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  • politics & global warming April 2019

  • Politics & Global Warming: April 2019

    1

    Table of Contents Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................................2

    Reading Notes .................................................................................................................................................................3

    Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................................................4 1. The Politics of Global Warming Beliefs ........................................................................................................7

    2. Who is Responsible for Action on Global Warming? ........................................................................... 10

    3. Support for Policies to Address the Pollution that Causes Global Warming ............................ 12 4. Special Policy Section: The Green New Deal ............................................................................................ 20

    5. Global Warming as a Voting Issue ................................................................................................................ 26 6. Individual and Collective Action to Reduce Global Warming .......................................................... 27

    Appendix I: Data Tables .......................................................................................................................................... 30

    Appendix II: Survey Method ................................................................................................................................. 65 Appendix III: Sample Demographics ................................................................................................................ 66

  • Politics & Global Warming: April 2019

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    Introduction This report is based on findings from a nationally representative survey – Climate Change in the American Mind – conducted by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (climatecommunication.yale.edu) and the George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication (climatechangecommunication.org). Interview dates: March 29 – April 8, 2019. Interviews: 1,291 adults (18+), 1,097 of whom are registered to vote. Average margin of error for registered voters: +/- 3 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. The research was funded by the 11th Hour Project, the Endeavor Foundation, the Energy Foundation, the Grantham Foundation, the TomKat Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation. Principal Investigators: Anthony Leiserowitz, PhD
 Yale Program on Climate Change Communication anthony.leiserowitz@yale.edu Edward Maibach, MPH, PhD
 George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication emaibach@gmu.edu Seth Rosenthal, PhD
 Yale Program on Climate Change Communication seth.rosenthal@yale.edu John Kotcher, PhD George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication jkotcher@gmu.edu Cite as: Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Rosenthal, S., Kotcher, J., Ballew, M., Goldberg, M., Gustafson, A., &

    Bergquist, P. (2019). Politics & Global Warming, April 2019. Yale University and George Mason University. New Haven, CT: Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/NBJGS

    https://climatecommunication.yale.edu https://climatecommunication.yale.edu http://www.climatechangecommunication.org http://www.climatechangecommunication.org

  • Politics & Global Warming: April 2019

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    Reading notes • This report includes only registered voters.

    • References to Republicans and Democrats throughout include respondents who initially

    identify as either a Republican or Democrat, as well as those who do not initially identify as Republicans or Democrats but who say they "are closer to" one party or the other (i.e., "leaners") in a follow-up question. The category "Independents" does not include any of these "leaners."

    • In all tables and charts, bases specified are unweighted, but percentages are weighted. • For tabulation purposes, percentage points are rounded to the nearest whole number. As a

    result, percentages in a given chart may total slightly higher or lower than 100%. Summed response categories (e.g., "strongly support" + "somewhat support") are rounded after sums are calculated (e.g., 25.3% + 25.3% = 50.6%, which, after rounding, would be reported as 25% + 25% = 51%).

    • Weighted percentages among registered voters of each of the groups discussed in this report:

    Ø Democrats (total) including leaners: 46% o Liberal Democrats: 25% o Moderate/Conservative Democrats: 20%

    § (Moderate Democrats: 18%; Conservative Democrats: 3%) Ø Independents excluding leaners: 8% Ø Republicans (total) including leaners: 42%

    o Liberal/Moderate Republicans: 15% § (Liberal Republicans: 2%; Moderate Republicans: 13%)

    o Conservative Republicans: 27% Ø No party/Not interested in politics/Refused: 4% (included in results reported for "All

    Registered Voters" only) • In the appendix data tables, "--" denotes that there were no responses in that cell, whereas

    "0" denotes that there were responses, but the value was less than 0.5.

  • Politics & Global Warming: April 2019

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    Executive Summary Drawing on a nationally representative survey (N = 1,291; including 1,097 registered voters), this report describes how Democratic, Independent, and Republican registered voters view global warming, climate and energy policies, and personal and collective action.

    Global Warming Beliefs and Attitudes

    • Most registered voters (70%) think global warming is happening, including 95% of liberal Democrats, 87% of moderate/conservative Democrats, and 63% of liberal/moderate Republicans. Only 38% of conservative Republicans think global warming is happening.

    • A majority of registered voters (55%) think global warming is caused mostly by human activities. This includes 86% of liberal Democrats, 71% of moderate/conservative Democrats, but fewer than half of liberal/moderate Republicans (46%), and only 21% of conservative Republicans.

    • Six in ten registered voters (61%) are worried about global warming, including 93% of liberal Democrats (an increase of five percentage points since our March 2018 survey), 81% of moderate/conservative Democrats, and 54% of liberal/moderate Republicans. Only about one in five conservative Republicans (21%) are worried, a nine-point decrease since March 2018.

    Global Warming and Energy Policies

    Respondents were asked how much they support three different strategies governments can use to reduce the pollution that causes global warming. Large majorities of registered voters across the political spectrum support:

    • Investing in renewable energy research and infrastructure (which reduces pollution by making clean energy cheaper; 87%)

    • Regulating pollution (legally require companies to limit the amount of pollution they emit; 82%)

    • Taxing pollution (require companies to pay a tax on the pollution they emit, which encourages them to reduce their emissions; 72%).

    Majorities of registered voters also support more specific policies to reduce carbon pollution and promote clean energy. These include:

    • A Revenue-Neutral Carbon Tax. Described as: “Requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a carbon tax and using the money to reduce other taxes (such as income tax) by an equal amount (67% of registered voters, 85% of Democrats, 66% of Independents, and 46% of Republicans).

    • Fee and Dividend. Described as: “Requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a fee on carbon pollution, and distributing the money collected to all U.S. citizens, in equal amounts, through monthly dividend checks” (59% of registered voters, 75% of Democrats, 58% of Independents, and 41% of Republicans).

    • The Clean Power Plan. Described as: “Setting strict carbon dioxide emission limits on existing coal-fired power plants to reduce global warming and improve public health, even if the cost of

  • Politics & Global Warming: April 2019

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    electricity to consumers and companies would likely increase” (69% of registered voters, 87% of Democrats, 65% of Independents, and 50% of Republicans).

    Large majorities of registered voters also support:

    • Funding more research into renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power (86% of registered voters, 96% of Democrats, 75% of Independents, and 77% of Republicans).

    • Providing tax rebates to people who purchase energy-efficient vehicles or solar panels (84% of registered voters, 94% of Democrats, 81% of Independents, and 75% of Republicans).

    • Regulating carbon dioxide as a pollutant (74% of registered voters, 91% of Democrats, 71% of Independents, and 57% of Republicans).

    Fewer registered voters support policies to increase fossil-fuel production:

    • About half of registered voters support expanding drilling for oil and natural gas off the U.S. coast (53% of registered voters, 33% of Democrats, 46% of Independents, and 75% of Republicans).

    • Only one in three registered voters support drilling for oil in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Re

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