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www.pwc.com.au Final – Release v1.0 Stakeholder Engagement Guide Department for Child Protection and Family Support October 2015 Out-of-Home Care Reform Stage 1: Evidence and Validatio n

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www.pwc.com.au Final – Release v1.0

Stakeholder Engagement Guide

Department for Child Protection and Family Support

October 2015

Out-of-Home Care Reform

Stage 1: Evidence and Validation

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This document has been prepared by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in our capacity as advisors to the Department for Child Protection and Family Support (WA) in accordance with our engagement letter dated 18 August 2015.

The information, statements, statistics, material and commentary (together the “Information”) used in this document have been prepared by PwC from publicly available material and from information provided by the Department for Child Protection and Family Support. PwC has relied upon the accuracy, currency and completeness of the Information provided to it by the Department for Child Protection and Family Support and takes no responsibility for the accuracy, currency, reliability or correctness of the Information and acknowledges that changes in circumstances after the time of publication may impact on the accuracy of the Information. The Information may change without notice and PwC is not in any way liable for the accuracy of any information used or relied upon by a third party.

Furthermore PwC has not independently validated or verified the Information provided to it for the purpose of this document and the content of this document does not in any way constitute an audit or assurance of any of the Information contained herein.

PwC has provided this advice solely for the benefit of the Department for Child Protection and Family Support and disclaims all liability and responsibility (including arising from its negligence) to any other parties for any loss, damage, cost or expense incurred or arising out of any person using or relying upon the Information.

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Table of Contents1. Introduction and overview 4

1.1 Purpose 4

1.2 Background 4

1.3 Guide structure 5

2. OOHC Reform - Stage 1 6

2.1 Objectives 6

2.2 Stage 1: Evidence and Validation 6

2.3 Reform Process and Timeline (Reasonable Expectations) 6

2.3.1. Profiling the Needs of Existing Children and Young People in Care 7

2.3.2.Benchmarking and Baselining Costs 7

2.3.3. A Dynamic and Responsive Market 8

3. Stakeholder Engagement 10

3.1 The Challenge 10

3.2 Internal Stakeholders 10

3.2.1 Governance – Roles and Responsibilities 10

3.2.2 OOHC Reform: Project Governance and Workstreams 11

3.3External Stakeholders 12

3.3.1 Champions and Influencers 12

4. Engagement Plan 13

4.1 Overview 13

4.2 Events Schedule 13

4.3 Stakeholder Engagement Plan 14

5. Closing Remarks 15

5.1 Summary 15

6. Appendix 16

6.1 References / Further Reading 16

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1. Introduction and overview1.1 Purpose

This Guide is intended as a source of information and reference about the engagement approach with stakeholders on Stage 1 activities of the funding framework aspects that will support the Out-of-Home Care (OOHC) Reform that is currently being undertaken by the Department for Child Protection and Family Support (the Department). This document sets out the strategy, approach and actions for engaging in a collaborative manner with all stakeholders, including:

The objectives OOHC Reform Stage 1 is seeking to achieve;

Principles for engagement with stakeholders; and

The planned engagement approach and timing.

1.2 BackgroundOut-of-Home Care is the provision of care arrangements outside the family home to children who are in need of protection and care, through the application of the Children and Community Services Act 2004 Western Australia (WA).

The Out - o f- Home C a r e St r ate g ic Dir e ct i ons in Weste r n Aust r alia 2 01 5 -2 0 2 0 Di s cussion Paper (the Discussion Paper) was released for consultation in late 2014. The paper proposed a strategic platform to further advance and strengthen the WA OOHC system. Approximately 50 written submissions were received from a range of government and community services sector organisations, inter-agency committees and individuals.

Earlier this year the Department released its R esp o nse to Ou t - o f- Home C a r e Strate g ic Dir e ct i ons in Weste r n Aust r alia 2 015 -2 0 2 0 Disc u ssion p a per (the Response Paper) in which it outlined a summary of feedback from public consultation together with revisions to and confirmation of Strategic Direction initiatives, under a new program of work titled Out-of-Home Care Reform. A key deliverable as part of the Reform is anOut-of-Home Care Reform Plan (OOHC Reform Plan) which the Department envisages releasing early in 2016, following which a staged, incremental implementation program will occur.

To support the broader OOHC reform initiatives and the development of the OOHC Reform Plan, the Department have engaged PricewaterhouseCoopers Australia Ltd (PwC) to undertake key activities which will help to inform the development of the OOHC Reform Plan and form the foundation of the future funding model for the OOHC system in WA. Stage 1 activity: Building and Validating Evidence is one (1) of a range of initiatives under the broader package of OOHC Reforms being led by the Department. P w C i s only contracted for Stage 1 a c t ivi t y , acting as an external, independent advisor, drawing on our national and international knowledge and experience of working in this sector.

Consistent with the WA Government’s D e liv e r ing C o m munity Se r vices in Pa r t n e r s h ip Policy ( 2 011 ) , this Guide provides the approach to partnership and collaboration between Government and stakeholders in the OOHC system to consult, and where appropriate co-develop and test tools, data and evidence gathered throughout our work.

The key activities (described more fully in the following sections of this Guide) to inform the OOHC Reform Plan and future development of the OOHC system are:

Profiling the needs of children and young people in OOHC;

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Benchmarking and baselining the costs involved in the OOHC system; and

Considering funding arrangements and service models.

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Undertaking these activities, with you as stakeholders, will enable the development of a robust and validated evidence base. Tthese activities will inform the Department and WA Government regarding the existing budget picture and future budget requirements in order to adequately service an OOHC system of the future.

The activities we outline must build on and complement the work already undertaken to date, contributions and advice received from the stakeholder community, and all other parallel activities currently underway, such as the ‘Review of Community Sector Services Expenditure’, being undertaken by Terry Simpson.

1.3 Guide structureThis Guide is intended to be a working document, providing the consultation framework for the activities we intend to undertake and links to relevant supporting information.

Ultimately this Guide is designed to outline the engagement approach and plan of action for consultation with you. At different stages of the process, the engagement approach will be tailored, where possible, to accommodate changing needs of stakeholder groups, and in order to be consistent with and to complement any policy or political imperatives that as yet are unknown.

The Guide is structured as

follows: Section 2: OOHC

Reform - Stage1 Objectives Stage 1: Evidence and Validation Reform Process and Timeline (Reasonable Expectations)

Section 3: Stakeholder Engagement The Challenge Internal Stakeholders External Stakeholders

Section 4: Engagement Plan Overview Events Schedule Engagement Project Plan

Section 5: Closing Remarks Summary

Section 6: Appendix References / Further Reading

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2. OOHC Reform - Stage 12.1 Objectives

The overarching reform objective is to further focus the system to support children and young people in OOHC to experience improved life outcomes. The system is currently facing challenges, with some of the drivers for reform including rising numbers of Aboriginal children and young people in care, a lack of capacity in the system, inconsistency in measuring outcomes, and unsustainable funding arrangements with the community services sector.

The five (5) Strategic Directions confirmed in the Response Paper set out the values and principles underpinning the reform of the OOHC system:

1. An Out-of-Home Care system that is driven by the needs of the child;

2. An Out-of-Home Care system that values and promotes stability and certainty for children;

3. A responsive and sustainable Out-of-Home Care system with capacity;

4. An Out-of-Home Care sector that is accountable; and

5. An Out-of-Home Care sector that is consistent.

It is upon this vision that we, collectively, embark on the design and development of the future OOHC system and funding model in WA.

2.2 Stage 1: Evidence and ValidationIn order to design and implement effective reform, we need to establish an evidence base that provides robust data about the needs of children and young people in OOHC, and a better understanding and transparency about the cost of services, and how well those services are positioned to respond to these needs. Ultimately, the developing service system needs to be dynamic and adaptable to respond to the ever increasing and changing needs of the children and young people it serves.

The Department have now engaged PwC to build a robust understanding of the needs of children in OOHC and develop an evidence base for appropriate funding for the full spectrum of these needs. This work will build on work already undertaken and lead to an informed OOHC Reform Plan, to be released in early 2016.

2.3 Reform Process and Timeline (Reasonable Expectations)

The activities we outline below are required in order to build the evidence base. We understand feedback received from the sector has indicated that the timelines for reform are ambitious, to which the Department have positively responded by moving the timeline from mid 2015 implementation, to early 2016. The forward timeline, while remaining ambitious, is necessary and achievable with your collaboration.

The work we need to undertake between now and early 2016 is to build the detail and the evidence, upon which a detailed implementation strategy for the next 3-5 years can be designed (OOHC Reform Plan). PwC’s work with you and the Department aims to provide that detail and evidence. We plan to undertake this work across the following activity workstreams.

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2.3.1. Profiling the Needs of Existing Children and Young People in Care

In its Response Paper, the Department, under Strategic Direction 1: An OOHC system that is driven by the needs of the child, described the need to consistently, accurately and efficiently identify the complexity of a child’s need. Early work undertaken by the Department suggested the adoption of a Complexity Assessment Tool (CAT). It was envisaged that this tool might ultimately also be used to inform resource requirements to meet a child’s identified needs.

Further assessment and analysis undertaken by the Department and PwC of the CAT and the applicability of attaching funding thresholds to different ‘levels’ of assessed need, has concluded that there would be problems associated with using such a tool for this purpose. The analysis also concluded that this mechanism would not be sufficiently robust, and that the tool should not be used for anything other than its original design purpose (as an additional assessment layer ‘screening tool’ to support Senior Practitioners working with case workers in relation to already identified children with highly complex needs and behaviours [Reference: Department for Families and Communities SA, CAT Reference Guide]).

In order for the Department and the broader community services sector to better understand the spectrum of needs of children and young people, we need to undertake a needs profiling exercise. We have recommended a sampling exercise, as an alternative to the use of the CAT, which focusses in a more targeted way on an holistic assessment of need across the spectrum of children and young people in OOHC.

We propose a ‘one-off’ targeted sampling exercise which uses a tool that achieves a less subjective, more consistent and directive needs assessment. It builds on the nine (9) dimensions of well-being within the existing Departmental needs assessment and care planning framework. We are currently developing the sampling ‘Needs Assessment Profiling Tool’ (NAPT), and will shortly b e undert a k i n g consultat i on exercises w i t hi n a s mall n u m b e r of Pract i t i on e r Focus Gro u p s i n or d er to s e ek i n p ut and feed b a ck . This will involve operational staff from both the Department and the community services sector.

Outputs from the NAPT sampling exercise will enable us to extrapolate data and build a profile of all children currently in OOHC in WA, including the spectrum of needs that need to be met. We will test these outputs with the sector through existing forums such as the Community Sector Roundtable, Children, Youth and Families Agencies Association (CYFAA), and the Alliance for Children at Risk (Alliance) meetings and purposely convened Focus Groups and Workshops.

2.3.2. Benchmarking and Baselining CostsAccompanying the above activity on profiling the needs of children and young people in OOHC, we need to develop a better understanding of the costs of services to meet existing and future projected needs of children and young people. This evidence is vital in order to inform resource allocation, service budgets and the future service system, as the Department moves away from standalone program funding towards a more integrated and dynamic framework for funding OOHC.

We propose to:

Research unit and service costs associated with servicing the spectrum of needs of children and young people in OOHC;

Compare and contrast these findings with the range of cost research and data already available nationally and from other Australian jurisdictions;

Form recommendations regarding Commonwealth and State funding sources that

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should or could meet certain minimum costs, and consider options for removing impediments where they exist (for example: Medicare; Department for Human Services (Centrelink); other relevant WA State

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Departments such as Health, Education, Mental Health Commission and the Disability Services Commission);

Run specific workshops and focus groups with the community services sector to seek data input on service and operating costs;

Test these outputs with the community services sector through existing forums such as the Community Sector Roundtable, CYFAA/Alliance meetings and purposely convened Focus Groups and Workshops with the broader set of stakeholders;

In consultation with you, we will merge the outputs from the sampling exercise (NAPT) with the unit and service cost data to form a reasonable threshold of costs per service and package of services;

Draw on the outcomes of the above steps to develop a framework (‘a hierarchy of services and associated funding levels’), to be tested with and informed by the community services sector; and

Form and test recommendations regarding needs profile versus costs of services and service alignment with the current OOHC system.

The activities above will complement and build upon the ‘Review of Community Sector Services Expenditure’, being undertaken by Terry Simpson.

2.3.3. A Dynamic and Responsive MarketIn the Department’s Response Paper, Strategic Direction 2: An OOHC system that values and promotes stability for children in care a nd Strategic Direction 3: A responsive and sustainable OOHC system with capacity, make reference to a review of funded services and contracting of OOHC arrangements. This review is discussed together with initiatives, yet to be determined, that support growth in the community services sector, specifically seeking opportunities to further engage with and evolve the use of Aboriginal community controlled organisations (ACCO’s). A key expectation from Strategic Direction 2 and 3 activities is a broadening of the role and capacity of the community services sector such that stable care and care services that meet the growing complexity of child need is provided.

There are other parallel initiatives under Strategic Direction 2 and 3, such as policy, legislative, process, and workforce realignments that are out of scope in the context of this Guide. However, these initiatives will be necessary, as complementary activities, to build a comprehensive package of initiatives which provide the medium and longer term reform of the system.

Funding Arrangements and Service Models

Work undertaken under the ‘Review of Community Sector Services Expenditure’, by Terry Simpson must be built upon in order to develop the forward plan. PwC’s activities under 2.3.1 and 2.3.2 will complement and build on this work. We propose to:

Form evidence based recommendations regarding existing funding arrangements, the grants and funding system, Service Level Agreements (SLA’s), contracts, and performance metrics (service Key Performance Indicators – KPI’s); and

Test indicative findings (building on the above) with stakeholders regarding service models and service system design.

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Our aim will be to use the evidence gathered by activities undertaken at 2.3.1 and 2.3.2 (above) to inform the design and development of the future OOHC system. This will help shape an OOHC system that is holistic, dynamic and services the spectrum of needs of children and young people, and supports the development of the overarching OOHC Reform Plan to be released early in 2016.

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3. Stakeholder Engagement3.1 The Challenge

A large range of stakeholders are interested in providing input to these reform activities. Stakeholders are both internal and external, and each possesses a unique perspective and a different role to play in the redevelopment of the OOHC system. While the landscape is complex, establishing and nurturing excellent relationships, developing a shared agenda, and fostering collaboration will go a long way towards ensuring engagement is meaningful and effective. This will be our aim.

The work undertaken to date has enabled us to develop an engagement plan, building upon the existing forums such as the Community Sector Roundtable and the CYFAA/Alliance meetings. The principles we will adopt during our engagement include:

Openly discussing with all stakeholders the overarching engagement plan and its components;

Proactively engaging with internal and external stakeholders to support buy-in, endorsement and to confirm that we are all ‘singing from the same song sheet’; and

Identifying and building relationships with community sector bodies/representatives and understanding how to best leverage existing structures, processes and communication avenues.

3.2 Internal StakeholdersInternal stakeholders are those within the Department or the WA Government. The Department’s stakeholders comprise the Corporate executive team, District Directors,Team Leaders, Child Protection Workers and other key staff currently working for or on behalf of the Department.

The proactive support of internal stakeholders is vital if we are to engage positively with external stakeholders. Continual inclusion of key staff in meetings, emails, and as ‘sounding boards’, to endorse key activities will be necessary going forward.

WA Government stakeholders include, but are not limited to: the Premier; the Treasurer; the Minister for Child Protection; and key executive and other staff in the Departments of the Premier and Cabinet, Treasury, Health, Education, Corrective Services; the Mental Health Commission and the Disability Services Commission.

3.2.1 Governance – Roles and ResponsibilitiesWe provide a high level Governance Schematic on the following page (section 3.2.2). This schematic depicts the key workstreams of activity in relation to which this Stakeholder Engagement Guide refers. You will note the role of the OOHC Reform Group as the Department’s Executive Reference Group, overseeing the package of OOHC reforms. The activities this Stakeholder Engagement Guide supports are those depicted in the centre of the schematic.

You will also note colour coded symbols representing:

Practitioner Focus Groups;

Workshops; and

Focus Groups and Workshops.

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The above symbols are used later in this Guide outlining indicative consultation points of the relevant style. General progress updates and feedback / consultation regarding our work will occur using the existing CYFAA/Alliance and the Community Sector Roundtable meeting schedule.

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3.3 External StakeholdersExternal stakeholders include community sector providers and peak bodies. These include, in no particular order (and are not limited to):

Community Sector Roundtable (Department advisory body comprising CEO’s of key community sector organisations);

Community services sector interagency forums including Children, Youth and Families Agencies Associaton (CYFAA), and the Alliance for Children at Risk (Alliance);

Foster Carer Association of WA; Family Inclusion Network WA CREATE Foundation; Yorganop; Kinship Connections; Djooraminda; Other Aboriginal community controlled organisations (ACCOs); Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representatives / groups / bodies; Aboriginal Medical Services (AMS); Western Australian Council of Social Services (WACOSS); Relevant Department staff – (including Aboriginal Engagement and Coordination directorate); and Peak disability bodies.

PwC and the Department intend to utilise existing forums where possible, such as the Community Sector Roundtable and the CYFAA/Alliance. Where possible we will encourage ‘like’ organisations (e.g.: Indigenous groups) to come together for consultation purposes where this is practical/appropriate. We intend facilitating purposely designed focus groups and workshops (as mentioned at 3.2.1, above) on the key workstream activity areas. An indicative plan for these focus groups and workshops is provided in Section 4 of this Guide.

It is worth reiterating that this Guide is intended to be a working document, outlining the engagement approach and plan of action for consultation with you. The plan is intended to be indicative and as we move forward, at different stages of the process, the plan will be added to and tailored where possible, to accommodate changing needs of stakeholder groups. The timing and number of focus groups/workshops in the Engagement Plan is proposed, rather than set in concrete. The number of these events will be determined by the depth and quality of input received.

3.3.1 Champions and InfluencersThese reforms provide an opportunity for key individuals within the community services sector to work in partnership with the Department’s practitioners and personnel. The sector will have an opportunity to participate collaboratively and champion reform activities to help support the development an OOHC system that is responsive to the needs of children and young people. We encourage key individuals who wish to champion and influence the development of these reform activities to participate, acting as mentors within the service system and sector.

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4. Engagement Plan4.1 Overview

The Stakeholder Engagement Plan on the following page outlines the indicative dates and forward schedule for the activities the Department have engaged PwC to support. The plan depicts anticipated periods of activities for:

Profiling the needs for children and young people in OOHC;

Benchmarking and baselining costs; and

Funding arrangements and service models.

4.2 Events ScheduleYour attention is additionally drawn to the lower half of the Engagement Plan as this depicts the anticipated scheduling of consultation sessions, specifically the timing of:

Practitioner Focus Groups;

Workshops; and

Focus Groups and Workshops.

Through the CYFAA/Alliance and Community Sector Roundtable schedule of meetings, we will seek input and feedback on the plan to support the right balance and number of Focus Groups and Workshops are put in place to serve the needs of the activities being undertaken.

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R epor

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PFS

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Stag

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4.3 Stakeholder Engagement Plan: OOHC Reform – Stage 1Indicative dates for Stage 1: Evidence & Validation (keys activities & consultation approach)

Sep 15 Oct 15 Nov 15 Dec 15 Jan 16 Feb 16 Mar 16 Apr 16 May 16 June 16 Jul 16Phase Week commencing 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 2 9 16 23 30 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 7 14 21 28 4 11 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27OOHC Reform Group Project update meetings (CPFS / PwC) Profiling the needs of children and young people in OOHC

• Engage with senior practitioners via targeted focusDevelop and deploy the Needs Assessment Profile Tool (NAPT)

Update and integrate

groups on design of revised needs assessment profiletool (NAPT), including details of drop down menus

• Develop NAPT with drop down boxes against the 9 dimensions

• Deploy NAPT to practitioners for high costs / complexity CYP plus 300 targeted clients

• Review feedback and inputs from revised needs profile tool and update as appropriate

• Match profiles with benchmarking / baselining dataBenchmarking / baselining costsBaseline current costs

Research and benchmark costs

• Collect invoicing and payment data from the Department’s Finance & Grants Units

• Research cost data across other jurisdictions• Hold workshops & focus groups with

community sector to test and challenge cost data collected

Funding arrangements and service models• Develop benchmarking findings with

community sector representativesTest the outcomesof base lining

Test potential for

• Seek input regarding— funding models and operation costs— service system design

future reforms Market management/competitive service model designConsultation

Communicate key messages and engage stakeholders

• Practitioner focus group s to inform and validate NAPT development

• Benchmarking & Baselining Costs• Funding Arrangements & Service Models• Use information gathered to inform project

decisions and further communication efforts• Explain the objectives, planned

timeframes, areas where consultation is sought and use of the NAPT;Benchmarking & Baselining exercises etc…

CYFAA/Alliance &

CYFAA/Alliance; OOHC Conference &

Community Sector

Community Sector Community Sector

Indicative date for broader OOHC Reform Plan release

• Engage with Treasury and Premier and Cabinet as appropriate to ensure buy in

MinisterialAdvisory Council

Roundtable & FINWA Forum

Community SectorRoundtable

Roundtable &CYFAA Alliance

Roundtable & CYFAA Alliance

Community SectorRoundtable & CYFAA Alliance

Community SectorRoundtable & CYFAA Alliance

Community SectorRoundtable & CYFAA Alliance

Community SectorRoundtable & CYFAA Alliance

Community SectorRoundtable & CYFAA Alliance

• Community sector representatives OOHC Reform OOHC

ReformOOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

OOHC Reform

Final

report

Indicativefindings report

Draft report • Departmental forums/staff

• Develop draft findings and recommendations

report, provide to the Department for approval and publis

hing (electronically or otherwise)

• Consult with stakeholders

• Develop

draft report, incorporating feedback received

and provide to the Department for approval and publishing

• Consult

with stakeholders

Working Group

Working Group

Working Group

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PwC

Working Group Working Group Working Group Working Group Working Group Working Group Working Group

Final report

• Develop final report considering all feedback on previous versions and provide to CPFS for approval

• Recommendations to Sector, the Department, etc..

Key Activities Progress meeting General OOHC Practitioner Focus Benchmarking Funding arrangement focus

Indicative findings / Draft / Final Holiday(CPFS / PwC) consultation Group workshops groups and workshops period

OOHC Reform – Stage 1: Evidence & Validation

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5. Closing Remarks5.1 Summary

This marks an exciting opportunity to inform the design and development of the OOHC system in WA. Building robust evidence about the needs and service costs of children and young people in OOHC in this state will provide the foundation upon which the broader set of OOHC reforms can be achieved.

PwC welcomes the opportunity to support the Department and the community services sector in this endeavour. We look forward to building the evidence base with you, bringing PwC’s external and independent view, advice and experience, and utilising a collaborative engagement process to help shape future reform of the OOHC system.

Building a system that is focussed on securing the best outcomes for children and young people, and a system that delivers services of the highest possible quality to meet individualised needs, means that we must combine our efforts and work collaboratively in order to:

Inform the type and mix of services the OOHC system requires, not just for today but into the future;

Maximise opportunities for market development and be open to considering new partnerships and new models for delivering services; and

Enable, over time, real user choice and provider contestability in a market that is more dynamically able to respond to meet the needs of children and young people.

Again, we look forward to working with you to deliver these important and exciting elements of the broader OOHC reform in WA.

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6. Appendix6.1 References / Further Reading

1. The Government of Western Australia: D e l i v e r i ng C o mmun i ty S e r vi ces i n Par t n e rsh i p Pol i cy ( 2 011)

2. The Department of Child Protection and Family Support: R es p on s e to Ou t - of - Ho m e C are S tra te g i c D i rec t i ons i n Western Aus t ral i a 201 5 - 2 0 2 0 D i scuss i on Pap e r

3. The Department of Child Protection and Family Support: Ou t - of - Home C a r e Stra t e gi c D i rec t i ons i n Western Austral i a 2 01 5 - 2 0 2 0 - O n e Pager

4. The Department of Child Protection and Family Support: Ou t - of - Home C a r e Stra t e gi c D i rec t i ons i n Western Austral i a 2 01 5 - 2 0 2 0 - D i scuss i on P a p er

5. The Department of Child Protection and Family Support’s set of original Consultation Papers:

Out - of - Home R e p osi t i on i n g of t h e OO H C system - C o nsultat i on p a p er

Fund i ng for p r e v en t i on and reuni f i cat i on se r vi ces

C are and f u nd i ng p lan n i n g for c hi ldren i n Out - of - H om e C are - C onsultat i on P a p er

R es p i te care i n t h e Out - of - Home C a r e system - C onsu l tat i on p a p er

6. Australian Department of Social Services: Updated Costs of Children Using Australian Budget Standards: h tt p s://www . dss . g o v. au/o ur - res p o nsi b i l i ties/fa m i l i e s - and - c hi ldren / p u b l i cat i on s- art i cles/u p date d - costs- of - c hi ldre n - usi n g- austral i a n - b ud g e t - stan d ar d s? H T ML

7. Parliament of Australia: Child abuse and protection in Australia:h tt p :// w w w . a p h . gov . au/ A b out _ Parl i ament/ Parl i a me n tary _ D e p ar t m e nts/ P arl i a m entary_ L i b rary/ p u b s / B N /0 8 09 / C h i ldA b use

8. The economic costs of child abuse and neglect CFCA Resource Sheet September 2014:h tt p s://aif s . g o v. au/cfca / p u b l i cat i ons/ec o nomi c - costs - c hi l d -a b u s e - an d - n e g lect

9. Child protection and Out-of-Home Care performance indicators:h tt p :// w w w . a i h w.go v . au / Wor k Area / DownloadAsse t . as p x? i d = 644245 5 2 97

10. ACWA Submission Inquiry into Out of Home Care in Australia: h tt p :// w ww . ap h .gov . au / D o cume n tStore . as h x ? i d = 6 8 2 a 717 0 - e73a - 45f e - 8 d0c- e639 2 6a 1 d50 0 &su b I d = 3 0 2 010

11. Families, policy and the law, Selected essays on contemporary issues for Australia, Collection – May 2014:

h tt p s://aif s . g o v. au / p u b l i cat i ons/fam i l i e s - p ol i c y - an d - l aw/1 5 - c hi ldr e n - out -h o m e - c are - system

12. NSW Government - Costing your services:h tt p :// w w w . ad h c . nsw . go v. au/sp/sector _ r eform/ f i na n c i al _ man a g e m ent/cost i n g - your - serv i c es

13. BCG Report NSW Government Out of Home Care Review Comparative and Historical Analysis September 2009:

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h tt p :// w ww . comm u n i ty. n s w.gov . au/docs w r/ _ a ssets/ma i n/docu m ents/ b c g _ re p ort. p df

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14. Parliamentary Committee report ‘Out of Home Care’ 19 August 2015:h tt p :// w w w . a p h . gov . au/P a rliamentar y _B u s i ness / C o m m i ttees/Senate / C o m muni t y_Affa i rs/ Ou t _ of _ h ome _ care/ R e p ort

15. Therapeutic residential care in Australia: Taking stock and looking forward NCPC Issues No. 35 – November 2011:h tt p s://aif s . g o v. au/cfca / p u b l i cat i ons/ th er a p eu t i c -re s i dentia l - care - austral i a - t a k i n g - stoc k - an d / i ntro d uct i on

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