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  • www.newberryobserver.com March 9, 2011 Newberry, S.C. 100% recycled

    newsprint 50¢ Newberry County’s Hometown Newspaper

    Visit www.newberryobserver.com for • archives • recipes • features • e-edition • polls • weather • gas prices Good Day, Novis Hunter. Thank You for Subscribing.

    Wed nes

    day

    CONTACT US: Phone 276-0625 • Fax 276-1517 • www.newberryobserver.com

    SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

    Mayor Senn welcomes Summit gatherers to Newberry � Natalie Netzel and Cindy Pitts Staff Writers

    Mayor Foster Senn en- courages Newberry county to “put today’s ideas into action” for a prosperous economic fu- ture.

    The morning began with registration and socializa- tion at the annual South Carolina Rural Summit on Monday.

    Newberry’s Mayor Senn brought to the podium a brief summary of New- berry County and visions and collaborations for the county’s future.

    The Opera House, econ- omy and the College all were made mention of in Senn’s speech.

    Senn did say that unem- ployment is too high in the county and hopes that these rates will change in the future.

    He also spoke of interac- tiveness with Newberry College and how the city needs to use what we have, which would be the college.

    In fact, underway will come the remodeling of the last standing textile mill in Newberry.

    The old mill will become part dormitory for college students and apartments on the other side.

    The project has no set date yet.

    Senn closed his speech

    � Cindy Pitts Staff Writer

    Governor Nikki Haley prom- ised to bring business to rural areas during a stop today at the Rural Summit at the Firehouse Conference Center in Newberry.

    Haley spoke to the sold out crowd saying when she thinks of rural areas she thinks of home. The Governor added that the rural area is one of the great parts of the state.

    “We’re going to change the face of rural South Carolina,” Haley said. “It is now going to become those lucky little gems that people didn’t know we had because we’re going to shine a light on it.”

    While she admits there are challenges to be faced to bring business and industry to rural communities that there are also

    benefits. Those benefits include the idea

    of companies being a big fish in a small pond and becoming the heart and soul of the town.

    She added companies see that in rural areas people are “not too busy for a neighbor to help a neighbor.”

    Haley used Newberry as an ex- ample of an area focusing on its beauty and told the crowd that town must be pretty to attract new industry.

    “When they come to your rural area, it has to be a pretty place. They love the fact that it has that small-town charm,” she said. For towns that don’t have that, she said much of it could be done with volunteer work: “Let’s make the town pretty.”

    WELCOME — District 40 Representative Walt McLeod welcomes Governor Nikki Haley to the Firehouse Conference Center Monday. — Staff photos by Cindy Pitts

    Governor promotes economic development in Newberry

    AN ORCHID BY ANY OTHER NAME — Carter and Holmes President Mac Holmes, right, honors Governor Nikki Haley by naming an orchid after her. The plants will be flowering in a couple of years at the Newberry greenhouse.� See SUMMIT, page 10 � See GOVERNOR, page 10

    � Natalie Netzel Staff Writer

    Jeffrey Eargle knows how to keep a secret.

    The Mid-Carolina High history teacher re- ceived a phone call Feb. 25 at around 6 in the evening from S.C. Super-

    intendent of Eduation Dr. Mick Zais.

    Eargle is one of five fi- nalists vying for the state’s annual Teacher of the Year competition.

    “Dr. Zais called and

    QUIZ TIME - Mid-Carolina High history teacher, Jeffrey Eargle, administers a quiz after a brief lecture on prohibition to one of his U.S. History classes.— Staff photo by Natalie Netzel

    Eargle ‘makes history come alive’ Jeffrey Eargle finalist in Teacher of Year campaign

    � See TEACHER, page 7

    LENT IS HERE IMPOSITION OF ASHES — Every year during Ash Wednesday, pastors put ashes on peopleʼs foreheads as a reminder of Jesus Christʼs death and also to welcome Lent. Ash Wednesday is dated back to the sixth century and any- one may come to any church service. Above, at the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Newberry, interim Pastor, David Seymour, imposes ashes on a few people. From left to right are volunteer Kay Porter, Administrative Assistant Mary Williams and Church Sexton Bill Brown. — Staff Photo by Natalie Netzel. FAT TUESDAY — At right, Ben Dukes flips pancakes at Epting United Methodist Church last night as his many churches aroudn the county began to prepare for the Lent season. — Staff Photo by Cindy Pitts.

    new030911.qxp:22 inch FINAL Quark 3/9/11 11:17 AM Page 1

    Frid ay

    $1 www.newberryobserver.com March 9, 2011 Newberry, S.C.

    100% recycled newsprint

    50¢ Newberry County’s Hometown Newspaper

    Visit www.newberryobserver.com for • archives • recipes • features • e-edition • polls • weather • gas prices Good Day, Novis Hunter. Thank You for Subscribing.

    Wed nes

    day

    CONTACT US: Phone 276-0625 • Fax 276-1517 • www.newberryobserver.com

    SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

    Mayor Senn welcomes Summit gatherers to Newberry � Natalie Netzel and Cindy Pitts Staff Writers

    Mayor Foster Senn en- courages Newberry county to “put today’s ideas into action” for a prosperous economic fu- ture.

    The morning began with registration and socializa- tion at the annual South Carolina Rural Summit on Monday.

    Newberry’s Mayor Senn brought to the podium a brief summary of New- berry County and visions and collaborations for the county’s future.

    The Opera House, econ- omy and the College all were made mention of in Senn’s speech.

    Senn did say that unem- ployment is too high in the county and hopes that these rates will change in the future.

    He also spoke of interac- tiveness with Newberry College and how the city needs to use what we have, which would be the college.

    In fact, underway will come the remodeling of the last standing textile mill in Newberry.

    The old mill will become part dormitory for college students and apartments on the other side.

    The project has no set date yet.

    Senn closed his speech

    � Cindy Pitts Staff Writer

    Governor Nikki Haley prom- ised to bring business to rural areas during a stop today at the Rural Summit at the Firehouse Conference Center in Newberry.

    Haley spoke to the sold out crowd saying when she thinks of rural areas she thinks of home. The Governor added that the rural area is one of the great parts of the state.

    “We’re going to change the face of rural South Carolina,” Haley said. “It is now going to become those lucky little gems that people didn’t know we had because we’re going to shine a light on it.”

    While she admits there are challenges to be faced to bring business and industry to rural communities that there are also

    benefits. Those benefits include the idea

    of companies being a big fish in a small pond and becoming the heart and soul of the town.

    She added companies see that in rural areas people are “not too busy for a neighbor to help a neighbor.”

    Haley used Newberry as an ex- ample of an area focusing on its beauty and told the crowd that town must be pretty to attract new industry.

    “When they come to your rural area, it has to be a pretty place. They love the fact that it has that small-town charm,” she said. For towns that don’t have that, she said much of it could be done with volunteer work: “Let’s make the town pretty.”

    WELCOME — District 40 Representative Walt McLeod welcomes Governor Nikki Haley to the Firehouse Conference Center Monday. — Staff photos by Cindy Pitts

    Governor promotes economic development in Newberry

    AN ORCHID BY ANY OTHER NAME — Carter and Holmes President Mac Holmes, right, honors Governor Nikki Haley by naming an orchid after her. The plants will be flowering in a couple of years at the Newberry greenhouse.� See SUMMIT, page 10 � See GOVERNOR, page 10

    � Natalie Netzel Staff Writer

    Jeffrey Eargle knows how to keep a secret.

    The Mid-Carolina High history teacher re- ceived a phone call Feb. 25 at around 6 in the evening from S.C. Super-

    intendent of Eduation Dr. Mick Zais.

    Eargle is one of five fi- nalists vying for the state’s annual Teacher of the Year competition.

    “Dr. Zais called and

    QUIZ TIME - Mid-Carolina High history teacher, Jeffrey Eargle, administers a quiz after a brief lecture on prohibition to one of his U.S. History classes.— Staff photo by Natalie Netzel

    Eargle ‘makes history come alive’ Jeffrey Eargle finalist in Teacher of Year campaign

    � See TEACHER, page 7

    LENT IS HERE IMPOSITION OF ASHES — Every year during Ash Wednesday, pastors put ashes on peopleʼs foreheads as a reminder of Jesus Christʼs death and also to welcome Lent. Ash Wednesday is dated back to the sixth century and any- one may come to any church service. Above, at the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Newberry, interim Pastor, David Seymour, imposes ashes on a few people. From left to right are volunteer Kay Porter, Administrative Assistant Mary Williams and Church Sexton Bill Brown. — Staff Photo by Natalie Netzel. FAT TUESDAY — At right, Ben Dukes flips pancakes at Epting United Methodist Church last night as his many churches aroudn the county began to prepare for the Lent season. —