bc adventures special, spring 2012

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Search for your adventure with this look at seven top British Columbia coastal destinations.

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  • SPRING 2012FREE at select outlets and online or by subscription

    Volume 22, Issue 1

    Wondering where to kayak?We showcase seven top

    British Columbia destinations

    Join us online: www.coastandkayak.com

    James Dorsey reflects on the encounter that started it all

    Living with whales

    The best of BC

    PM

    416

    8751

    5

    We examine the sub-culture that is Greenland kayaking the punk rockers of paddlesports?

    The qayaq quotient

    COAST&KAYAKMagazineThe magazine of coastal adventure and recreation

  • 2 COAST&KAYAK MAgAzine SPRING 2012

    Over 100 Sea Kayaks in Stock

    Deep Cove Outdoorsdeepcoveoutdoors.com / 604.987.2202

  • SPRING 2012 COAST&KAYAK MAgAzine 3

    Dancing with Dinosaurs 8

    The Qayaq Way 34

    BC Trip Planner Spring 2012 12

    James Dorsey reflects on how a chance kayaking trip turned into a lifelong passion for whales.

    Gerhardt Lepp looks at why he became one of the punk rockers of the kayaking world.

    Kyuquot and Spring Island 14 Haida Gwaii / SGang Gwaay 20 Broken Group Islands 22 Nuchatlitz / Nootka Sound 23 Gabriola Island / North Gulf Islands 24

    Desolation Sound / Discovery Islands 25 South Gulf Islands 26 Yukon Territories 28 Other destinations 30 Exotic / tropical destinations 31

    First Word ..........................................................................................................4News .....................................................................................................................6BC Marine Trail Update by Stephanie Meinke .............................30Sea Kayak Guides Alliance of BC by Sheila Porteous ..............32Skillset by Alex Matthews .......................................................................38When the Tide Is Out by Hilary Masson ........................................40New Gear ........................................................................................................44Events................................................................................................................45Books .................................................................................................................46

    Inside

    Find out where to go and what to do this year. Featured are:

  • 4 COAST&KAYAK MAgAzine SPRING 2012

    Spring 2012 Volume 22, Number 1 PM No. 41687515

    A product of:

    Wild Coast Publishing

    PO Box 24, Stn ANanaimo, B.C., Canada, V9R 5K4

    Ph: 1-866-984-6437 Fax: 1-866-654-1937Email: kayak@coastandkayak.comWebsite: www.coastandkayak.com

    2012. Copyright is retained on all material (text, photos and graphics) in this magazine. No reproduction is allowed of any material in any form, print or electronic, for any purpose,

    except with the permission of Wild Coast Publishing.

    Some elements in maps in this magazine are reproduced with the permission of Natural Resources Canada 2010, courtesy of the Atlas of Canada. Also, our thanks to Geobase for some

    elements that may appear on Coast&Kayak maps.

    Advertising rates and submission guidelinesavailable at www.coastandkayak.com

    subscribe$20 for 1 year 4 issues$35 for 2 years 8 issues

    While Coast&Kayak Magazine is made available free, subscriptions ensure the magazine is delivered to your home and that you will never miss an issue.

    To subscribe, visit www.coastandkayak.com/Subscribe.html

    or call 1-866-984-6437.

    ISSUE ADDEADLINE DISTRIBUTION Spring2012 Jan.27 Feb.27 Summer2012 April27 May28 Fall2012 July2 Aug.1 Winter2012 Oct.1 Nov.6

    I expect of all the varieties of kayaking out there, my particular style and niche is probably the most rare. Id categorize myself as a trekker. I relish long-distance, multi-day excursions covering as much area as possible.

    I suspect the most popular category is the rose-smeller, or those who stop to smell the roses in the intertidal sense of the phrase: daytrippers who use kayaks to explore bays and nooks and crannies and the rich intertidal life, for which kayaks are supremely well suited. No great energy need be expended nor miles logged nor any particular skills used, which makes it so accessible. These kayakers get all the benefits with very little in the way of investment or effort. And thus the popularity.

    Some of those kayakers will probably graduate into other more defined styles of kayaking as they get better and seek out other ambitions. I see my trekking as an outgrowth of rose-smelling, as many miles may be involved, but still kayaking over a long distance is slow enough and usually close enough to shore to allow careful investigation just over a far greater and more varied environment. It also allows you to smell roses in the most glorious, wild and secluded locations, some of which few people will ever get to visit amid a landscape and environment worlds away from where you started.

    Trekking isnt for everyone. Ive alienated friends and family by setting out on trips that were too ambitious and too demanding for their own interest. Woe to the person who followed me as I said enthusiastically, Lets paddle to that island over there!

    There are the other niches in kayaking, the obvious being surf or whitewater. An emerging niche is the Greenland kayaker who follows the tradition set out generations ago by way of kayaks (qayaqs), paddles (pautiks) and skills (upside-down then back up again). Were exploring that phenomenon a bit in this issue courtesy of Gerhardt Lepps insights into his attraction to that niche. I appreciate his comparison to Greenland kayakers being the punk rockers of kayaking. Me, I have no particular need to develop an arsenal of 23 types of Greenland rolls. In fact, to be a trekker you dont need any particular skills in terms of performance. I like to think trekking specializes in trip planning, navigation and weather awareness in order to be comfortably self-reliant.

    The last bit is the true appeal of trekking. After spending days in the wilderness with nothing more at your disposal than your own strength and abilities a sixth sense kicks in. To me its developing a wonderful connectedness to nature no longer being an observer, but becoming as much a part of the environment as the birds and sea life around you. That sense of belonging is an integral part of my enjoyment of kayaking, and it is what keeps drawing me back to the water.

    What draws you? The adrenaline of surf? The satisfaction of learning a new roll? The social milieu? Or simply the enjoyment of an hour on the water? It doesnt matter

    its all part of the wide appeal of kayaking. Enjoy the diverse options you have. There is no wrong way to take part.

    - John Kimantaseditor@coastandkayak.com

    Connecting by finding your niche

    Coast&kayak maGaZINE is an independent magazine available free at hundreds of print distribution sites (paddling shops, outdoor stores, paddling clubs, marinas, events, etc.), and globally on the web. Also available by paid subscription.

    Articles, photos, events, news are all welcome.

    Find back issues, articles, events, writers guidelines and advertising information online at coastandkayak.com

    Cover Photo: After logging thousands of miles along the BC coast, we decided that Spring Island defines perfection and to prove it we present an eight-page spread on this gem in the Mission Group off Kyuquot Sound.

    General queries: kayak@coastandkayak.comEditorial: editor@coastandkayak.comAdvertising: kayak@coastandkayak.com

    Coast&Kayak Magazine is dedicated to making self-propelled coastal exploration fun and accessible. Safety and travel

    information is provided to augment pre-existing safety and knowledge. A safety course and proper equipment are advised before any exploration on water. See a list of paddling instruction

    locations at www.coastandkayak.com

    A full moon paddle to Whitesand Cove on Flores Island.

    Contact Us:

    The First Word

  • SPRING 2012 COAST&KAYAK MAgAzine 5

  • 6 COAST&KAYAK MAgAzine SPRING 2012

    News

    PassINGs u Eric soaresKayaker, author, active blogger and one

    of the founders of the Tsunami Rangers, Eric Soares passed away Feb. 1 in hospital while awaiting surgery to correct injuries from a bad skiing fall at Lake Tahoe.

    Eric Soares was an ardent pioneer kayaker, exploring the rough coastal waters of northern California and southern Oregon as early as 1983. He and Jim Kakuk founded the Tsunami Rangers in 1985 as a social group leading the way in surf, cave and rock garden kayaking.

    Eric was also a contributor to Coast&Kayak Magazine, writing the Summer 2009 cover article The Tao of Kayaking. He was author of Confessions of a Wave Warrior, a look back at the history and antics of the Rangers. His blog entries can still be read at the Tsunami Rangers website. u www.tsunamirangers.com

    NEW RaCE u Paddle the EdgeIf the Round Bowen Challenge and Alert

    Bay 360 has caught your interest for the mix of

    social and racing skills, add Paddle the Edge to the agenda.

    The new race will be held June 11 in Ucluelet Harbour, the day after the Edge to Edge Marathon from Ucluelet to Tofino.

    The Paddle the Edge will be a three-hour race in sheltered waters designed for intermediate to expert paddlers. For more event listings visit coastandkayak.com.u info@uclueletinfo.com

    CaNCELLED u PaddlefestAdd Vancouver Island Paddlefest to the list

    of kayak events cancelled on the West Coast in the past few years.

    The Vancouver Island Paddlefest announced a one-year hi

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