Reflective Assessments

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Reflective Assessments. Value-Added Reports. Diagnostic Reports the whiskers. Diagnostic Reports Looking for Patterns. School Diagnostic Shed Pattern. School Diagnostic Reverse Shed Pattern. School Diagnostic Tent Pattern. School Diagnostic V Pattern. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<p>Reflective Assessments</p> <p>Reflective AssessmentsParticipants should go to the EVAAS wiki. Under the agenda section have users click on the reflective assessments link. Files to support this portion of the presentation can be found there.1Value-Added Reports</p> <p>Use to evaluate the overall effectiveness of a school on student progress. Compares each school to the average school in the state. Comparisons are made for each subject tested in the given year and indicate how a school influences student progress in those subjects.</p> <p>Has to be more than -1.8 to be below; more than 2 standard errors to be above.</p> <p>(Provide definition of value-added.)</p> <p>Some things to note are that like students are in a subgroup.Show how to read the report. Explain that 0 is the equivalent of one year of growth. Looking at the bottom of the page at the green, yellow, and red descriptors. Explain that there is a blue descriptor when there is not enough data to make a distinction. </p> <p>If your LEA uses DIBELS, the reports have similarities in design with the colors. </p> <p>Have the participants look at the data and talk about how you can see here.Look at trends in the same grade.Look at the students that moved from 6th grade in 2011 to 7th grade in 2012 and to 8th grade in 2012. Talk about what you can take a way from this report.2Diagnostic Reports the whiskers</p> <p>In this diagram, the two bars have the same height, but the whiskers extend to different lengths. On the left, the whiskers lie completely below the green line, so the group represented by the bar made less than average progress (). On the right, the whiskers contain the green line, so the group represented by the bar made average progress (-). The red whisker represents the confidence interval due to the standard error for the mean. There is a high probability that the actual mean falls somewhere within the Whiskers. The size of the confidence interval is determined by the sample size. The larger number of data points the smaller the standard error, smaller the whisker, and therefore the confidence interval. If the whisker passes over the green line (reference line),the data shows expected growth since there is a chance the mean is actually on the other side of the green line. It is not certain that the teacher is exclusively above or below the reference line, if the whisker crosses the green reference line. 3Diagnostic Reports Looking for Patterns</p> <p>In this school, some subgroups of students are not making sufficient gain. Students in the lowest subgroups have not made sufficient progress while high achieving students are making excellent gain. The lack of appropriate progress among low achieving students is a pattern that has been repeated from previous years, indicating a persistent lack of effectiveness with lower achieving students.</p> <p>This is one of the most intriguing components of EVAAS.</p> <p>Common Diagnostic Patterns activity</p> <p>*Pattern Slides are on wiki4School DiagnosticShed Pattern</p> <p>In this example, the lowest achieving students are making sufficient progress. Students at an average achievement level are making expected progress.However, the highest achieving students appear to be losing ground. Teachers and administrators will want to find ways to create more progress opportunities for high achieving students. </p> <p>5School DiagnosticReverse Shed Pattern</p> <p>In this example, high achieving students are making excellent progress.Students who are average in achievement also are making sufficient progress. In contrast, the lowest achieving students are not making as much progress as they should. A pattern like this one will widen the achievement gap. Teachers and administrators should consider how to help lower achieving students gain more ground. 6School DiagnosticTent Pattern</p> <p>In this example, the students in the middle of the achievement distribution are making sufficient progress, but both lower achieving and higher achieving students are falling behind their peers.In this case, teachers and administrators will want to consider both how to support low-achieving students and how to challenge high-achieving students.</p> <p>7School DiagnosticV Pattern</p> <p>In this example, the opposite of the Tent Pattern, only the lowest and the highest achieving students are making good progress. Students in between have not had enough opportunities for academic growth.</p> <p>8School DiagnosticOpportunity Gap Pattern</p> <p>In this example, the students in every achievement group are making sufficient progress in the most recent year, except for the second group. Teachers and administrators will want to consider how to adjust the classroom instruction to meet these students needs. In addition, what approaches that are successful with the lowest achieving students could be expanded to include students in the second achievement group?</p> <p>9What would an ideal pattern on a Diagnostic Report look like for closing the achievement gap?</p> <p>Have participants draw an ideal pattern</p> <p>On index card, make a box with 1-5 at bottom. Draw the ideal diagnostic report; discuss</p> <p>Ideal to narrow the achievement gap: 1 is highest, descending to 5</p> <p>Common Diagnostic Patterns activity look at common patterns; taking turns, explain the pattern to your partner10Diagnostic Reports Desirable Pattern</p> <p>Print and handout this slide for the next activity on drawing a desirable pattern or have participants use plain paper. 11Diagnostic Report Desirable Pattern</p> <p>In this example, all bars above the green line indicating the district was highly effective with students in all achievement groups. Additionally, students in the lowest quintile made more progress than students in the other quintiles. Effectively, these students are starting to catch up with their peers; the gap is closing because they are increasing their performance more than a years worth of growth. 12Diagnostic &amp; Performance Diagnostic Reports (Part 2)Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>Place activity instructions on the wiki.</p> <p>Use the Value-Added and Diagnostic reports to complete the table. Navigate to a Value-Added Report and enter the Tested Subject/Grade name in the Overview of School Effectiveness table below. Locate the color for the most recent year. If the color is RED, place an X in the Overall Results column. Use a separate row for each grade for EOG reporting.If your school tests in both EOG and EOC subjects, record the EOG subjects and grades and then choose EOC from the Tests tab.For each test, subject, and/or grade, note the color for the most recent year. If the color is RED, place an X in the Overall Results column. </p> <p>14Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>Drill down to the Diagnostic Report for each Tested Subject/Grade. Locate the blue bars on the graph for each of the 5 Achievement Groups. Also note the red whiskers. For any blue bars above the green line (where the whiskers are also completely above), place an up arrow () in the appropriate cell of the Overview of School Effectiveness table. For any blue bars below the green line (where the whiskers are also completely below), place a down arrow () in the table. For any blue bars at or near the green line (the whiskers cross the green line), place a horizontal dash () in the table. 15Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>These documents will be uploaded to the wikiAn extra set of sample data has been loaded on the wiki if participants cant log into EVAAS 16Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>These documents will be uploaded to the wiki17Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>These documents will be uploaded to the wiki</p> <p>18Overview of School Effects (sample data)</p> <p>Double check for correct answers19</p> <p>1. Go to the websitewww.ncdpi.sas.comCopyright 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.20</p> <p>1. Go to the website ncdpi.sas.comCopyright 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.21</p> <p>1. Go to ncdpi.sas.com2. BOOKMARK IT!3. Secure &amp; ConvenientOnline LoginCopyright 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.22Do you see this? </p> <p>Then Sit Tight!</p> <p>Copyright 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.23Overview of School EffectsIts Your Turn!Find the blank table.</p> <p>Do this by yourself.Using sample dataFill in your table.</p> <p>Participants will examine sample data located on wiki site to complete this activity.Locate the blue bars on the graph for each of the 5 Achievement Groups. Also note the red whiskers. For any blue bars above the green line (where the whiskers are also completely above), place an up arrow () in the appropriate cell of the Overview of School Effectiveness table. For any blue bars below the green line (where the whiskers are also completely below), place a down arrow () in the table. For any blue bars at or near the green line (the whiskers cross the green line), place a horizontal dash () in the table. </p> <p>24Overview of School EffectsWhat did you find?Interesting PatternsInsightsAreas of ConcernAreas of CelebrationThis is a sharing activity Think-Pair-Share, TTP, Tea Party, etc.25</p> <p>1. Go to the website ncdpi.sas.comLog back in.Copyright 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.26</p> <p>Finding Your Patterns</p> <p>Have participants find their school or a school in their district.Identify the patterns for your subjects and grade levelsPatterns and explanations can be located on the wiki in the Reflective Assessments portion of the agenda.</p> <p>27Interpreting Your Results</p> <p>Complete the Interpreting Your Results downloadable take home form on the Wiki.Have participants go to the Reflective Assessments section of the wiki and download the Interpreting Your Results documents. </p> <p>28Student Pattern ReportThis report is a customized Diagnostic report where you can examine progress for groups of students of your choice. It is only available from the school level and only to users w/access to student reports.</p> <p>29Student Patterns Report</p> <p>Key points to remember:</p> <p>The report shows growth for the lowest, middle, and highest achieving students within the chosen group. The report can be used to explore the progress of students with similar educational opportunities. Like all diagnostic reports, this report is for diagnostic purposes only.A minimum of 15 students is needed to create a Student Pattern Report.</p> <p>Enables you to see how effective the school has been with lowest, middle and highest achieveing students at least 15 w/predicted and observed scores.30Student Pattern Report</p> <p>Take a look at this data, what do you notice? What are your thoughts?Higher students did better than expected. Our ML did not do as well as predictedThe groups l, m, h placed in 3rds based on their predicted scores and where they fall in the distributionTeacher self reflection how effective were you in teaching based on their predicted score. 31Student Pattern Report</p> <p>This teacher may have had 100% proficiency but we are looking at growth. This teacher did not contribute to the students learning.Students listed by name by subgroups, so that you can identify which group each child falls in. Look at individual students to see if we note any patterns. We can also look at race, gender, and see if some teachers are teaching better to a certain sub-population.</p> <p>32</p> <p>Key QuestionsWe need to ask some key questions to find out why some students had better growth than others.We could even look at each subgroup individually and think about what contributes to negative and positive growth in the classroom.</p> <p>33Student Pattern Report Key Questions</p> <p>Different experience?Different strategies?Different needs?Number of hours? In this case we are comparing students in the same sub-group, the group that is considered the H group. Some key questions we might want to ask include:After asking these questions we find that in this particular report the hours that a student participated in a program made positive difference in growth.At this point we looked at number of hours so we ran another report of all 31 students to see if it had a large effect on student growth. We looked at all students that had over 40 hours of enrichment/remediation etc</p> <p>34Student Pattern Report Key Questions</p> <p>Different experience?Different strategies?Different needs?Number of hours? Rerun the report with new criteria.YES!Student Pattern Report Next Steps</p> <p>16 Students who attended for 40+ hoursAll 31 Students in the ProgramThe 16 students that had over 40 hours in a program showed far greater growth than their counter parts that did not participate in the program. The 15 that didnt participate the 40+ really negatively effected the overall growth. If you run a report and this is your result think the next step to figure out what the number actually mean. This shows the program did what you wanted.36</p> <p>Less Informed Conclusion: We need to change the selection criteria for this program.More Informed Conclusion: We need to adjust the recommended hours for participants.37Activity: Interpreting your schools results</p> <p>1. What patterns did you identify? Study the diagnostic results for a single subject/grade. Which quintiles, if any, made appropriate progress? (Consider for each achievement group whether or not average progress is enough.)</p> <p>Which quintiles, if any, are losing ground? </p> <p>Study the results for each academic discipline. That is, study all the results for math, then all the results for reading, etc. Identify any discipline-wide successes or deficiencies. Which disciplines, if any, are showing appropriate progress across quintiles? What school-wide programs or practices could explain their success?</p> <p>Which disciplines, if any, are losing ground across quintiles?</p> <p>Study the results for each quintile, across subjects/disciplines. Which quintiles, if any, are being served well across multiple subjects/disciplines?</p> <p>Which quintiles, if any, are being underserved across multiple subjects/disciplines?</p> <p>For each quintile thats losing ground, go back to the reporting to determine the number and percent of students being underserved. (This information is found in the diagnostic table below the graph and is displayed in a pie chart when you click on Nr of Students.) The numbers in each quintile (achievement group) may vary from one report to another.</p>