gardening sheets-attractive annuals-2013

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  • Bigelow Coreopsis Coreopsis bigelovii (kor-ee-OP-sis big-el-OH-vee-eye )

    Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

    Native to: Desert mountains and foothills of California (Mojave, Colorado and Sonoran Deserts) and Santa Monica Mtns.; in open woodlands, grasslands, deserts, dry gravelly hillsides in many plant

    communities including creosote bush scrub, joshua tree woodland, chaparral, pinyon-juniper woodland to about 5000'.

    Growth characteristics: annual wildflower mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 1-2 ft. Annual wildflower with many flowering stems. Leaves mostly in basal rosette, often so finely divided

    as to appear linear. Color medium green to gray-green (depending on water/light).

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring generally Mar-May in western L.A. county. Flowers in a sunflower head typical for Coreopsis species. Ray and disk flowers both a golden yellow. This plant is really showy in bloom looks like a garden variety of Coreopsis.

    Uses in the garden: Most often used in desert-themed gardens but adaptable to many types of flower gardens. Nice along walkways. Good for attracting pollinators to vegetable garden. Flowers can be used as cut flowers. Desert-dwelling CA natives used the leaves of this plant

    extensively as a raw and cooked vegetable. Nice choice for containers.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native coreopsis.

    Attracts: Excellent bird and pollinator habitat: provides nectar, seeds for food.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to light shade.

    Soil Most local soils and pH; likes a well-drained soil but OK with others.

    Water Needs good winter/spring water; taper off water at end of bloom season.

    Fertilizer None needed but wont kill it.

    Other Use inorganic (gravel) mulch or none at all.

    Management: Easy to grow. Collect seeds or let re-seed naturally. Remove dead plants after seeding if desired.

    Propagation: from seed: no pre-treatment; sow in later fall/winter just before a rain storm.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 5, 10, 16 4/4/13 Project SOUND

  • *Wild Canterbury-bells Phacelia minor (fa-SEEL-ee-a MI-nor )

    Family: Hydrophyllaceae (Waterleaf Family)

    Native to: Drier foothills of Southern California. Locally in the Santa Monica Mtns, San Gabriels, Verdugo Hills, Griffith Park; dry, disturbed or recently burned areas below 5000 ft. in Coastal Sage

    Scrub and Chaparral.

    Growth characteristics: annual wildflower mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: 1-2 ft. Upright annual from a dense basal rosette of rounded, tooth and crinkled leaves on long petioles

    (leaf stems). Foliage looks somewhat like Heuchera. Foliage covered by stiff, glandular hairs (may cause contact dermatitis).

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring usually between March & June. Flowers are uniformly blue-purple, broadly tubular in shape and clustered along a few upright stems. Flowers large for Phacelia species up to 1 inch and a deep color making them very attractive.

    Uses in the garden: Most often used as a flowering annual in cottage gardens, wildflower gardens or around Chaparral & CSS shrubs. Excellent choice as habitat plant. Very showy when massed behind

    shorter wildflowers. Good choice for containers. Pair with white or yellow/orange flowering natives.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native Canterbury Bells.

    Attracts: Excellent habitat plant: pollinators, butterflies love the nectar; birds eat seeds.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun.

    Soil Likes well-drained soil; any local pH.

    Water Needs good winter/spring rain; taper off as blooming ceases.

    Fertilizer Not needed but wouldnt hurt.

    Other Best with inorganic (gravel) mulch or none.

    Management: Plants will re-seed if happy. Wear gloves when handling to prevent rash.

    Propagation: from seed: germination slightly increased with smoke extracts.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 8, 10, 13, 16 4/2/13 * CA native plant but not native to Western L.A. county Project SOUND

  • * Desert (California) Bluebells Phacelia campanularia (fuh-SEE-lee-uh kam-pan-yoo-LAR-ee-uh )

    Family: Hydrophyllaceae (Waterleaf Family)

    Native to: Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of S. California; open, dry, sandy places below 4000 ft.

    Growth characteristics: annual wildflower mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: < 1 ft. Attractive annual wildflower with dark green foliage. Plant is compact, stiff, usually erect. Leaves

    are heart-shaped, toothed, fuzzy and edged in red. Stems are red-green. Neat looking, pretty.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring anytime from March to May in our area. Flowers are in loose clusters on stalks. Flowers are intense blue-purple, bell-shaped, extremely attractive. Anthers are

    bright yellow. This plant has long been planted in gardens because of its lovely flowers.

    Uses in the garden: Used wherever blue annual wildflowers are desired. Nice addition to mixed wildflower gardens and prairies. Pretty along walks and at fronts of beds or tucked in around drought tolerant shrubs. Lovely massed or in containers. Good for habitat gardens.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native Blue Bells.

    Attracts: Excellent habitat plant. Flowers attract an array of pollinators including butterflies and bees; birds love the seeds.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to light shade.

    Soil Well-drained sandy soils best, but others OK; any local pH.

    Water Needs good winter-spring water; taper off after flowering to Zone 1

    Fertilizer OK with light fertilizer, but not really needed

    Other

    Management: Treat like other annual wildflowers. May need to re-seed each year in the fall. Leaf hairs may cause mild skin allergy in some wear gloves.

    Propagation: from seed: easy sow in place right before a rainstorm for best results.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 14, 16 6/23/10 * CA native plant but not native to Western L.A. county Project SOUND

  • * Mojave Pincushion Chaenactis xantiana (kee-NAK-tus zan-tee-AY-na )

    Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

    Native to: Deserts & desert hills/mountains of CA, OR, NV & AZ. Locally in Mojave Deserts & desert side of San Gabriels; on sandy slopes in Chaparral, Pinyon-Juniper Woodland, Sagebrush Scrub,

    between 1500 and 7000 feet.

    Growth characteristics: annual wildflower mature height: 1-2 ft. mature width: < 1 ft. Erect annual wildflower with one or many stems. Basal leaves somewhat succulent; usually wither away before/during flowering. Foliage has a bright- to gray-green foliage depending on light,

    water. Gray color is due to waxy white scales. Plant dies after setting seeds.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms spring to early summer, usually Mar-Jun. Tiny pale-pink to white flowers in dense, flat heads resembling a pincushion. There may be many flowering heads per plant in the

    garden setting. Very delicate and old-fashioned appearance.

    Uses in the garden: Most often used in desert-themed gardens. Appropriate for wildflower gardens. Good choice for pollinator gardens. Does well in containers consider pairing with other annuals that like sandy soils like Phacelia campanularia, Malacothrix glabrata and other desert annuals.

    Sensible substitute for: Non-native white-flowered wildflowers.

    Attracts: Good habitat plant: provides nectar for pollinators and seeds for birds, small wildlife.

    Requirements:

    Element Requirement

    Sun Full sun to part-shade.

    Soil Well-drained; sandy soils are natural. Any local pH.

    Water Needs good winter/spring water then taper off when begins to bloom.

    Fertilizer None needed.

    Other Inorganic mulch (gravel) only; fine with no mulch.

    Management: Fairly easy to grow from seed. Collect seeds or let self-sow in summer/fall.

    Propagation: from seed: Sow in place in containers or ground late fall/winter.

    Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 13 4/2/13 * CA native plant but not native to Western L.A. county Project SOUND

  • * Desert Dandelion Malacothrix glabrata (ma-la-KOH-thrix gla-BRAY-ta)

    Family: Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

    Native to: Mojave and Sonoran Desert occasionally in other inland areas from Santa Barabara to San Diego counties. Also in deserts of ID, OR, UT and N. Mexico; coarse soils in open areas or

    among shrubs in desert areas, Creosote Bush Scrub, Joshua Tree Woodland, Shadscale Scrub between 0 and 6000 feet .

    Growth characteristics: annual wildflower mature height: up to 2 ft. mature width: 1-2 ft. Fast-growing annual wildflower that somewhat resembles a dandelion. Basal leaves have narrow,

    sometimes threadlike lobes which are unique to the species.

    Blooms/fruits: Blooms in spring depending on rains sometime between March & June. In the wilds, only blooms in wet years. Flowers are dandelion-like with yellow or white r

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