water Safety Instructors will now be able to meet learner needs, even more successfully, by using the multiple intelligences to target learners. Activity #1 Learning about Multiple Intelligences Suggested Time: 30 minutes - Read each of the multiple intelligence categories to the candidates. - Ask candidates to follow along in their participant guides and identify which intelligence(s) they use to learn (high school, college, WSI course, etc.). - Have participants answer the following questions: o Which intelligence(s) do you gravitate to under normal learning conditions? o What about in times of stress? o Can you give an example? o Why do you think that this may be? - Discuss what value the Multiple Intelligences may have to a Water Safety Instructor while (s)he teaches an adult to learn to swim. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 41 - In a Red Cross Swim Basics class how would a WSI recognize the different learning types including, a Naturalist learner, or an Existential learner, or a Musical/Rhythmic learner, etc.? - Distribute a Red Cross Swim Basics worksheet to the candidates and allow them time to review it. Be prepared to discuss Red Cross Swim Basics classes if the candidates are not familiar with them. - Guide the candidates as they select one item from the worksheet and one of the nine Multiple Intelligences. If possible, ensure that there are no duplications. - Allow the candidates a few minutes to review the worksheets and plan a three to five minute warm-up activity that matches the intelligence with the chosen worksheet item. - Assign each candidate one item from the Red Cross Swim Basics worksheet (each candidate must be given the same item). Ask the candidates to remember what the item was when they get to the pool. Multiple Intelligence chart: Verbal/Linguistic Thinks and learns through written and spoken words; has the ability to memorize facts, fill in workbooks, take written tests and enjoys reading. Body/Kinesthetic Learns through physical movement and body wisdom; has a sense of knowing through body memory. Intrapersonal Enjoys and learns through self-reflection, metacognition (thinking about thinking); working alone; has an awareness of inner spiritual realities. Logical/Mathematical Thinks deductively; deals with numbers and recognizes abstract patterns. Musical/Rhythmic Recognizes tonal patterns and environmental sounds; learns through rhyme, rhythm and repetition. Existential Is concerned with ultimate life issues like love, death and philosophy. Learns in context with meaning. Visual/Spatial Thinks in as well as visualizes images and pictures; has the ability to create graphic designs; communicates with diagrams and graphics. Interpersonal Learns and operates through one-to-one relationships, group relationships and communication; also depends on all of the other intelligences. Naturalist Loves nature and the out of doors. Enjoys classifying species like flora and fauna. Red Cross Swim Water Safety Instructor Recertification Workshop April 2010 March 2012 Facilitator Guide P a g e | 42 Activity #2 Applying the Multiple Intelligences Suggested time:30 minutes - Have the candidates lead the three to five minute warm-up activity that they planned in activity one. - The candidate should indicate before they begin what the worksheet item is and what type of learner intelligence they are going to target. - At the end of the activity, the candidate or IT can read the definition for the learner intelligence and the group can discuss how the activity would, (or would not) successfully meet the needs of the targeted learner. - As a discussion activity, (this could be used as a closing activity or an alternate activity), have each candidate tell the class how they would meet the needs of their learner type -from the earlier activity - while instructing their assigned item. It should be apparent that there are many ways to meet the needs of many different learners within the same class, while teaching the same stroke or skill.

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