What is XML and Why Should You Care?

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<ul><li><p>What is XML and Why Should YouCare?</p><p>Deborah Aleyne Lapeyre Mulberry Technologies, Inc.17 West Jefferson St.Suite 207Rockville, MD 20850Phone: 301/315-9631Fax: 301/315-8285info@mulberrytech.comhttp://www.mulberrytech.com </p><p>Version 1.0 (January 2006)2006 Mulberry Technologies, Inc.</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?Administrivia......................................................................................................................1</p><p> What is XML?</p><p> What XML Means.............................................................................................................2</p><p> XML Works Through Tags...............................................................................................2</p><p> XML Documents...............................................................................................................3</p><p> How XML works</p><p> An XML Document is a Sequence of Elements.............................................................3</p><p> XML Elements...............................................................................................................5</p><p> Elements Contain Other Elements.................................................................................5</p><p> Elements Identify Many Kinds of Content.....................................................................6</p><p> Attributes Add Further Description...............................................................................6</p><p> Technical Note: Editing XML Files...............................................................................7</p><p> What XML Isnt.............................................................................................................7</p><p>XML Is a Data Format</p><p> XML Unites/Divides Two Very Different Data Visions...................................................8</p><p> One XML Document Produces Many Results</p><p> Employee Record Example.....................................................................................13</p><p> Why Use XML?.............................................................................................................16</p><p> Real World Examples of XML</p><p> XML is a Metalanguage...........................................................................................16</p><p> New XML Markup Languages.....................................................................................17</p><p> XML Initiatives (Very Partial List)..............................................................................17</p><p>Parts of an XML Application</p><p> Logical Components of an XML Application.................................................................27</p><p> Component 1: XML Document....................................................................................28</p><p> Component 2: The Document Model...........................................................................28</p><p> DTDs / Schemas Express Rules ..................................................................................29</p><p> Why Use a DTD or Schema?.......................................................................................29</p><p> To Share Information, Share the DTD / Schema .........................................................30</p><p> Current XML Modeling/Constraint Languages...........................................................30</p><p>Page i</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p> Component 3: Formatting (and Behavior).................................................................31</p><p> Remember What XML Looks Like Without Formatting.............................................31</p><p> What We Would Like to See (Print or Screen)............................................................33</p><p> XML Design Feature....................................................................................................33</p><p> Display Specifications Give Instructions.....................................................................34</p><p> Component 4: XML Transformation</p><p> XSLT for XML............................................................................................................36</p><p> Why This Is Exciting....................................................................................................36</p><p> Component 5: XML Repository...................................................................................37</p><p> Content Management Using an XML Repository........................................................37</p><p> XML in Non-XML Databases......................................................................................38</p><p> Lots of XML is Managed in File Systems....................................................................38</p><p>Conclusion</p><p> The Big News: XML DOES NOT DO ANYTHING!.....................................................39</p><p> You (and Your Software) Can Do a Lot with XML........................................................39</p><p> The Good News: You Can Do XML and Benefit...........................................................40</p><p>Where to Get More Information</p><p> The Source for XML and Related Information...............................................................40</p><p> General XML Information on the Web...........................................................................41</p><p> Books on XML Concepts (Not So Technical)................................................................41</p><p> XML Books We Recommend (More Technical)............................................................41</p><p> Other Information Sources..............................................................................................42</p><p>Colophon............................................................................................................................43</p><p>Page ii</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 1</p><p>AdministriviaC Questions are always in order</p><p>C Why this talk</p><p>C Anything else?</p><p>slide 2</p><p>Where We Are Not Going in This TalkC Specific XML vocabularies/languages (UbXML, IFX, DocBook, etc.)</p><p>C XML for Ecommerce, eBusiness, B2B, B2C</p><p>C JDF (Job Definition Format)</p><p>C PPML (Personalized Print Markup Language)</p><p>C Content syndication (PRISM, et al.)</p><p>C Interchange and packaging of XML (SOAP, XML-RPC, etc.)</p><p>C How to solve your particular business problems</p><p>C Specific XML tools</p><p>slide 3</p><p>Where We Are Going Today:XML as ContentXML as the text and the data (content)</p><p>C What is XML</p><p>C How XML works</p><p>C Why XML is important</p><p>C Typical components of an XML application</p><p>Page 1</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>What is XML?</p><p>slide 4</p><p>The Word XML is Used to Mean:C An open standard (well ... a W3C Recommendation) that provides </p><p>C a data format</p><p>C a data modeling language</p><p>C The use of XML-formatted data in an application (like a browser)</p><p>C A metalanguage for creating markup languages </p><p>C A set of associated recommendations and specifications(style, transformation, query, link, APIs, etc.)</p><p>slide 5</p><p>XML Works Through TagsA tag is a word surrounded by pointy brackets411</p><p>C Start tag marks start of some data</p><p>C End tag marks end of some data</p><p>Page 2</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 6</p><p>XML DocumentsC In XML jargon, your data (no matter what form)</p><p>is called a document</p><p>C A document is a coherent, ordered collection of information </p><p>C journal article</p><p>C invoice</p><p>C reference book</p><p>C chapter in a reference book</p><p>C sales catalog</p><p>C drug monograph(Sometimes called document instance or just instance)</p><p>How XML works</p><p>slide 7</p><p>An XML Document is a Sequence of ElementsDocuments</p><p>C are made up of Elements</p><p>C consisting of Markup (tags)</p><p>C ... and Element ContentEconomics for Everyone</p><p>New York</p><p>This chapter focuses on the role of optical fibersas a communication channel in lightwave systems. We usegeometrical optics to explain the guiding mechanism andintroduce the related basic concepts. </p><p>Page 3</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 8</p><p>Sample XML Document: A Chapter</p><p>Mysterious DoingsIt was a dark and stormy night ...</p><p>slide 9</p><p>Sample XML Document: A Recipe</p><p> 3 eggs 1/4 cup milk </p><p>Break the eggs into a bowl.Add the milk and mix with a fork.</p><p>Pour the mixture into a frying panover medium-low head. Tilt the pan to coverthe bottom.</p><p>When the eggs have set to your liking,turn onto a plate.</p><p>Enjoy!</p><p>Page 4</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 10</p><p>XML ElementsAn element is an identifiable, named component of a document(paragraph, authors name, article title, unit price, bulleted list)</p><p>C Can have content (data, other elements)</p><p>C Can be a pointer to information (hypertext link, table reference)</p><p>C Must be contiguous (one start and one end; no holes in the middle)</p><p>slide 11</p><p>Elements Contain Other Elements</p><p>(this nesting makes a Tree)</p><p>Page 5</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 12</p><p>Elements Identify Many Kinds of Content(No limit to the number of possible elements)</p><p>Structure What part of the document? (article, title, paragraph, list, footnote)</p><p>Metadata About the document (issue number, first page, article title, DOI, journal abbreviation)</p><p>Named content What is this text/data?(genus-species, surname, glossary, gene, question and answer)</p><p>Navigation/Links Value-added for searching/linking (bibliographic citations; links toother articles, index terms, related material; figure references)</p><p>Presentation How text should look (typographic emphasis, superscript, forced line breaks)</p><p>slide 13</p><p>Attributes Add Further DescriptionC Live inside start tags</p><p>C Say something about the data </p><p>C Add information to our knowledge of the element</p><p>C Are made up of </p><p>C a name</p><p>C an equal sign</p><p>C a quoted value</p><p>Hoboken Highlights</p><p>301/315-9631</p><p>Page 6</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 14</p><p>Technical Note: Editing XML FilesXML Files</p><p>C Are plain text underneath </p><p>C use any text editor or any word processor that can handle plain text</p><p>C built on Unicode (represents all major scripts of the world)</p><p>C Are human readable</p><p>C Are machine processable</p><p>slide 15</p><p>XML Isnt Any of the FollowingC A programming language</p><p>(does not replace C++, Java, Perl, Python, ...)</p><p>C A user interface</p><p>C A presentation format</p><p>C A formatting or processing system</p><p>C A standard set of tags</p><p>C A recommended set of tags</p><p>Page 7</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>XML Is a Data Format</p><p>slide 16</p><p>XML Unites/Divides Two Very Different Data VisionsC Data Folks</p><p>C All the world is a database</p><p>C I know how big everything is and its data type</p><p>C Things come in this order/arrangement</p><p>C Thats the whole point of information!</p><p>C Text Folks</p><p>C Databases are limited</p><p>C I have free-flowing content</p><p>C If you have to ask how long a paragraph is or how many times itmay repeat, you dont understand</p><p>C I need named things that float somewhere inside other things (like aPart Number or a Persons Name somewhere inside a paragraph)</p><p>C Thats the whole point of information!</p><p>Page 8</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>One XML Document Produces Many Results</p><p>slide 17</p><p>Text Book Example</p><p>Compounds</p><p>A compound is asubstance containing at least two elements combinedchemically in definite proportions by mass. A compoundcan be chemically broken up into its constituent elementsor simpler compounds. There are two types of compounds,ionic and molecular.</p><p>Testbank GDW</p><p>67954</p><p>An ion(eye-on) is an atom or group ofatoms that is positively or negatively charged. Anegatively charged ion is an anion(pronounced an-eye-on) while apositively charged ion is a cation(pronounced cat-eye-on). Anionic compound is a compound thatis held together by the attractive forces betweenpositively and negatively charged ions.</p><p>Testbank GDW67ionic compounds9cations2526anions</p><p>...</p><p>Page 9</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 18</p><p>We Still Print Textbooks</p><p>Page 10</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 19</p><p>Textbooks May Have Instructors Manuals</p><p>Page 11</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 20</p><p>View This in a Web Browser/eBookConvert into HTML or HTML-like format</p><p>slide 21</p><p>Automatically Generated Section of Same Textbook</p><p>Page 12</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 22</p><p>Same Source, Different ResultsC On the Web, eBook, and CD versions</p><p>C tie the pronunciations to audio files</p><p>C link keywords to definitions in the dictionary</p><p>C Make large print, voice synthesis, and Braille</p><p>C Collect statistics on which test questions are used, how often, andwhere</p><p>slide 23</p><p>Employee Record Example</p><p>SasparillaUsdin</p><p>Deputy in Charge of ChewablesMulberry TechnologiesRockvilleMD20850sassy</p><p>3670</p><p>Page 13</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 24</p><p>View This in a BrowserConvert into HTML (today), or in an XML browser (tomorrow)</p><p>slide 25</p><p>A Familiar Print Application</p><p>Page 14</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 26</p><p>Same Data, Different Application</p><p>C XML elements rolled into form letter</p><p>C Something (perhaps employee-id) linked to photo</p><p>slide 27</p><p>Same Source: Load a Database</p><p>Key: 00095AUSEMPNO: 009001:USDIN002:Sasparilla008:36014:70020:Deputy in Charge of Chewables</p><p>Page 15</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 28</p><p>Why Use XML?</p><p>The ultimate purpose</p><p>C Encode (mark up) data only once</p><p>C Produce many products from that markup</p><p>C Enable semantically complex searching</p><p>C Reuse data (in whole or part) many times</p><p>C Interchange data freely</p><p>C Enable machine-to-machine communication</p><p>C Let whole communities agree on data content</p><p>C Let data live a long time</p><p>Real World Examples of XML</p><p>slide 29</p><p>XML is a Metalanguage</p><p>Used to define custom tag sets</p><p>C Tag sets get called languages</p><p>C Languages can be built for </p><p>C problem domains (journal publishing, textbooks, computer manuals)</p><p>C applications (like eBusiness, content-management)</p><p>C vertical markets (airplanes, tourist industry, financial)</p><p>C information collections (reference works, laws and statutes,biographies, dictionaries)</p><p>C Different markup languages for different information types</p><p>Page 16</p></li><li><p>What is XML and Why Should You Care?</p><p>slide 30</p><p>New XML Markup LanguagesC Not really languages but a set of agreements </p><p>C Agreements may include: </p><p>C sets of tags</p><p>C problem and process models</p><p>C document or message models (DTDs and schemas)</p><p>C vocabularies and dictionaries</p><p>C business rules</p><p>C Discipline-oriented, like CML (chemistry) and MathML (mathematics)</p><p>C Process-oriented, like SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) </p><p>C Industry oriented, like Airlines/aircraft and Semiconductors</p><p>slide 31</p><p>XML Initiatives (Very Partial List)</p><p>(with thanks to OASIS and Robin Cover)</p><p> - Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) - Markup Language for Complex Documents (Bergen MLCD Project) - Manuscript Access through Standards for Electronic Records (MASTER) - XCES: Corpus Encoding Standard for XML - Global Document Annotation Initiative (GDA) - Electronic Metadata for Endangered Languages Data (EMELD) - Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature (ETCSL) - XML System for Textual and Archaeological Research (XSTAR) - Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS) - Image Metadata Aggregation for Enhanced Searching (IMAGES) - Encoded Archival Description (EAD) - Encoded Archival Context Initiative (EAC) - Linking and Exploring Authority Files (LEAF) - Channel Definition Format, CDF (Based on XML) - RDF Rich Site Summary (RSS) - Open Content Syndicatio...</p></li></ul>

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