hazard communication program (hazcom) osha 1910.1200 presented by: fred holmes e tech environmental...

Download Hazard Communication Program (HAZCOM) OSHA 1910.1200 Presented By: Fred Holmes e Tech Environmental & Safety Solutions, Inc

Post on 15-Jan-2016

215 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Hazard CommunicationProgram(HAZCOM)OSHA 1910.1200Presented By: Fred HolmeseTech Environmental & Safety Solutions, Inc.

  • Training ObjectivesAt the end of this class, students are expected to:Have a better understanding of HAZCOM.Understand labels and warnings systems.Understand the use of MSDSs.Have a basic understanding of protective measures.

  • HAZCOM StandardAlso known as Right-To-Know.Was created as a method to convey chemical hazards to:EmployeesVisitorsContractorsEmergency Responders

  • HAZCOM Standard cont. Chemical manufacturers must:Determine the hazards of chemicals they produceLabel all containersMake and provide material safety data sheets (MSDSs)

  • HAZCOM Standard cont. Employers must:Create and maintain a written program on chemical hazardsList hazardous chemicals that they useMaintain chemical records 30+ yearsProvide MSDSs to all affected personnelTrain employees about the standard, chemicals in their workplace, how to recognize, understand and use labels and MSDSs and associated safe procedures

  • HAZCOM Standard cont. Employees must:Read labels and MSDSsFollow all applicable instructions and warningsIdentify hazards before starting a job and take appropriate precautionsParticipate in training

  • Chemical HazardsHazards are broken down into two categories:Physical Hazards:FlammableExplosiveReactiveHealth HazardsCorrosiveToxic

  • Physical HazardsFlammable chemicals are those chemicals that can readily burn when exposed to extreme heat or flameExamples include:Crude OilCondensatePaint ThinnersParts CleanersWD 40

  • Physical Hazards cont. Explosive hazards are those chemicals that may explode when exposed to shock, heat or excessive pressure.Examples include:Compressed Gas CylindersAerosol Cans

  • Physical Hazards cont. Reactive chemicals are those that react to another substance and may generate heat or give off toxic vapors.Examples include:Mixing bleach and ammoniaMixing acids with caustics

  • Health HazardsCorrosive: Are those chemicals that may cause damage to the body.Damage can range from minor irritation to destruction of tissue or organs.Examples include:Sulfuric, Hydrochloric and Nitric acids Many Household Cleaners

  • Health Hazards cont. Toxic: Are those chemicals that may penetrate the skin, be ingested or inhaled resulting in illness or damage to tissue and organs.Examples include:PesticidesHerbicides

  • Health Hazards Routes of EntryContact (Skin and Eye)InhalationIngestion (Swallowing)Penetration (Absorbing through the Skin or by Injection)

  • Health Hazard ExposuresAre divided into two main groupings based upon dose.Acute: Short-term effects that disappear when you are no longer exposed to the chemical.RashesBurnsChronic: Long-term effects that develop over prolonged exposureLung DamageLiver Damage

  • Labels and WarningsAre critical to your safetyHave similar information but may appear differentlyRead the label before using any chemical

  • NFPA LabelsNFPA (National Fire Protection Association)Developed a standardized label for conveying chemical hazards NFPA 704Uses colors to identify the hazard areaUses numbers to rank the hazard

  • NFPA Labels cont. Scale: 0 (Minimal or No Hazard) to 4 (Extreme Hazard)Number will be placed in the center of each colorException: White which is used for special informationHEALTHFIREREACTIVITY

  • Multiple Information LabelsUse HMIS or NFPA FormatGive additional information such as the generic name, personal protective equipment and CAS numbers.

  • DOT LabelsUse symbols numbers and colors to convey hazardsNumbers are hazard class numbers, not NFPA and correspond to the symbol for the type or hazard

  • DOT Labels cont. ColorHazardSymbolRedFlammable liquid or gasFlameYellowOxygen or OxidizerFlame circled at baseOrangeExplosiveExplosionGreenCompressed GasGas cylinderBlueDangerous When WetW with a slashBlack & WhiteCorrosiveDrops eating a hole in a persons hand

  • Hazardous WasteMake sure that the container is the correct one that you are dumping waste intoNever mix wastes that are not compatibleMake sure that all information is filled out before affixing the label

  • Labels and WarningsMust be adhered toAny damaged or illegible hazard label must be immediately replacedIf you are not sure of the hazards associated with the chemicals you are using, ask your immediate supervisor before using them

  • MSDSAre created by the chemical manufacturerMust accompany the initial shipmentMust be sent anytime the hazards or formulation changeMust be maintained in a chemical inventory for 30+ years

  • MSDS InformationAt a Minimum, a MSDS must contain:NOTE: MSDS is considered the best source for first aid information

  • MSDS StorageMSDS for chemicals used by each facility are to be maintained at a place where they can be readily accessed by individuals using the chemicals.

  • MSDS ProtocolsAll chemicals brought into a facility should be evaluated by the area safety representative and supervisor.The hazards of the chemicals should be conveyed to the individuals using or exposed to the chemicals prior to use.This includes:SamplesStore Purchases

  • StorageWhen not in use, all hazardous chemicals should be stored in designated chemical lockers.Chemicals must be stored by compatibility in a neat and orderly fashion.An inventory, listing the identity of the chemicals must be maintained on the locker.

  • Spills and LeaksAny leaks observed are to be immediately reported and stopped.All spills are to be immediately cleaned up and the resulting waste properly disposed.Only trained personnel should attempt to cleanup spills.

  • Spills and Leaks cont. If you have any doubt about how to correctly clean up the spill, or do not know what it is, contact your immediate supervisor right away.

    Never Attempt to clean up a spill before identifying the product and its associated hazards

  • Personal Protective EquipmentAlways wear the appropriate type of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when handling any chemical.If you are not sure of the correct PPE to use, contact you supervisor and review the MSDS before handling the chemical.

  • ContractorsContractors are required to provide an MSDS for any chemical they bring into the facility.Chemicals used by contractors should be evaluated and the hazards conveyed to exposed individuals prior to use.

  • SummaryIdentify chemical hazards by reading the labels and MSDSs.Follow all warnings and instructions for use and handling.Use the correct PPE.Practice safe, sensible work habits.Know correct emergency procedures.

  • Summary

    If you do not know what it is or how its supposed to be used.

    ASK!!!

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

    Hazard Communication Speakers Notes:

Recommended

View more >