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Neighborhood Conservation Plan Woodbury, New Jersey

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Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan

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  • Neighborhood Conservation PlanWoodbury, New Jersey

  • Acknowledgements

    MAYOR

    Harry R. Riskie

    CITY COUNCIL

    Francis I. Connor

    Lester Lockman

    Danielle Carter

    C. Barry Sloane

    Gwendolyn Joyce Brown

    William H. Fleming

    Heather S. Tierney

    Harry E. Trout

    Thomas B. Louis

    PLANNING / ZONING BOARD

    John Belko, Chairman

    Robert Langi, Vice Chair

    Mark Meagher

    John Pafumi

    Joseph Di Martile

    David White

    Thomas Haase, 1st Alternate

    Joseph Palimeno, 2nd Alternate

    Ryan Lange, 3rd Alternate

    Charles Mattern, 4th Alternate

    Harry R. Riskie, Mayor

    Francis I. Connor, Councilman

    Brian Bosworth, Administrator

    John Leech, Secretary

    Mark Shoemaker, Solicitor

    J. Timothy Kernan, Planner

    Fralinger Engineers, Engineer

    CLIENT TEAM

    Harry R. Riskie, Mayor

    Ronda Abbruzzese, Economic Development Director

    Patty Elkis, Associate Director of Planning, DVRPC

    William H. Fleming, City Council

    Karl Kinkler, Administrator

    Robert Law, CFO, Deputy Administrator

    Heather S. Tierney, City Council

    Harry E. Trout, City Council

    All who volunteered their time and opinions in stakeholder interviews, meetings, and public workshops.

    This project was funded through a Transportation and Community Development Initiative (TCDI) grant from the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC).

  • Part

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    Table of Contents

    INTRODUCTION 1

    GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS 2

    PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN 8

    PUBLIC PROCESS VISIONING WORKSHOP 10

    PUBLIC PROCESS WALKING TOURS 16

    PUBLIC PROCESS SUMMARY 16

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 23

    CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY 28

    DEMOGRAPHICS 31

    NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES 34

    COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS 40

    PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS 42

    IMPLEMENTATION 61

    IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX 62

  • List of Figures

    Figure 1.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas. 1Figure 1.2: Typical dwelling units in North Woodbury 2Figure 1.3: Walnut Street Elementary School 2Figure 1.4: Underwood Memorial Hospital 2Figure 1.5: Zoning map of North Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 3Figure 1.6: A typical dwelling in West Woodbury 4Figure 1.7: Woodbury Junior/Senior High School 4Figure 1.8: Woodbury Creek Park 4Figure 1.9: Zoning map of West Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 5Figure 1.10: A typical single-family dwelling in East + South Woodbury 6Figure 1.11: The northern entrance to Wing-Dickerson Park 6Figure 1.12: Pocket park at intersection of South and East Barber Streets 6Figure 1.13: Zoning map of East + South Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined. 7Figure 1.14: Proposed commuter rail line running through Woodbury. 8Figure 1.15: Broad Street District Revelopment Area 9Figure 1.16: Community members working during the Public Workshop to identify issues, opportunities, and their visions for their neighborhoods. 11Figure 1.17: Map depicting where workshop participants live (blue dots) and work (red dots) in relation to the three neighborhoods. 12Figure 1.18: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for North Woodbury, based on public feedback. 13Figure 1.19: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for West Woodbury, based on public feedback. 14Figure 1.20: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for East + South Woodbury, based on public feedback. 15Figure 1.21: Neighbors and members of the project team facilitating the North Woodbury Walking Tour. 17Figure 1.22: North Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17Figure 1.23: West Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17Figure 1.24: East + South Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops 17Figure 2.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas. 22Figure 2.2: North Woodbury Neighborhood Area 24Figure 2.3: West Woodbury Neighborhood Area 25Figure 2.4: East + South Woodbury Neighborhood Area 26Figure 2.5: Overview map of goals and major recommendations in the Plan. 27Figure 2.6: Woodbury High School, c. 1919 - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28Figure 2.8: Stokes Grocery on Broad Street - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28Figure 2.7: Employees in front of G.G. Greens laboratory in 1873 - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 28Figure 2.9: Sanborn 1886 map of Woodbury. Development is clustered along Broad Street, except in East Woodbury, where it reaches the train tracks. 28Figure 2.10: Sanborns 1915 map of Woodbury. Development has moved beyond from Broad Street in all directions. 29Figure 2.11: Stores on Broad Street between Curtis Avenue and Centre Street, c. 1954. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29Figure 2.12: Broad Street between Centre Street and Aberdeen Place, c. 1954. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29Figure 2.13: Courthouse Intersection c. 1900. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29Figure 2.14: Underwood Hospital c. 1920. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 29Figure 2.15: A 1923 advertisement for Budd Brothers Construction Company. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30Figure 2.16: Homes on West Street in the Glover District, 1914. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30Figure 2.17: A residence on Delaware Street between Harrison Street and Lupton Avenue. A parking lot now sits on the site.- courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30Figure 2.18: The Henry Clay Foote home at 42 East Centre Street, pictured in 1880. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30Figure 2.19: The home at 37 East Centre Street, which would see later conversion to apartments and a doctors office. - courtesy Sands and Turner, Woodbury: Images of America 30Figure 2.20: City-wide demographics 31Figure 2.21: Neighborhood-specific demographics 33Figure 2.22: Typical conditions along Tatum Street looking North towards Hessian Avenue. 34Figure 2.23: Edge of parking lot on the southern side of West Packer Street. 34Figure 2.24: Typical medical office along Broad Street. 34Figure 2.25: Birds-eye view of the Walnut Street School and playground. 35Figure 2.26: Semi-detached homes along Logan Street. 36Figure 2.27: Edge of the former laundry site with the neighboring residential area. 36Figure 2.28: Warning sign for drivers heading south on Lupton Avenue towards West Street. 37Figure 2.29: Muddy, unpaved pathway adjacent to the creek in Woodbury Creek Park. 37Figure 2.29: Typical large-format home in East Woodbury, originally designed as a single-family household. 38Figure 2.30: Typical home in the neighborhood south of Carpenter Street. 38Figure 2.31: Attached row-housing in East Woodbury. 38Figure 2.32: Improvements to Railroad Avenue will need to be made in the future to handle an increase in traffic from the train station. 39Figure 2.33: Lack of pedestrian access to the park at the intersection of South and East Barber Avenue. 39Figure 2.34: The transition area between Underwood Memorial Hospital and the North Woodbury neighborhood area. 42Figure 2.35: North Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. 43Figure 2.36: Landscaping serving as a buffer between parking lot and sidewalk along a right-of-way. 44Figure 2.37: Detached garage behind principle building, typical of North Woodbury. 44Figure 2.38: Bump-out on a residential street - courtesy fhwa.dot.gov. 45

  • Figure 2.39: Raised crosswalks provide cues for drivers to slow down, and create a safer crossing for pedestrians. 45Figure 2.40: Sharrow marking on a street - courtesy timesunion.com. 46Figure 2.41: Crosswalks on roads intersecting Broad Street. 46Figure 2.42: Potential future park site on West Packer Street. 47Figure 2.43: Pedestrian and automobile access to Walnut Street School 47Figure 2.44: Prioritized site for redevelopment at Salem and Glover Streets 48Figure 2.45: Example of allowable densities in the Live/Work Transect Zone, which encompasses the former laundry site. 48Figure 2.46: Prioritized site for redevelopment on Broad Street between West Center Street and West Barber Avenue 48Figure 2.47: Conceptual scheme of the redevelopment. 48Figure 2.48: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. 49Figure 2.49: Detached garages behind principle buildings, typical of West Woodbury. 50Figure 2.50: Additional stop signs create three-way intersections at Glover and High Streets and Glover and West Street, allowing for safer traffic patterns. 50Figure 2.51: The proposed street cross-section for Downtown Broadway incorporating a 5 foot bike lane in either direction, as proposed in the Redevelopment Plan. 51Figure 2.52: A proposed extension and new pedestrian access to Woodbury Creek Park. 52Figure 2.53: Pocket park on Delaware Street: First Phase 53Figure 2.54: Pocket park on Delaware Street: Second Phase 53Figure 2.55: New infill single-family home in South Woodbury, with a garage emerging from the front of the structure. 54Figure 2.56: A more typical home in the neighborhood, with a detached garage behind the principle structure. 54Figure 2.57: West Woodbury summary diagram of recommended physical improvements. 55Figure 2.58: The St. Patricks School site, a 5-acre site where potential new development could include community open space. 56Figure 2.59: The current lack of a buffer zone between residential and commercial uses in South Woodbury. 56Figure 2.60: Bike loop connecting neighborhood amenities to downtown. 57Figure 2.61: Example of planned downtown Woodbury wayfinding signage, a template that could be used to potentially expand into the neighborhoods. 58Figure 2.62: Crosswalks, curb cuts, and signage increase pedestrian connectivity between the pocket park, Wing Dickerson park, and the greater neighborhood. 58Figure 2.63: The intersection at Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue. 59Figure 2.64: Dog park - courtesy reddogcincinnati.com. 59Figure 2.65: Community center - courtesy jra-architects.com. 59Figure 2.66: Historic marker. 60

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  • Neighborhood Conservation PlanWoodbury, New Jersey

    Part I: Background + Public Process

  • Part I: Background + Public Process

    INTRODUCTION 1

    GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS 2

    PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN 8

    PUBLIC PROCESS VISIONING WORKSHOP 10

    PUBLIC PROCESS WALKING TOURS 16

    PUBLIC PROCESS SUMMARY 16

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    North Woodbury

    Broad Street Redevelopment

    Plan Area

    Potential Station Area

    Potential Station Area

    West Woodbury

    East + SouthWoodbury

    0 1,000FeetFigure 1.1: Overview of Woodbury

    Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas.

  • Background + Public Process

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 1 GmD

    INTRODUCTION

    Communities are not static; neighborhoods are always changing, evolving, and growing or shrinking. Growth and change may originate in the communities themselves, or it may originate at the periphery, with resultant effects on neighboring areas. This is part of a natural process. Communities tend to adapt to these changing circumstances and thrive over the long-term, both in terms of demographic as well as physical changes. However, some changes are not always desired, and identifying the important aspects of a neighborhoods character and a plan to conserve that character allows change to occur in a sustainable way. The goal of neighborhood conservation is not to preserve a neighborhood in time, but to allow for a community to evolve in a direction desired by the community while conserving those aspects the community deems essential to the neighborhoods character.

    The Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan (NCP) will act as a guide and implementation plan to chart the course for future improvements in three neighborhoods (North, West, East + South) in Woodbury that are likely to experience the impacts of growth and development in both the near and long-term (figure 1.1). The NCP will identify existing concerns as well as future recommendations for each of the three neighborhoods and provide a plan for three specific areas that can be addressed by the City and the community: 1) Land Use + Community Form, 2) Circulation + Mobility, and 3) Public Amenities + Infrastructure.

    The three neighborhoods were chosen for this plan because of their proximity to the Broad Street Redevelopment Plan area and the two potential light-rail stations of the planned Glassboro-Camden Line. It is expected that these elements will spur growth and development in and around the Broad Street district in Woodbury, and that the town should plan for the effects of development on the surrounding neighborhoods now to address both present and future needs in these neighborhoods.

  • Background + Public Process

    2 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    GEOGRAPHY OF PLAN AREAS

    The NCP focuses on three neighborhoods adjacent to and overlapping areas of anticipated growth and change. The following descriptions delineate the boundaries and areas of likely nearby development that could influence the neighborhoods in the future.

    NORTH WOODBURY

    The North Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by the municipal boundary and Hessian Avenue to the north, the municipal boundary and Tatum Street to the west, Packer Street to the south, and the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east.

    The Redevelopment Plan intersects this neighborhood areas eastern and southern boundaries. This neighborhood is not overlapped by a historic district. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-35 Residential and R-60 Residential (figure 1.5).

    This neighborhood is characterized by its collection of two to three story homes fronting along the street, with prominent open or enclosed porches at the front and parking either on-street or accessed through private drives and garages located behind the primary structure (figure 1.2). The housing stock and street layout dates to the early twentieth century, and was originally advertised as a neighborhood having a homey home feel with walkable streets, close-knit single-family dwellings, and access to transit, shopping, and amenities.

    Though the neighborhood layout resembles the gridded street pattern typical of older walkable communities, in actuality most streets in the neighborhood only run along the northwest southeast axis. With the exception of Cherry Street that connects Chestnut and Walnut Streets, the only north-south streets in the neighborhood are Tatum Street and Broad Street, limiting the options for travel within the neighborhood.

    Currently, the sole open space/recreation area in the neighborhood is the playground on the northern side of the Walnut Street School. The School is the primary institutional presence in the neighborhood, and a destination for many of its youngest residents (figure 1.3).

    South of this neighborhood is Underwood Memorial Hospital and a growing concentration of related medical/office uses (figure 1.4). One of the two new train stations along the Glassboro-Camden line may be located near the intersection of Red Bank Avenue and the railroad right-of-way. North Woodbury is expected to see new growth at its edges in the years to come principally from these two factors, as well as commercial revitalization and growth along Broad Street.

    Figure 1.3: Walnut Street Elementary School

    Figure 1.4: Underwood Memorial Hospital

    Figure 1.2: Typical dwelling units in North Woodbury

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.5: Zoning map of North Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

    R35 - Residential

    Redevelopment Plan Area

    R60 - Residential

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 3 GmD

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  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.7: Woodbury Junior/Senior High School

    Figure 1.6: A typical dwelling in West Woodbury

    4 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    WEST WOODBURY

    The West Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by Delaware Street to the north, the lots fronting on the western side of Jackson Street with the exception of the West End Elementary School to the west, an alternating boundary along the railroad right-of-way, Logan Street, and Penn Street to the south, and the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east.

    The Redevelopment Plan intersects this neighborhood areas eastern boundary along Lupton Avenue, Glover Street, and Lincoln Streets. The Historic District intersects this neighborhood area primarily by the lots fronting onto Delaware Street and the lots fronting onto High Street. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-15 Residential, R-35 Residential, R-60 Residential, and contains both PO-1 and PO-2 Professional Office District Overlays (figure 1.9).

    This neighborhood is characterized by an eclectic mix of architectural styles and predominantly single-family homes fronting along the street, with leafy streets shaded by both street trees and trees on private lots (figure 1.6). A small collection of duplex housing was built along Logan Street in the late twentieth century, and some of the larger homes in the neighborhood have been converted to either multi-family dwellings within the neighborhood, or professional offices located primarily in the stately large-lot homes along Delaware Street.

    The neighborhood is laid out in a grid pattern emanating from and connecting to Broad Street, Delaware Street, and Salem Avenue. Some streets, such as Jackson and Lupton/Glover Streets, act as parallel circulation routes to Broad Street when congestion or construction impedes travel on Woodburys primary arteries.

    This neighborhood sits adjacent to Woodbury Junior-Senior High School (figure 1.7), the athletic fields in West Deptford across the creek, and Woodbury Creek Park (figure 1.8). There currently is no public open space/recreation space within this neighborhood.

    To the east of this neighborhood area is downtown Woodbury, the historic commercial core and principal traffic artery. This neighborhood is also within walking distance of many small businesses and major institutions, such as City Hall, the High School, the Justice Complex, and the Gloucester County administrative offices. One of the two new train stations along the Glassboro-Camden line may be located near the intersection of Centre Street and Railroad Avenue. This neighborhood is expected to see some spillover from the Redevelopment Plan area as revitalization along Broad Street occurs and when the light-rail line becomes operational.

    Figure 1.8: Woodbury Creek Park

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.9: Zoning map of West Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

    R35 - Residential

    PO2 - Professional Office Overlay

    R15 - Residential

    Redevelopment Plan Area

    Historic District

    PO1 - Professional Office Overlay

    R60 - Residential

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 5 GmD

    0 500Feet

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.10: A typical single-family dwelling in East + South Woodbury

    Figure 1.11: The northern entrance to Wing-Dickerson Park

    Figure 1.12: Pocket park at intersection of South and East Barber Streets

    6 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    The East + South Woodbury neighborhood area, for the purposes of this plan, is roughly bounded by Cooper Street to the north, the edge of the residential neighborhood nearest Broad Street to the east, and the railroad right-of-way to the south and east.

    The Redevelopment Plan covers the majority of this neighborhood area, overlapping with the neighborhood north of Carpenter Street and west of Railroad Avenue. The Historic District intersects this neighborhood area north of Hopkins Street to Cooper Street. The lots in this area outside of the Redevelopment Plan area are zoned R-15 Residential (figure 1.13).

    This neighborhood is one of the oldest residential areas in Woodbury, characterized by a strong collection of historic homes and a rich and diverse cultural background. The area reflects a range of housing types, including single-family detached, single-family attached, and multi-family housing (figure 1.10). A number of the units along Cooper Street have been converted to professional office uses.

    The neighborhood is laid out in a predominantly northwest to southeast grid pattern, connecting Railroad Avenue to Broad Street. Carpenter Street, Railroad Avenue, South and East Barber Avenues are the primary arteries connecting the neighborhood and the proposed rail station to Broad Street and Cooper Street.

    This neighborhood contains Wing-Dickerson Park (figure 1.11), a large, newly renovated public park with basketball, tennis courts, passive green space, and two playground areas, as well as a small pocket park where South and East Barber Avenue intersect (figure 1.12).

    This neighborhood is likely to see the most immediate effects of the introduction of rail-service in Woodbury when the southern station is operational, and may experience some of the greatest changes through the Redevelopment Plan. At the same time, this is one of the oldest areas in Woodbury, and new development and growth from the train station, the downtown, and through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan will have to strike a balance between new growth and conservation of neighborhood character.

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.13: Zoning map of East + South Woodbury, with neighborhood area outlined in red.

    Redevelopment Plan Area

    Historic District

    R15 - Residential

    Potential Station Area

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 7 GmD

    0 500Feet

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.14: Proposed commuter rail line running through Woodbury.

    8 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    Mantua

    Gloucester Township

    Deptford

    Monroe

    Winslow

    Camden

    Elk

    Washington Township

    Glassboro

    Voorhees

    East Greenwich

    Lindenwold

    Bellmawr

    Pitman

    Maple Shade

    Haddonfield

    Woodbury

    GloucesterCity

    Runnemede

    Audubon

    Somerdale

    Westville

    Collingswood

    National Park

    Wenonah

    Paulsboro

    MountEphraimBrooklawn

    PURPOSE + SCOPE OF PLAN

    The push for a renewed commuter rail stretching into South Jersey and connecting to Philadelphia and Camden has a long history, though a concrete plan for a commuter rail line was only formulated in the past decade. The initial step of the most recent process, an Alternatives Analysis for the rail alignment, was completed in 2009. The chosen alternative connected many of Gloucester Countys historic towns and communities to Camden and Philadelphia by running largely along an existing rail alignment. Eleven stations were proposed in Gloucester County, two of which are in Woodbury (figure 1.14). The first will be potentially located proximate to downtown near the original station platform near Cooper Street and Railroad Avenue. The second will be potentially located near Red Bank Avenue and the growing Medical/Hospital area.

    In anticipation of the effects of light-rail service on the Citys downtown business district, Woodburys Planning/Zoning Board recommended that the Downtown Business District be designated an area in need of redevelopment under the Local Redevelopment and Housing Law, N.J.S.A. 40A:12A-1 et. Seq. (the LRHL). The Redevelopment Plan was adopted in 2010 and created a long-term framework for the revitalization of downtown Woodbury and Broad Street, and to prepare the Broad Street business district for the future effects of a major new transit connection (figure 1.15).

    The Neighborhood Conservation Plan process was initiated to assist those residential blocks that will potentially be impacted by Redevelopment Plan implementation and the introduction of light-rail service. However, the NCP is not a preservation initiative and does not seek to seal off the neighborhood from change. The goal of neighborhood conservation is to allow evolution and change to proceed in a sustainable way that is desired by the community. The NCP will be largely based on input from residents and City officials, and will identify current and potential issues in the three residential neighborhood areas that can be addressed to reinforce existing communities while mitigating future points of conflict. The concerns will be based around three focus areas focused on future implementation of the plan:

    Location of proposed stations in Woodbury

  • Background + Public Process

    Figure 1.15: Broad Street District Revelopment Area

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 9 GmD

    Land Use + Community Form: Addresses issues such as zoning, density, scale, and buffers. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the Citys Master Plan or Master Plan Re-examination and adopted into the Citys Zoning Ordinance.

    Circulation + Mobility: Addresses issues such as pedestrian access and sidewalks, traffic calming, and wayfinding. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the Citys Master Plan or Master Plan Re-examination and subsequently integrated into the Capital Improvements Plan.

    Public Amenities + Infrastructure: Addresses issues such as parks, playgrounds, gateways, stormwater, and utilities. The NCP recommendations in this section could be implemented if integrated into the Citys Master Plan or Master Plan Re-examination and subsequently integrated into the Capital Improvements Plan.

    These focus areas were chosen so that the public and City officials could concentrate on areas that promised significant benefit to the community and that could be implemented through the normal Master Planning process in the near future.

  • Background + Public Process

    10 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    PUBLIC PROCESS VISIONING WORKSHOP

    To form the basis of the Plan, a series of public workshops were held in order to identify the communitys current issues, concerns, goals, objectives, and long-term visions for their neighborhoods. The first was held at Woodbury Junior-Senior High School on January 24, 2012. The purpose of this workshop was to introduce the scope and purpose of the project to the community, and then to lead small groups through a series of interactive workshops to identify the issues and opportunities in their neighborhoods. Approximately 77 members of the community attended the event and participated in the interactive workshops, many of whom were also present at the public workshops for the Redevelopment Plan. A majority of the attendees were residents of the neighborhood areas. Following the introductory presentation, participants were asked to join a small group for the workshop portion of the meeting based on which neighborhood they were interested in. Each group was given a large map of the neighborhood area and markers to write and draw their ideas directly onto the map. Members of the project team rotated between groups around the room to assist groups and keep discussions within the scope of the project when needed. These small groups were asked to spend about 45 minutes discussing a series of pre-prepared questions related to the topics of land use + community form, circulation + mobility, and public amenities + infrastructure. Groups were asked to both write down the points that emerged from their discussions, and to illustrate them on the maps of each neighborhood provided. To conclude the meeting, each group identified their top 3 big ideas for the neighborhoods future, and gave a 5 minute presentation of their big ideas to the rest of the room.

    Following this meeting, Group Melvin Design compiled each groups response by topic area and neighborhood to aggregate the publics feedback. This feedback, along with notes and illustrations that accompanied the small group maps, was compiled into three diagrammatic maps for each neighborhood showing the issues and opportunities identified in the workshop. The following photographs (figure 1.16) and overall municipal map (figure 1.17) represent the workshop participants and where participants live or work in Woodbury. The next three maps (figures 1.18-1.20) illustrate the public comments from the workshop for each neighborhood.

  • Background + Public Process

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 11 GmD

    Figure 1.16: Community members working during the Public Workshop to identify issues, opportunities, and their visions for their neighborhoods.

  • Background + Public Process

    12 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    Figure 1.17: Map depicting where workshop participants live (blue dots) and work (red dots) in relation to the three neighborhoods.

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    WHERE DO YOU LIVE/WORK?

    Please use the red and blue dots to indicate one or both of the following:

    WHERE YOU LIVE WHERE YOU WORK

    Broad Street Redevelopment

    Plan Area

  • Background + Public Process

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 13 GmD

    Figure 1.18: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for North Woodbury, based on public feedback. 0 500

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  • Background + Public Process

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    Figure 1.19: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for West Woodbury, based on public feedback.

    Broad Street Redevelopment Plan

  • Background + Public Process

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    Figure 1.20: Issues and Opportunities diagrams for East + South Woodbury, based on public feedback.

    Broad Street Redevelopment Plan

  • Background + Public Process

    16 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    PUBLIC PROCESS WALKING TOURS

    Following the analysis of public commentary from the first public workshop, it was clear that while the public was able to give us a broad sense of the issues and opportunities in their neighborhoods, it was still unclear as to what some of the specific issues were. For example, the North Woodbury neighborhood groups identified Tatum Street as having issues with pedestrian comfort, lighting, and speeding, though it was unclear what the optimal solution would be for this issue, as it was unclear who the users of Tatum Street were, and how they used that street.

    In order to learn more about the topics addressed in the first workshop, the second public workshop consisted of a series of walking tours with residents and members of the local community that investigated many of the issues previously identified by the community during the first public workshop (figure 1.21). The walking tours were held on three week-day evenings in mid-March, and were open and advertised to the general public and to attendees from the previous workshop. Each Walking Tour participant was given a map with a pre-determined tour route (figures 1.22-1.24) and a comment form corresponding to tour stops. At each stop along the tour, the major issues and big ideas from the first public workshop were summarized for the group, and where appropriate, follow-up questions were asked of Walking Tour participants for further clarification.

    This process allowed the team to experience the issues and opportunities in the neighborhoods with residents first-hand, providing a much clearer picture of specific points raised during the first public workshop, while also bringing new issues to light. For example, it was much easier to observe the lighting issues of a street when walking that same street with residents late in the evening near sunset. The Walking Tours also gave interested residents more time to discuss neighborhood issues and opportunities with the project team, and gave some a chance to meet new friends and neighbors in their community.

    PUBLIC PROCESS SUMMARY

    The public workshop and walking tours yielded both neighborhood-level and site specific community analysis of the issues, opportunities, and visions for the North, West, and East + South communities of Woodbury. These comments, once aggregated, formed the basis of the Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Strategies of the Plan Recommendations and Implementation sections for each of three neighborhoods.

  • Background + Public Process

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    ONEIGHBORHOOD WALKING TOUR - West Woodbury 0 250 500125 FeetCity of WoodburyGloucester County, New Jersey

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    Figure 1.22: North Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops

    Figure 1.21: Neighbors and members of the project team facilitating the North Woodbury Walking Tour.

    Figure 1.23: West Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops

    Figure 1.24: East + South Woodbury Walking Tour Route and Stops

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 17 GmD

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  • Neighborhood Conservation PlanWoodbury, New Jersey

    Part II: Neighborhood Conservation Plan

  • Part II: Neighborhood Conservation Plan

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 23

    CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY 28

    DEMOGRAPHICS 31

    NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES 34

    COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS 40

    PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS 42

    IMPLEMENTATION 61

    IMPLEMENTATION MATRIX 62

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

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    22 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    Figure 2.1: Overview of Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan Study Areas.

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 23 GmD

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    The Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan (NCP) is intended to serve as a guide and roadmap for projects and policy changes to help conserve neighborhood character as the Redevelopment Plan is implemented for the Broad Street district and when the Glassboro-Camden Line arrives. The NCP focuses on three neighborhood areas (North, West, East + South) chosen for their proximity to areas of future potential growth and development and provides recommended strategies for each neighborhood in the categories of 1) Land Use + Community Form, 2) Circulation + Mobility, and 3) Public Amenities + Infrastructure (figure 2.1). Organizing the recommendations into these three categories will assist the City in implementing the recommendations of the NCP within the Master Planning process, and within updates to the Capital Improvement Plan and Zoning Ordinance. The creation of an NCP now allows the community to address current neighborhood issues while reinforcing the positive aspects of the community, and provides the City with a tool to help neighborhoods prepare for the future effects of redevelopment.

    The needs, challenges, vision, and recommendations of the NCP were informed by a comprehensive public process and the consultants expertise and research. The public process involved a public workshop session held on January 24, 2012, followed by three neighborhood walking tours to observe issues voiced during the public workshop in mid-March. The results of the public process were analyzed and combined with the consultants research and analysis to produce the plan recommendations in this document (figure 2.5). The following is a summary of the goals and objectives for each neighborhood.

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

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    NORTH WOODBURY

    Land Use + Community Form

    Goal: Foster a village atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Soften the transition between the residential neighborhoods and the hospital.

    Objective B: Allow for reasonable improvements to property by ensuring zoning regulations are consistent with the communitys vision.

    Circulation + Mobility

    Goal: Create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Make Tatum St. safer for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists.

    Objective B: Create safer pedestrian routes throughout so that kids can better navigate the neighborhood.

    Objective C: Improve circulation patterns around the Walnut Street School.

    Public Amenities + Infrastructure

    Goal: Provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Create new recreational spaces and enhance access to existing open space for users of all ages.

    Figure 2.2: North Woodbury Neighborhood Area

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

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    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 25 GmD

    WEST WOODBURY

    Land Use + Community Form

    Goal: Stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Promote high quality development at key sites along the neighborhoods edges.

    Objective B: Allow for small-scale infill development compatible with neighborhood character.

    Circulation + Mobility

    Goal: Improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users. The following objectives and strategies are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Lupton Ave/Glover St.

    Objective B: Improve pedestrian and bicycle mobility conditions throughout the neighborhood.

    Objective C: As the business district grows, update parking, wayfinding, and circulation systems to accommodate the needs of businesses and residents.

    Objective D: Improve traffic circulation and pedestrian conditions along Jackson St.

    Public Amenities + Infrastructure

    Goal: Improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Increase the amount of shade trees on sidewalks, and ensure the right types of trees are selected.

    Objective B: Improve access to Woodbury Creek Park from the neighborhood.

    Objective C: Create smaller neighborhood-serving parks and maintain existing open spaces.

    Figure 2.3: West Woodbury Neighborhood Area

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

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    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    Land Use + Community Form

    Goal: Preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets the needs of current and future residents. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Maintain existing neighborhood character between Broad Street and the railroad.

    Objective B: Allow for market flexibility in determining rental/ownership, development type mix, and in encouraging redevelopment.

    Objective C: Buffer residential neighborhoods from commercial strip development in south Woodbury.

    Circulation + Mobility

    Goal: Create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad St. as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Create safer pedestrian and bicycle routes to neighborhood destinations.

    Objective B: Improve signage + circulation for visitors.

    Objective C: Improve parking and traffic conditions near the train station.

    Public Amenities + Infrastructure

    Goal: Create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces. The following objectives are recommended to achieve this goal:

    Objective A: Improve and expand access to open space and recreation facilities.

    Objective B: Add excitement and aesthetic enhancements to neighborhood streets connecting the railroad to Broad Street.

    Objective C: Incorporate public art, neighborhood character details into the landscape.

    Figure 2.4: East + South Woodbury Neighborhood Area

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan: Executive Summary

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 27 GmD

    Medical-HospitalZone

    Athletic Fields

    North WoodburyLand Use + Community FormGOAL: Foster a village atmosphere by maintaining the character of the residential neighborhood.

    Circulation + MobilityGOAL: Create safer, enhanced connections for kids, pedestrians, and cyclists throughout the neighborhood.

    Public Amenities + InfrastructureGOAL: Provide recreational space in the neighborhood that is easily and safely accessible for all users.

    WOODBURY NEIGHBORHOOD CONSERVATION PLANSummary Map of Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Strategies - DRAFT 5.22.12

    West WoodburyLand Use + Community FormGOAL: Stabilize neighborhood character at the edges, and fill in the gaps with appropriate development.

    Circulation + MobilityGOAL: Improve traffic patterns, bicycle, and pedestrian conditions to foster streets that serve all users.

    Public Amenities + InfrastructureGOAL: Improve the quality of public and recreational space in the neighborhood.

    East + South WoodburyLand Use + Community FormGOAL: Preserve the character and form of the existing neighborhoods while allowing for balanced growth that meets that needs of current and future residents.

    Circulation + MobilityGOAL: Create strategies to embrace traffic between the railroad and Broad Street as an asset, while making it easier for pedestrians and cyclists to safely access neighborhood amenities.

    Public Amenities + InfrastructureGOAL: Create a vibrant public realm that reflects the character of the neighborhood and the connection to downtown and the railroad, and increase access to community facilities and open spaces.

    0 1,000FeetFigure 2.5: Overview map of goals and

    major recommendations in the Plan.

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan

    Figure 2.6: Woodbury High School, c. 1919

    28 | Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan GmD

    CITY + NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY

    Founded in 1683, Woodbury was established by Quakers fleeing religious persecution in England. Henry Wood and his family, sailing further down the Delaware River from newly christened Philadelphia, ventured three miles up the Pesczackasing Creek to establish the hamlet, whose name is a combination of the family name and their parish home of Bury, England. Construction of the old Kings Highway (later Broad Street) thirteen years later accelerated commercial activity, replacing the creek as the thoroughfare for transportation of goods and attracting business from all over southern New Jersey. Having experienced considerable growth by the mid-19th century, Woodbury, formerly a part of Deptford Township, was incorporated as a separate and sovereign municipality and borough in 1854, and in 1871, an independent city.

    Woodbury saw considerable economic growth between 1880 and 1900, spearheaded by G.G. Greens laboratory at Broad and Cooper streets, which became known as drugstore corner and developed medicine sold worldwide (figure 2.7). Concurrently, trolley service established in 1894 complemented the horse-and-buggy as an essential travel mode and accelerated growth. The commercial district on Broad Street has traditionally contained a diverse mix of businesses, including banks, theaters,

    Figure 2.7: Employees in front of G.G. Greens laboratory in 1873

    Figure 2.8: Stokes Grocery on Broad Street

    Figure 2.9: Sanborn 1886 map of Woodbury. Development is clustered along Broad Street, except in East Woodbury, where it reaches the train tracks.

  • Neighborhood Conservation Plan

    Woodbury Neighborhood Conservation Plan | 29 GmD

    clothing stores, barber shops, jewelry stores, shoe stores, hardware stores, hotels, restaurants, meat markets, bakeries, grocery stores, a farmers market and Mom and Pop establishments (figures 2.8-2.12), the latter of which would become obsolete after the late 1930s with the opening of Acmes first self-service supermarket in New Jersey. During this time, most establishments remained open for business in the evening hours on Friday and Saturday. Throughout, Woodburys prominent residents constructed many lavish homes, and development eventually spread to the surrounding farmland. Census records reveal sustained growth until the 1960s, when Woodbury reached its peak of just under 12,500 residents. Since then, the citys population has remained above 10,000 people.

    Woodbury has served as the government seat of Gloucester County since 1787. Courthouse intersection (figure 2.13) at Broad and Delaware Streets has been the site of a number of public buildings since, including the first courthouse, demolished in 1887, and its predecessor, the current 90-foot structure which fronts Woodbury Junior/Senior High School (figure 2.6). Underwood Hospital was established in 1915 just north of this intersection, before relocating to its current location at Broad and Red Bank Avenue (figure 2.14). It remains the largest county employer to this day.

    Figure 2.11: Stores on Broad Street between Curtis Avenue and Centre Street, c. 1954.

    Figure 2.12: Broad Street between Centre Street and Aberdeen Place, c. 1954.

    Figure 2.13: Courthouse Intersection c. 1900.

    Figure 2.14: Underwood Hospital c. 1920.

    Figure 2.10: Sanborns 1915 map of Woodbury. Development has moved beyond from Broad Street in all directions.

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    NORTH WOODBURY

    The earliest development in North Woodbury occurred along Chestnut and Cherry Streets, just off Broad Street by 1902. The neighborhood saw a development boom in the 1920s when the Budd Brothers developed a 60-acre tract known as the Old Homestead Farm into single-family homes (figure 2.15). The smallest lots, at 6,500 square feet, contained homes that sold for $4,300, while the largest went for $7,000. This was part of an overall housing boom on the west side of Broad St, which also saw development of large tracts off of Delaware Street.

    WEST WOODBURY

    Lying just west of early commercial development on Broad Street, contiguous residential development wouldnt reach the neighborhood until 1890. At this time, Centre Street accommodated residences to Harrison Street, as did lots between German (now Barber) Avenue and High Street east of Glover Street (figures 2.16-2.17). Residential development would extend to Jackson on High Street by 1902, and at the southern extent of the neighborhood, along Salem Avenue to Glover Street.

    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    The northernmost section of East Woodbury is part of the historic district, much of the development of which occurred in the late 19th century. After purchasing and refurbishing the Newton Hotel at the corner of Delaware and Broad, Mahlon Newton turned to developing real estate across the street, mostly along Curtis and Newton Avenues, directly south and north of Cooper Street, respectively. By 1886, all of Cooper Street between Broad and Euclid Streets was developed with single family homes. Both sides of Centre Street and the southern side of Hopkins Street were also developed by this time (figures 2.18-2.19), although the neighborhood wouldnt approach the current housing density until after Curtis Street and Aberdeen Place were constructed, by 1902 and 1908, respectively. Development reached South Woodbury only slightly later, and by the turn of the century residential development had occurred along German (now East Barber) Avenue and Carpenter Street. This neighborhood has a rich legacy as an African-American enclave within Woodbury, continuing to this day.

    Figure 2.15: A 1923 advertisement for Budd Brothers Construction Company.

    Figure 2.16: Homes on West Street in the Glover District, 1914.

    Figure 2.17: A residence on Delaware Street between Harrison Street and Lupton Avenue. A parking lot now sits on the site.

    Figure 2.18: The Henry Clay Foote home at 42 East Centre Street, pictured in 1880.

    Figure 2.19: The home at 37 East Centre Street, which would see later conversion to apartments and a doctors office.

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    Figure 2.20: City-wide demographics

    DEMOGRAPHICS

    In 2010, Woodburys population was 10,174, a slight 1.3% decrease from 2000, but reflective of the population total since 1980. While not as pronounced a difference as ten years ago, there were more females than males living here (52% of the city) and they were living longer, making up 70% of the 75 year and above age cohort. The city has seen an increase in racial and ethnic diversity in the past ten years, and is now approximately two-thirds white and one quarter black. Additionally, the Hispanic population grew by over 250% since 2000, to one in ten Woodbury residents in 2010.

    Occupationally, Woodbury saw large increases in those working in the professional, healthcare support, and sales sectors, while the largest decrease occurred in building and maintenance jobs.

    58% of housing units were owner-occupied in 2010, down slightly from 2000, while the vacancy rate rose from 6% to 8%. Adjusted for inflation, the median home value increased 52% to $188,500, while household income rose 7% to over $58,000 in 2010. This is largely a reflection of a decrease in those earning $15,000 to $40,000 and an increase in the $40,000 to $100,000 bracket. However, earners at the bottom and top of the income bracket increased and decreased respectively, although the number of families living in poverty decreased from 11% to 8% in ten years. This was accompanied by overall educational increases that reflect national trends, although slightly behind those of Gloucester County as a whole. Finally, while the median home value increased by over 50%, this was not on pace with either the national (68% increase) or Gloucester County median, where home values doubled.

    Racial/Ethnic Composition of Woodbury

    Asian Native American

    Two or more races

    2000

    2010

    Source: U.S. Census

    Median Home ValueSource: U.S. Census, ACS

    Woodbury Gloucester Co.

    $123,844 $118,200

    $188,500

    $236,900

    2006- 2010Avg.

    2000

    2010 Age Distribution for WoodburySource: U.S. Census

    MalesFemales

    Under 5 years

    5 to 9 years

    10 to 14 years

    15 to 17 years

    18 to 24 years

    25 to 34 years

    35 to 44 years

    45 to 54 years

    55 to 64 years

    65 to 74 years

    75 to 84 years

    85 years and over

    Persons200 400 600 800200400600800

    Other race

    61.2%

    70.8%

    23.8%

    22.1%

    White

    Black or African American

    WhiteBlack or African American

    Hispanic (of any race)10.7%

    Hispanic (of any race)3.9%

    1.0%

    Asian1.2%

    0.2%

    Native American0.1%

    2.8%

    Two or more races 1.8%

    0.1%

    Other race0.1%

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    NORTH WOODBURY

    This neighborhood is majority white (73%) and female (51%). The median age is less than the citys by two years at 35, while the average household size is larger than Woodburys (2.67 persons compared to 2.38 in the city). 66% of households are families, and 43% are married couples.

    Median home value mirrors that of Woodbury at $189,401, and is comprised of mostly 3 to 4 bedroom dwellings built between 1940 and 1969, with a presence of newer homes built within the last 15 years. 74% of housing units are owner-occupied, and there exists a similar 7% vacancy rate to the city as a whole.

    WEST WOODBURY

    West Woodbury mirrors North Woodbury in many ways. 76% of residents are white and 52% are female. It is slightly older, with a median age of 38 years, and households are slightly smaller, with a 2.52 average. 68% of households are comprised of families, and 47% are married couples.

    The median home value in West Woodbury is the highest of the three neighborhoods, at $231,967, and is comprised of mostly 3 to 4 bedroom dwellings mostly built between 1940 and 1969. 73% of housing units are owner-occupied, and only 6% are vacant.

    $189,401 $231,967 $200,795 $188,500

    North West East + South Woodbury

    Median Home Value, 2006-2010 5-year average(in 2010 dollars)

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    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    This neighborhood displays marked demographic differences from the other two in the plan. An approximate equal number of whites and blacks reside here (45% and 43%, respectively), and 15% of the population is Hispanic. East Woodbury accounted for over half the overall rise in the citys Hispanic population between 2000 and 2010. The neighborhood mirrors Woodburys 37-year median age and 52% female composition, and most closely reflects the citys average household size, at 2.34 persons per household. Of these, a majority (54%) are non-family, and only 20% of the neighborhoods households are headed by a married couple.

    Similar to the other neighborhoods, the median home value is greater than that of the city, at $200,795. These are comprised of mostly 1 to 2 bedroom dwellings, most of which were built between 1940 and 1969. Unlike the city overall, where a majority of housing units are owner-occupied, 70% of units in East Woodbury are rental, and 10% are vacant.

    Sources: U.S. Census and American Community Survey

    Percentage Non-Hispanic White

    North

    West

    East + South

    Woodbury

    68%

    73%

    39%

    61%

    Housing Tenure: Rent vs. Own

    North West East + South Woodbury

    74%

    26%

    73%

    27% 70%

    30% 58%

    42%Rent RentRentRent

    Own Own Own Own

    Figure 2.21: Neighborhood-specific demographics

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    NEIGHBORHOOD NEEDS + CHALLENGES

    Existing neighborhood conditions were collected from a number of sources, including research and analysis of existing conditions and neighborhood zoning regulations, interviews with City officials, and an extensive public outreach process that involved a public workshop and three guided neighborhood walking tours. The following is a summary of the major issues and opportunities in each of the neighborhood areas.

    NORTH WOODBURY

    Land Use - The North Woodbury neighborhood is proximate to the Medical/Hospital area along Broad Street and Red Bank Avenue, and near the proposed site of the northern train station of the Glassboro-Camden Line. The current residential zoning is largely reflective of the existing community character. The few differences that exist between conditions on the ground and the existing code include narrower lot widths and shallower setbacks on the ground than allowed by right in some cases, but do not deviate enough and are not problematic enough to warrant suggesting a change in the zoning. During meetings with zoning officials from the City and community members, it was clear that no major land use conflicts concerning the residential zones existed. Community members were more concerned with ensuring that reasonable improvements to property would be allowed and that the zoning code was navigable for residents. Community members also expressed their desire that the edge of the hospital area be softened where it meets the residential neighborhood as the hospital and related medical uses grow (figures 2.23-2.24), and wanted to see more commercial/professional development on the neighboring portion of Broad Street.

    Tatum Street - Improving conditions on Tatum Street was a primary concern for community members. Other than Broad Street, Tatum is the only north-south street that links the various blocks and destinations of the neighborhood together. As such, it is a primary pedestrian route in the neighborhood used most heavily by children walking to the Walnut Street Elementary School and between friends homes in the neighborhood. Tatum is a long, straight street running almost a mile in length, with only two stop signs along its length at Dubois and Progress Avenues between the northern border of the municipality at Hessian Avenue and Red Bank Avenue (figure 2.22). Additionally, pedestrian lighting along Tatum Street is insufficient, especially recognizing that this street provides an important link to the elementary school and the adjoining playground.

    Figure 2.22: Typical conditions along Tatum Street looking North towards Hessian Avenue.

    Figure 2.23: Edge of parking lot on the southern side of West Packer Street.

    Figure 2.24: Typical medical office along Broad Street.

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    Figure 2.25: Birds-eye view of the Walnut Street School and playground.

    Parents in this neighborhood typically advise their children to walk along Tatum Street instead of Broad Street, so it is critical that pedestrian conditions along Tatum Street be improved. The configuration of Broad Street is less of a concern for residents, with the exception of the intersection with Park Street, where the lack of a traffic light and ability to make left turns onto Broad Street is an issue.

    Walnut Street School - The Walnut Street Elementary School is a major institutional presence in the neighborhood, and contains the sole playground in the neighborhood area. Concerns from the community include ensuring that there are safe streets surrounding the school, that parking and traffic conditions are adequate, and that the playground is maximized as an important community asset.

    Open Space - With the exception of the playground at the Walnut Street Elementary School (figure 2.25), there are no recreational amenities in this neighborhood. One of the issues identified by the community is that there are no destinations, save for private homes, for kids from the neighborhood to walk to. Neighborhood residents would like to see a new recreational space and better lighting throughout the neighborhood so that recreational spaces can be accessed safely.

    Walnut St

    Chestnut St

    Cher

    ry St

    Tatum

    StPlayground

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    WEST WOODBURY

    Land Use - The West Woodbury neighborhood area is proximate to downtown and likely to experience some effects from implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. The current residential zoning in the neighborhood is largely reflective of the existing community character, though some properties in this area were observed to have larger accessory garages than is allowed by code. Additionally, some semi-detached units exist in this neighborhood (figure 2.26), most notably along Logan Street at the southern section of this neighborhood. Such units are not permitted under the existing code. The majority of the larger lots and homes along Delaware Street have been converted to professional offices with parking in the rear. The historic district intersects this neighborhood along High Street, from Broad Street to Jackson Street.

    Residents expressed both a desire for new development at key sites abutting their neighborhood in the Redevelopment Plan area, as well as some concern regarding spillover effects as the downtown grows. The former laundry site at Salem Avenue and Glover Street (figure 2.27) and the block facing Broad Street between West Centre Street and West Barber Avenue were both expressed as sites of particular interest for prioritizing redevelopment. Both sites front on major commercial corridors, while backing up directly on the residential neighborhood. Context-sensitive development of both of these sites is a concern so that new mixed-use or non-residential development provides a reasonable transition to neighboring residences.

    Parking Impacts - Though the availability of on-street parking in the neighborhoods is not currently an issue, residents were concerned about the possibility of future spillover parking from Broad Street through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. Neighbors are particularly concerned with future on-street parking needs on High Street and West Barber Avenue, both of which are proximate to Broad Street and potential future areas of redevelopment, and the need for more on-street parking along Wood Street near the high school and the entrance to Woodbury Creek Park. Residents are interested in the possible future use of parking permits for non-commercial streets and signage to direct shoppers to public parking lots and businesses off Broad Street.

    Figure 2.26: Semi-detached homes along Logan Street.

    Figure 2.27: Edge of the former laundry site with the neighboring residential area.

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    Figure 2.28: Warning sign for drivers heading south on Lupton Avenue towards West Street.

    Figure 2.29: Muddy, unpaved pathway adjacent to the creek in Woodbury Creek Park.

    Roadways - During the public workshop and walking tour, Lupton Avenue / Glover Street arose as the primary roadway of concern to neighborhood residents. This street is unique in that it provides a direct link between Salem Avenue and Delaware Street, running parallel to Broad Street through the residential neighborhood. This however was not always the case. Glover Street used to run from Salem Avenue to High Street, where it terminated. Similarly, Lupton Avenue used to run from Delaware Street to West Barber Avenue where it terminated. Later, the portion of the block of High Street separating these two was acquired to connect the two streets, resulting in the slight jog of the street at its intersection with High Street. Though this increased connectivity in the street network is a positive, traffic calming measures along the length of the street and improved intersections at West Street and High Street are of particular concern to residents (figure 2.28). Similarly, Jackson Street, which also runs parallel to Broad Street further into the neighborhood, was also identified as needing traffic calming measures.

    Residents also identified the desires to see a bike lane on Broad Street, which at this time consists of four travel lanes and two parking lanes. Under a plan by NJ DOT currently beginning construction, Broad Street is being reconfigured to have two parking lanes, two travel lanes, a dedicated turning lane, curb bump-outs at intersections, and bicycle lanes in either direction.

    Open Space - Though there is no public park within the West Woodbury neighborhood area, the neighborhood is proximate to Woodbury Creek Park, which links to athletic fields, trails, lakes, and is part of the Woodbury Creek watershed. Residents expressed that they would like to see improved maintenance of existing parks, and improved access to Woodbury Creek Park from the West Woodbury Neighborhood. As part of this effort, residents also expressed a desire to see an increase in the amount of finished path in the park (figure 2.29) and for possible expansion of the park westward towards I-295. In general for the neighborhood, residents also expressed their desire for improved maintenance of existing sidewalks throughout the neighborhood and the provision of a dense shade tree cover with appropriate street trees.

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    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    Land Use - The East + South neighborhood area sits directly between the site of the future downtown train station and Broad Street, and is anticipated to see the most potential growth due to the introduction of passenger rail service and implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. The portion of this neighborhood north of Carpenter Street is within the Redevelopment Plan area, and the lots fronting on either side of Aberdeen Place north to Cooper Street are within the historic district. Throughout the public process, it was evident that a tension existed between future growth and development and existing neighborhood character in terms of scale, preservation, and use. Particularly in the historic district, residents would like to see improved enforcement of district standards, preservation of single-family homes, and better maintenance of rental properties. Higher density development in the historic district through implementation of the Redevelopment Plan is also a concern to residents, as some feel this could dramatically alter the existing character of the neighborhood.

    However, residents also believe that the neighborhood will need to adapt to the demands of the housing market in order to thrive in the future. The most current census data shows that 70% of units in the neighborhood are rental properties. Additionally, 54% of households are non-family. Though many residents would like to see properties in the neighborhood remain as single-family homes, they also express that this should happen only if it is economically viable and does not stunt growth (figure 2.29). Well-maintained multi-family rental or owner-occupied units are not necessarily seen as a detriment to the neighborhood, however, regular property maintenance and enforcement of existing standards is needed for these and single-family units in the northern section of this neighborhood area. Though single-family homes are the predominant building type in this neighborhood, a small collection of semi-detached and row homes exist as well (figure 2.31)

    The portion of this neighborhood south of Carpenter Street has recently seen some new infill development in the form of new single-family residences. However, the placement of garages attached to and in front of the principal structure is not consistent with existing neighborhood character (figure 2.30). No standards for the placement of garages on the lot relative to the main house exist in the zoning code to address this. Additionally, this section of the neighborhood sits directly adjacent to the C-2 commercial zone, an area characterized by a collection of car dealerships along Route 45. There is little to no buffering between the dealerships and residential homes, and inconsistent and unspecified buffer dimensions for this type of use.

    Figure 2.29: Typical large-format home in East Woodbury, originally designed as a single-family household.

    Figure 2.30: Typical home in the neighborhood south of Carpenter Street.

    Figure 2.31: Attached row-housing in East Woodbury.

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    Figure 2.32: Improvements to Railroad Avenue will need to be made in the future to handle a projected increase in traffic from the train station.

    Figure 2.33: Lack of pedestrian access to the park at the intersection of South and East Barber Avenue.

    Circulation - Many of the issues related to traffic circulation relate to future anticipated needs once rail service arrives in Woodbury. Residents recognize there will be positive aspects to increased traffic, as one neighbor put it during the public workshop, embrace traffic, its people coming into your town (figure 2.32). In order to accommodate this increase in traffic without negatively impacting the neighborhood, residents feel that the intersection of Railroad Avenue and Cooper Street should be improved to be able to better handle increased traffic, where it is currently difficult to turn left from Railroad Avenue onto Cooper Street. Residents also thought that parking should be balanced to encourage more people to walk rather than drive to this train station. Additionally, residents feel there is an existing need for safer biking conditions within the neighborhood.

    Open Space - This neighborhood area contains Wing-Dickerson Park, one of the largest public parks in Woodbury and is centrally located within the heart of the neighborhood. This park was recently renovated adding athletic courts and site improvements, and also contains some space for passive recreation as well as a playground for kids and families. Residents expressed however that better access needs to be created for pedestrians to access the park (figure 2.33), and expressed a desire for another park or community center that could serve the City year-round and provide activities during winter.

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    Pedestrian-friendly streets

    Access to open space

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    COMMUNITY VISION + GOALS

    A vision statement is a vivid description of a desired outcome, or series of outcomes, that helps to paint a mental image to encourage and inspire. A vision statement for a neighborhood conservation plan illustrates the collective ideal of the plan participants and the community. The vision builds a specific idea of how a place will look, feel, and operate in the future. From this statement, projects and strategies can be tested for their ability to fulfill the vision.

    The following vision statement is divided into three parts, one for each neighborhood of the plan. These visions were derived from the public participation process conducted for this plan.

    NORTH WOODBURY

    Containing the community anchors of Underwood Memorial Hospital and Walnut Street School in addition to a network of open space, North Woodbury has developed into a more connected, pedestrian-friendly neighborhood. The hospital is buffered by green space and a network of sidewalks that enhance the pedestrian experience. The community vision correlates with clear, readily accessible zoning regulations, which provide for sustainable building practices. The pedestrian experience has improved dramatically, most notably on Tatum Street, which now features a dedicated bike lane and enhanced crosswalks and bump-outs at key intersections. It is also a safe thoroughfare for pedestrians, with improved sidewalks and abundant lighting. Circulation around Walnut Street School has also been enhanced through special signage, parking restrictions, and one-way streets. Along Broad Street, crosswalk and traffic light additions have created a safer, more connected experience for pedestrians. Finally, open space amenities have been augmented through the addition of a park on West Packer Street, a connective corridor between the neighborhood, athletic fields, high school, and downtown, and improved lighting throughout.

    WEST WOODBURY

    The neighborhood has complemented and accommodated development along Broad Street while better utilizing its potential for open space access and recreation. West Woodbury now enjoys redevelopment on the former laundry site and on the block between West Centre and West Barber Streets, all constructed with sustainable building practices. Street improvements throughout the neighborhood acknowledge increases in automobile presence while maintaining and improving the pedestrian experience. Sidewalks and roads previously in poor condition have been improved, and key north-south roads running parallel to Broad Street have clear visual and infrastructural elements to make the environment safer for cars and pedestrians. Automobile spillover into the neighborhood from new

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    Maintain neighborhood character

    A new community center

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    development on Broad Street is mitigated by shared lots and the institution of parking permits for residential areas contiguous with Broad Street. West Woodbury is now a bicycle-friendly community, anchored by a bike lane on Broad Street. Finally, West Woodburys residents are enjoying access to improved open space. Woodbury Creek Park is accessible by new entrances in the neighborhood. An informed public facilitates the flourishing of tree planting in the neighborhood and enjoys the benefits of a more complete tree canopy. Finally, vacant, undevelopable land throughout the neighborhood is turned over to pocket parks, augmenting West Woodburys green space amenities.

    EAST + SOUTH WOODBURY

    East Woodbury experiences a renaissance spurred on by the extension of light rail through Gloucester County. At the same time, the historic character of the existing neighborhood is maintained as educated homeowners comply with historic district requirements which are duly enforced. Redevelopment in the area is seamless, with guidelines in place to accommodate single-family and multi-family homes as well as a redevelopment of St. Patricks School to include community open space. The neighborhood now enjoys safer pedestrian and bicycle access. The parks in the middle of the neighborhood are more connected through pedestrian-friendly signage and crosswalks. A bike loop circumscribes the neighborhood,