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Year 11 & Year 12 Handbook VCE/VCAL 2019–2020 T 03 9439 4077 F 03 9431 1157 www.clc.vic.edu.au ABN 44 058 164 891 Catholic Ladies’ College Ltd Mary Aikenhead Ministries In The Tradition Of The Sisters Of Charity 19 Diamond Street Eltham VIC 3095 Australia

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  • 19 Diamond Street

    Eltham VIC 3095

    T 03 9439 4077

    www.clc.vic.edu.au

    Year 11 and Year 12

    Handbook

    VCE/VCAL 2019-2020

    Year 11 & Year 12 HandbookVCE/VCAL 2019–2020

    T 03 9439 4077F 03 9431 1157

    www.clc.vic.edu.au

    ABN 44 058 164 891

    Catholic Ladies’ College Ltd

    Mary Aikenhead Ministries In The Tradition Of The Sisters Of Charity

    19 Diamond StreetEltham VIC 3095Australia

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 2

    CONTENTS

    General Information Page No:

    Abbreviations ................................................................. 2

    VCE ............................................................................... 3

    Planning a VCE Program .................................................. 3

    Year 11 ............................................................................. 3

    Studying a Unit 3/4 Sequence in Year 11 ........................ 3

    Year 12 ............................................................................. 4

    Subjects Pre-requisites for Units 3 and 4 ......................... 4

    Assessment ......................................................................

    General Achievement Test (GAT) ..................................... 4

    Units 3 and 4: The ATAR .................................................. 4

    Students undertaking VCE outside of the College ........... 4

    VCAL ................................................................................ 5

    Planning a VCAL Program ................................................ 5

    Assessment .................................................................... 5

    Subject Selection Process ................................................ 6

    Careers and Tertiary Courses .......................................... 6

    Open Days ....................................................................... 6

    More Information About VCE, VET and VCAL Courses

    and Expectations ............................................................. 6

    General Information/ Course Advice .............................. 7

    Course Descriptions

    KLA: English

    English Offerings .............................................................. 8 English – Units 1-4 ............................................................ 9-10

    English – Literature .......................................................... 11-12

    KLA: Health and Physical Education

    Health and Human Development .................................... 13-14

    Physical Education............................................................ 15-16

    VCE VET Certificate III Sport and Recreation .................... 17

    KLA: Humanities

    Accounting ....................................................................... 18

    Australian and Global Politics .......................................... 19-20

    Business Management ..................................................... 21-22

    Geography ....................................................................... 23

    History ............................................................................. 24

    Legal Studies .................................................................... 25

    VCE VET Certificate II Business ......................................... 26

    KLA: Languages

    Languages – German ........................................................ 27-28

    Languages – Indonesian .................................................. 29-30

    Languages – Italian ......................................................... 31-32

    Course Descriptions (cont’d) Page No:

    KLA: Mathematics

    Mathematics Offerings .................................................. 33

    General Mathematics (Units 1 & 2) ................................ 34

    Further Mathematics (Units 3 & 4) ................................ 34

    Mathematical Methods ................................................. 36

    Specialist Mathematics ................................................... 38

    KLA: Religious Education

    Religious Education Offerings ........................................ 37

    Religion and Society ...................................................... 38

    KLA: Science

    Biology ............................................................................. 39-40

    Chemistry ........................................................................ 41-42

    Physics ............................................................................ 43-44

    Psychology ....................................................................... 45-46

    KLA: The Arts

    Studio Art (Units 1 & 2) ................................................... 47

    Art (Units 3 & 4) .............................................................. 48

    Drama ............................................................................ 49-50

    Media ............................................................................ 51-52

    Music Performance (Units 3 & 4) ................................... 53

    Visual Communication Design ....................................... 54-55

    VCE VET Certificate III Music Industry ............................ 56

    KLA: Technology

    Food Studies .................................................................... 57

    VCE VET Certificate II Applied Fashion Design &

    Technology ...................................................................... 58

    KLA: VCAL

    VCAL (Personal Development Skills and Work Related Skills) 59

    VCAL (Literacy) ................................................................ 60-61

    VCAL (Numeracy .............................................................. 62

    Forms

    Application for Year 11 Student to Study

    VCE Units 3 and 4 (Proforma) ......................................... 63

    Studies Undertaken Outside CLC (Proforma) .................. 64

    Subject Selection Instructions VCE – 2019 ...................... 65

    ABBREVIATIONS

    ATAR - Australian Tertiary Admission Rank GAT - General Achievement Test SAC - School Assessed Coursework SAT - School Assessed Task VCAA - Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority

    VCAL - Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning VCE - Victorian Certificate of Education VET - Vocational Education and Training VTAC - Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 3

    Catholic Ladies’ College provides a diverse and stimulating curriculum. The College aims to ensure that all students achieve success in their pathway to the future and in the development of the skills and attributes necessary for adult life. Students are supported in their studies by a highly qualified, experienced and committed staff. Special programs operate to support each student as she moves through her final years of schooling. These include a comprehensive Careers Program, a series of challenging Religious Education Units, an affirming Student Wellbeing Program and a range of Senior Leadership experiences and opportunities.

    At the Senior level students have a choice of completing one of the following certificates:

    Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE)

    Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL)

    VCE

    The Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) is a state-wide certificate that students in Victoria receive on satisfactory completion of their secondary education. The VCE provides diverse pathways to further study or training at University or TAFE and to employment. The VCE is made up of a number of studies, each of which is broken up into four units. Each VCE study unit is numbered 1, 2, 3 or 4 and is of semester length. Students will complete Units 1 and/or 2 of a VCE study in Year 11. Units 3 and 4 of a VCE study are undertaken in Year 12. Students must complete both Units 3 and 4 of a study.

    To be awarded a VCE, students must: 1. satisfactorily complete a total of at least sixteen units 2. these sixteen units must include:

    i. three Units of English. The three Units of English may be selected from English Literature Units 1-4 and English Units 1–4.

    ii. three sequences of Units 3 and 4 studies other than English – this may include VET 3 and 4 sequences

    PLANNING A VCE PROGRAM

    When selecting a VCE course, particularly Units 1 and 2, students may experiment a little and try different subjects. However, students need to be aware that certain Unit 3 and 4 subjects cannot be selected in the following year without the completion of Units 1 and 2. Before making a final selection of subjects’ students should make sure that they satisfy the requirements of tertiary or post-secondary courses they wish to enter, or the conditions of the employment they intend seeking. In addition, students must be aware that choosing too wide a range of subjects increases the likelihood of timetable clashes.

    When making their subject selections, it is important for students to look at the detail of individual University and TAFE courses. Students must consult the VTAC Guide (www.vtac.edu.au) and the VICTER 2019 which lists Tertiary prerequisites for the year in which students will enter University or TAFE. For further information please make an appointment with the Careers Adviser Ms Annette Kilsby.

    YEAR 11

    It is a College requirement that all Year 11 students undertake:

    English or English Literature Units 1 and 2; and

    Five other Unit 1 and 2 studies;

    Year 11 Religious Education.

    Students who satisfy the set criteria can apply to take one Unit 3 and 4 sequence in place of one of the Unit 1 and 2 studies (see section “Students interested in studying a unit 3 and 4 sequence in Year 11”). There are no subject prerequisites for entry into Units 1 and 2, except for Languages.

    STUDENTS INTERESTED IN STUDYING A UNIT 3 AND 4 SEQUENCE IN YEAR 11

    Year 11 students interested in this option should collect the appropriate application form from the Administration Office, a copy of which is included in this Handbook. Students will be required to meet the criteria set out in the application form and will be asked to attend an interview with a staff panel which has been formed to decide the success of each application. The application form should be returned with the Year 11 initial subject selection form.

    Students are advised to be flexible in their choice of a Unit 3 and 4 subject and are reminded of the benefits of undertaking tertiary prerequisite subjects within their Year 12 program. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss this option with their Year 10 subject teacher and the appropriate KLA Team Leader. Where class size is an issue, Year 12 student choices will take preference. All students who undertake a Unit 3 and 4 in Year 11 are expected to take a full load (five subjects) at the Year 12 level the following year.

    http://www.vtac.edu.au/

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 4

    YEAR 12

    It is a College requirement that all Year 12 students undertake a full VCE program, which usually consists of:

    English or English Literature Units 3 and 4;

    Four other Unit 3 and 4 sequences;

    Year 12 Religious Education.

    All students who undertake a Unit 3 and 4 subject in Year 11 will not be allowed to take less than the Year 12 College requirements unless medical and/or other evidence is produced that demonstrates that the student will be otherwise unable to successfully complete the VCE. An interview with the Deputy Principal Learning and Teaching, the student and her parents will be organised to discuss the situation.

    Subject prerequisites for Units 3 and 4: There are no prerequisites for entry into Units 3 and 4, except for Languages. However, students are advised that in some subject areas the expectations of the course and the skills required for necessary completion mean that it would be very difficult to take them up at Unit 3 and 4 level. See specific subject pages for details.

    ASSESSMENT

    Satisfactory Completion of Units 1 - 4

    A student will receive an:

    S for Satisfactorily completed

    N for Not Satisfactorily completed

    for each Unit depending on whether or not they have satisfactorily completed the outcomes of the Unit.

    Level of Performance in Units 1 and 2

    In Units 1 and 2 there will be graded Assessment Tasks and grades for these tasks will be included on student reports. However, they will not be included in the official statement of results from the VCAA. This statement will show S and N results only.

    Level of Performance in Units 3 and 4

    Each subject will have a number of assessment components. These will consist of School Assessed Coursework (SACs) and/or School Assessed Tasks (SATs) and an end of year examination. All School Assessments will be based on specific outcomes.

    General Achievement Test (GAT)

    All students who are studying a VCE Unit 3 and 4 will undertake the GAT. The GAT is a three hour test, measuring levels of general achievement across three broad areas: Written communication; Mathematics, Science, Technology; Humanities, the Arts and Social Sciences. GAT results are used in a number of ways by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA), one of which is to monitor school based assessment.

    Units 3 and 4: The ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank)

    The Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) runs the application and offer process for approximately 2000 Tertiary courses by providing information concerning VCE applicants to selection officers at each institution. How the information is used varies from course to course, but nearly all courses make some use of the ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admission Rank) which is an overall measure of how a student has performed in his or her studies. It is expressed as a rank and is an estimate of where the student came in the relevant age group. The overall rating is on a scale of 0 – 99.95.

    VTAC uses the study scores awarded by the VCAA to calculate the ATAR. VTAC scales the study scores to allow for any variation in the strength of competition between the cohorts of students taking the various studies that year. The ATAR is calculated by adding the scaled score for English Units 3 and 4 or English Literature Units 3 and 4 or English Language Units 3 and 4, the next best three scaled scores and 10% of any fifth and sixth scaled score. The increment for a sixth study may be replaced with an increment for satisfactorily completing an approved University study as part of the VCE extension study program.

    Students undertaking VCE units outside of the College

    For various reasons, students may wish to undertake one or more VCE Units at another provider (eg: Night school, Dance school, Language school, TAFE, Private Music, etc). Catholic Ladies' College however will still be regarded as the HOME SCHOOL and WE must therefore enrol the student.

    As such, we must be notified regarding the undertaking of these studies by: 1. Obtaining a separate form from the VCE Leader; 2. Enrol in units outside CLC and pay your fees (if applicable); 3. Return the form to the Administration Office.

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 5

    VCAL

    The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is an alternate Senior Certificate to the VCE, which is aimed at developing and extending pathways for young people who are considering the following options:

    Further study at TAFE Employment Apprenticeship or Traineeship

    VCAL is a ‘hands on’ option for Year 11 and 12 students and its flexibility enables students to undertake a study program that suits their interests and learning needs. VCAL sits alongside the VCE as a senior secondary option for Victorian students.

    There are three levels of the VCAL: Foundation, Intermediate and Senior. CLC offers Intermediate level to Year 11 students and Intermediate and Senior level to Year 12 students. VCAL may be undertaken by students enrolled in either Year 11 or Year 12. Students may choose to complete two VCAL levels over two years. The VCAL provides a program of studies in the following compulsory strands:

    Literacy Numeracy Work-Related Skills Industry-Specific Skills Personal Development Skills

    PLANNING A VCAL PROGRAM A student’s VCAL program will be individually tailored to her needs and interests. A student must satisfactorily complete ten accredited units in order to be awarded the VCAL. Students will be enrolled in the following VCAL units: Literacy, Numeracy, Work Related Skills and Personal Development Skills. In addition to these VCAL units, students will be assisted to build a program that includes: a Vocational Education Training (VET) Certificate or school-based apprenticeship in a vocational area of interest to them and VCE Units.

    Students may elect to enrol in VCAL during the subject selection process. It is also possible to move from VCE to VCAL during the year, subject to VCAA dates. The required VET program may be one of the VCE VET courses listed in this Handbook or may be chosen from any available to secondary students through local TAFEs and the Northern Melbourne VET Cluster, for example, Hairdressing, Childcare.

    ASSESSMENT Styles of assessment vary according to the units studied. Assessment in VCAL units is school-based and there are no exams. Successful completion of the VCAL will provide young people with skills that are important for life, work and further study as well as a Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning.

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 6

    Students Entering Years 11 in 2019 – Subject Selection Process

    CAREERS AND TERTIARY COURSES All students are invited to make appointments with the Career Adviser, Ms Annette Kilsby, to discuss Course and Career options and subject selection and to use the many Careers resources located in the Resource Centre:

    The Good Careers Guide – www.goodcareersguide.com.au

    www.gooduniversitiesguide.com.au – this site allows exploration of courses, plus it links to the Good Careers Guide as well.

    www.myfuture.edu.au – this site provides the information about jobs. Go to ‘The Facts’. It also has links to job prospects and shows the expected demand in different industries. Students do need to set up and account (free) for this site.

    www.vtac.edu.au – course search for post Year 12.

    www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au – a good website to explore many aspects of working/careers including a link to check award wages.

    University and TAFE Course Guides.

    OPEN DAYS Most Universities and TAFEs have an Open Days each year. This is a wonderful chance to visit the Campus, inspect facilities, discuss course and career outcomes with lecturers, course selection officers, current students, graduates and others. This Handbook has been compiled from the VCAA Study Designs. Students can access the full VCAA Study Designs for all VCE units via www.vcaa.vic.edu.au or can find hard copies in the Resource Centre.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT VCE, VET AND VCAL COURSES AND EXPECTATIONS

    Mrs Georgia Heffernan Deputy Principal Learning and Teaching Mrs Christina Pascalis VCE Leader Ms Annette Kilsby Careers and VET Coordinator Ms Jade Charalambous VCAL Team Leader

    Tuesday, 17 July Student VCE Subject Session 1 - Periods 4 and 5 (College Hall)

    Wednesday, 18 July

    Student VCE Subject Session 2 - Periods 1 and 2 (College Hall)

    VCE/VCAL ‘Futures Expo’ for parents and students

    6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Year 7 Area VCE/VCAL teachers available and University Expo

    7:15 pm to 8:00 pm College Hall Keynote address and information session for all parents and students

    8:00 pm to 8:30 pm College Hall Q & A

    Monday, 23 July

    Year 11 2019 commencement date for entering subject selection via the internet – Receipts to Homeroom Teachers

    Individual Year 11 2019 student interviews

    Monday, 30 July

    Year 11 2019 final date for entering subject selection;

    Applications to study a VCE Unit 3 and 4 subject close - applications must be submitted to the Administration Office by 3:00 pm.

    Tuesday, 31 July Final day to return signed subject selection receipt to Homeroom teachers.

    Wednesday, 1 August Interviews for Year 11 2019 students applying for a VCE Unit 3 and 4 subjects.

    http://www.goodcareersguide.com.au/http://www.gooduniversitiesguide.com.au/http://www.myfuture.edu.au/http://www.vtac.edu.au/http://www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au/http://www.fcaa.vic.edu.au/

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 7

    RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

    Mr Heinz Wolf

    Religious Education

    Religion and Society

    (Units 3 and 4)

    SCIENCE

    Mrs Cathy Jackson

    Biology(Units 1-4)

    Chemistry(Units 1-4)

    Physics(Units 1-4)

    Psychology(Units 1-4)

    TECHNOLOGY

    Ms Melinda Wills

    Food Studies(Units 1-2)

    VETMs Annette Kilsby

    VCE VET Certificate II

    Applied Fashion Design and Technology

    VCAL

    Ms Jade Charalambous

    Personal Development Skills:2 Units;

    Work Related Skills:2 Units

    (Intermediate/Senior)

    Numeracy: 1 UnitIntermermediate/Senior)

    Literacy: 1 UnitOral Communication: 1 Unit

    Intermediate/ Senior)

    ENGLISH

    Mrs Trish Smith

    English

    (Units 1-4)

    Literature

    (Units 1-4)

    HEALTH & PE

    Mrs Sarah Chadha

    Health and Human

    Development

    (Units 1-4)

    Physical Education

    (Units 1-4)

    VETMs Annette Kilsby

    VCE VETCertificate III

    Sport and Recreation

    HUMANITIES

    Mr Damian Brasier

    Accounting

    (Units 1-4)

    Australian and Global Politics

    (Units 1-4)

    Business Management

    (Units 1-4)

    Geography

    (Units 1-4)

    History

    (Units 1-4)

    Legal Studies

    (Units 1-4)

    VETMs Annette Kilsby

    VCE VET Certificate II

    Business

    LANGUAGES

    Ms Caroline Bailey

    German

    (Units 1-4)

    Indonesian

    (Units 1-4)

    Italian

    (Units 1-4)

    MATHEMATICS

    Mr Vincent Lam

    General Mathematics

    (Units 1-2)

    Specialist Mathematics

    (Units 1-4)

    Mathematical Methods

    (Units 1-4)

    Further Mathematics

    (Units 3-4)

    THE ARTS

    Ms Andrea Durham

    Studio Art

    (Units 1-2)

    Art(Units 3-4)

    Drama

    (Units 1-4)

    Media

    (Units 1-4)

    Music Performance

    (Units 3-4)

    Visual Communication

    and Design(Units 1-4)

    VETMs Annette Kilsby

    VCE VET Certificate III

    Music Industry

    General Information/Course Advice

    Students are encouraged to speak to subject teachers for specific subject advice. All students will be interviewed before their final subject selection is submitted.

    FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SUBJECTS

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 8

    YEAR 11VCE English Unit 1

    AND

    VCE English Unit 2

    AND/OR

    VCE Literature Unit 1

    AND

    VCE Literature Unit 2

    Intermediate VCAL Literacy Unit 1

    AND

    Intermediate VCAL Literacy Unit 2

    YEAR 12VCE Literature Units 3 & 4

    AND/OR

    VCE English Units 3 & 4

    Senior VCAL LiteracyUnits 1 & 2

    OR

    Intermediate VCAL Literacy Units 1 & 2

    COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    KLA: ENGLISH

    ENGLISH OFFERINGS

    English Course Options

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 9

    ENGLISH

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Trish Smith

    Career Paths / Future Directions:

    Advertising, Editing, Film and Radio, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Policy Development, Politics, Public Relations, Publishing, Script Editing and Writing, Teaching

    Unit 1 - English (Code: EN011)

    Description

    In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.

    Areas of study

    This course is divided into two areas of study:

    Reading and creating texts

    Analysing and presenting argument

    Outcomes There are two key outcomes for Unit 1, which correspond to the areas of study: Students will respond to a set text in oral and/or written form,

    both analytically and creatively. Students will need to analyse how argument and persuasive

    language can be used to position audiences, and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students will identify and discuss how language can be used to persuade readers and/or viewers.

    Assessment An analytical response to a set text A creative response to a set text such as a monologue, script,

    short story, illustrated narrative, short film or graphic text An analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language

    in text/s Oral presentation Semester Examination

    Unit 2 - English (Code: EN012)

    Description

    In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts. They will explore how comparing texts can provide a deeper understanding of ideas, issues and themes. Students will analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences.

    Areas of study

    The course is divided into two areas of study:

    Reading and comparing texts

    Analysing and presenting argument

    Outcomes

    There are two key outcomes for Unit 2, which correspond to the areas of study: Students will compare the presentation of ideas, issues and

    themes in two texts. Students should be able to identify and analyse how argument

    and persuasive language are used in text/s that attempt to influence an audience, and create a text which presents a point of view.

    Assessment A comparative analytical response to set texts A persuasive text that presents an argument or viewpoint An analysis of the use of argument and persuasive language

    in text/s. Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 10

    ENGLISH (Cont’d)

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Trish Smith

    Career Paths / Future Directions:

    Advertising, Editing, Film and Radio, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Policy Development, Politics, Public Relations, Publishing, Script Editing and Writing, Teaching

    Unit 3 - English (Code: EN013)

    Description

    In this unit, students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts.

    Area of Study 1: Reading and Creating Texts

    In this area of study students identify, discuss and analyse how the features of selected texts create meaning and how they influence interpretation. Students examine the ways in which readers are invited to respond to texts. Students prepare sustained analytical interpretations of selected texts, discussing how features of the texts create meaning and using textual evidence to support their responses. Students present sustained creative responses to selected texts, demonstrating their understanding of the world of the texts and how texts construct meaning.

    Area of Study 2: Analysing Argument

    In this area of study students analyse and compare the use of argument and language in texts that debate a topical issue. Students explore the argument of a persuasive piece, and the way written, spoken and visual language is used. Students develop written and spoken critical analyses of the use of argument and language in written, spoken, and/or multimodal texts, including analysis of the quality of the reasoning presented and the use of features intended to position audiences. They compare different written texts presenting argument on similar ideas or issues, considering different ways authors use language to express arguments.

    Outcomes

    There are two key outcomes for Unit 3, which correspond to the areas of study: An analytical interpretation of a selected text, and a creative

    response to a different selected text. An analysis and comparison of the use of argument and

    persuasive language in texts that present a point of view on an issue currently debated in the media.

    Assessment

    Analytical text responses

    Creative text response

    Analysis of the persuasive use of language

    Unit 4 - English (Code: EN014)

    Description

    In this unit students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in two texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media.

    Area of Study 1: Reading and comparing texts

    In this area of study students explore the meaningful connections between two texts. They analyse texts, including the interplay between character and setting, voice and structure, and how ideas, issues and themes are conveyed. By comparing the texts, they gain a deeper understanding of the ideas, issues and themes that reflect the world and human experiences. Students produce a written analysis comparing selected texts, discussing important similarities and differences and exploring how the texts deal with similar or related ideas, issues or themes from different perspectives to reflect particular values.

    Area of Study 2: Presenting argument

    In this area of study students build their understanding of both the analysis and construction of texts that attempt to influence audiences. They use their knowledge of argument and persuasive language as a basis for the development of their own persuasive texts in relation to a topical issue. This area of study focuses on the construction of persuasive texts. Students use discussion and writing to clarify their thinking and develop a viewpoint on an issue. Students reflect on their intentions in positioning the reader and consider how their use of language expresses their argument.

    Outcomes

    There are two key outcomes for Unit 4, which correspond to the areas of study: A detailed comparison which analyses how two selected texts

    present ideas, issues and themes. A sustained and reasoned point of view on an issue currently

    debated in the media.

    Assessment

    Comparative Essay

    Point of View Oral Presentation and accompanying statement of intention

    Examination

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 11

    ENGLISH - LITERATURE

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Trish Smith An understanding of English Literature has many benefits beyond the personal development. English is the language of not only our society but, increasingly, of the world and a good command of language empowers the individual.

    Career Paths / Future Directions: English Literature has relevance in the following areas: Advertising, Communications, Court Reporter, Editing, Education, Ethics/Philosophy, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Marketing, Multi-media, Performance, Policy Development, Politics, Professional Writing, Psychology, Public Relations, Publishing, Social Research, Teaching, Theatre, TV/Film/Radio, Script Writing

    Unit 1 – Approaches to Literature (Code: LI011)

    Description Unit 1 focuses on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students’ analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop increasingly discriminating response to a range of literary forms and styles. Students respond critically, creatively and reflectively to the ideas and concerns of texts and gain insights into how texts function as representations of human experience. They develop familiarity with key terms, concepts and practices that equip them for further studies in Literature. Students will also develop an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text.

    Areas of Study The course is divided into two areas of study:

    Area of Study 1- Reading practices

    Area of Study 2- Ideas and concerns in texts

    Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 1, which correspond to the areas of study:

    Reading practices

    Ideas and concerns in texts

    Assessment Analytical text response Film study Discussion Forums Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Context and Connections (Code: LI012)

    Description In Unit 2, students explore the ways literary texts connect with each other and with the world. They deepen their examination of the ways their own culture and the cultures represented in texts can influence their interpretations and shape different meanings. Drawing on a range of literary texts, students consider the relationships between authors, audiences and contexts. Ideas, language and structures of different texts from past and present eras and/or cultures are compared and contrasted. Students will analyse the similarities and differences across texts and establish connections between them. They engage in close reading of texts and create analytical responses that are evidence-based. By experimenting with textual structures and language features, students understand how imaginative texts are informed by close analysis.

    Areas of Study The course is divided into two areas of study:

    Area of Study 1- The text, the reader and their contexts

    Area of Study 2- Exploring connections between texts

    Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 2, which correspond to the areas of study.

    Assessment

    Discussion Forums

    Reading journal

    Views and values essay

    Comparative analysis

    Close analysis

    Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 12

    ENGLISH – LITERATURE (Cont’d)

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Trish Smith An understanding of English Literature has many benefits beyond the personal development. English is the language of not only our society but, increasingly, of the world and a good command of language empowers the individual.

    Career Paths / Future Directions: English Literature has relevance in the following areas: Advertising, Communications, Court Reporter, Editing, Education, Ethics/Philosophy, Journalism, Law, Librarian, Marketing, Multi-media, Performance, Policy Development, Politics, Professional Writing, Psychology, Public Relations, Publishing, Social Research, Teaching, Theatre, TV/Film/Radio, Script Writing

    Unit 3 – Form and Transformation (Code: LI013)

    Description In this unit students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. Students develop their skills in communicating ideas in both written and oral forms.

    Area of Study 1: Adaptations and transformations In this area of study students focus on how the form of text contributes to the meaning of the text.

    Area of Study 2: Creative responses to texts Students focus on the imaginative techniques used for creating and recreating a literary work. Students develop an understanding of the various ways in which authors craft texts. They reflect critically upon their own responses as they relate to the text, and discuss the purpose and context of their creations.

    Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 3, which correspond to the areas of study: Analyse the extent to which meaning changes when a text is

    adapted to a different form. Respond creatively to a text and comment on the connections

    between the text and the response.

    Assessment Discussion Forums Reflections/Evaluations Comparative analysis Creative response At least one assessment in Unit 3 must include an oral

    component

    Unit 4 – Interpreting Texts (Code: LI014)

    Description In this unit students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They consider the context of their responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts, the style of the language and points of view. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.

    Area of study 1: Literary perspectives In this area of study students focus on how different readings of texts may reflect the views and values of both writer and reader. They compare and analyse two pieces of literary criticism reflecting different perspectives, assumptions and ideas about the views and values of the text studied develop their own response to a text.

    Area of study 2: Close analysis In this area of study students focus on detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts. Students attend closely to textual details to examine the ways specific features and/or passages in a text contributes to their overall interpretations.

    Outcomes There are two outcomes for Unit 4, which correspond to the areas of study: Produce an interpretation of a text using different literary

    perspectives to inform their view Analyse features of texts, and develop and justify

    interpretations of texts. (two tasks on two different texts)

    Assessment Discussion Forums Close analysis Discussion papers

    Examination At the end of the year there is a two hour examination with one literary perspectives question and one close passage question.

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 13

    KLA: HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Sarah Chadha

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Community Health, Education, Food Science, Health Administration, Health Sciences, Nursing, Social Welfare

    Unit 1 - Understanding Health and Wellbeing (Code: HH011)

    Description This unit focuses on the health and individual human development of Australia’s youth. Students will develop an understanding of the physical, social, emotional and intellectual changes associated with the developmental stage of youth. Issues that impact on the health and individual human development of Australia’s youth will also be investigated.

    Outcomes

    Describe and explain multiple dimensions of health and wellbeing, including indicators used to measure health status and analyse factors that contribute to variations in health status of youth.

    Describe and apply nutrition knowledge and tools to the selection of food and the evaluation of nutrition information.

    Describe and interpret data to identify key areas for improving youth health and wellbeing.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list:

    Case study analysis

    Data analysis

    Visual presentation, such as concept/mind map, poster or presentation file

    Multimedia presentation

    Oral presentation, such as a debate or podcasts (audio or visual)

    Blog

    Test

    Written response, such as a research assignment or briefing paper

    Semester Examination

    Unit 2 - Managing Health and Development (Code: HH022)

    Description This unit focuses on the lifespan stages of prenatal childhood and adulthood. Students will develop an understanding of the health and individual human development of Australia’s children and adults. A range of health issues that are having an impact on Australia’s healthcare system will be discussed. Outcomes

    Describe and explain factors that affect the health and individual during the prenatal stage.

    Describe and explain how Australia’s health system promotes health and wellbeing.

    Describe and analyse a range of issues associated with the use of new and emerging health procedures and technologies.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list:

    Case study analysis

    Data analysis

    Visual presentation, such as concept/min map, poster or presentation file

    Multimedia presentation

    Oral presentation, such as a debate or podcasts (audio or visual)

    Blog

    Test

    Written response, such as a research assignment or briefing paper

    Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 14

    HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (Cont’d)

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Sarah Chadha

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Community Health, Education, Food Science, Health Administration, Health Sciences, Nursing, Social Welfare

    Unit 3 – Australia’s Health in a Globalised World (Code: HH033)

    Description This unit focuses on health and wellbeing as a global concept. Students will consider the benefits of optimal health and wellbeing and its importance as an individual and a collective resource. Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organization (WHO) and evaluate the variations in the health status of Australians. A look at various public health approaches and the interdependence of different models is researched to make health improvements and evaluate successful programs.

    Outcomes

    Explain the complex, dynamic and global nature of health and wellbeing, interpret and apply Australia’s health status data and analyse variations in health status.

    Explain changes to public health approaches, analyse improvements in population health over time and evaluate health promotion strategies.

    Unit 4 – Health and Human Development in a Global Context (Code: HH034)

    Description This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Students use data to investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between and within countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live. They consider the health implications of increased globalisation and worldwide trends relating to climate change, digital technologies, world trade and the mass movement of people.

    Students look at global action to improve health and wellbeing and human development, focusing on the United Nations’ (UN’s) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the work of the World Health Organization (WHO). Students also investigate the role of non-government organisations and Australia’s overseas aid program. Outcomes

    Analyse similarities and differences in health status and burden of disease globally and the factors that contribute to differences in health and wellbeing.

    Outcomes (cont’d)

    Analyse relationships between the SDGs and their role in the promotion of health and human development, and evaluate the effectiveness of global aid programs.

    Assessment

    Case Studies

    A media analysis, a research inquiry, a blog or a case study analysis

    An oral presentation, such as a debate or a podcast

    A visual presentation such as a graphic organiser, a concept/mind map, an annotated poster, a digital presentation

    Written Reports

    Data Analysis

    Tests Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 15

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION KLA Team Leader: Mrs Sarah Chadha

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Childcare, Chiropractor, Education, Fitness industry, Health industry, Nursing, Outdoor Education, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Sports Administration, Sports Marketing

    Unit 1 – The Human Body in Motion (Code: PE011)

    Description In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise. They explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity.

    Using a contemporary approach, students evaluate the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement. They consider the implications of the use of legal and illegal practices to improve the performance of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems, evaluating perceived benefits and describing potential harms. They also recommend and implement strategies to minimise the risk of illness or injury to each system.

    Outcomes

    Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of practical activities to explain how the musculoskeletal system functions and its limiting conditions, and evaluate the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances that enhance human movement.

    Outcomes (cont’d) Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a

    variety of practical activities to explain how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems function and the limiting conditions of each system, and discuss the ethical and performance implications of the use of practices and substances to enhance the performance of these two systems.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Written report analysing participation Practical laboratory report linking key knowledge and key skills

    to practical activity Case study analysis Data analysis Critically reflective folio/diary of participation in practical

    activities Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Physical simulation or model Oral presentation such as podcast, debate Written report Structured questions Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Physical Activity, Sport and Society (Code: PE022)

    Description This unit develops students’ understanding of physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different population groups.

    Through a series of practical activities, students experience and explore different types of physical activity promoted in their own and different population groups. They gain an appreciation of the level of physical activity required for health benefits. Students investigate how participation in physical activity varies across the lifespan. They explore a range of factors that influence and facilitate participation in regular physical activity. They collect data to determine perceived enablers of and barriers to physical activity and the ways in which opportunities for participation in physical activity can be extended in various communities, social, cultural and environmental contexts. Students investigate individual and population-based consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. They then create and participate in an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines relevant to the particular population group being studied.

    Students apply various methods to assess individual and population physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels and analyse the data in relation to behaviour guidelines. Students study and apply the social ecological model and/or the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model to critique a range of individual and settings based strategies that are effective in promoting participation in some form of regular physical activity.

    Outcomes Collect and analyse data related to individual and population

    levels of participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour to create, undertake and evaluate an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines for an individual or a specific group.

    Apply a social-ecological framework to research, analyse and evaluate a contemporary issue associated with participation in physical activity and/or sport in a local, national or global setting.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Written plan and reflective folio Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Oral presentation such as podcast, debate Written report Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 16

    PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Cont’d)

    KLA Team Leader: Mrs Sarah Chadha

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Childcare, Chiropractor, Education, Fitness industry, Health industry, Nursing, Outdoor Education, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Sports Administration, Sports Marketing

    Unit 3 – Movement skills and energy for physical activity (Code: PE033)

    Description This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport.

    Students investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems to performance in physical activity, sport and exercise. In particular, they investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity. Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery.

    Outcomes

    Collect and analyse information from, and participate in, a variety of physical activities to develop and refine movement skills from a coaching perspective, through the application of biomechanical and skill acquisition principles.

    Use data collected in practical activities to analyse how the major body and energy systems work together to enable movements to occur, and explain the factors causing fatigue and suitable recovery strategies.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list:

    Practical laboratory report Case study analysis Data analysis Critically reflective folio/diary of participation in practical

    activities Visual presentation Multimedia presentation Structured questions

    Unit 4 – Training to improve performance (Code: PE034)

    Description In this unit students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness, depend on the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program.

    Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual, and evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective.

    Outcomes

    Analyse data from an activity analysis and fitness tests to determine and assess the fitness components and energy system requirements of the activity.

    Participate in a variety of training methods, and design and evaluate training programs to enhance specific fitness components.

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 17

    VCE VET CERTIFICATE III SPORT AND RECREATION TWO UNITS KLA Team Leader: Mrs Sarah Chadha

    The VCE VET Sport and Recreation program aims to provide students with skills and knowledge to achieve competencies that will enhance their employment prospects in the sport and recreation or related industries.

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Personal Trainer, Sports Coach, Gym Instructor, Event/Promotions Manager and Facilitates Manager.

    Unit 1 (Code: SIS30115)

    Description The VCE VET Sport and Recreation program aims to provide students with skills and knowledge to achieve competencies that will enhance their employment prospects in the sport and recreation or related industries. This will enable students to gain a recognised credential and to make a more informed choice of vocation or career path. Certificate III in Sport and Recreation provides students with the skills and knowledge to work in the Sport and Recreation industry. The VCE VET Unit 1 and 2 sequence incorporates compulsory units such as developing critical and creative thinking skills, organising personal work priorities and development, providing first aid, using social media tools for collaboration and management, provide customer service, respond to emergency.

    Outcomes

    Eight employability skills - communication, initiative and enterprise, learning, planning and organisation, problem solving, self-management, teamwork, and technology – as well as the skills associated with the particular Sport and Recreation electives chosen by the school and the student.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list: Observation Tests Practical demonstrations Group sessions and presentations

    Unit 2 (Code: SIS30115)

    Description The VCE VET Sport and Recreation program aims to provide students with skills and knowledge to achieve competencies that will enhance their employment prospects in the sport and recreation or related industries. This will enable students to gain a recognised credential and to make a more informed choice of vocation or career path. Certificate III in Sport and Recreation provides students with the skills and knowledge to work in the Sport and Recreation industry. The VCE VET Unit 1 and 2 sequence incorporates compulsory units such as developing critical and creative thinking skills, organising personal work priorities and development, providing first aid, using social media tools for collaboration and management, provide customer service, respond to emergency situations and follow work health and safety policies.

    Outcomes

    Eight employability skills - communication, initiative and enterprise, learning, planning and organisation, problem solving, self-management, teamwork, and technology – as well as the skills associated with the particular Sport and Recreation electives chosen by the school and the student.

    Assessment A range of tasks taken from the following list:

    Observation Tests Practical demonstrations Group sessions and presentations

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 18

    KLA: HUMANITIES

    ACCOUNTING

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Accountancy, Banking, Business, Finance, Insurance, Law, Marketing, Merchant Banking, Owning or managing a trading or service business, Record keeping for business.

    Unit 1 – Establishing and operating a service business (Code: AC011)

    Description This unit focuses on accounting and financial management of a small business. Use of information and communication technologies will be used to compile reports for the small business owner. Outcomes Describe the resources required and explain and discuss the

    knowledge and skills necessary to set up a small business. Identify and record the financial data and report and explain

    accounting information for a sole proprietor of a service business.

    Assessment Exercises Case studies Tests Assignments Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Accounting for a trading business (Code: AC022)

    Description This unit focuses on the accounting and financial operations of a sole proprietor trading business. Students will learn to account for credit transactions using the accrual approach. Outcomes

    Record and report financial data and information for a sole trader.

    Record financial data and report accounting information for a single activity sole trader using a commercial accounting software package and discuss the use of ICT in the accounting process.

    Select and use financial and non-financial information to evaluate a business and suggest strategies that will improve business performance.

    Assessment Exercises Case studies Tests

    Assignments

    Semester Examination

    Unit 3 – Recording and reporting for a trading business (Code: AC033)

    Description This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting.

    Outcomes Record financial data for a single activity sole trader using a

    double entry system, and discuss the function of various aspects of this accounting system.

    Record balance day adjustments and prepare and interpret accounting reports.

    Unit 4 – Control and analysis of business performance (Code: AC034)

    Description This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process. Students investigate the role and importance of budgeting for the business and undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, profit and financial position. Students interpret and analyse accounting reports and graphical data to suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.

    Outcomes

    Record financial data using double entry accounting and report accounting information using an accrual-based system for a single activity sole trader, and discuss the function of various aspects of this accounting system.

    Prepare budgets and variance reports, evaluate the performance of a business using financial and non-financial information and discuss strategies to improve the profitability and liquidity of the business.

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment Coursework includes:

    Tests (manual and/or ICT)

    (At least 30 marks in each Unit must be allocated to ICT based assessment)

    Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25%

    Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25%

    Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 19

    AUSTRALIAN AND GLOBAL POLITICS

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Journalism, Diplomacy, Communications, Education, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research, Teaching, Administration, Local Government, Social Research.

    Unit 1 – Ideas, Actors and Power (Code: PS041)

    Description In this unit, students are introduced to the key ideas relating to the exercise of political power. They explore how these ideas shape political systems and in particular the characteristics of liberalism. They consider the nature of power in Australian democracy and in a non-democratic political system. They also explore the nature and influence of key political actors in Australia: political parties, interest groups and the media. All these forms of participation in Australian democracy influence the political agenda.

    Area of Study 1: Power and Ideas Area of Study 2: Political Actors and Power

    Outcomes On completion of the unit students should be able to:

    Identify and explain key ideas relating to the exercise of political power.

    Analyse and evaluate different approaches to governmental power by comparing Australian democracy with a non-democratic political system.

    Explain and analyse the roles and functions of political parties, interest groups and the media and their influence on participation in Australian politics.

    Assessment Research report Case study Essay Short answer questions Extended response questions Oral presentation Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Global Connections (Code: PS042)

    Description This unit introduces students to the global community and the global actors that are part of this community.

    In Area of Study 1 students explore the myriad ways lives have been affected by the increased interconnectedness – the global links – of the world through the process of globalisation.

    In Area of Study 2, students consider the extent to which global actors cooperate and share visions and goals as part of the global community. They investigate the ability of the global community to manage areas of global cooperation and to respond to issues of global conflict and instability.

    Area of Study 1: Global Threads Area of Study 2: Global Cooperation and Conflict

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Identify and analyse the social, political and economic interconnections created by globalisation and evaluate Australia’s participation in the global community.

    Describe and analyse the extent to which global actors can effectively manage cooperation, conflict and instability in relation to selected case studies.

    Assessment Research report Case study Essay Short answer questions Extended response questions Oral presentation Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 20

    AUSTRALIAN AND GLOBAL POLITICS (Cont’d)

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Journalism, Diplomacy, Communications, Education, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research, Teaching, Administration, Local Government, Social Research.

    Unit 3 – Global Actors (Code: PS053 )

    Description In this unit students investigate the key global actors in twenty-first century global politics. They use contemporary evidence. post 2000, to analyse the key global actors and their aims, roles and power. They develop an understanding of the key actors through an in-depth examination of the concepts of national interest and power as they relate to the state and the way in which one Asia-Pacific state, China, uses power within the region to achieve its objectives.

    Global actors could include states; international institutions of global governance, for example the United Nations, International Monetary Fund, International Criminal Court and the World Trade Organisation; transnational corporations (TNCs), for example Nike or Apple; and non-state actors.

    For the purposes of this study, the term ‘non-state actors’ covers a range of global actors: altruistic non-governments organisations (NGOs), for example Amnesty International and Greenpeace; organised religions; terrorist movements, for example Al-Qaeda; and organised crime syndicates.

    Area of Study 1: Global Actors Area of Study 2: Power in the Asia-Pacific Region

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Evaluate the power and influence of key global actors in the twenty-first century and assess the extent to which they achieve their aims.

    Analyse and evaluate types of power as used by a specific Asia-Pacific state in the region in pursuit of its national interest.

    Assessment (Selection from) Multimedia presentation Case study Essay Report Test Structured questions Short-answer questions Extended response

    Unit 4 – Global Challenges (Code: PS054 )

    Description In this unit students investigate key global challenges facing the international community in the twenty-first century. They examine and analyse the debates surrounding two ethical issues, which are underpinned by the contested notion of global citizenship. Two of the following issues can be studied; human rights, people movement, development, arms control and disarmament. They then evaluate the effectiveness of responses to these issues. Students also explore the context and causes of global crises, and consider the varying effectiveness of responses and challenges to solving them. Two of the following crises will be studied; climate change, armed conflict, terrorism or economic instability.

    This unit is concerned with contemporary issues and events. Conflicts in the Congo, Middle East or Asia could be studied.

    Area of Study 1: Ethical Issues and Debates Area of Study 2: Global Crises

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Analyse two global ethical issues from a range of perspectives and evaluate the effectiveness of global actors’ responses to these issues.

    Explain two contemporary global crises and evaluate the effectiveness of responses to these.

    Assessment (Selection from) Multimedia presentation Case study Essay Report Test Structured questions Short-answer questions Extended response

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 and 4 School-assessed Coursework 50% Examination 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 21

    BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Banking, Business, Education, Finance, Government and Private Organizations, Management, Small Business

    Unit 1 – Planning a Business (Code: BM011)

    Description Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore, how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate and the effect of these on planning a business.

    Outcomes Describe how and why business ideas are created and developed, and

    explain the methods by which a culture of business innovation and entrepreneurship may be fostered in a nation.

    Describe the external environment of a business and explain how the macro and operating factors within it may affect business planning.

    Describe the internal business environment and analyse how factors from within it may affect business planning

    Assessment A range of tasks from the following: Case study analysis Business research report Development of a business plan and/or feasibility

    study Interview and report on contact with business Business simulation exercise School-based short-term business activity Essay Business survey and analysis Media analysis Tests Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Establishing a Business (Code: BM022)

    Description This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years.

    Outcomes

    Explain the importance when establishing a business of complying with legal requirements and financial record keeping, and establishing effective policies and procedures.

    Explain the importance of establishing a customer base and a marketing presence to achieve the objectives of the business, analyse effective marketing and public relations strategies and apply these strategies to business-related case studies.

    Discuss the staffing needs for a business and evaluate the benefits and limitations of management strategies in this area from both an employer and an employee perspective.

    Assessment A selection from the following range of assessment tasks:

    Case study analysis

    Business research report

    Development of a marketing plan and/or feasibility study

    Interview and report on contact with business

    Business simulation exercise

    Essay

    Business survey and analysis

    Media analysis

    Tests

    Semester Examination

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 22

    BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Cont’d) KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Banking, Business, Education, Finance, Government and Private Organizations, Management, Small Business

    Unit 3 – Managing a Business (Code: BM033)

    Description In this unit students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

    Outcomes

    Discuss the key characteristics of businesses and stakeholders, and analyse the relationship between corporate culture, management styles and management skills.

    Explain theories of motivation and apply them to a range of contexts, and analyse and evaluate strategies related to the management of employees.

    Analyse the relationship between business objectives and operations management, and propose and evaluate strategies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business operations.

    Assessment A range of tasks selected from the following:

    Case study

    Structured questions

    Essay

    Test

    Report in written format

    Media analysis

    Unit 4 – Transforming a Business (Code: BM034)

    Description Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory. Outcomes

    Explain the way business change may come about, use key performance indicators to analyse the performance of a business, discuss the driving and restraining forces for change and evaluate management strategies to position a business for the future.

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of strategies used by managers to implement change and discuss the effect of change on the stakeholders of a business.

    Assessment A range of tasks selected from the following:

    Case study

    Structured questions

    Essay

    Report

    Media analysis

    Test Units 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 23

    GEOGRAPHY

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Agriculture, Business, Eco-Tourism, Environmental Management and Research, Environmental Planning, Journalism, Local Government, Public Policy, Science, Social Research, Teaching, Tourism, Urban Planning and Development, Economist, Lawyer, Diplomacy, Mining, Real Estate, Meteorology and Cartography.

    Unit 1 – Hazards and Disasters (Code: GE011)

    Description In this unit students undertake an overview of hazards before investigating two contrasting types of hazards and the responses to them by people. Hazards can be geological (earthquakes, etc.), hydro-meteorological (floods, bushfire, etc.), biological (HIV/AIDS, malaria, etc.) or technological (oils spills, radiation leaks, etc.).

    Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a destination, such as Kinglake, relating to the type of hazard selected for study.

    Outcomes On completion of the unit students should be able to:

    Analyse, describe and explain the nature of hazards and impacts of hazard events at a range of scales.

    Analyse and explain the nature, purpose and effectiveness of a range of responses to selected hazards and disasters.

    Assessment

    Fieldwork Report

    One of case study, research report, folio or test

    Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Tourism (Code: GE022)

    Description In this unit students investigate the characteristics of tourism, with particular emphasis on where it has developed, it’s various forms, how it has changed and continues to change and its impact on people, places and environments. It will include a study of tourist destinations beyond Australia and the story of tourism to the Great Ocean Road and the Otway’s region of Victoria.

    Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a tourist destination – the Otway Ranges and the Great Ocean Road.

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Analyse, describe and explain the nature of tourism at a range of scales.

    Analyse and explain the impacts of tourism on people, places and environments and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies for managing tourism.

    Assessment

    Fieldwork Report

    One of case study, research report, folio or test

    Semester Examination

    Unit 3 – Changing the Land (Code: GE033)

    Description This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water. Students will investigate three major processes that are changing many regions of the world;

    Deforestation

    Desertification

    Melting glaciers and ice sheets

    Fieldwork Students will undertake fieldwork to a destination relating to the topics studied, such as Summerland Peninsula, Philip Island.

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Analyse, describe and explain land use change and assess its impacts.

    Analyse, describe and explain processes that result in changes to land cover and discuss the impacts and responses resulting from these changes.

    Assessment

    Structured questions test

    Fieldwork report

    Analysis of geographic data test

    Unit 4 – Human Population – Trends and Issues (Code: GE034)

    Description In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore the patterns of population change, movement and distribution and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the world. This unit will focus on the social, economic, political, environmental, historical and technological factors contributing to population trends and patterns.

    Outcomes On completion of this unit, students should be able to:

    Analyse, describe and explain population dynamics on a global scale.

    Analyse, describe and explain the nature of significant population issues and challenges in selected locations and evaluate responses.

    Assessment

    Analysis of geographic data test

    Structured questions test

    Unit 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework 25% Examination 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 24

    HISTORY

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Communications, Education, Journalism, Law, Marketing, Multimedia, Public policy, Publishing, Research

    Unit 1 – Twentieth Century History (1918 - 1939) (Code: HI031)

    Description In Unit 1 students explore the nature of political, social and cultural change in the period between the world wars. World War One is regarded by many as marking the beginning of Twentieth Century History since it represented such a complete departure from the past and heralded changes that were to have an impact for decades to come. The period after World War One was characterised by significant social and cultural change in the contrasting decades of the 1920s and 1930s. In the USA, the consumerism and material progress of the 1920s was tempered by the Great Crash of 1929. Writers, artists, musicians, choreographers and filmmakers reflected, promoted or resisted political, economic and social changes.

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Explain the consequences of the peace treaties which ended World War One, the impact of ideologies on nations and the events that led to World War Two.

    Explain the patterns of social life and cultural change in on or more contexts and analyse the factors which influenced changes to social life and culture in the inter-war years.

    Assessment A selection of tasks from:

    Historical inquiry

    Analysis of primary sources

    Analysis of historical interpretations

    Essay

    Semester Examination

    Unit 2 – Twentieth Century History (1945 - 2000) (Code: HI042)

    Description In Unit 2 students explore the nature and impact of the Cold War and challenges and changes to existing political, economic and social arrangements in the second half of the Twentieth Century. The period saw challenge and change to the established order in many countries. The second half of the Twentieth Century also saw a rise of social movements that challenged existing values and traditions, such as civil rights movement, feminism and environmental movements.

    Outcomes On completion of this unit students should be able to:

    Explain the ideological divisions in the post-war period and analyse the nature, development and impact of the Cold War on nations and people, in relation to one or more particular conflicts in the period.

    Explain the causes and nature of challenge and change in relation to two selected contexts in the second half of the Twentieth Century and analyse the consequences for nations and people.

    Assessment A selection of tasks from:

    Historical inquiry

    Analysis of primary sources

    Analysis of historical interpretations

    Essay

    Semester Examination

    Unit 3 – The French Revolution (Code: HI133) Unit 4 – The Russian Revolution (Code: HI134)

    In Units 3 and 4 Revolutions students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Post-revolutionary regimes are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of violence, oppression and terror.

    Description Area of Study 1: Units 3 and 4 – Causes of Revolution In this area of study students analyse the long-term causes and short-term triggers of revolution.

    Area of Study 2: Units 3 and 4 – Consequences of Revolution In this area of study students analyse the consequences of the revolution and evaluate the extent to which it brought change to society.

    Units 3 and 4 Outcomes

    Outcome 1: Analyse the causes of revolution and evaluate the contribution of significant ideas, events, individuals and popular movements.

    Outcome 2: Analyse the consequences of revolution and evaluate the extent of change brought to society.

    Units 3 and 4 Assessment

    Historical inquiry

    Analysis of primary sources

    Analysis of historical interpretations

    Essay

    Unit 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

  • Catholic Ladies’ College | YEAR 11 AND YEAR 12 HANDBOOK 2019 - 2020 25

    LEGAL STUDIES

    KLA Team Leader: Mr Damian Brasier

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Legal Secretary, Business and Commerce, Correctional Services, Criminology, Justice system, Law, Paralegal, Public Service, Social Work and Teaching

    Unit 1 – Guilt and Liability (Code: LS011)

    Description This study focuses on developing an understanding of legal foundations, such as different types and sources of law and the existence of a court hierarchy in Victoria. It investigates key concepts of criminal law and civil law and applying these to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios to determine whether and accused may be found guilty of a crime or liable in a civil dispute. It develops an appreciation of the way in which legal principles and information are used in making reasoned judgements and conclusions about the culpability of an accused and the liability of a party in civil dispute.

    Outcomes

    Describe the main sources and types of law and assess the effectiveness of laws.

    Explain the purposes and key concepts of criminal law and use legal reasoning to argue the criminal culpability of an accused based on actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

    Explain the purposes and key concepts of civil law and apply legal reasoning to argue the liability of a party in civil law based on actual and/or hypothetical scenarios.

    Unit 2 – Sanctions, Remedies and Rights (Code: LS022)

    Description This study focuses on the enforcement of criminal law and civil law, the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute, and the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness. It also investigates two criminal cases and two civil cases from the past four years to form a judgement about the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve the principles of justice.

    Outcomes

    Explain key concepts in the determination of a criminal case and discuss the principles of justice in relation to the determination of criminal cases, sanctions and sentencing approaches.

    Outcomes (cont’d)

    Explain key concepts in the resolution of a civil dispute and discuss the principles of justice in relation to the resolution of civil disputes and remedies.

    Evaluate the ways in which rights are protected in Australia, compare this approach with that adopted by another country and discuss the impact of an Australian case on the rights of individuals and the legal system.

    Units 1 and 2 Assessment

    Case Studies

    Structured assignment

    Folio and Report

    Test

    Semester Examination

    Unit 3 – Rights and Justice (Code: LS033)

    Description In this unit students examine the methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes. Students explore matters such as the rights available to an accused and to victims in the criminal justice system, the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties, and the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve their purposes. Students investigate the extent to which the principles of justice are upheld in the justice system, and discuss recent reforms to the legal system.

    Outcomes

    Explain the rights of the accused and of victims in the criminal justice system, discuss the means used to determine criminal cases and evaluate the ability of the criminal justice system to achieve the principles of justice.

    Analyse the factors to consider when initiating a civil claim, discuss the institutions and methods used to resolve civil disputes and evaluate the ability of the civil justice system to achieve the principles of justice.

    Unit 4 – The People and the Law (Code: LS034)

    Description In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and State Parliaments and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on Parliament in law making. Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate Parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law making and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform.

    Outcomes Discuss the significance of High Court cases involving the

    interpretation of the Australian Constitution and evaluate the ways in which the Australian Constitution acts as a check on Parliament in law making.

    Outcomes (cont’d)

    Discuss the factors that affect the ability of Parliament and courts to make law, evaluate the ability of these law makers to respond to the need for law reform and analyse how individuals, the media and law reform bodies can influence a change in the law.

    Assessment

    Case study

    Structured questions

    Unit 3 and 4 Assessment Unit 3 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Unit 4 School-assessed Coursework = 25% Examination = 50%

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    VCE VET CERTIFICATE II BUSINESS

    KLA Team Leader: Ms Annette Kilsby

    Career Paths / Future Directions: Administration, Business, General