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Marion Blank, Ph.D. Columbia University msb5@columbia.edu. Suzanne Goh, M.D. Pediatric Neurology Therapeutics sgoh@gohmd.com. Website www.spectacularbond.com Email info@spectacularbond.com. Susan Deland delands@optonline.net. OVERVIEW. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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PowerPoint Presentation

Marion Blank, Ph.D.Columbia Universitymsb5@columbia.eduSuzanne Goh, M.D.Pediatric Neurology Therapeuticssgoh@gohmd.comSusan Delanddelands@optonline.netWebsite www.spectacularbond.com

Emailinfo@spectacularbond.com

OVERVIEWcreating the social and behavioral foundation for learningDr. Marion Blank

the neuroscience behind Spectacular Bond Dr. Suzanne Goh

a familys experience Susan Deland

The Starting Pointin contrast to the common focus on what the child needs to learn, our starting point is

seeing the world through the childs eyes

the everyday world is not getting in WHY?

The Childs Viewvia reportsvia observations

the child finds the world to be overwhelming, confusing, & painful

Much of that pain and confusion is caused by the very stimulation that NT children find appealing and irresistible the social realm.

The Social Worldnewborn is primed to attend to, focus on, and interact with the adult

one-day-old infant with her mother

Diane Deland age 2 (prior to starting the Spectacular Bond program)ImplicationsThe social world is the basis for communication.

Communication is the basis of all interaction, including INTERVENTION.

When a child avoids the social world, adult-directed teaching will rarely, if ever, be truly effective.

The accommodations made for children are often counterproductive.

The First ElementSimplify the World

simplifying the world is the opposite of providing stimulation

key points for the two worlds:the non-social worldthe social world

Simplification is not Enoughwell-established defenses are in play

child will not readily give them up

one key defense is stimmingkeeps the outside world from intrudingprovides stimulation

Comment from a Nonverbal Teenager with ASDI treat stims like a welcomed friend.I am so needy to escape reality and stims take me to another world. (Ido in Autismland)

The Second ElementSelf Control of Stimming and Other Unproductive Behaviors(in the presence of adults)

The Third ElementManaging Meltdowns

temper tantrums

overloads

The Fourth ElementSitting QuietlyKey Elementsfocus is on developing inhibition and inner calmall are done at home prior to moving to the outside worldgoal is 10 to 15 minutes of carefully structured, effective interaction every hour (child is free the rest of the time)childs room becomes a haven

OVERVIEWcreating the social and behavioral foundation for learningDr. Marion Blank

the neuroscience behind Spectacular Bond Dr. Suzanne Goh

a familys experience Susan Deland

The Neuroscience Behind Spectacular BondKnowledge about how the brain works has not been factored into most intervention programs

Yet, all intervention programs represent efforts to reshape brain networks

The Brain in Autism CAN ChangeWith early intervention, electrical patterns of brain activity begin to resemble that of neurotypical children*Before these changes can take place, children need to be receptive to intervention

*Dawson, G. et al. (2012) Early behavioral intervention is associated with normalized brain activity in young children with autism. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 51(11):11501159.

The Effects of Training on Brain NetworksIf unproductive behaviors arent addressed in a treatment programstronger neural networks are created in areas of the brain that should NOT be growingnew, productive patterns cant be established

How to Reshape Neural NetworksChange is possible if weDiminish those repetitive behaviors that are working against positive brain growthExpand neural networks for the skills that will allow the children to live full and productive lives

Calm the Brain before Stimulating ItReduce the stressful stimulation that the child must face

Simplify the childs world

Intervention Must Begin in the Social DomainSocial brain is intimately tied to emotional centers of the brain that control feelings of fear and anxiety

The Social BrainAmygdalaPrefrontal corticesTemporal cortices

OVERVIEWcreating the social and behavioral foundation for learningDr. Marion Blank

the neuroscience behind Spectacular Bond Dr. Suzanne Goh

a familys experience Susan Deland

Diane Deland a case studyDiagnosed at 3 years of age, Diane began the Spectacular Bond program right away.

We will see the program in action in her particular case.

Element 1 simplify the worldchanging the physical and interpersonal environment

Diane would no longer eat meals in the playroom

Element 2 build self controltargeting unproductive behaviors

Diane would stop running and shrieking in our playroom. She would stop pulling clothes out of drawers.

Element 3 manage meltdownsdistinguishing between tantrums and overloadsbypassing rewardslearning to say not now

Diane would get the things she desired, but at the times that we decided, not at her request

Element 4 sit quietlycalming the mindreshaping my relationship with Diane

Diane would sit quietly with her hands on her lap for a short period of time

Element 5 organize the dayCreating a clear plan for how each day would be structured There would be time for adult-led exchange, child-led exchange, minimal exchange, and no exchange.

Element 6 simple actionsTeaching her to follow simple commands under an adults direction

Diane would imitate simple actions with me or Dr. Blank

Marion Blank, Ph.D.Columbia Universitymsb5@columbia.eduSuzanne Goh, M.D.Pediatric Neurology Therapeuticssgoh@gohmd.comSusan Delanddelands@optonline.netWebsite www.spectacularbond.com

Emailinfo@spectacularbond.com

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