the minneapolis journal (minneapolis, minn.) 1902-01-23 [p...

of 1/1
^vrvqw *£&*& ^75^^ wmn. ^ r THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL. THUESDAT EVENING, JANTTAKY 23, 1902. > *"^fi #\ Jl f t-t 1/ | * , CITY NEWS Fractured Hia Skull—Henry Kuch, a farmer, living near Robblnsdale, slipped and (tell while cutting ice at Crystal lake Monday afternoon. His skull was fractured, and he died. r Charged With Theft—Charles Pool, a driver for the Fred Armstrong Transfer company, was arrested this morning by De- tective Oscar Hicks for the alleged theft of grain from hia employer's barn, on Seventh street and Third avenue SB. Pool lives at 205 Second street N. THvo Charges Avaiust Her—Rachel Grigsby, colored, was arrested on the charse of being found *in a disorderly house. Levi Anderson, tbe complainant, later charged her with robbing him of $1S0. She was lined $10 for the former offense and was held under $500 bonds for hearing as to the latter. Credit Men Dine — The Minneapolis Credit Men's association banquetted last night at the Hotel Nicollet. Officers were elected as follows: President, George E. Hig- gins of Anthony Kelly &. Co.; vice presi- dent, W. S. Hughes of Dodson, Fisher, Brock- man & Co. AMES STANDS FOR IT He Discusses His Withdrawal From the Congressional Race. TEN POLICEMEN TO BE DROPPED The Reduction May Be Necessary to Keep Within the Appro- priation. Result of a Flg-ht—Owen Murphy is at the city hospital suffering from erysipelas, which resulted from a wound. on the fore- head. Inflicted in a fight in u lodging-house at 204 Hennepin avenue, yesterday morning. Murphy, it was reported to the police, was eet upon by several men and brutally as- saulted. Capt. MacGrcgor Improves-Captain John MacGregor, special agent of the treas- ury department, who suffered a light stroke of paralysis at the San Angelo last Thurs- day is improving. Several years ago the captain had a slight attack of the same trouble and It is believed that he will again recover. , A Fall and a Broken Wrist—While Cleaning windows on the second story of the Twin City Telephone company's building. Third avenue S and Seventh street, this fore- noon, O. A. Van Valkenberg lost his balance and fell, breaking his wrist. He was taken to the city hospital, and later to his home, 292S Sixteenth avenue S. G. A. R. Commanders' Asa'n—The- G. A. R. Commanders and Past Commanders' Association will hold its annual meeting at the G. A R. headquarters Saturday evening, Jan. 2b. New officers will be elected and business connected with the next.department encampment will be attended to. All the delegates for this encampment, it is hoped, will t>e present Next Citizens' Council — The Clti- zene' Council, which. was- orgauLzad last No- vember for the purpose of promoting chari- table unity and interest, will hold Its second meeting Jan. 29. The subject for considera- tion, "Social Betterment," will be discussed under the following heads: "Social Settle- ments," "Industrial Education," "Hospitals," ''District Nursing" and "Friendly Visiting." Tile meeting will close with, a general discus- sion of the whole subject. There will be a meeting Feb. 19 and one in March, at which the subjects of "The Protection of Unfortu- nates" and "The Relation of the State to Social Problems" will be considered. On McKinley Day—On the fifty-fifth anniversary of William McKinley's birth, Jan. 29, the Ohio association' of Minneapolis will hold Its annual dinner at the Hotel Nicollet. The usual speeches will be omitted. The Masonic quartet will furnish the enter- tainment and has prepared a magnificent pro- gram, in which will appear Heinrlch Hoevel and other artists. Among the songs the quartet will sing an original poem by a mem- ber of the society. This has been set to music and will be an enjoyable feature of the en- tertainment. The society expects the coming celebration to be the largest and most in- spiring affair that has ever been given under Its auspices. Lecture on Sir Thomas More—Dr. Henry Austin Adams, who will lecture at the Lyceum theater this evening, ' dined with Archbishop Ireland, in St. Paul, last evening. He has lectured to three audiences In St. Paul and several St. Paul persons have secured seats in the Lyceum for his lecture to-morrow night. His subject is "Sir Thomas More." Sir Thomas was the ideal Catholic layman, who so stoutly resisted the claims of Henry VIII. to spiritual supremacy in Eng- land. His trial on a charge of treason and his tragic death for conscience sake have been told and read with interest since the day of his death. While Dr. Adams does not offend those who differ from him, he is a most enthusiastic admirer of the martyred ' chancellor. Mayor Ames, who returned late last night after a week at French Lick Springs, arrived at the city hall at 11:20 yesterday, and after a few moments in his private office with Secretary Brown began to receive callers. When the mayor entered the city hall the first to greet him was Captain ."Coffee John" Fitchette. with whom the mayor exchanged a few words. The genial chef and police officer followed Dr. Ames into the office, where the mayor met other friends. Policemen to Be Dropped. Then Superintendent of Police Fred W. Ames and Captain Hill were called and these two and the mayor and ills secre- tary were closeted together for nearly an hour. It was announced that no change in the police department were imminent, although Dr. Ames says he will find it necessary within a month or so to drop at least ten men from the force in order to keep within the appropriation. He has not yet decided, he said, where these men could best be spared. Before receiving the reporters Mayor Ames perused the published stories of his rumored intentions and of the many troubles in the various departments of the city government since his absence. To the reporters Dr. Ames said: I am in .favor of a thorough Investigation Into any municipal institution where there has been sincere criticism as to the conduct of affairs. As to the hospital, I will say that I believe there have been no overcharges as reported. It is true that orders for goods that had to be sent by express may show a slight increase over the price that would have been paid if the goods had' been in stock, but this excess, £ believe, was neces- sary. Mr. Thompson agreed that he would furnish medicines for the hospital at as low a rate as any druggist in this locality could furnish them, and I believe he has done so. However, I am anxious that there shall be a careful investigation. I intend to stand by my appointees until there is positive proof that there is something wrong. There is one thing I want to say about the complicated state of affairs at the work- bouse, and that Is this: I have always held to the belief that'the wife of a public official should not be admitted to an institution in which he is employed. I cannot stand for "petticoat government." Why He Withdrew. I wish to state emphatically that my health was the only thing that entered into my de- termination to withdraw from the congres- sional race. I was- not advised to do so by any one, and I have not regretted that I did it. It would have been suicidal for me to at- tempt the arduous campaign that would be necessary. I do not know that I shall be a candidate for mayor next term. I have not been urged by my friends to make the campaign, and only my health will determine whether or not I enter the race. Mayor Ames said that he enjoyed his vacation at the springs immensely and that he was feeling much better as a re- sult. THE IRONY OF FATE Alonzo Phillips Drawn on the Me- gaarden Jury Venire. '*"'• MART* WH1TC0MB IS ACCEPTED He Is the Third Juror and the Only Man Approved This Morning. When Judge Pond called his courtroom to order yesterday Judge Steele an- nounced that since Tuesday afternoon three jury panels had been discharged from consideration of the cases for which they had been empaneled and demanded that the thirty-six members be called for the Megaarden trial before those on the special venire were called. Judge Pond consulted with other members of the •bench and it was decided that the names on the. regular venire and the special venire should ;jo into the same box and the names drawn as chance dictated. Judge Steele entered a formal objection to this ruling. Of ttie special venire of 100 drawn 1 yes- terday only 58 reported this morning. In the venire was Alonzo Phillips, the former sheriff, who will doubtless be excused from hearing the testimony against his successor. Only ono juror was secured this morn- ing, this being Martin Whitcomb, the well known feed dealer and politician. He has been candidate for alderinan and for sheriff on ' the democratic tickets. Whitcomb was not challenged by either Judge Steele or County Attorney Board- man and was sworn almost as soon ao he struck the witness box. HITS M C CLEARY Tawney Denounces His Col- league's Methods as to Oleo Bill. Declares That McCleary's Action Is Without Precedent. SHE USED THE POLICE A DIVE-KEfcpER'S CASE FAILS Her Charge Against Monroe and Mrs, Evans Dismissed—The Latter's Unfortunate Situation. NO. TRUST PRAGTIGABLE NECROIiOGICAIi MRS. MARVIN DEWEV PROCTOR, a former resident of Minneapolis, and widow of the late Professor H. I. Proctor, who was well-known among Minneapolis musicians, died at Boston, Mass., Jan. 16. The Proctors made their home in Minneapolis for many years, Professor Proctor being organist of •Westminster church during much of the time. Mrs. Proctor is survived by a daughter. C. A. DUBY, an attorney of this city, died last Saturday at the city hospital with tuberculosis of the lungs. He was 45 years old and had practiced for several years in this «ity. WONT QUIT SAWING HERE •canlon-Glpson Mill Will Continue to Operate. Officials of the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber company deny the report In a morning paper that they would discontinue operations at the Minneapolis saw mill hereafter on account of the cost of trans- porting logs. "We will continue to do business at the Minneapolis mill," said Mr. Gipson," and on probably a larger scale. We al- ready have enough logs in the river awaiting the drive to feed our mill in this city as soon as the season opens. The proportionate output at our mills at Nickerson and Cass Lake will be about the same as in other years. "A misunderstanding -witti regard to our Jiew mill at Scanlon, near Cloquet,- doubt- less accounts for the misleading article in the morning paper. This mill will handle a large amount of logs for the Duluth market—-logs which would not come to Minneapolis under any circumstances, and consequently would stand no show of be- ing sawed here. "Its minimum capacity will be 100,000,- 00 feet of logs. The combined capacity of the three mills at Nickerson, Cass Lake and Soanlon will be approximately 200,- 000,000 feet. We expect to haul about the •ame per centage of logs by railroad to Minneapolis this season as last. How large this haul will be depends entirely upon our ability to get logs." CREAMERIES CANNOT COMBINE F. C. McMullen Says Under Present Condition It Is Impossible to Control the Output. "SEARCH" BR1GGS He Doesn't Knon Why He Is in Close Confinement. Fred Brlggs was taken from his accus- tomed place In the engine room at the workhouse yesterday and was placed in close confinement. Relatives who called on (him yesterday afternoon found him in his oelL Briggs, who has been regarded as a model prisoner since his incarcera- tion, says he knows no reason for the change*. ABERDEEN'S HOPES Talk: o* New liines of Soo's Plans. Railroads- Special to The Journal. Aberdeen, S. D., Jan. 23.—A meeting of citizens was held liere at the request of Watertown men interested in a project to secure a road, probably the Illinois Cen- tral, to connect the two cities and to run south from Watertown to Sioux Falls. A committee of prominent citizens was appointed to gather details to be sub- mitted at another public meeting. Renewed assurances have been received that the Soo will build southeast to this city at the earliest possible date. Sur- veys are being made and several cars of ties and iron have been received here. In the western counties Milwaukee surveyors have already reached the line between Emmons and Mcintosh counties, about three miles north of the state line, and a,re close to the Northern Pacific survey. The survey in which Northern Pacific en- gineers are engaged extends from th© main line south through the center of Emmons county to a point about six miles north of the Campbell county line, then turns oast toward Edgeley, which is the probable destination. Wheat Rates Cut. Premier Roblin, of Manitoba, has announced a reduction in wheat rates of 2 cents per hundred over the lines of the Canadian North- ern, from Brandon to Port Arthur and inter- mediate points. The present rate is 14 cents per hundred. It is expected that another like reduction will \>© mate Ouring ths prea eat year. __ . * &v'--v f, , ?J "^ In connection with the dispatches of yesterday announcing the attempt of To- peka promoters to form a gigantic cream- ery combine, Frank C. McMullen, vice president of the Minneapolis Cold Stor- age company says that such a combine is impracticable. He said to-day: It would be impossible to form a creamery trust, and a moment's thought would con- vince any one of that fact. Farmers are un- alterably opposed to anything in the trust line, and if a trust was formed It could only live through the aid and help of the farmers. To make any quantity of butter, it would be necessary to have the patronage of a very large number of farmers. The largest indi- vidual producer of milk in.the state would have relatively a very small quantity of milk; so it is easy to perceive the very large num- ber of farmers that would have to contribute their product in order to make any amount of butter, and this it would be impossible for a .trust to get. On the other side, a trust must control the output. In the 'manufacture of butter this would be utterly impossible. With modern methods, It is only necessary to have a churn in order to get into the business. There are upwards of twenty churning plants in Min- neapolis and St. Paul to-day, all of which are buying more or less cream and milk di- rect from the farmers. A practical and effi- cient creamery could be equipped in this city for less than $300. This would make compe- tition that no trust could stand. For a but- ter-maker to go into the business here, It would be only necessary to equip a creamery and do his own work, and he could then turn out goods creaper than any trust on earth. The introduction of efficient hand separa- tors on the farm has absolutely placed the control of the dairy products right in the farmers' hands, and, without question, they are increasing the dairy earnings from 60 to 100 per cent. With the aid of a hand separa- tor, he has an extremely valuable food prod- uct in his skim milk, which he can feed in its best condition. His cream he can ship to any point that will pay the most money. No doubt some of the older creameries and creamery companies, with a large amount of obsolete machinery, would be glad to form some kind of a combination to rid themselves of what is nothing but Junk, but it Is ex- tremely doubtful if such a scheme could be floated.' As before stated, a farm separator places the business directly in the farmers' hands, where it belongs, and gives him the control of his product such as he never had before. The farmer who takes his milk to-day to a creamery loses half a day In hauling his milk, for bis skim milk he gets back milk too acid and too poor to be of any feeding value, and he must wait from six weeks to two months before he knows what he is go- ing to get for milking his cows. All this is changed with a hand separator. He separates his milk while it contains the natural heat, has the skim milk In the best possible con- dition to feed; he has his cream that he can ship to any one of a dozen or more churn- ing plants; knows each day just exactly what the price is on his butter fat, and In this way knows exactly how he stands at all times. The arrest of. Mrs. Maud Evans, alleged to be an innocent but unfortunate woman, her appearance in court yesterday to answer to a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses, and her release by the court as wholly innocent of the charge, all Sbring to .light a sad tale and one well .calculated to arouse indignation. From 'all that can be learned, Mrs. Evans, who is quite young, suffers from some slight mental malady. Unfortunate- ly she had some fancied difficulty with her husband a few days ago, which led to her coming to Minneapolis without him. Being without friends here she went to a Third street boarding place and there, it seems, asked for aid. Harry Monroe known about town, and who was arrested charged with complicity in the offense with which Mrs. Evans was charged, heard the appeal, and volunteered his assist- ance. This Mrs. Evans accepted, where-^ upon Monroe called a carriage and bust- ling Mrs. Evans into it *ook her to the dive of Jennie Pierce on First street. Monroe", it was charged, left, first hav- ing received $17 from the. Pierce woman. 'Mrs. Evans, discovering the nature of the den she was in, insisted upon leaving. Thereupon, it is said, the Pierce woman, being $17 out, appealed to police depart- ment friends and had her arrested on a charge'of obtaining money under false pretenses. Monroe was likewise arrested. But he, too, was released this morning. Those who know of Mrs. Evens' unfor- tunate connection with the case express deep sympathy, and are not slow to say that there was a dark plot in it all, for which someone Should suffer. Whether Monroe received the money outright for guiding Mrs. Evans to the low resort, or whether the Pierce woman gave him the money simply in order that she might place Mrs. Evans in her debt so that she might have the greater power over her, are the questions that disturb Mrs. Evans' sympathizers. On the assumption that Monroe received the money outright, a charge against him for acting as a procur- er, it is felt, might hold. Monroe, after his release this morning, left the court- room laughing. Police Captain Krum- wiede's name has been connected with the case in a way which does not reflect great credit upon his official bearing. Mr. Evans is in the city and expresses his entire willingness to take his wife to her home and see that she is properly cared for. From Tha Journal Bureau, Room </>, Pott Building, Washington. Washington, Jan. 23.—Before the house agriculture committee to-day Congress- men McCleary and Tawney spoke in sup- port of their bills to regulate the sale of oleomargarin. McCleary spoke first, and confined himself to a plea for the passage of the Grout bill of the last congress, which is now his bill. It leaves a small tax on uncolored oleo. Tawney's places uncolored oleo on the free list. Both bills fax the colored article 10 cents a pound. Air. Tawney in his speech referred quite caustically to the methods Mr. McCleary has resorted to in advancing his bill, and said in the beginning of his address: I am here at the request of the committee, not for the purpose of urging you to support my bill or any particular bill. Any bill which the friends of the man who makes' hon- est butter may report from this committee will receive my hearty support. Tawney then referred to the "gross misrepresentations that have been cir- culated throughout the country, especially among dairymen and agricultural news- papers concerning the bill I Introduced," and the "strenuous attempt thus made to discredit the bill and impugn the motives of its author"; and although McCleary was not named it was evident that Taw- ney had him in mind. After. giving a history of the attempted oleo legislation, including the old Grout bill, Tawney said, again referring to McCleary: It is a common thing for those outside of congress to endeavor to accomplish the same end as the proposed legislation by praising the measure in which they are interested, but I doubt jf prior to this congress, within the experience of the oldest member of the house, and certainly not in my almost ten years! ex- perience, has a member Introduced a bill, and then, by printed and written circulars sent broadcast by him over his signature and under his fraak, sought to discredit the bill of a fellow member relating to the same BUW- ject and at the esame time endeavoring to discredit him by impugning that member's motives. That is not the practice of "states- men nor of gentlemen. It is childish. Tawney's strongest argument against the old Grout bill in addition to these previously alluded to in these dispatches, was that it has recently been discovered that it is possible for the purchaser or user of uncolored oleo to color it with- out remelting or remanufacturing. "If this is so," he said, "the quarter of a cent tax on uncolored oleo is as ob- jectionable as to tax it at all. The entire oleo product would be uncolored and the retail dealers carefully instructed how to color it, thereby enabling him to evade the entire tax." . Tawney advocated an amendment of the legal definiteion of the word ''manufac- turers" so as to make it cover the above possible situation. —W. W. Jermans. State Capitol News TO PUBLISH ALL BALLOTS ELECTION PRINTING HEAVY Complete Ballot Must Appear in the Official Puper for Every Change Made. State Printer C. C. Whitney has dis- covered some rough edges in the primary election law, which will need attention as soon as possible. He has made sure by securing opinions from the state legal de- partment. Ballots for city elections are prepared by the county auditor, and the printing bill has to be borne by the county. As- sistant Attorney General Somerby says the city should reimburse the county for such printing, but there is no law to re- quire it. Ballots must be printed twice in the county official paper. This, may be in a city twenty miles from the one holding the election and will not help the voters in the least. In Captain Whitney's opinion a com- plete ballot will have to be printed for every change made. In Minneapolis, where there are thirteen wards, seven legisla- tive districts and {our county commis- sioner districts, there are a multitude of changes and a full ballot from congress- man down will have to be printed for each change, occupying several pages of a newspaper. A RECEIVER ASKED For the Minnesota Mutual Farm In- surance Company. Elmer H. Dearth, state insurance com- missioner, has asked Attorney General Douglas to apply for a receiver for the Minnesota Mutual Farm Insurance com- pany of Minneapolis. The assets consist of premium notes to the amount of $2,549.07 and debit bal- ances on agents for $678.25. None of these are available. Liabilities' amount to $7,867.55. An assessment was levied Nov. 14, which should have brought $3,761.74, but only $156.16 was received. The offi- cers evidently gave up, for when the ex- aminer called the office was deserted and he had .to secure the services of L. E. Utley, a former secretary, to get access to the books. H. G. Lund is president and S."R. Ar- thur, secretary. The company was incor- porated in 1895. COMMERCE DEPARTMENT NELSON BILL. AGAIN DISCUSSED Senator Q,uarles Would Amend and Labor Leader Gompers . Files Protest. Washington, Jan. 23.—Mr. Nelson, in the senate to-day, called up the bill establishing a department of commerce. Mr.Quarles (Wis.) offered an amendment that the secretary of commerce should have complete control of the work of gathering and distributing sta- tistical information naturally relating to the subjects confided to his department and should have Authority to call upon all other departments for data. Mr. Gallinger made a vigorous effort in sup- port of the measure. The establishment of such a department, he said, had been de- manded by commercial and industrial bodies throughout the country for years. /The president pro tern laid before the /senate a letter from Samuel Gompers, presi- dent of the American Federation of Labor, protesting againsc the incorporation of the department of labor in the proposed depart- ment. He said that the department of labor had been organized at the earnest solicitation of the organized labor of the country in the hope that ultimately it might become one of the executive departments, with a secretary of labor. Mr. Gompers thought if the de- partment of labor were incorporated in the department of commerce it would minimize the interests of labor. QUARANTINE AT HASSAN The Chairman of the Town Board Explains the Expense. Chairman E. S. Wiggin of the board of supervisors of the town of Hassan takes exception to the criticism made by Coun- ty Physician Kistler over the manner of dealing with diphtheria cases in the town of Hassan. Dr. Kistler thought that a guard for a diphtheria quarantine was un- necessary and that a charge of $25 for fumigating the house was exorbitant. . Mr. Wiggin says that in this particular case the family was a large one, there being several cases and one death in a period of thirty days. He wants Dr. Kistler to explain how the towji could avoid furnishing an attendant if the fami- ly was to be shut off from intercourse with the public. He says further that Dr. Kistler was notified, but was not heard from for twenty days. • The town at first sought to collect the expense of the quarantine from the state board of health from the $20,000 appro- priated by the legislature for fighting contagious diseases, but Dr. Bracken in- toTmed tne town supervisors that the , county was liable. , *',': TELLER TOO LATE Intervention Asked After Scheepers Was Exe- cuted. Washington, Jan. 23.—Senator Teller to- day introduced a concurred resolution asking the president to request the Brit- ish government to set aside the death sentence of Commandant Soheepers, be- cause he was captured while sick In a hospital, in violation of the Geneva con- vention. New York, Jan. 23.—An Associated Press dispatch announced that the death sen- tence upon Commandant Scheepers of the Boer army had been confirmed by General Kitchener and that he -would be executed next Saturday. The fact is that he was executed last Saturday, Jan. 18. MERGER Speculators Claiming Minne- sota^. Application Will Be Denied. Special to The Journal. New York, Jan. 23.—For some reason a rumor was circulated in speculative cir- cles to-day that the supreme court will decide against the state of Minnesota, Monday, in the application to bring suit before that court against the Northern Securities company. This belief induced buying at intervals during the day by speculative commission houses. The same idea was understood to prevail in the west, and to have caused buying from there to-day. Northern Securities was more active on the probability of a favorable decision. The stock rose to 103%, which was a gain of 1%. HERMAN ROGERS KILLED FATALITY AT ABERCROMBIE, N. D. While Driving: With Some Compan- ions He Was Thrown Out Re- ceiving Fatal Injuries. Herman P. Rogers, 1713 Aldrich avenue N, son of Rev. Samuel J. Rogers, a re- tired Congregational -minister, living in Minneapolis, was .thrown from a buggy and killed near Abercrombie, N. D., Tuesday. Word to this effect was re- ceived by the father this morning. The account of the accident received here is meager. Mr. Rogers was employed by the Hennepin Lumber company of this city, and together with two other repre- sentatives of the firm, was inspecting the company's property ' near Abercrombie, driving in a buggy. The team became frightened and ran away, throwing all of the men to the frozen ground. Rogers received injuries from which he died al- most instantly. His companions were more or less seriously injured. The body was taken to Abercrombie and will be shipped to Minneapolis this evening. Mr. Rogers was a very popular young man among church, people. He was an active member of Pilgrim Congregational church and president of the Christian En- deavor society of that church. He was 28 years old and is survived by a wife ana two small children. The funeral will prob- ably be held from the Pilgrim church Friday. PARDON FOR YOUNGERS THREE DAYS GONE - —M : Only Six Jurymen Secured for West Murder Trial. J. H. SMITH ADDED TO LIST TODAY Entire Week Will Probably- Be Con- sumed In Getting a Jury. Special to The Journal. Grand Forks, N. D., Jan. 23.—By the acceptance of J. H. Smith as a juror in the West murder trial this morning, the sixth ma ( n was added to the list. Of the panel of eighty talesmen summoned but seven remain from which to select the remaining six jurors and that number will all *e disposed of during the afternoon. Thirty talesmen have been summoned, to appear to-morrow morning, but it is expected that another special venire will be necessary before the jury is completed. This is the third day of the trial and as but half a jury has been selected it looks as though the entire week would be taken up in getting the twelve men. W. C. March, father of the dead man, attends the sessions regularly, but has not given away to his emotion in any way. The aged father of the defendant is also present. . The six jurors accepted are: A. P. Winslow, E. O. Berg, Charles Kinney, Hugh Marshall, A. M. Wilcox and J. H. Smith. Juror No. 7 Secured. James McGillivray, a farmer at Ardock and a candidate for state representative from the sixth district was accepted as the seventh juror late this afternoon. ',£'&£ Clear' ance Prices Ladies' $3.50, heavy sole lace. For French enamel, $2.40 $1.50 EXTRA SESSION TALK Petitions for Same Pouring: Into Governor's Office. Petiti&ns for the pardon of the Younger brothers are pouring Into the governor's office. There is one signed by thirty-four members of the state senate, some of whom have written personal letters. A long petition is in from Minneapolis, an- other from St. Paul, and there are several old soldier petitions. The application will be considered by the board of pardons Saturday, Feb. 1. IG DEALING The Hines Lumber Co. Buys 80,000,000 Feet of Logs at Menominee. Special to The Journal. Menominee, Mich., Jan. £3.—The Ed- ward Hines Lumber Co., of Chicago, has just bought the season's cut of the H. New Ulm News—Whether the legislature will confine Its labors to the proposed new tax law or take in other legislation cannot be known until that body has been in session a short time. It is probable that the tempta- tion on the part of speculative members to make a pull on the railroads by threatening more restrictive legislation will be too great to resist, and if such' shall provo true there will be some music'in the air, and some po- litical dry bones may rattle loud enough to be heard. Marshall News Messenger—It is possible that some slight changes in the tax code may be desirable, but to a layman it seems that the efforts of men so signally qualified as are the members of the tax commission should meet the approval of the legislature and be given the benefit of one year's trial, when needed changes can be effected by the regular session of the legislature a year hence. Wadena Pioneer Journal—There are numer- ous other important matters which demand consideration, but there Is some question as to the wisdom of bringing them to the atten- tion of the present legislature In extra ses- sion. The prevailing sentiment seems to be that the sooner the pressing business of the session is settled and the legislature adjourns, the better. Hutchinson Independent-Times—We believe it would be safe for the legislature to pass this law as it stands at the special session, and in the time intervening before the regular session the public could study the law and become familiar with its workings. It could then be amended if necessary. Lakefield Standard—There can be but little doubt that the legislature will put into effect the recommendations of the commission prac- tically as made. Ladies' $2, heavy sole, viei kid lace.. Ladies' $4.00, leather-lined, vici kid lace, with patent leather tips and heavy soles, 42LQ M*^a Ladies' $3.00 high - cut Winter Storm Boots, in box calf and vici kid, cut to Ladies' $2.10 patent leather Dress S^.° u !;- $1.75 Men's $3.50 Goodyear welt black Russia calf lace, oh"fl* tfj) ' Kff& the newest lasts.only * m*J%ff Men's $8.50 heavy sole.. French Enamel Lace the tife9 /L^S "swell" street s h o e s N * ^ • * * «JP Men's $2.50 Satin-Calf -Lace, with heavy leather lining, a splendid Shoe for every day. Cfc4 €1S| Men's $3.50 Goodyear Welt Patent Leather Lace for <£ *B WS&& dress, cut to .*P^ji •!***• LION SHOE and CTflDC CLOTflLNu 31!li\E 121-123 Washington Av. So. - TOO LATE TO CLASSIFY WANTED—TWENTY-FIVE GLRLS TO AD- dress letters. Write to A. S. T. Mail Co., Ban k of Minneapolis building. SATIN-SKIN CREAM NOURISHES AWAY wrinkles, blemishes, gives lovely complexion; satin skin; 25c. WANTED—TO BUY FOR CASH A COUNTY atlas of Hennepin county, in good condition. J. ,H. Hutchins, 504 Hennepin. Owatonna Chronicle—The legislature of Wisconsin recently turned down the recom- mendations of a tax commission, and we may- follow their example. However, whatever of I good the report contains should be lncorpo- Witbeck Co., 35,000,000 feet, for $700,000, | r a t e d i n o u r J a w s o f ar ^s is consistent with and the season's cut of tho N. Ludington tne p 0 H Cy adopted. company, 45,000,000 feet, for $800,000. OTHER PEOPLE'S NOTIONS FOR LAND OFFICES South Dakota Appointees Announced <foy P r e s i d e n t . ?Mu i ** Washington, Jan 23.—The president to- day sent the following nominations to the senate: United States Attorney—Robert V, Coeler, district of Idaho. Surveyor General of South Dakota—Frank A. Morris. Registers of Land Offices—John S. Vetter, Aberdeen, S. D.; Geowge B. Foster, Mitchell, > S. D. Receivers of Public Moneys—Thomas C, ..m,. Barns. Mitchell. S. D.; Morris H. Kelly '-Wi Aberdeen, S, D, i V IN SELF-DEFENSE Metculf Exonerated From Blame for Death of Prisoners. Kansas City, Jan. 23.—Lemuel D. Cum- mins, a former member of the Twentieth Kansas regiment, is quoted as admitting that he and Maurice Cohan; deceased, shot and killed two Filipino prisoners at the battle of Caloocan, and exonerating General Wilder S. Metcalf from all blame. Cummins says that Metcalf had ordered him and Cohen to take the prisoners to the rear. "Cohen and I started with them to the rear," said Cummins. "The prisoners re- sisted and in the mix-up that followed they were killed. Metcalf was a short distance away, but I don't think he saw the shooting. We killed these Filipinos in self-d«fense." . . m HERREIDMLL SEE Alleged Lynching of an Indian to Be Investigated. Special to The Journal. Aberdeen, S. D., Jan. 23.—Governor Herreid to-day wired the authorities at Rapid City for information relative to a report that John Yellow Wolff, an Indian, was lynched a few days ago on White river for stealing a horse near Rapid City. * Should the report prove true the governor will undoubtedly exert himself to punish the guilty persons. Recently he took much pains In searching the records and compiling evi- dence to dlsprovo a newspaper report that lynchings were common in South Dakota and he naturally feels indignant over this alleged i I occurence, i." Defense of the Indian. To the Editor of The Journal: The order of Indian Commissioner Jones, that some of the Indian charges of the gov- ernment shall cut off their long hair, discard the use of paint and the gaudy habiliments of savagery, prompts me, as an aborigine, to offer a few queries on this subject. I know that it is ialways a favorite pastime with some of the 'white citizens of the United States to labor for-the civilization and gen- eral social reform of people other than his own kind. We see this In the history of his treatment of the Indian and of the Filipino, and in his efforts to oonvert the people of all other lands to his own narrow and anti- quated religious notions. But let me ask Mr. Jones arid Mr. Ostensibly-Wise-Man a few questions. If Mr. Jones is going to civilize, or Jones- ixe, the Indian by compelling him to adopt the white man's igarb, what is he going to prescribe as the correct style of dress? May he be privileged to wear the Mackinaw Bull of the lumberjack, or the grotesque suit of the golfer? And as for the women, are they to follow the padding fashion, now on their stomachs and again on their hips? Are they to drag through the grass and brush around their camps In trailing sTtirts lilt© tlveir <white sisters? , , If Mr. Jones is going to deprive the Indians of the use of paint, how does he reconcila that with the license allowed white women to use paint and powder? Mr. Jones is also, as I am Informed, anx- ious to break up the reservation system and have the Indians earn their living by work- ing as white men do. »"As white men do" is good.. For every Indian on the reserva- tion that lives on his annuity from the gov- ernment, there are a thousand able-bodied white men, loafers, idlers, gamblers, thieves, tramps and vagrants in the United States living on what they can steal and sponge and beat. Every town is full of them. There is not an Indian in this country who is an object of the government's charity. His annuities have been fully paid for in the lands that he has ceded. It may also be noted here that the majority of the Indiana in all the states and territories are now en- gaged in gainful occupations—farming, stock- raising and other industries. How many white men would go to work if they enjoyed a comfortable Income from the government? —John Waahtay. KILLEDA MAN , Carlson, a Woodsman, Run Over by a 'Wisconsin Central Freight. Special to The Journal. Marshfleld, Wis., Jan. 23.—Ed Carlson, a woodsman whos3 home isi at La Crosse, was killed one mile south of the city this morn- ing by being run over by a freight train on ihe Wisconsin Central. It is thought Carlson was intoxicated and laid down on the track to sleep. He bar. been working for the Arpln Lumber company at Arpln. Litchfield Review—We would prefer that the legislature accept the bill as it is, with but very few changes, leaving time and expe- rience with the measure to point out its de- fects, rather than that the bill as reported be amended out of its present self by the mem- bers representing the many and diverse in- terests of the state. The report and bill as filed represent a harmonious whole, and if tampered with too much may become a jum- ble of patches no better than the present iaws upon tbe subjecet, with which the people of the state have so long been dissatisfied. The St Cloud Journal-Press thinks that Governor Van Sant should urge the legisla- ture to create a commission, charged with preparing a bill for a distance tariff on Min- nesota railroads. "It should be made by able men," says the Journal Press, "who should be given time to prepare a just and reason- able bill. It is too complicated a matter to be settled by the legislature in extra session." Morris Suni—Governor Van Sant has called an extra session of the legislature to act on the report of the tax commission, and if found advisable, to make an appropriation to enable the governor to continue the fight against the railway merger. It is hoped that the legislature will confine themselves to these two matters alone as the public will not take kindly to an extended extra session. Elk River Star News—The proper thing to do would be to adopt the bill recommended by the commission without amendment and go home. If the legislature does this it will be entitled to the commendation of the peo- ple. Any other course is liable to injure them- selves and the party. Elbow Lake Tribune—It is hoped the mem- bers will study the report carefully and go to St. Paul prepared to cut out the wood- chucks, if thare are any, and 6ee that the corporations don't make its defeat at the election certain by amending it to death. Crookston Times—There can be no excuse for indecision, or for prolonged discussion. It is right and proper that the legislature should give the matter careful consideration when it assembles, but it should now be prepared to consider the matter intelligently and to arrive at some definite conclusion within a reasonable length of time. What the people expect of this session offhe legislature is the transaction of business with intelligence and dispatch. Elbow Lake Herald—In his proclamation the governor states no other business than consideration of the tax commission's report. It would be well if the legislature considered nothing else. so that it will rest equally on all classes. Iron Trade Journal, Twc Harbors—The bill prepared by the tax commission contains many wise and just provisions and its adop- tion would be a stride in the right direction. St. James Journal—As a whole, the recom- mendations of the commission will meet with the hearty approval of the people of the state, and if the legislature should adopt them without change or amendment, there i3 little question but that their work would meet with popular commendation. But this is too much to hope. Tyler Journal—The legislature will be am- ply employed in considering the report of the tax commission. We doubt if members will think themselves competent to review or alfer in essential details the work to which three experts have given so much time and labor. Probably the legislation proposed wlil be accepted or rejected without material change. Morris Tribune—The bill which the tax commission proposes should be passed with but very few if any amendments, and if any defects are found after it has been in force one year, these defects can easily be remedied at the next session of the legislature. The people do not" want a long drawn out special session and it would be to the credit of the republican party if this tax bill is promptly passed by the members and they then go nome> The Mankato Free Press thus discusses tha special session: Now that he governor has called the legisla- ture to meet in extra session on Tuesday, Feb. 4, to consider the tax bill reported by the tax commission, it is up to that body as to what kind of a record will be made. Last winter that body made a most commendabla record, and this has given people generally a belief that they can hope for a continuanca of the same at the special session. Just as little legislation as possible, outside of the tax law, should be the aim of that body. The idea of a caucus on the evening preceding the convening of the legislature, at which an agreement as to about the length of the ses- sion, and the business that shall be transacted if any, outside of the consideration of the tax bill, is a good idea, and should be car- ried out. While Governor Van Sant did noc mention any other business in his call for the meeting, it is generally understood that in his message transmitting the tax report, he will ask for an appropriation to defray the expense of the suit against railway consolidation, he may allude to some other matters, but if so, fle is keeping tnem closely to bimseii. TTiere •are one or two matters which ought to receive attention, most prominent of which is an amendment to the board of control law in reference to the normal schools and the state university. These educational Institutions ougth to be separated from the authority of that body and put under the full control of their respective boards, and the sooner it is done the better for both. If the state is to be represented at the St. Louis exposition, steps ought to be taken at the coming sesion to this end. If the advan- tages which the state gained at Buffalo last season could be duplicated at St. Louis in 1903 it would be a first-class invest mey for the state. If anything is to be done it saoul* be done at once, so that ample time may b» had to secure a proper exhibit for the state, and it should be done on a scale that will allow the state a good showing. Your Hotel * will serve Clarkfleld Reform Advocate—The tax com- mission has not said the last word, and there are , undoubtedly opportunities for criticism and improvement in its report. However, if the bill of the commission should become law It would not only vastly improve _ present conditions but would put Minnesota i with Cream to pOUr Over it In +hA fArafMnt *\9 thnca at o* *\m wlii*-»Vi a**n X in the forefront of those states whinh are fGrape^Nutsf i . . 5 if you ask Order the food served dry and endeavoring to adjust the burden of taxation I +»frOfrOQO»<«>»00»»0»0»0»Ofr04 l Last 3 Days Of Great Piano Sale. . Only 35 of the original 200 pianos now remain. Some of the finest styles, however, and you still have an opportunity to secure the greatest piano bargain ever offered in the west. Open Evonlnge. .Mew Location will he . • 727 MIooUoU "V^A^S A ggggg W W KIMBALL CO FACTORY BRANCH 715MIC0U.CT AVE, \ *' ^..,w- ^.J;.;?i<>. V- y ^ W ^ ^ j j a ^ ^ ^ i ' S i i o - ; J-.^ftfetifch,;^:..

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    THE MINNEAPOLIS JOURNAL. THUESDAT EVENING, JANTTAKY 23, 1902. >

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    CITY NEWS F r a c t u r e d Hia SkullHenry Kuch, a

    farmer, living near Robblnsdale, slipped and (tell while cutting ice at Crystal lake Monday afternoon. His skull was fractured, and he died. r

    C h a r g e d W i t h TheftCharles Pool, a driver for the Fred Armstrong Transfer company, was arrested this morning by De-tective Oscar Hicks for the alleged theft of grain from hia employer's barn, on Seventh street and Third avenue SB. Pool lives at 205 Second street N.

    THvo C h a r g e s A v a i u s t HerRachel Grigsby, colored, was arrested on the charse of being found *in a disorderly house. Levi Anderson, tbe complainant, later charged her with robbing him of $1S0. She was lined $10 for the former offense and was held under $500 bonds for hearing as to the latter.

    C r e d i t Men Dine The Minneapolis Credit Men's association banquetted last night at the Hotel Nicollet. Officers were elected as follows: President, George E. Hig-gins of Anthony Kelly &. Co.; vice presi-dent, W. S. Hughes of Dodson, Fisher, Brock-man & Co.

    AMES STANDS FOR IT He Discusses His Withdrawal From

    the Congressional Race.

    TEN POLICEMEN TO BE DROPPED

    The R e d u c t i o n May Be N e c e s s a r y t o K e e p W i t h i n t h e A p p r o -

    p r i a t i o n .

    R e s u l t of a Flg-htOwen Murphy is at the city hospital suffering from erysipelas, which resulted from a wound. on the fore-head. Inflicted in a fight in u lodging-house at 204 Hennepin avenue, yesterday morning. Murphy, it was reported to the police, was eet upon by several men and brutally as-saulted.

    Cap t . MacGrcgor Improves -Cap ta in John MacGregor, special agent of the treas-ury department, who suffered a light stroke of paralysis at the San Angelo last Thurs-day is improving. Several years ago the captain had a slight attack of the same trouble and It is believed that he will again recover.

    , A F a l l a n d a B r o k e n WristWhile Cleaning windows on the second story of the Twin City Telephone company's building. Third avenue S and Seventh street, this fore-noon, O. A. Van Valkenberg lost his balance and fell, breaking his wrist. He was taken to the city hospital, and later to his home, 292S Sixteenth avenue S.

    G. A. R. C o m m a n d e r s ' Asa'nThe- G. A. R. Commanders and Past Commanders' Association will hold its annual meeting at the G. A R. headquarters Saturday evening, Jan. 2b. New officers will be elected and business connected with the next.department encampment will be attended to. All the delegates for this encampment, it is hoped, will t>e present

    Next C i t i zens ' Counci l The Clti-zene' Council, which. was- orgauLzad last No-vember for the purpose of promoting chari-table unity and interest, will hold Its second meeting Jan. 29. The subject for considera-tion, "Social Betterment," will be discussed under the following heads: "Social Settle-ments," "Industrial Education," "Hospitals," ''District Nursing" and "Friendly Visiting." Tile meeting will close with, a general discus-sion of the whole subject. There will be a meeting Feb. 19 and one in March, at which the subjects of "The Protection of Unfortu-nates" and "The Relation of the State to Social Problems" will be considered.

    On M c K i n l e y DayOn the fifty-fifth anniversary of William McKinley's birth, Jan. 29, the Ohio association' of Minneapolis will hold Its annual dinner at the Hotel Nicollet. The usual speeches will be omitted. The Masonic quartet will furnish the enter-tainment and has prepared a magnificent pro-gram, in which will appear Heinrlch Hoevel and other artists. Among the songs the quartet will sing an original poem by a mem-ber of the society. This has been set to music and will be an enjoyable feature of the en-tertainment. The society expects the coming celebration to be the largest and most in-spiring affair that has ever been given under Its auspices.

    L e c t u r e on Sir T h o m a s MoreDr. Henry Austin Adams, who will lecture at the Lyceum theater this evening, ' dined with Archbishop Ireland, in St. Paul, last evening. He has lectured to three audiences In St. Paul and several St. Paul persons have secured seats in the Lyceum for his lecture to-morrow night. His subject is "Sir Thomas More." Sir Thomas was the ideal Catholic layman, who so stoutly resisted the claims of Henry VIII. to spiritual supremacy in Eng-land. His trial on a charge of treason and his tragic death for conscience sake have been told and read with interest since the day of his death. While Dr. Adams does not offend those who differ from him, he is a most enthusiastic admirer of the martyred

    ' chancellor.

    Mayor Ames, who returned late last night after a week at French Lick Springs, arrived at the city hall a t 11:20 yesterday, and after a few moments in his private office with Secretary Brown began to receive callers. When the mayor entered the city hall the first to greet him was Captain ."Coffee John" Fitchette. with whom the mayor exchanged a few words. The genial chef and police officer followed Dr. Ames into the office, where the mayor met other friends.

    P o l i c e m e n to Be D r o p p e d . Then Superintendent of Police Fred W.

    Ames and Captain Hill were called and these two and the mayor and ills secre-tary were closeted together for nearly an hour. It was announced that no change in the police department were imminent, although Dr. Ames says he will find it necessary within a month or so to drop at least ten men from the force in order to keep within the appropriation. He has not yet decided, he said, where these men could best be spared.

    Before receiving the reporters Mayor Ames perused the published stories of his rumored intentions and of the many troubles in the various departments of the city government since his absence. To the reporters Dr. Ames said:

    I am in .favor of a thorough Investigation Into any municipal institution where there has been sincere criticism as to the conduct of affairs. As to the hospital, I will say that I believe there have been no overcharges as reported. It is true that orders for goods that had to be sent by express may show a slight increase over the price that would have been paid if the goods had' been in stock, but this excess, believe, was neces-sary. Mr. Thompson agreed that he would furnish medicines for the hospital at as low a rate as any druggist in this locality could furnish them, and I believe he has done so. However, I am anxious that there shall be a careful investigation. I intend to stand by my appointees until there is positive proof that there is something wrong.

    There is one thing I want to say about the complicated state of affairs at the work-bouse, and that Is this: I have always held to the belief that'the wife of a public official should not be admitted to an institution in which he is employed. I cannot stand for "petticoat government."

    W h y H e W i t h d r e w . I wish to state emphatically that my health

    was the only thing that entered into my de-termination to withdraw from the congres-sional race. I was- not advised to do so by any one, and I have not regretted that I did it. It would have been suicidal for me to at-tempt the arduous campaign that would be necessary.

    I do not know that I shall be a candidate for mayor next term. I have not been urged by my friends to make the campaign, and only my health will determine whether or not I enter the race.

    Mayor Ames said that he enjoyed his vacation at the springs immensely and that he was feeling much better as a re -sult.

    THE IRONY OF FATE Alonzo Phillips Drawn on the Me-

    gaarden Jury Venire. '*"'

    MART* WH1TC0MB IS ACCEPTED

    He I s t h e T h i r d J u r o r a n d t h e Only Man A p p r o v e d T h i s

    M o r n i n g .

    When Judge Pond called his courtroom to order yesterday Judge Steele an-nounced that since Tuesday afternoon three jury panels had been discharged from consideration of the cases for which they had been empaneled and demanded that the thirty-six members be called for the Megaarden trial before those on the special venire were called. Judge Pond consulted with other members of the bench and it was decided that the names on t h e . regular venire and the special venire should ;jo into the same box and the names drawn as chance dictated. Judge Steele entered a formal objection to this ruling.

    Of ttie special venire of 100 drawn1 yes-terday only 58 reported this morning. In the venire was Alonzo Phillips, the former sheriff, who will doubtless be excused from hearing the testimony against his successor.

    Only ono juror was secured this morn-ing, this being Martin Whitcomb, the well known feed dealer and politician. He has been candidate for alderinan and for sheriff on ' the democratic tickets. Whitcomb was not challenged by either Judge Steele or County Attorney Board-man and was sworn almost as soon ao he struck the witness box.

    HITS MCCLEARY Tawney Denounces His Col-

    league's Methods as to Oleo Bill.

    Declares That McCleary's Action Is Without

    Precedent.

    SHE USED THE POLICE A DIVE-KEfcpER'S CASE FAILS

    H e r C h a r g e A g a i n s t Monroe a n d Mrs, E v a n s DismissedThe L a t t e r ' s

    U n f o r t u n a t e S i t u a t i o n .

    NO. TRUST PRAGTIGABLE

    NECROIiOGICAIi MRS. MARVIN D E W E V PROCTOR, a

    former resident of Minneapolis, and widow of the late Professor H. I. Proctor, who was well-known among Minneapolis musicians, died at Boston, Mass., Jan. 16. The Proctors made their home in Minneapolis for many years, Professor Proctor being organist of Westminster church during much of the time. Mrs. Proctor is survived by a daughter.

    C. A. DUBY, an attorney of this city, died last Saturday at the city hospital with tuberculosis of the lungs. He was 45 years old and had practiced for several years in this ity.

    WONT QUIT SAWING HERE c a n l o n - G l p s o n Mill W i l l C o n t i n u e

    t o O p e r a t e . Officials of the Scanlon-Gipson Lumber

    company deny the report In a morning paper tha t they would discontinue operations at the Minneapolis saw mill hereafter on account of the cost of trans-porting logs.

    "We will continue to do business at the Minneapolis mill," said Mr. Gipson," and on probably a larger scale. We al-ready have enough logs in the river awaiting the drive to feed our mill in this city as soon as the season opens. The proportionate output at our mills at Nickerson and Cass Lake will be about the same as in other years.

    "A misunderstanding -witti regard to our Jiew mill a t Scanlon, near Cloquet,- doubt-less accounts for the misleading article in the morning paper. This mill will handle a large amount of logs for the Duluth market-logs which would not come to Minneapolis under any circumstances, and consequently would stand no show of be-ing sawed here.

    "I ts minimum capacity will be 100,000,-00 feet of logs. The combined capacity of the three mills at Nickerson, Cass Lake and Soanlon will be approximately 200,-000,000 feet. We expect to haul about the ame per centage of logs by railroad to Minneapolis this season as last. How large this haul will be depends entirely upon our ability to get logs."

    CREAMERIES CANNOT COMBINE

    F . C. McMullen Says U n d e r P r e s e n t C o n d i t i o n I t I s I m p o s s i b l e t o

    C o n t r o l t h e O u t p u t .

    "SEARCH" BR1GGS H e D o e s n ' t K n o n W h y H e Is i n Close

    Conf inement . Fred Brlggs was taken from his accus-

    tomed place In the engine room a t the workhouse yesterday and was placed in close confinement. Relatives who called on (him yesterday afternoon found him in his oelL Briggs, who has been regarded as a model prisoner since his incarcera-tion, says he knows no reason for the change*.

    ABERDEEN'S HOPES Talk: o* New l i i nes of

    Soo's P l a n s . R a i l r o a d s -

    Special to The Journal. Aberdeen, S. D., Jan. 23.A meeting of

    citizens was held liere at the request of Watertown men interested in a project to secure a road, probably the Illinois Cen-tral , to connect the two cities and to run south from Watertown to Sioux Falls. A committee of prominent citizens was appointed to gather details to be sub-mitted a t another public meeting.

    Renewed assurances have been received that the Soo will build southeast to this city at the earliest possible date. Sur-veys are being made and several cars of ties and iron have been received here. In the western counties Milwaukee surveyors have already reached the line between Emmons and Mcintosh counties, about three miles north of the state line, and a,re close to the Northern Pacific survey. The survey in which Northern Pacific en-gineers are engaged extends from th main line south through the center of Emmons county to a point about six miles north of the Campbell county line, then turns oast toward Edgeley, which is the probable destination.

    W h e a t R a t e s Cut. Premier Roblin, of Manitoba, has announced

    a reduction in wheat rates of 2 cents per hundred over the lines of the Canadian North-ern, from Brandon to Port Arthur and inter-mediate points. The present rate is 14 cents per hundred. It is expected that another like reduction will \> mate Ouring ths prea eat year. __ . * &v'--v f, , ?J "^

    In connection with the dispatches of yesterday announcing the attempt of To-peka promoters to form a gigantic cream-ery combine, Frank C. McMullen, vice president of the Minneapolis Cold Stor-age company says that such a combine is impracticable. He said to-day:

    It would be impossible to form a creamery trust, and a moment's thought would con-vince any one of that fact. Farmers are un-alterably opposed to anything in the trust line, and if a trust was formed It could only live through the aid and help of the farmers. To make any quantity of butter, it would be necessary to have the patronage of a very large number of farmers. The largest indi-vidual producer of milk in.the state would have relatively a very small quantity of milk; so it is easy to perceive the very large num-ber of farmers that would have to contribute their product in order to make any amount of butter, and this it would be impossible for a .trust to get.

    On the other side, a trust must control the output. In the 'manufacture of butter this would be utterly impossible. With modern methods, It is only necessary to have a churn in order to get into the business. There are upwards of twenty churning plants in Min-neapolis and St. Paul to-day, all of which are buying more or less cream and milk di-rect from the farmers. A practical and effi-cient creamery could be equipped in this city for less than $300. This would make compe-tition that no trust could stand. For a but-ter-maker to go into the business here, It would be only necessary to equip a creamery and do his own work, and he could then turn out goods creaper than any trust on earth.

    The introduction of efficient hand separa-tors on the farm has absolutely placed the control of the dairy products right in the farmers' hands, and, without question, they are increasing the dairy earnings from 60 to 100 per cent. With the aid of a hand separa-tor, he has an extremely valuable food prod-uct in his skim milk, which he can feed in its best condition. His cream he can ship to any point that will pay the most money. No doubt some of the older creameries and creamery companies, with a large amount of obsolete machinery, would be glad to form some kind of a combination to rid themselves of what is nothing but Junk, but it Is ex-tremely doubtful if such a scheme could be floated.'

    As before stated, a farm separator places the business directly in the farmers' hands, where it belongs, and gives him the control of his product such as he never had before. The farmer who takes his milk to-day to a creamery loses half a day In hauling his milk, for bis skim milk he gets back milk too acid and too poor to be of any feeding value, and he must wait from six weeks to two months before he knows what he is go-ing to get for milking his cows. All this is changed with a hand separator. He separates his milk while it contains the natural heat, has the skim milk In the best possible con-dition to feed; he has his cream that he can ship to any one of a dozen or more churn-ing plants; knows each day just exactly what the price is on his butter fat, and In this way knows exactly how he stands at all times.

    The arrest of. Mrs. Maud Evans, alleged to be an innocent but unfortunate woman, her appearance in court yesterday to answer to a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses, and her release by the court as wholly innocent of the charge, all Sbring to .light a sad tale and one well .calculated to arouse indignation.

    From 'all that can be learned, Mrs. Evans, who is quite young, suffers from some slight mental malady. Unfortunate-ly she had some fancied difficulty with her husband a few days ago, which led to her coming to Minneapolis without him. Being without friends here she went to a Third street boarding place and there, it seems, asked for aid. Harry Monroe known about town, and who was arrested charged with complicity in the offense with which Mrs. Evans was charged, heard the appeal, and volunteered his assist-ance. This Mrs. Evans accepted, where-^ upon Monroe called a carriage and bust-ling Mrs. Evans into it *ook her to the dive of Jennie Pierce on First street.

    Monroe", it was charged, left, first hav-ing received $17 from the. Pierce woman. 'Mrs. Evans, discovering the nature of the den she was in, insisted upon leaving. Thereupon, it is said, the Pierce woman, being $17 out, appealed to police depart-ment friends and had her arrested on a charge'of obtaining money under false pretenses. Monroe was likewise arrested. But he, too, was released this morning.

    Those who know of Mrs. Evens' unfor-tunate connection with the case express deep sympathy, and are not slow to say that there was a dark plot in it all, for which someone Should suffer. Whether Monroe received the money outright for guiding Mrs. Evans to the low resort, or whether the Pierce woman gave him the money simply in order that she might place Mrs. Evans in her debt so that she might have the greater power over her, are the questions that disturb Mrs. Evans' sympathizers. On the assumption that Monroe received the money outright, a charge against him for acting as a procur-er, it is felt, might hold. Monroe, after his release this morning, left the court-room laughing. Police Captain Krum-wiede's name has been connected with the case in a way which does not reflect great credit upon his official bearing. Mr. Evans is in the city and expresses his entire willingness to take his wife to her home and see that she is properly cared for.

    From Tha Journal Bureau, Room , Pott Building, Washington.

    Washington, Jan. 23.Before the house agriculture committee to-day Congress-men McCleary and Tawney spoke in sup-port of their bills to regulate the sale of oleomargarin. McCleary spoke first, and confined himself to a plea for the passage of the Grout bill of the last congress, which is now his bill. It leaves a small tax on uncolored oleo. Tawney's places uncolored oleo on the free list. Both bills fax the colored article 10 cents a pound.

    Air. Tawney in his speech referred quite caustically to the methods Mr. McCleary has resorted to in advancing his bill, and said in the beginning of his address:

    I am here at the request of the committee, not for the purpose of urging you to support my bill or any particular bill. Any bill which the friends of the man who makes' hon-est butter may report from this committee will receive my hearty support.

    Tawney then referred to the "gross misrepresentations that have been cir-culated throughout the country, especially among dairymen and agricultural news-papers concerning the bill I Introduced," and the "strenuous attempt thus made to discredit the bill and impugn the motives of its author"; and although McCleary was not named it was evident that Taw-ney had him in mind. After. giving a history of the attempted oleo legislation, including the old Grout bill, Tawney said, again referring to McCleary:

    It is a common thing for those outside of congress to endeavor to accomplish the same end as the proposed legislation by praising the measure in which they are interested, but I doubt jf prior to this congress, within the experience of the oldest member of the house, and certainly not in my almost ten years! ex-perience, has a member Introduced a bill, and then, by printed and written circulars sent broadcast by him over his signature and under his fraak, sought to discredit the bill of a fellow member relating to the same BUW-ject and at the esame time endeavoring to discredit him by impugning that member's motives. That is not the practice of "states-men nor of gentlemen. It is childish.

    Tawney's strongest argument against the old Grout bill in addition to these previously alluded to in these dispatches, was that it has recently been discovered that it is possible for the purchaser or user of uncolored oleo to color it with-out remelting or remanufacturing.

    "If this is so," he said, "the quarter of a cent tax on uncolored oleo is as ob-jectionable as to tax it at all. The entire oleo product would be uncolored and the retail dealers carefully instructed how to color it, thereby enabling him to evade the entire tax." .

    Tawney advocated an amendment of the legal definiteion of the word ''manufac-turers" so as to make it cover the above possible situation.

    W. W. Jermans.

    State Capitol N e w s

    TO PUBLISH ALL BALLOTS ELECTION PRINTING HEAVY

    Comple t e Ba l l o t Must A p p e a r i n t h e Official P u p e r for E v e r y

    C h a n g e Made .

    State Printer C. C. Whitney has dis-covered some rough edges in the primary election law, which will need attention as soon as possible. He has made sure by securing opinions from the state legal de-partment.

    Ballots for city elections are prepared by the county auditor, and the printing bill has to be borne by the county. As-sistant Attorney General Somerby says the city should reimburse the county for such printing, but there is no law to re-quire it.

    Ballots must be printed twice in the county official paper. This, may be in a city twenty miles from the one holding the election and will not help the voters in the least.

    In Captain Whitney's opinion a com-plete ballot will have to be printed for every change made. In Minneapolis, where there are thirteen wards, seven legisla-tive districts and {our county commis-sioner districts, there are a multitude of changes and a full ballot from congress-man down will have to be printed for each change, occupying several pages of a newspaper.

    A RECEIVER ASKED

    For t h e M i n n e s o t a M u t u a l F a r m I n -s u r a n c e C o m p a n y .

    Elmer H. Dearth, state insurance com-missioner, has asked Attorney General Douglas to apply for a receiver for the Minnesota Mutual Farm Insurance com-pany of Minneapolis.

    The assets consist of premium notes to the amount of $2,549.07 and debit bal-ances on agents for $678.25. None of these are available. Liabilities' amount to $7,867.55. An assessment was levied Nov. 14, which should have brought $3,761.74, but only $156.16 was received. The offi-cers evidently gave up, for when the ex-aminer called the office was deserted and he had .to secure the services of L. E. Utley, a former secretary, to get access to the books.

    H. G. Lund is president and S."R. Ar-thur, secretary. The company was incor-porated in 1895.

    COMMERCE DEPARTMENT

    NELSON BILL. AGAIN DISCUSSED

    S e n a t o r Q,uarles W o u l d A m e n d a n d L a b o r L e a d e r G o m p e r s

    . F i l e s P r o t e s t .

    Washington, Jan. 23.Mr. Nelson, in the senate to-day, called up the bill establishing a department of commerce. Mr.Quarles (Wis.) offered an amendment that the secretary of commerce should have complete control of the work of gathering and distributing sta-tistical information naturally relating to the subjects confided to his department and should have Authority to call upon all other departments for data.

    Mr. Gallinger made a vigorous effort in sup-port of the measure. The establishment of such a department, he said, had been de-manded by commercial and industrial bodies throughout the country for years. /The president pro tern laid before the

    /senate a letter from Samuel Gompers, presi-dent of the American Federation of Labor, protesting againsc the incorporation of the department of labor in the proposed depart-ment. He said that the department of labor had been organized at the earnest solicitation of the organized labor of the country in the hope that ultimately it might become one of the executive departments, with a secretary of labor. Mr. Gompers thought if the de-partment of labor were incorporated in the department of commerce it would minimize the interests of labor.

    QUARANTINE AT HASSAN T h e C h a i r m a n of t h e T o w n B o a r d

    E x p l a i n s t h e E x p e n s e . Chairman E. S. Wiggin of the board of

    supervisors of the town of Hassan takes exception to the criticism made by Coun-ty Physician Kistler over the manner of dealing with diphtheria cases in the town of Hassan. Dr. Kistler thought that a guard for a diphtheria quarantine was un-necessary and that a charge of $25 for fumigating the house was exorbitant. .

    Mr. Wiggin says that in this particular case the family was a large one, there being several cases and one death in a period of thirty days. He wants Dr. Kistler to explain how the towji could avoid furnishing an attendant if the fami-ly was to be shut off from intercourse with the public. He says further that Dr. Kistler was notified, but was not heard from for twenty days. The town at first sought to collect the

    expense of the quarantine from the state board of health from the $20,000 appro-priated by the legislature for fighting contagious diseases, but Dr. Bracken in-toTmed tne town supervisors that the

    , county was liable. , *',':

    TELLER TOO LATE Intervention Asked After

    Scheepers Was Exe-cuted.

    Washington, Jan. 23.Senator Teller to-day introduced a concurred resolution asking the president to request the Brit-ish government to set aside the death sentence of Commandant Soheepers, be-cause he was captured while sick In a hospital, in violation of the Geneva con-vention.

    New York, Jan. 23.An Associated Press dispatch announced that the death sen-tence upon Commandant Scheepers of the Boer army had been confirmed by General Kitchener and that he -would be executed next Saturday. The fact is that he was executed last Saturday, Jan. 18.

    MERGER Speculators Claiming Minne-

    sota^. Application Will Be Denied.

    Special to The Journal. New York, Jan. 23.For some reason a

    rumor was circulated in speculative cir-cles to-day that the supreme court will decide against the state of Minnesota, Monday, in the application to bring suit before that court against the Northern Securities company. This belief induced buying at intervals during the day by speculative commission houses. The same idea was understood to prevail in the west, and to have caused buying from there to-day.

    Northern Securities was more active on the probability of a favorable decision. The stock rose to 103%, which was a gain of 1%.

    HERMAN ROGERS KILLED FATALITY AT ABERCROMBIE, N. D.

    W h i l e Dr iv ing: W i t h Some C o m p a n -i o n s H e W a s T h r o w n Out R e -

    c e i v i n g F a t a l I n j u r i e s .

    Herman P. Rogers, 1713 Aldrich avenue N, son of Rev. Samuel J. Rogers, a re-tired Congregational -minister, living in Minneapolis, was .thrown from a buggy and killed near Abercrombie, N. D., Tuesday. Word to this effect was re-ceived by the father this morning. The account of the accident received here is meager. Mr. Rogers was employed by the Hennepin Lumber company of this city, and together with two other repre-sentatives of the firm, was inspecting the company's property ' near Abercrombie, driving in a buggy. The team became frightened and ran away, throwing all of the men to the frozen ground. Rogers received injuries from which he died al -most instantly. His companions were more or less seriously injured. The body was taken to Abercrombie and will be shipped to Minneapolis this evening.

    Mr. Rogers was a very popular young man among church, people. He was an active member of Pilgrim Congregational church and president of the Christian En-deavor society of that church. He was 28 years old and is survived by a wife ana two small children. The funeral will prob-ably be held from the Pilgrim church Friday.

    PARDON FOR YOUNGERS

    THREE DAYS GONE - M :

    Only Six Jurymen Secured for West

    Murder Trial.

    J. H. SMITH ADDED TO LIST TODAY

    E n t i r e W e e k W i l l Probably- Be Con-s u m e d In G e t t i n g a

    J u r y .

    Special to The Journal. Grand Forks, N. D., Jan. 23.By the

    acceptance of J. H. Smith as a juror in the West murder trial this morning, the sixth ma(n was added to the list. Of the panel of eighty talesmen summoned but seven remain from which to select the remaining six jurors and that number will all *e disposed of during the afternoon.

    Thirty talesmen have been summoned, to appear to-morrow morning, but it is expected that another special venire will be necessary before the jury is completed.

    This is the third day of the trial and as but half a jury has been selected it looks as though the entire week would be taken up in getting the twelve men.

    W. C. March, father of the dead man, attends the sessions regularly, but has not given away to his emotion in any way. The aged father of the defendant is also present. . The six jurors accepted are: A. P. Winslow, E. O. Berg, Charles Kinney, Hugh Marshall, A. M. Wilcox and J. H. Smith.

    J u r o r No. 7 Secured . James McGillivray, a farmer at Ardock

    and a candidate for state representative from the sixth district was accepted as the seventh juror late this afternoon.

    ','&

    Clear' ance

    Prices

    Ladies' $3.50, heavy sole lace. For

    French enamel,

    $2.40 $1.50

    EXTRA SESSION TALK

    P e t i t i o n s for Same Pour ing : I n t o G o v e r n o r ' s Office.

    Petiti&ns for the pardon of the Younger brothers are pouring Into the governor's office. There is one signed by thirty-four members of the state senate, some of whom have written personal letters. A long petition is in from Minneapolis, an-other from St. Paul, and there are several old soldier petitions. The application will be considered by the board of pardons Saturday, Feb. 1.

    IG DEALING The Hines Lumber Co. Buys

    80,000,000 Feet of Logs at Menominee.

    Special to The Journal. Menominee, Mich., Jan. 3.The Ed-

    ward Hines Lumber Co., of Chicago, has just bought the season's cut of the H.

    New Ulm NewsWhether the legislature will confine Its labors to the proposed new tax law or take in other legislation cannot be known until that body has been in session a short time. It is probable that the tempta-tion on the part of speculative members to make a pull on the railroads by threatening more restrictive legislation will be too great to resist, and if such' shall provo true there will be some music'in the air, and some po-litical dry bones may rattle loud enough to be heard.

    Marshall News MessengerIt is possible that some slight changes in the tax code may be desirable, but to a layman it seems that the efforts of men so signally qualified as are the members of the tax commission should meet the approval of the legislature and be given the benefit of one year's trial, when needed changes can be effected by the regular session of the legislature a year hence.

    Wadena Pioneer JournalThere are numer-ous other important matters which demand consideration, but there Is some question as to the wisdom of bringing them to the atten-tion of the present legislature In extra ses-sion. The prevailing sentiment seems to be that the sooner the pressing business of the session is settled and the legislature adjourns, the better.

    Hutchinson Independent-TimesWe believe it would be safe for the legislature to pass this law as it stands at the special session, and in the time intervening before the regular session the public could study the law and become familiar with its workings. It could then be amended if necessary.

    Lakefield StandardThere can be but little doubt that the legislature will put into effect the recommendations of the commission prac-tically as made.

    Ladies' $2, heavy sole, viei kid lace. . Ladies' $4.00, leather-lined, vici kid lace, with patent leather tips and heavy soles, 42LQ M*^a

    Ladies' $3.00 high - cut Winter Storm Boots, in box calf and vici kid, cut to Ladies' $2.10 patent leather Dress

    S^.u!;- $1.75 Men's $3.50 Goodyear welt black Russia calf lace, oh"fl* tfj) ' Kf f& the newest lasts.only * D m*J%ff

    Men's $8.50 heavy sole.. French Enamel Lace the tife9 / L ^ S "swell" street s h o e s N * ^ * * JP Men's $2.50 Satin-Calf -Lace, with heavy leather lining, a splendid Shoe for every day. Cfc4 1 S |

    Men's $3.50 Goodyear Welt Patent Leather Lace for