solano tempest

of 12/12
FAIRFIELD, CALIF. www.solanotempest.net MORE ONLINE AT WWW.SOLANOTEMPEST.NET - Bonus photos of Cinco de Mayo and local band El Loma Prieta “Change is not always growth, but growth is often rooted in change.” -R.A. Salvatore QUOTE OF THE WEEK 8SEE CINCO DE MAYO, PAGE 2 COFFEE BREAK ON 4 VOL. 28, NO. 14 MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012 THE VOICE OF SOLANO COLLEGE THE TEMPEST Is college monopolizing your life? 4 Practice makes perfect: 6 Softball team takes division champs again SPORTS ON 10 3 El Loma Prieta rocks Band is a fusion of reggae, rock and progressive metal A&E ON 8 Steamroller smackdown!6 SCC artists take printmaking to Dixon May Fair A&E ON 9 Voting: Use it or lose it 6 Exercise your right to vote OPINION ON 5 By Sharman Bruni Editor-in-Chief [email protected] If the beautiful weather was a portent of the day ahead, the Cinco de Mayo festivities at Solano Com- munity College certainly proved a success. With colorful costumes and vibrant smiles, danc- ers from Napa Valley’s Ballet Folklorico brightened the event, the girls twirling their dresses and the boys tapping their heels to the Mexican folk music playing from the loudspeakers. “It makes me proud as a student, it makes me proud of being a Mexican to be here celebrating Cinco de Mayo with you guys,” said Jose Montes, represent- ing the student government on campus. Other members of the student government were present, including Geff Freire, Davis Martinez and Daniel Schmitgal. Schmitgal sported a festive sombre- ro stood at the front of the campus shaking a sign for the event. Employees from the Solano County Library came to promote their “What do you geek?” campaign, along with employees from the Cordelia Fire Department, BabyFirst, Consumer Choice Marketing, and other various booths were present at the event. By Deborah Graham Online Editor [email protected] The second Solano Community Col- lege Education Fair saw community mem- bers and students experiencing a wide array of career degree and certificate programs offered at the college Sunday. The event was interactive fun for all. Students and community members were able to see robots in action, help build an airplane, analyze a crime scene, earn a free typing certificate, have their hair and make-up done, then get a photo. There was an ambulance available to explore, virtual welding, CPR training and more. Some new additions this year included Passport to Prizes. K-12 teachers and stu- dents were encouraged to download these passports, bring them to the event and get each square with the listed course stamped. Winning teachers with the most partici- pants received a $100 gift card and students received a $25 gift card. Another new feature to the fair was a car show. Auto body instructor Dan Ulrich’s buddies dedicated their free time to show off their classic vehicles. “I have been doing cars all my life. I asked my close friends if they could bring their cars out to help out the college, and they did,” Ulrich said. “I am trying to get the program accredited. It is helpful when people see the work these students do.” Professor Tom Woodbeck from the film and television department said that it was his first time participating at the fair. “This has been so much fun for me.” Woodbeck said. “It is nice to see such a large turnout in support of the college.” Debra Berrett, faculty member and co- chair of the event, said she was pleased with the turnout. “There is so much more going on this year,” Berrett said. “It was heavily marketed towards K-12. I think it was im- portant getting them down here and intro- duced to all the programs. Samantha Schneider, 18, a deaf studies major, said she learned about the fair from her career life plan teacher. She came out to see the programs the college had to offer. “I am glad I came. I wanted to come and see what other opportunities were out there.” The dance group Ballet Folklorico performs at the Cinco de Mayo event on campus. Sharman Bruni/Tempest Career Education Fair draws large crowd A cosmetology student gives a hair demo at the career fair on Sunday, May 6. Deborah Graham/Tempest Cinco de Mayo returns with sun and fun at Solano College

Post on 17-Mar-2016

214 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Our May 9 2012 issue with the amazing community college game

TRANSCRIPT

  • FAIRFIELD, CALIF.www.solanotempest.net

    MORE ONLINE AT WWW.SOLANOTEMPEST.NET - Bonus photos of Cinco de Mayo and local band El Loma Prieta

    Change is not always growth, but growth is often rooted in change.

    -R.A. Salvatore

    QUOTE OF THE WEEK

    8SEE CINCO DE MAYO, PAGE 2

    COFFEE BREAK ON 4

    VOL. 28, NO. 14MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012T H E V O I C E O F S O L A N O C O L L E G E

    THE TEMPEST

    Is college monopolizing your life? 4

    Practice makes perfect: 6

    Softball team takes division

    champs again

    SPORTS ON 10

    3 El Loma Prieta rocks

    Band is a fusion of reggae, rock and progressive metal

    A&E ON 8

    Steamroller smackdown!6

    SCC artists take printmaking to Dixon May Fair

    A&E ON 9

    Voting: Use it or lose it 6

    Exercise your right to vote

    OPINION ON 5

    By Sharman [email protected]

    If the beautiful weather was a portent of the day ahead, the Cinco de Mayo festivities at Solano Com-munity College certainly proved a success.

    With colorful costumes and vibrant smiles, danc-ers from Napa Valleys Ballet Folklorico brightened the event, the girls twirling their dresses and the boys tapping their heels to the Mexican folk music playing from the loudspeakers.

    It makes me proud as a student, it makes me proud of being a Mexican to be here celebrating Cinco de Mayo with you guys, said Jose Montes, represent-ing the student government on campus.

    Other members of the student government were present, including Geff Freire, Davis Martinez and Daniel Schmitgal. Schmitgal sported a festive sombre-ro stood at the front of the campus shaking a sign for the event.

    Employees from the Solano County Library came to promote their What do you geek? campaign, along with employees from the Cordelia Fire Department, BabyFirst, Consumer Choice Marketing, and other various booths were present at the event.

    By Deborah GrahamOnline [email protected]

    The second Solano Community Col-lege Education Fair saw community mem-bers and students experiencing a wide array of career degree and certificate programs offered at the college Sunday.

    The event was interactive fun for all. Students and community members were able to see robots in action, help build an airplane, analyze a crime scene, earn a free typing certificate, have their hair and make-up done, then get a photo. There was an ambulance available to explore, virtual welding, CPR training and more.

    Some new additions this year included Passport to Prizes. K-12 teachers and stu-dents were encouraged to download these passports, bring them to the event and get each square with the listed course stamped. Winning teachers with the most partici-pants received a $100 gift card and students received a $25 gift card.

    Another new feature to the fair was a car show. Auto body instructor Dan Ulrichs buddies dedicated their free time to show

    off their classic vehicles. I have been doing cars all my life. I

    asked my close friends if they could bring their cars out to help out the college, and they did, Ulrich said. I am trying to get the program accredited. It is helpful when people see the work these students do.

    Professor Tom Woodbeck from the film and television department said that it was his first time participating at the fair.

    This has been so much fun for me. Woodbeck said. It is nice to see such a large turnout in support of the college.

    Debra Berrett, faculty member and co-chair of the event, said she was pleased with the turnout. There is so much more going on this year, Berrett said. It was heavily marketed towards K-12. I think it was im-portant getting them down here and intro-duced to all the programs. Samantha Schneider, 18, a deaf studies major, said she learned about the fair from her career life plan teacher. She came out to see the programs the college had to offer. I am glad I came. I wanted to come and see what other opportunities were out there.

    The dance group Ballet Folklorico performs at the Cinco de Mayo event on campus.

    Sharman Bruni/Tempest

    Career Education Fair draws large crowd

    A cosmetology student gives a hair demo at the career fair on Sunday, May 6.

    Deborah Graham/Tempest

    Cinco de Mayo returns with sun and fun at Solano College

  • NEWS2 THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    By John GliddenStaff [email protected]

    The Solano Community College gov-erning board, during its May 2 meeting, announced that the district had reached a settlement with Carey Roth, former vice-president of administrative and business services at Solano College.

    Rosemary Thurston, governing board president, announced that Roth will receive a total of $135,000. The Solano district will have to pay $45,000 with the remaining bal-ance being paid by insurance.

    The Solano Community College Dis-trict is part of SWACC (Statewide Associa-tion of Community Colleges) said Eugene B. Elliot, counsel representing the Solano College District, in an email to The Tem-pest.

    According to the SWACC website, [SWACC] was formed for the purposes of providing the services and other items necessary and appropriate for the establish-ment, operation and maintenance of a joint program for liability and property damage claims against public agencies.

    In addition to the monetary payment, the district will provide a letter of recom-mendation for Roth.

    Mr. Roth has requested a letter setting forth the dates of his employment with the District and a statement setting forth his job duties, said Elliot in the same email.

    Leo Donahue, Roths legal counsel for the case, declined to comment.

    Plaintiff [Roth] disclosed that he be-lieved the Defendant [Solano College] was willfully misrepresenting official govern-ment fiscal documents to present Solano in a false light in order to make it appear that SCCD met the California Community Col-lege Chancellor requirement that SCCD have a minimum reserve balance of five per-cent of operating expenses for unrestricted funds, Roths complaint alleges.

    The suit also states that the failure of SCCD to maintain this reserve balance would result in the Chancellor of the Cali-fornia Community College system declaring Solano fiscally insolvent; which would lead the Chancellor to take over the Solano Dis-trict and then merge Solano with a nearby community college district.

    After being praised for his [Roths] job performance, having saved the SCCD $6 [million when Roth] disclosed to his superi-ors that this information must be addressed, [Roth] was quickly and summarily fired (re-leased from probation), Roths suit alleges.

    A final dismissal has not yet been en-tered in this case. Further comment by the District regarding this matter would thus not be appropriate at this time, said Elliot in the email to The Tempest.

    The governing board, in closed session, voted 5-0 to accept the terms between Roth and the district. Trustees McCaffrey and Honeychurch were not in attendance at the meeting.

    Roth worked at Solano College from Dec. 2009 to June 2010.

    By John GliddenStaff [email protected]

    Kelsey Moran-Richardson, the president of the Associated Students of Solano Col-lege (ASSC) student government, has re-signed.

    The new president of the ASSC student government is Kristine Barruzo.

    Kelsey vacated the president position, and I assume the office of president, said Barruzo to the ASSC student government during their May 1 meeting.

    During the initial weeks of the spring semester, Moran-Richardson, the then-pres-ident of ASSC student government, nomi-nated Barruzo for the office of vice-presi-dent. The ASSC student senate approved the nomination.

    In April, Barruzo resigned from the posi-tion of vice-president to become the ASSC student government health and physical education associate. Associate is akin to a senate position without the ability to make motions or binding votes but associates have an advisory vote.

    To replace Barruzo, Moran-Richardson nominated Naser Baig to be the new ASSC vice-president of the ASSC student govern-ment.

    Baig resigned from his position as aca-demic curriculum senator, to be eligible for the office of vice-president of ASSC student

    government. The ASSC student senate ap-proved his nomination to the office of vice-president.

    The ASSC constitution states that the vice president will assume the position of president if the office is vacated.

    Official ASSC agendas from April 3 to May 1 listed Barruzo as an associate and Baig as the vice-president of ASSC student government.

    I never submitted my letter of resigna-tion, Barruzo said at the May 1 ASSC stu-dent government meeting.

    Last week, The Tempest learned that Moran-Richardson was ineligible for the position of president of ASSC student gov-ernment because she was not enrolled in at least six units at Solano College.

    Article I, section 1 of the ASSC bylaws defines the eligibility requirement of the ASSC president and other executive officers of the ASSC student government, Execu-tive officers shall complete a minimum of six (6) units in each semester that they hold office.

    I have nothing to say, said Moran-Richardson when asked whether she was enrolled in six units at Solano College.

    Mostafa Ghous, Director of Student De-velopment did not respond to emails asking if Moran-Richardson was still holding an of-fice in student government.

    By Deborah GrahamOnline [email protected]

    The door opens and you are greeted with a warm smile. Your records are reviewed, suggestions made and by end of your visit to Brenda Tuckers office you are on a clear path to success. This is what Tucker, coun-selor for Solano Community College, does on a day-to-day basis. She challenges stu-dents to go beyond their own expectations, to aim high.

    Tuckers title goes beyond that of coun-selor. She is one of 16 counselors at SCC. For the past six years her role at SCC has included being a caregiver, psychiatrist, nurturer, activist, and grief counselor. A Berkeley native, she attained her psychol-ogy and educational degrees from Cal State Hayward, U.C. Berkley, Argosy University, San Francisco State and a certificate in orga-nizational development and social behavior through Wright Institute.

    Tucker spent the past 20 years doing motivational speaking tours throughout her community, hosting several radio shows, one of which was a relationship talk show for KDIA AM, which she hosted for two years.

    I was doing all these things but I knew I wanted to go back into academics, Tucker said. I specifically wanted to work with the community college population.

    When Tucker looked into applying for SCC she scaled back her private practice, workshops and seminars. She did several years in many part-time colleges before she came to Solano. Tuckers first year at SCC was as an interim counselor before taking on the role as a permanent counselor. Her other counseling roles at the college includ-ed positions at disability services program, and the Umoja program.

    I came to Dr. Tucker just seeking a business degree. She has encouraged me to go much further with my educational goals. said Tiffany McIntyre-Finley, student and mother of three. She has helped me see my true destiny.

    Due to Tuckers encouragement McIn-tyre-Finley is pursuing a teaching career at the high school level.

    Tucker doesnt see anything special about her way of counseling. She says she feels it is important to allow students the op-portunity to develop a sense of purpose.

    Sometimes, she says, a students pur-pose is to find a purpose. They come here hoping to develop a sense of who they are and who they can become.

    She says she finds her biggest challenges

    can be students who have low reading or writing scores and the college doesnt have enough resources to accommodate them.

    She lauds the counseling departments new drop-in program that allows students to come in to the department and be able to be seen on a first come, first-served basis. She says she sees these things as just the begin-ning of some wonderful changes that are coming to the counseling department

    Erin Vines, director of counseling ser-vices, recognizes Tuckers ability to take stu-dents who either are in a crisis situation or low academic standings and give them the motivation and drive to excel, despite many obstacles that get in their way.

    She has such a positive spirit, and has this uncanny ability to work with a student regarding some challenging situations, Vines said. You can go into her office on a casual conversation and it might become a therapeutic session. It is just who she is though. She has this wonderful intuition.

    SCC Trustee A. Marie Young and President Rosemary Thurston from the SCC govern-ing board were present at the event to show their support.

    Congressman John Garamendi (D-Fairfield) also surprised the audience with a visit.Its a great privilege for me to share this day with all of you and to really pay tribute to

    the extraordinary contributions that the Mexican culture has made in California and to America, Garamendi said.

    Garamendi also made a point of relaying to the audience the importance of voting and participating in the political process.

    All of us here, wherever you happen to be, wherever you happen to live, must begin to participate in the electoral process, Garamendi said.

    He spoke of next years Cinco de Mayo festival as well.I understand it will be bigger, but not necessarily better next year, because it is terrific

    this year.We look forward to having you here next year, added Superintendent-President Jowel

    Laguerre.

    7 CINCO DE MAYO: FROM PAGE 1

    ASSC president resigns

    Brenda Tucker stays busy at Solano working as a school counselor.

    Deborah Graham/Tempest

    School counselor helps students find their purpose

    College reaches $135,000 settlement with former VP

    Festivities brighten the day during this years Cinco de Mayo event

    MORE STORIES ON THE WEB

    The future of campus theatre is at stake

    Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society inducts new members

    She has such a posi-tive spirit, and has

    this uncanny ability to work with a student re-garding some challeng-

    ing situations.

    - Erin Vines

  • By John GliddenStaff [email protected]

    About 50 students voted in Fridays Associated Students of Solano College (ASSC) student government election for president, vice president, student trustee and three amendments to governing documents.

    Arturo Castillo and Jack Spe-row, running for president and vice-president, respectively, gar-nered 51 yes votes. Kayla Salazar, running for student trustee, re-ceived 54 yes votes. All three are current members of ASSC student government and were running un-opposed.

    All Solano College students enrolled in classes after the W deadline were eligible to vote in the election.

    Phil McCaffrey Jr., current

    career technical senator of ASSC student government, and member of the ASSC election committee, garnered six write-in votes for the office of legislative advocate.

    The election committee was set to approve McCaffrey Jr. as the official winner of the office when the committee was informed that the ASSC election code forbids members of the election commit-tee from being candidates in the election.

    McCaffrey Jr. worked the vot-ing polls as a member of the elec-tion committee.

    Daniel Schmitgal, current ASSC senator, received four write-in votes for the legislative advocate position. It is unknown if Schmit-gal will accept the position.

    Schmitgal initially submitted a candidacy form for the position of legislative advocate but records show that he turned in his candi-

    dacy form a day after the deadline to submit the form; thus, his name was not placed on the ballot.

    On the ballot were three chang-es to the ASSC governing docu-ments. Two of these changes were to the ASSC bylaws. The ASSC constitution states that amend-ments to the ASSC bylaws shall become a part of the bylaws with a majority vote of the ASSC student senate.

    The ASSC student government held a special meeting April 20 in which six senators, a simple major-ity, voted to ratify the amendments to the bylaws.

    The third change is one to the ASSC constitution, and the pro-cess to amend the ASSC constitu-tion is different than amending the ASSC bylaws. The ASSC constitution states that, the membership of the ASSC shall consist of all students

    currently enrolled at Solano Com-munity College. and ratification of this constitution any proposed amendments shall be placed on the spring semester general elec-tion ballot and shall require a two-thirds vote of the ASSC member-ship.

    Baig and the election com-mittee said that a two-thirds af-firmative vote of students who participated in the spring election is enough to amend the ASSC constitution, not two-thirds of all students currently enrolled at So-lano College.

    My emphasis is on vote [list-ed in Article IX, section II of the ASSC constitution], if they dont vote then they dont get a say, Baig said after the ballot counting meeting.

    The constitutional change gar-nered 53 affirmative votes with four no votes. Baig is recom-

    mending that the ASSC student government adopt the 53 affirma-tive votes to alter the ASSC con-stitution.

    Maybe we should have ad-vertised a lot more. I think that is about it, Baig said when asked about the low voter turn-out. I wish there was more represen-tation, I wish there were more votes, Baig said.

    NEWS 3THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    PAY OFF YOUR EDUCATIONTuition costs shouldnt stop you from reaching your goals in life. By joining the Army National Guard, youll receive the money you need to help pay for college as well as the skills and training you need to get the career you want. If youre looking to get through college, with the Army National Guard, you can!

    Staff Sergeant Richard Howes 707-761-7908NATIONALGUARD.com 1-800-GO-GUARD

    54466_AMS-02_5.9x7_Howes.indd 1 2/1/12 10:03 AM

    Complete your bachelor's degree at USF's East Bay Campus in San Ramon. Attend classes one evening per week and earn a degree in less than two years.

    Attend an advising workshop to learn more about: Life experience credit Financing your education

    Degree options, program format Admission process

    Accepting ApplicAtions for August 2012.

    Apply now!

    CALL or EMAIL to schedule an advising appointment [email protected]

    or 925-867-2711

    One Annabel Lane, Ste. 115, San Ramon, CA 94583

    www.usfca.edu/sanramon

    Business Degree Programs AT usf EAsT BAY

    change the world from heres a n f r a n c i s c o s a n ta r o s a s a n j o s e s a c r a m e n t o e a s t b ay

    By Sharman [email protected]

    Although hes not in the circus, Frank Miranda performs quite the juggling act. He holds the position of chairman for Solano Countys Republican Central Committee, and is constantly involved in fundraisers, events, supporting candidates, and a myriad of other activities in the political circuit.

    Miranda encourages voters, especially college students, to get involved in the po-litical process.

    Without the people voting, were never going to change things, Miranda said.

    Miranda sees Obama as a president that has led people to be dependent on govern-ment. Miranda supports Romney and the

    pursuit of capitalism. He believes that with-in two years of Romney taking office, our country will be running again.

    The committee relies on the help of vol-unteers and dedicated staff members like Franklin Carballo.

    Carballo encourages constituents of any party affiliation to become active in their political community. He believes in the va-lidity of the two-party system and its basis in American government.

    When you work with a party, you re-ally have to understand whats best for the party. By doing this, youll have a strong government, Carballo said.

    Carballo spoke fondly of Miranda. When he became the chairman of the (So-lano County) Republican Party, he made some changes that really put me to work

    harder for him, Carballo said. He is a man of action.

    Miranda believes in hard work and at-tributes his success to his dedication.

    Nobody gave me a thing, I just worked like heck all my life, Miranda said. Once I make a goal, I stick to it.

    Miranda relays that individuals can reg-ister to vote at the committee office as well as find out how they can get involved in lo-cal politics.

    Most of the time were open five days a week, Thursday being the only day the secretary isnt here, Miranda said. If you want to get involved, all you need to do is come down.The Republican Committees offices are lo-cated at 625 Jackson St. in Fairfield.

    Solano County Republican Committee chairman looks to the future with vigor

    Voter turn-out was low at this years student body elections

    Although 1200 ballots were printed, only around 50 were used.

    John Glidden/Tempest

    Frank Miranda poses in front of re-districting maps at the Solano County Republican Committee.

    Sharman Bruni/Tempest

    Join The Tempest: Journalism 60

  • ASSC is growing and learningEditor-

    I would like to take the op-portunity to address the article you published on April 25 en-titled, Student government not following election code. As the chair of the election committee, I believe that the title of the piece is misleading.

    The author, John Glidden, brings up some issues that he sees as violations. However I hope you will note that he also acknowl-edges, albeit lopsidedly, that the committee did remedy any missteps. For instance, he admits that the period of availability of declaration of candidacy forms was extended and that the ASSC did in fact comply with this sec-tion of the code.

    The initial mandatory can-didates meeting was declared invalid due to lack of a published agenda, and I freely own that was an error on my part. However, as

    Mr. Glidden notes, we make up for this deficiency by scheduling a second meeting, with a correctly posted agenda, in a public area, and in full compliance with the Brown Act.

    Every semester, the ASSC is reborn. An influx of new students are exposed to a system of poli-cies that are initially foreign and counter-intuitive. It takes about three-quarters of the semester for the students of Political Science 50 the class behind the ASSC to get used to using parliamentary procedure and conforming to the Brown Act at every meeting

    By the time the ASSC Senate finds its rhythm, the semester draws to a close. It is a learning process, and mistakes will be made. Mr. Glidden himself was

    a long-standing member of the ASSC and presiding secretary of the election committee last year

    In the Spring 2011 elections, the election calendar was ap-proved a mere five weeks prior to the actual elections. Do the errors of the past justify errors in current or future sessions of the ASSC? No. However, I would take the position that our current senate has done a better job of comply-ing with the election code than most prior sessions of student government.

    Naser Baig,

    Vice President, ASSC

    Chair Spring 2012 Election Com-mittee

    OPINION4 THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    ON THE WEB

    See more stories, opinion pieces and polls on our

    website at:Solanotempest.net

    Wed. May 9ASSC Political Forum12:30 p.m.Back of cafeteria (1400 Bldg)

    Sacramento State transfer representative on campusDrop in 9 - 11:30. Appointments Noon - 2:30

    Thur. May 10Student Health CenterOutreach Health Services5 - 6:30 p.m.Vacaville Center

    Bike to Work Day 2012Energizer station will be set up in Quad, 8 - 10 a.m.Building 1400

    ICC Meetings last meeting12:30 - 1:30 p.m.Room 1421

    Spring Choral Concert7:30 p.m.Hosted by Solano College ChoralSolano College Campus Theatre Building 1200

    May 10-12Horticulture Spring Plant SaleThurs. 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.Sat. 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Building 100

    Fri. May 11Solano College Spring Film Festi-val, free student film screening6 - 9 p.m.Hosted by Solano College Film DepartmentSuisun Harbor Theatre720 Main Street, Suisun City

    Mon. May 14CSU East Bay transfer representa-tive on campusDrop in 9-11:30. Appointments Noon-2:30

    UC Davis transfer representative on campus Drop in: 9-10:30, Appointments: 10:30 - 11:30 and

    12:30 - 2:30

    May 16-22Evening class final exams

    May 17-23Day class final exams

    Sat. May 19Final exams, Saturday classes

    Sun. May 20Final exams, Sunday classes

    Mon. May 21Horticulture Club Meeting6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.Bldg. 1000

    Wed. May 23Graduation ceremony10:30 a.m.Holister Field

    Thurs. May 24The Sound of Music7:30 p.m.Hosted by Solano Youth Theatre Solano College Campus Theatre Building 1200

    Sat. June 2Aquatics Adventure & Water Safety Day11:30 a.m .- 3 p.m.SCC poolContact [email protected]

    Mon. Aug. 13Fall 2012 classes begin

    campus calendarThe problem with

    the rap industry is theres too many, talk-ers and not enough doers.

    In the music indus-try today you need to manage and excel in every aspect of your music promoting, mar-keting, and performing.

    You cant expect anyone to push you further than youre will-ing to push yourself. I can tell you through my own experience that it takes a lot of hard work and dedication.

    I went to San Diego in pursuit of a career as a music producer. I graduated in 2008 with a degree in music production, now what to do with it?

    I started producing my own beats in Vallejo. This led to recording my own songs and mixing and mastering them. In Vallejo, where some of the local artists include All American Mob, Mr. Apher of E.A.R. (Everybodys A Rapper) Entertainment, Money Bag Management/Purple Session Entertain-ment, and Bay Boy Entertainment, I created Young Hicks Productions.

    If youre an artist, producer, engineer or promot-er, the work you do day-to-day is going to determine how far youre going to get in this business. As an artist, your pay is a result of your lyrics and per-formance. As a producer, your pay is based on the quality of sound arrangement and as an engineer your pay is a result of your mixing and mastering skills. The promoter gets his/her money due to his/her hustle in arranging venues. If youre not signed, these are things youll need to pay for. Dont expect someone to hand you a meal ticket if youre not investing time and money in your own business.

    You have to be clear with yourself as an artist. You have to have purpose and intent. What are you making your music for? Who is the target group you want to listen to your music? What is the message you are communicating to your listener?

    Most importantly you need to own up to your words, actions, and credibility. Its an honor when someone listens to your music and understands where youre coming from. When youre able to ex-press a part of you that you dont share all the time or allow everyone to see.

    Recently I had a spontaneous run-in with Hip-Hop artist Redman, who had listened to some of my tracks and gave me feedback. It meant a lot to me that someone in the industry took the time to do this.

    It was an honor to meet you, and I love your songs, said Redman. Keep doing your thing and stay focused. I never asked him to listen to my mu-sic, and to receive feedback, just from running into him randomly, is a blessing and shows progression for me. Its not about how many people you know, its about who you know.

    Music plays a big part in everyones life, whether its listening to music or making music. The key to this relationship between music and people is experience. Going through bad times some may listen to slow music to get through what theyre going through or put on something to make them happy. Looking to party, some may want faster more uplifting music. People relate most to whats real, the truth, and whats honest.

    Anyone can make a dollar, how to maintain it and make it work for you is another topic entirely. Welcome to the music industry.

    Val Hicks, a.k.a Young Hicks, is currently produc-ing a three-part series, offering three mixedtapes for free. Download, The Struggle, available this July, The Hustleto be released in September, and The Bubble, available on I-tunes and other music down-load sites in November.

    Rap isnt just talk

    Letter to the editor

    Dont expect someone to hand you a meal ticket if

    youre not investing time and money in your own business.

    By Val HicksStaff Writer

    [email protected]

    Every semester, the ASSC is reborn. An influx of new students are exposed to a system of policies that are initially

    foreign and counter-intuitive.

    VOICE YOUR OPINION

    If you have something to say, a reaction to a story or an opinion on a topic, email us your view at:[email protected] you do send letters please make sure to in-clude your full name, and contact information (for verification purposes) and be advised that letters may be edited and/or shortened for length.

  • Yes, you read the title correctly. If you dont vote, you should leave the country immediately. I have vacillated on this radical view but I grow tired of the low voter turnout in Solano County and in the United States as a whole. Many rejoice when there is a fifty percent turnout of regis-tered voters. That is quite pitiful and shameful. According to Solanos registrar of voters, there were 191,387 reg-istered voters in Solano County during the November 2008 presidential election. Eighty-five percent of Solano county voters (thats 162,638) cast a ballot. Compare this to November 2010 when 196,133 people were regis-tered to vote in Solano County but only 121,916 (62 percent) of the registered voters in Solano county voted. Where did the vot-ers go? Why did so many discard the vote so soon after 2008? My wrath is for those individuals who have never registered to vote, those who have let their voter registration lapse due to a lack of voting, those who are registered voters but refuse to vote, and, finally, these people are my abso-lute favorite, those who declare that they will never register to vote or actually vote. Well, hell, allow me to show you the door. Naturally, the above-mentioned individuals will assert one or more of the following reasons: I

    have no time to learn about the issues or candidates, I am protest-ing the government (local, state, or federal), I dont believe in voting (my favorite excuse), all the candidates are bad choices, etc. I have a small test. Now, I believe everyone should vote but there are a few groups I would like to single out. This test is quite simple. Find a mir-ror. Look at the mirror, staring at your reflection. Then read the next two lines. If you qualify for one or both lines you really have no excuse not to vote. Are you ready? The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condi-tion of servitude

    The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

    How did it go? Did you qualify for one of the lines? Now do you understand the importance of voting? No? Need more proof? Okay, go to google.com and switch to image search of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith. Look at the full image see that guy in the crowd pointing up at Shipp

    and Smith? Do you see the glee and defiance in his eyes? Shipp and Smith were not lynched for voting they werent lynched for other reasons but I have always thought of the man pointing up at Shipp and Smith when I cast a ballot. Every time, any-one, whether African-American, Caucasian-America, male, female, or any other ethnicity votes, you are telling that man pointing at Shipp and Smith to go to hell. Vote so you can erase that smirk off of his face. Vote so you can avenge Shipp and Smith. Did you know that suffragette Susan B. Anthony was arrested

    for voting in the 1872 presidential election? She was arrested for vot-ing- arrested because women were not allowed to vote at that time. Vote to avenge Anthonys arrest over such an arcane rule. Im comforted by the words of William Lloyd Garrison who started his own newspaper: The

    OPINION 5THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    campus conversation

    What are you doing over summer break?

    Looking for work and a place to live.

    -Andrew Billings. 22electronics

    I will be getting my drivers li-cense and looking for work.

    -Kelly Bennett, 21 art

    I will be going to another school for summer break but coming back for the fall semester.

    -Nashawna Scott, 19fashion design

    I have been unemployed since 09 so basically I will be looking for a job.

    -Tyler Decker, 21aeronautics

    I am possibly going to Cancun, studying more information on criminal justice and also think-ing about going into the police academy.

    -Lorenzo Valenzuel, 19criminal justice

    By John GliddenStaff Writer

    [email protected]

    The Tempest is published by Solano College

    students. Opinions expressed in the paper

    are those of the individual writers and artists,

    and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of

    the colleges governing board, the administra-

    tion, the faculty and staff, or the Associated

    Students of Solano College.

    Readers may take up to five copies of The Tem-

    pest free. Additional copies may be purchased

    for 25 cents.

    Member: California College Media Associa-tion Journalism Association of Community Colleges California Newspaper Publishers

    Association

    contact us

    It is Tempest policy to correct any errors in the paper. Please contact us if you spot one. To get in touch with us:phone:(707) 864-7000, ext. 4361e-mail: [email protected] address:SCC, Room 18614000 Suisun Valley Road, Fairfield, California 94534

    THE TEMPESTThe Voice of Solano College nVol. 28, No. 14

    Sharman Brunieditor-in-chief

    Sharman Bruninews editor

    Ben Gognasports editorphoto editor

    Nick Sestanovich a&e editor

    Deborah Grahamonline editor

    opinion editor

    Camille LevasseurLarry RaglandJohn GliddenMark BeierlySam ZaghloulTim Hosford

    Valentino HicksVigil Taltonstaff writers

    Phillip Templecartoonist

    Samanda Dorgeradviser

    Your vote: Use it or lose itMy wrath is for those individuals who

    have never registered to vote...

    Suffragette Susan B. Anthony was arrested for voting in the 1872 presidential election because women were not allowed to vote.

    Liberator in 1831. As an ardent moral abolitionist of slavery in America, Garrison wrote: The apathy of the people is enough to make every statue leap from its pedestal, and to hasten the resurrection of the dead.

  • COFFEE BREAK6 THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    Sometimes its a roll of the dice to get the classes you need, to transfer within two years, to collect financial aid, to find your books, or just to stay awake in class because you worked a double the night before. Take a break with our Community College game. Warm up your dice and start figuring your odds, and jump right in, its your turn. Is community college monopolizing your life?

  • COFFEE BREAK 7THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    Phillip Temple/Tempest

    Sometimes its a roll of the dice to get the classes you need, to transfer within two years, to collect financial aid, to find your books, or just to stay awake in class because you worked a double the night before. Take a break with our Community College game. Warm up your dice and start figuring your odds, and jump right in, its your turn.

  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT8 THE TEMPEST g MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    El Loma Prieta brings fusion of sounds to local scene

    By Sharman Bruni Editor-in-Chief [email protected] Guzzling honey from a plastic bear, lead singer Kolby Stancil prepares for a show at Club Retro on April 26. Although he is feeling a bit under the weather, Stancil manages to carry himself with pride and invests himself passionately in his vocals as well as in his guitar playing. El Loma Prieta began in 2009 with Stancil, Dan Cagley (drums), Chad Perrault (bass) and guitarist Leland Van-dermeulen joining the team in 2011. The Vacaville band named themselves after the earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989. Its quite a fitting name, as the band members of El Loma Prieta jolt audience members with a fusion of reggae, rock, and at times, a dash of progressive metal. When I think of the band El Loma Prieta, I think of perseverance, dedica-tion and motivation, and about how much ELP has enlightened me to the true meaning of those words, as well as impacting me to executing the same actions in my own life, said Lacey Paulson, who has been a close friend of the band members for almost 11 years. They have each impacted on my life musically and personally so greatly it is hard to even describe without get-ting emotional. The music is unique, original and has now become some of my favorite music to listen to on a daily basis.

    On the scene at Club Retro, the band is joined by Room 121 Productions, a local film company whose name is de-rived from the doors of the film depart-ment at Solano Community College. Its exciting to see the beginning of a really good band forming, said director Tyler Manzo. Manzo is a familiar face to the local film scene, working on shorts such as Belgian Waffles and An Occur-rence at C116. I like their sound, I like their atti-tude, and I like their drive, said Room 121 Productions founder Stevo Ng. We match their creative force. Outside of Club Retro, the members of El Loma Prieta come together for an interview. While Stancil may be the lead singer, a position that typically heads the face of a band, he passes the credit on to the other band members. If it wasnt for these guys motivation, there wouldnt be a band, Stancil said. The band lists such influences as Incubus, Deftones, and Sublime. We all have our own weird back-grounds, Vandermeulen said. Dan is a big hip hop guy, Chad came from a punk rock background and Kolby is into (the band) Minus the Bear. Were almost the equivalent of a Swiss Army Knife. All of us can play different types of instruments. We flow, Dan adds. El Loma Prietas next show is May 11 at The Mutiny on 422 West 2nd Street, Antioch at 9 p.m.

    (Left to right) Dan Cagley, Kolby Stancil, and Leland Vandermeulen perform as El Loma Prieta at Club Retro April 26.

    EL LOMA PRIETA

    -Friday, May 11 at The Mutiny, 9 p.m.

    -422 West 2nd Street, Antioch

    -Also playing with Forrest Day and Space Monkey Gangstas

    -Learn more about the band @ElLomaPrieta.com

    Vacaville band blends variety of styles for crowd-pleasing sound

    Dan Cagley pours his soul into the drums at El Loma Prietas show at Club Retro on April 26.

    Chad Perrault draws from a punk rock background to craft his bass lines for El Loma Prieta.

    Photos by Sharman Bruni/Tempest

  • ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 9THE TEMPEST g MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    Vinyl records and steamrollers inspire SCC art instructor

    A rtists have many tools to work with. Most notable artists use a brush for their work, while others use tools to craft some abstract sculpture for their work.

    Solano College art teacher Jeanne Lorenz would rather use a steamroller on one of her art projects. Printmaking, Lorenzs artistic expertise, is essentially etching a plate painting onto a press. The students really love it, Lorenz said. Lorenz has been teaching at Solano for four years. During one of her color design classes, Lorenz challenged her students to make four paintings of daffodils using a handmade tool instead of a brush. Lorenzs art work can be seen everywhere from the video pages of YouTube to the Oakland Art Gallery known as The Compound Gallery. Its in The Compound Gallery where some of Lorenzs finest work is there in the form of vinyl records. Lorenz would use a classic vinyl record of musicians such as AC/DC or LL Cool J and craft a colorful art piece shaped like a record. In the past few years, Lorenz has had group artist

    exhibitions in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York. Lorenzs latest showcase will be this week at the Dixon May Fair, where she will use a steamroller to craft and make large-scale printmaking projects in the fairs Solano Steamroller Smackdown. The 12-ton black and white steamroller will be rolling through the fair and spinning inky imagery created by participants. All prints and t-shirts produced will be for sale, with proceeds benefiting the Solano college art department. Lorenz and her students will each make and steamroll three prints. The theme Lorenz is striving for her students is country symbolism.

    Once again instead of reviewing something on Netflix like the name of the column would suggest, Ive decided to talk about something I found on the internet so I could have an excuse to watch cartoons in class (shut up you would too if you could). So anyhow, heres my first impression of this new Lovecraftian splat stick

    romcom, Nyarko-san: Another Crawling Chaos. You know who H.P. Lovecraft is, right? Of course you do. Early American horror writer, created the Cthulhu mythos, known for being very verbose and scaring audiences for life with the feeling of being totally alone in a cold uncaring universe? If you answered no to any those questions, stop reading this right now. We dont need your kind of riff-raff here. Are they gone? Good. This show has a verydifferent interpretation of Lovecrafts work. It starts with our hero, Mahiro, being attacked by a gargoyle-looking god-knows-what, only to be saved at the last second by silver-haired girl who claims to be the Lovecraftian entity Nyarlathotep. Now, traditionally, Nyarlathotep has been depicted as a cross between Satan, Loki, Randall Flagg, and a mutilated cow corpse. Here shes this cute, hyperactive nerd girl assigned by the local space police to stop smuggling on earth (apparently, we have the best entertainment in the universe. Who knew? ) and keep Mahiro safe (and get into his pants, but that goes without saying.) The series thus far seems to be built upon silliness, which I approve of. Nyarkos main means of defending Mahiro is Space CQC, which involves beating things to death with a crowbar , a rock, use of a Pokmon (which has a 99 to 0 loss-win recordshe keeps it around because its cute) and a blasphemous hand grenade. Apparently the rule is that anything you call Space CQC is considered Space CQC, even if your opponent disagrees with it. I had this weird kneejerk reaction one element of the show: since Nyarko acts like a small child on a constant sugar-high, Mahiro must occasionally resort to fork-related slapstick to get her to calm down. Now, this made me a feel a bit...awkward. Even though I knew if the genders were reversed, I wouldnt care. Its less of a problem with the show, and more a problem with my internalized double standards. Catch Nyarko-san: Another Crawling Chaos on Crunchyroll.com, with a new episode every Monday.

    FROM THE BOWELS OF NETFLIX

    By Sam Zaghloul

    Most notable artists use a brush for their work. Jeanne Lorenz would

    rather use a steamroller on one of her projects.

    Jeanne Lorenz has used old vinyl records to create her artwork.

    Photos courtesy of Jeanne Lorenz

    Nyarko-San is a Lovecraft throwback

    DiXON MAY FAIR

    - May 10-13 on 655 South 1st Street in Dixon

    -Performances by English Beat with the Romantics, Kellie Pickler & Phil Vassar, and Larry the Cable Guy.

    -$12 for adults, $8 for seniors and military, and $7 for children 12 and under

    -Wednesday opens at 4 p.m. for some carnival rides and Snoop Dogg concert

    -More information @DixonMayFair.com

  • SPORTS10 THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    Practice perfect

    The Solano Falcons softball team had a strong 28-9 season overall, 19-1 conference. Solano has collected seven consecutive Bay Valley Conference titles and reached the playoffs eight years in a row. Leading the conference by two games over Yuba College (17-3), Solano clinched the conference after beating Napa April 19. Hannah Wilbur pitched in 28 games, starting 19 with a 1.26 ERA. She went 21-5 overall with

    193 strikeouts. She received All-State pitcher of the year as well as MVP pitcher of the year. Darian Quist-Richard was awarded 1st team outfield and the All Nor-Cal statewide award. Darian had a .447 batting aver-age, 37 runs scored, 55 hits and 25 RBIs. Solano has made the playoffs eight consecutive years in a row, collecting seven consecutive Bay Valley Conference titles. Our goal is to win, but it

    comes down to who is the best team, coach Terri Pearson-Bloom said. The key is to recruiting great players and developing their talents. The Falcons played playoff games in Fresno last weekend against Fresno City College. They lost Saturday 1-0 and Sunday 9-0, ending their season.

    Ben Gogna/Tempest

    Solano softball dominates division once again with seventh championship in a row

    makes

    Photos by Tim Hosford/Tempest

    Solano Community College softball players Monieka Takeda-Torix, left, Lynzie Ryan and Autumn Price run during a recent practice.

    Outfielder Lynzie Ryan

    wears her eye-black in a

    unique way.

    Autumn Price laughs during a light moment at soft-ball practice.

    A glove and visor sit in the

    dugout at a recent Falcons

    softball practice.

    Photos by Tim Hosford/The Tempest

  • SPORTS 11THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    Pitching Coach Cheryl Mitchell gives pointers to players.

    Audrey Musgrove and teammates watch a game.

    Falcons catcher Monieka Takeda-Torix, right, confers with pitcher Hannah Wilbur during recent game.

    Photos by Tim Hosford/Tempest

    Darian Quist-Richard, left, and Monieka Takeda-Torix give each other a high-five in the dugout.

    The Solano softball team huddles before a game.

    The key is to recruiting great players and developing their talents.

    Terri Pearson-Bloom, softball head coach

  • SPORTS12 THE TEMPEST n MAY 9 - SEPT. 4, 2012

    START THE NEXT STEP TO YOUR DEGREE

    *You must enroll by August 27, 2012 to be eligible; other terms and conditions may apply.

    Brandman University, a part of the Chapman University System, is a private, non-profit institution accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) with programs offered both online and at 26 campuses in California and Washington. 12_0412_CC_PUBS

    Transfer to Brandman University.Are you ready to transfer and take the next step to get your bachelors degree? At

    Brandman University, you can transfer to programs that start every eight weeks,

    taught by experienced instructors who share real-world insights. Its a unique

    college experience, with personal Academic Advisors for each student, that

    Brandman students value. Its one reason why Brandman graduation rates

    are nearly 70%. So dont get sidetrackedstay on track to graduate.

    Find out more today and ask about the $500 transfer scholarship.*

    Call 877-750-6173 or visit TransferToBrandman.com.

    Three Solano basketball players signed letters of intent to two dif-ferent schools at 1 p.m. on May 3 at Solano Community College.

    Im very proud of these girls, Matt Borchert said. Im excited for them and their futures.

    Presley (Star) Neufeld, will be

    transferring to the NCAA Division III School, Eastern

    Nazarene University, in Quincy, Massachusetts and will be playing point guard. Neufeld averaged 7 points per game, 4.5 assists and 2

    steals here at Solano Community College.

    It was a great opportunity to come to Solano, Neufeld said. Without Borchert, I wouldnt be where Im at now and heading to Eastern Nazarene University.

    Both Shannon Rankin and Tara Cooley will be transferring to San Francisco State.

    Rankin was All Conference, Academic All Conference and

    won the Falcon award carry-ing 13.3 points per game, 7.6 rebounds and 2.2 steals.

    My two years at Solano developed me into the player I

    am today, Tara Cooley said. My coaches and teammates taught me how to be a determined and hard working player that I will now carry on over to San Francisco State which is the perfect school and program for an athlete with a lot of heart and motivation like myself.

    Cooley was an All Conference as a freshman and carried 8.9 points per game, 4.6 rebounds and 2.2 steals.

    One of the best decisions I ever made was choosing to come to Solano. Shannon Rankin said. Without coach Borchert and my teammates support, I wouldnt have had the oppor-tunity to go on and play at San Francisco State. I cant thank them enough.

    Three Solano basketball athletes sign onto four year universitiesBy Ben GognaSports/Photo [email protected]

    Star Neufeld, Tara Cooley and Shannon Rankin (left to right) signing the letters of intent to the schools they plan on transferring to. They signed the letters Thursday, May 3 at Solano Community College.

    Ben

    Go

    gn

    a -

    Sort

    s/p

    ho

    to e

    dit

    or

    Solano Community College is offering Aquatics Adventure & Water Safety Day Saturday, June 2, from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Solano College pool, locat-ted at 4000 Suisun Valley Rd, Fairfield, Calif.

    The event will include safety instructions, demonstrations from aquatic experts, and free swim-ming lessons.

    For more information [email protected]

    Aquatics

    Solano to hold water safety day

    Join the Tempsetin the fall of 2012.Staff looking for

    photographers, writers, artists. For more information,

    contact:[email protected]

    May9newsp1_2_3May9pg4-5_Opinion6-7monopolyMay9pages8-9again_AandEMay9pages10-11_SPORTS12