sooke news mirror, march 23, 2016

44
SOOKE IS SELLING! 2016 Sooke Home Sales: 95 250.642.6361 TAMMI DIMOCK Personal Real Estate Corp. 2015 Sooke Home Sales: 395 tammidimock .com 15 MINUTES TO CANWEST IMMAC 2000 BUILT 4BR 3BATH ATTRACTIVELY LANDSCAPED C CAMOSUN WESTSIDE #1 REAL ESTATE OFFICE IN SOOKE FOR 2015 OLIVER KATZ Personal Real Estate Corporation CRISTINA STAICU Personal Real Estate Corporation SUNRIVER $479,900 17 MILE $469,000 SOOKE CORE $309,900 BROOMHILL $379,800 BUYING or SELLING ??? Call 250.642.6480 SPRAWLING 1800SF RANCHER QUIET CUL DE SAC LOCATION SPARKLING 3BR 2 BATH BIG, BRIGHT 3BR 3BATH CORNER TOWNHOME CONVENIENT LOCATION 3500 SF ON 2 LEVELS WALK-OUT RANCHER IMMAC. INSIDE & OUT Wednesday, March 23, 2016 Mail Agreement #40110541 INDEX NEWS SPORTS News 3 Opinion 8 Arts 30 New aesthetics are on their way to the town’s core, but a roundabout art centerpiece is not one of them. At least, not anytime soon. Page 3 A change of hands and a new outlook at basketball programs in Sooke could mean big things for Edward Milne Community School athletes. Page 27 Kevin Laird Sooke News Mirror As some Greater Victoria cities inch closer to a solution to the regional sewage treatment question, Sooke, with tertiary treatment already in place, watches carefully. The reason? Sooke produces about 170 tonnes of sewage sludge every year, with all of it transported to the Hartland landfill in Saanich. The cost to the municipality is about $20,000 annually. After years of studies, public consultation and debate, CRD directors decided to build two tertiary-treatment plants as the best option for mov- ing forward with the troubled mega project. (Tertiary treatment refers to cleaning sewage to a point that becomes usable water.) That move could open the door to a better way to dispose of sewage sludge then having it trucked to a landfill, if the CRD directors approve a plan for resource recovery. “The sludge is sent to Hartland as a special waste, but it’s only happening because there is no other method of disposing of it. It’s almost been done on an emergency-type basis,” said acting mayor Rick Kasper, who repre- sents Sooke on the CRD board. Recently, the CRD board struck a subcommittee to look at options of dealing with the sludge and how it can be disposed of in a more environ- mentally friendly way. Treated sewage sludge is used in forestry, agricul- ture, land reclamation, composting and as an energy source. Sooke is not the only community looking at source recovery for sludge. North Saanich shares a sewage treatment facility with Central Saanich, Sid- ney and the Psatsartilt First Nation, while Port Renfrew operates a system for 80 people. “The sludge issue must be straightened out eventually. It’s the other part of the puzzle,” said Juan de Fuca Electoral Area director Mike Hicks. “When they [the CRD] talk about treating biosolids they’re not just talk- ing about their own, they’re talking about Sooke’s too. We’re not totally out of this. It does affect us.” The CRD board referred the disposal of sewage sludge back to staff to look at cost implications. A March 31 deadline looms for federal funding on regional sewage treatment. Pirjo Raits/Sooke News Mirror Spring fever Cash and his friend Lucas revelled on the swings thanks to the welcome warm weather and sunshine of spring during their second week of Spring Break. Classes start up again on Wednesday, March 30 all across most B.C. school districts, including Sooke School District 62. Sewage series starts this week The Sooke News Mirror, along with other Black Press community newspapers in Greater Victoria has launched a two- part series on the Capital Regional District’s ongoing sewage dilemma. Our team of veteran journalists will examine every angle of the CRD sewage story including the location debate, the science and success in other cities. See page B1 SOOKE EYES TERTIARY SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT IN EFFORT TO REDUCE SLUDGE It could be a better way to dispose of sludge instead of trucking it, say CRD directors COMMUNITY NEWS MEDIA Black Press

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March 23, 2016 edition of the Sooke News Mirror

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Page 1: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

SOOKE IS SELLING!

2016 SookeHome Sales: 95

250.642.6361

T A M M I D I M O C KPe r sona l Rea l E s ta t e Co rp .

2015 SookeHome Sales: 395

tammidimock.com

15 MINUTES TO CANWEST IMMAC 2000 BUILT 4BR 3BATH ATTRACTIVELY LANDSCAPED

CCAMOSUN WESTSIDE

#1 REAL ESTATE OFFICE IN SOOKE FOR 2015

OLIVER KATZ Personal Real Estate Corporation

CRISTINA STAICU Personal Real Estate Corporation

SUNRIVER $479,900 17 MILE $469,000 SOOKE CORE $309,900 BROOMHILL $379,800

BUYING or SELLING ??? Call 250.642.6480

SPRAWLING 1800SF RANCHER QUIET CUL DE SAC LOCATION

SPARKLING 3BR 2 BATH

BIG, BRIGHT 3BR 3BATH

CORNER TOWNHOME

CONVENIENT LOCATION

3500 SF ON 2 LEVELS

WALK-OUT RANCHER

IMMAC. INSIDE & OUT

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 Mail Agreement #40110541

INDEX NEWS SPORTSNews 3Opinion 8Arts 30

New aesthetics are on their way to the town’s core, but a roundabout art centerpiece is not one of them. At least, not anytime soon.

Page 3

A change of hands and a new outlook at basketball programs in Sooke could mean big things for Edward Milne Community School athletes.

Page 27

Kevin LairdSooke News Mirror

As some Greater Victoria cities inch closer to a solution to the regional sewage treatment question, Sooke, with tertiary treatment already in place, watches carefully.

The reason? Sooke produces about 170 tonnes of sewage sludge every year, with all of it transported to the Hartland landfill in Saanich. The cost to the municipality is about $20,000 annually.

After years of studies, public consultation and debate, CRD directors decided to build two tertiary-treatment plants as the best option for mov-ing forward with the troubled mega project. (Tertiary treatment refers to cleaning sewage to a point that becomes usable water.)

That move could open the door to a better way to dispose of sewage sludge then having it trucked to a landfill, if the CRD directors approve a plan for resource recovery.

“The sludge is sent to Hartland as a special waste, but it’s only happening because there is no other method of disposing of it. It’s almost been done

on an emergency-type basis,” said acting mayor Rick Kasper, who repre-sents Sooke on the CRD board.

Recently, the CRD board struck a subcommittee to look at options of dealing with the sludge and how it can be disposed of in a more environ-mentally friendly way. Treated sewage sludge is used in forestry, agricul-ture, land reclamation, composting and as an energy source.

Sooke is not the only community looking at source recovery for sludge. North Saanich shares a sewage treatment facility with Central Saanich, Sid-ney and the Psatsartilt First Nation, while Port Renfrew operates a system for 80 people.

“The sludge issue must be straightened out eventually. It’s the other part of the puzzle,” said Juan de Fuca Electoral Area director Mike Hicks.

“When they [the CRD] talk about treating biosolids they’re not just talk-ing about their own, they’re talking about Sooke’s too. We’re not totally out of this. It does affect us.”

The CRD board referred the disposal of sewage sludge back to staff to look at cost implications. A March 31 deadline looms for federal funding on regional sewage treatment.

Pirjo Raits/Sooke News Mirror

Spring feverCash and his friend Lucas revelled on the swings thanks to the welcome warm weather and sunshine of spring during their second week of Spring Break. Classes start up again on Wednesday, March 30 all across most B.C. school districts, including Sooke School District 62.

Sewage series starts this weekThe Sooke News Mirror, along with other Black Press community newspapers in Greater Victoria has launched a two-part series on the Capital Regional District’s ongoing sewage dilemma. Our team of veteran journalists will examine every angle of the CRD sewage story including the location debate, the science and success in other cities.

See page B1

SOOKE EYES TERTIARY SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT IN EFFORT TO REDUCE SLUDGE It could be a better way to dispose of sludge instead of trucking it, say CRD directors

C O M M U N I T Y N E W S M E D I A

Black Press

Page 2: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A2 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Publisher: Rod Sluggett [email protected]: Kevin Laird [email protected]: Octavian Lacatusu [email protected]: Kel Phair [email protected]: [email protected]: Vicky Sluggett [email protected] Manager: Deb Stolth [email protected]

How to reach us 250.642.5752 fax: [email protected]

SUPERSPECIALS

For all your Insurance needsHome • Business • Farm • Auto

Don McCormick

“Serving Sooke for over 35 years”

250-882-7411

Shelby KnightDesigner/Sales [email protected]

1.250.743.7605

Shoreline DesignSpecializing in water accessover steep and rugged terrain• Fully insured• Excellent references

Peter Christenson • 250.858.9575shorelinedesign.ca

See our services & prices at:www.sookesoil.com

Come seeus for:

• Garden wastedrop-off

• Soil & Mulches

• Compost & Manure• Decorative Rock• Sand & Aggregates

Aren’t you loving these sunny days of SPRING?

2830 Ramsden Road (in the 3300 block of Otter Point Road, a block west of Sooke Business Park)

WE’RE OPEN OUR REGULAR HOURS EASTER WEEKEND

Open Mon-Sat 8:30am-5:30pmSunday 10am-2pm

250-642-65096852 West Coast Road

Sooke, BC V9Z 0V2www.sookemarinecentre.com

Sales, Service & Parts for all Outboard and Sterndrives

Easter BrunchSunday March 27, 9am-2pm

Prestige Oceanfront Resort6929 West Coast Rd.

Reservations: 778.425.0888

PROUDLY SERVING SOOKE, METCHOSIN,

JORDAN RIVER AND SOMBRIO !

OUR LOCAL WEEKLYSPECIALS ARE BACK

Small fire temporarily shuts down Sooke A&W

Sooke Fire and Rescue responded to the A&W restaurant in Sooke after a bun warmer caught fire.

The fire was put out by restaurant staff using a fire extinguisher before fire crews arrived at the scene.

No one was injured.According to

Sooke Fire Chief Steven Sorensen, the restaurant sustained no fire damage, however the fire extinguisher caused minor damage in the affected spot.

Log house burns down in Whiffen Spit

Friday evening became a long night for Sooke Fire and Rescue, Metchosin and Otter Point firefighters as they battled the flames of after a log house on McMillan Road in Whiffen Spit.

The building, which was vacant for several years, was entirely engulfed in flames at the time fire crews arrived, said Sooke Fire Chief Steven Sorensen.

“There was fire coming out the roof, out every window and door, and it’s been burning for some time,” he said, adding that the fire, which started around 8:30 p.m., took at least two hours to bring under control.

Last fire crew were at the site until midnight.

This was the second time this log house caught fire, the last time being in

November 2009, noted Sorensen. No one has been living in it since.

Exact cause of the fire remains unknown, though local authorities suspect foul play.

Sorensen said it was fortunate the fire occurred while everything is still cold and wet around.

“We’re just lucky it wasn’t during the summer, because sparks were going everywhere.”

Want to see your shot featured as a Reader Photo of the Week?

We’re seeking shots that grab our attention for their creativity, impact, humour or beauty, taken in the Sooke region. They can be of people, nature or the urban environment. Email your submissions to [email protected].

Reader Photo of the WeekEmily Zschau captured this picture near Sunriver. Reader’s Photo of the Week is sponsored by the Stickleback West Coast Eatery.

Publisher: Rod Sluggett [email protected]: Kevin Laird [email protected]: Octavian Lacatusu [email protected]: Kel Phair [email protected]: [email protected]: Vicky Sluggett [email protected] Manager: Deb Stolth [email protected]

How to reach us 250.642.5752 fax: [email protected]

Page 3: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A3

PEOPLES DRUG MART... Where People Come First

PEOPLEFIRST

Cedar Grove Centre I 250.642.2226

MED MANAGERPeoples Drug Mart offers a free medication compliance programcalled “Med Manager”. The Med Manager is a blister pack compliance card that conveniently organizes your medication for a full week, and helps you identify what medications are to be taken at what time of the day.Many people today are on more than one medication and when you combine this with a busy and active life, it can lead to the confusion of properly taking your medications. Medication non-compliance is a major concern and accounts for approximately 25% of all hospital admissions among seniors.Talk to a Peoples Pharmacist about the convenient and safeMed Manager Program

PEOPLES DRUG MART ...Where people come first.

Funding restored for Park Watch

District of Sooke council has restored $5,000 in funding to Juan de Fuca Park Watch Society.

Funding was cut to $1,000 last year by council on the recommendation of its grants committee.

The park watch program is run by volunteers from May to September, with a focus on preventing theft from vehicles, break-ins and vandalism.

Last year, volunteer patrollers handed out more than 30,000 brochures.

The program serves parks from Matheson Lake to Aylard Farm, Sooke Potholes, French Beach, China Beach and Botanical Beach in Port Renfrew.

Trail group receives support

District of Sooke council is supporting the Southern Vancouver Island Nature Trails Society in its vision of shared use and wilderness trail connections.

Recognizing the region has an abundance of natural surface trails, the trails society wants to create an “epic network” of accessible multi discipline trails from Brentwood Bay to Sooke Hills.

For more information,

please go online to naturetrailssociety.com.

Work set for Goose connector

District of Sooke council has approved plans for work on the Galloping Goose connector in Sooke River Park and Sooke Road.

Jasmine’s Excavating was awarded a $29,500 contract to build a gravel multi-use trail through park property, while York Excavating is constructing a paved, multi-use trail from Kirby Road to Sooke Road for $64,098.

The project is also supported by a BikeBC grant.

Sooke politicians back women’s rights

Sooke politicians are backing women’s rights with Take the Pledge for Parity proposed by District of Central Saanich council.

The pledge’s goals are to: help women and girls achieve their ambitions, challenge conscious and unconscious bias, call for gender-balanced leadership, value women and men’s contributions equally and create inclusive, flexible culture.

Central Saanich sent the pledge to all Capital Regional District municipalities asking for support.

Council Briefs

Pacific Gateway Marina makes waves in Port Renfrew as it inches towards summer opening Octavian LacatusuSooke News Mirror

After years of negotiations and plan-ning, the all-season Pacific Gateway Marina in Port Renfrew is expected to open this summer with a capacity to hold 60 permanent boats and several transient boats.

The marina’s controversial develop-ment process fell into limbo last year when its proposed 150-boat capacity and location near the San Juan River created waves with Port Renfrew locals and the Pacheedaht First Nation, who pointed out its proximity to the river would affect salmon fishing patterns and ancient burial sites.

As a result, the marina was redesigned and relocated further down the shore, said Andrew Purdey, CEO of Ruskin Con-struction and PGM’s developer, adding that the effort was made to meet the requirements of the community.

“There was a process of working with the various special interest groups and

we’ve come to a common ground, every-one’s happy, and that’s what we’re going to build,” he said, hoping the marina will open May 15, “if all goes well.”

The marina reduced its number of boats to 60, and will also include avail-able berth to handle up to a 60-foot yacht all year long.

Recently, PGM renewed its temporary use permit with the Capital Regional Dis-trict to operate as-is until its rezoning application goes through, said Purdey, though it won’t be for another year.

Still, he remains optimistic things will go smoothly from this point on.

“I want to build the most efficient sport fishing marina on the West Coast, and it will be a spot where people with the odds can come in,” Purdey said. “It’s good news in the community and the fishing community that we’ve built a facility where people can enjoy the West Coast safely 12 months a year.”

While the Pacheedaht agreed with the marina’s changes, the First Nation hopes the developer will address its concerns

regarding the marina’s effect on fish hab-itat.

“There is no 100 per cent guarantee that the salmon migration will not be disrupted, and therefore ongoing evalu-ation of the impacts will be important in protecting the fishery,” wrote Pacheed-aht spokesperson Kristine Pearson in an email.

Pearson added that no “agreement” was struck with the federal government, and that the First Nation felt it had no alternative but to accept the redesigned marina.

“Both governments have failed to uphold the honour of the Crown or to engage in meaningful consultation,” she said, adding that negotiations with PGM are ongoing.

While a rezoning application is still underway, Purdey said other marina facilities are in the plans, such as access to food, fuel and boat maintenance, including a lodge once the rezoning pro-cess is finished.

[email protected]

Contributed

A diagram of what the Pacific Gateway Marina will look like once the breakwaters and docks are implemented.

New marina can accomodate as many as 60 boats, plus 60-foot yacht

B.C. school districts have until April 15 to apply for an annual “fix-it fund” that has grown from $35 million to $40 million.

The fund is in addition to the ongoing capi-tal funds for school districts, and is targeted to projects costing $100,000 or more. They include heating and ventilation upgrades, roof repairs or replacement, plumbing and boiler replacements and safety improvements.

School repair funds underway

Page 4: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A4 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Sponsored in part by:

Join in the fun at our annual

Easter EGGstravaganzaFREE EVENT for Ages 1-7

Saturday, March 2610:30-12:00pmSEAPARC Leisure Complex2168 Phillips Road

Egg Hunt Times10:30 for Ages 1-411:15 for Ages 5-7

The Easter Bunny is coming to SEAPARC! Join us for this fun-filled family event: Crafts, bouncy house, Easter egg hunts and a visit from the Easter Bunny of course!

Admission is by donation to support the Sooke Food Bank.

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONCribbage 7 p.m.BINGOSr. Drop-In Centre, 12:45-3 p.m. Sooke Community Hall. Info: 250-664-6612.ADULT WALKING GROUPSEAPARC 10-11 a.m. Registration required. 250-642-8000.QUILTERS & CRAFTERS

Shirley Quilters and Crafters. Shirley Hall, 10:30 a.m.MEDITATION TALKSooke Yoga and Meditation Centre, 7:30 p.m.SOOKE WINDS

Concert band rehearsal. Journey Middle School band room, 7:30 p.m. Info: 250-891-8433.

PARENT & TOT DROP-IN

Child, Youth, & Family Centre, 9:30 to 11 a.m. 250-642-5152.CALLING ALL QUILTERS

Knox Pres. Church. All welcome. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Info: 250-642-0789.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGIONEuchre 6:30 p.m.ART EXHIBIT

Tales of Woe and Whimsey. Sooke Region Museum, all day.

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Sunday breakfast brunch, 9 to 12:30 p.m.Drop in pool tournament every second Sunday.Bluegrass Jam, first and third Sunday, 2:30 to 5 p.m. October to May.MUSIC JAM

Kemp Lake Store Music Cafe Music Jam. 7875 West Coast Rd., 1 to 5 p.m.QI GONG & TAI CHI

By donation. Sooke Yoga and Wellness, 6750 Westcoast Rd., 6 p.m.MINDFULNESS MEDITATION

By donation. Sooke Yoga and Wellness, 6750 Westcoast Rd., 7:15 p.m.ART EXHIBIT

Tales of Woe and Whimsey. Sooke Region Museum, all day.

WALKING GROUP

People’s Drug Mart hosts a walking club, 9:15 a.m.PARENT DISCUSSION GROUP

Sooke Child, Youth, and Family Centre, 9:30 to 11 a.m. Information: 250-642-5464.ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Dominos 10 a.m.Shuffleboard, 6:30 p.m. NASCAR Pool, 7 p.m.TOASTMASTERS

Village Foods meeting room, 7 p.m. Info: Allan at 250-642-7520.SOOKE COMMUNITY CHOIR

Sooke Community Hall, 7 p.m.ART EXHIBIT

Tales of Woe and Whimsey. Sooke Region Museum, all day.

Community Calendar

BABY TALK

Dental Care. Youth and Family Centre, 10 to 11:30 a.m. Info: 250-642-5464.

YOUTH CLINIC

Ages 13-25, 4-7 p.m. Family Medical Clinic.SOCIAL CONTRACT BRIDGE

Sooke Community Hall, 1 to 4 p.m.SENIORS LUNCH

Sooke Senior Drop In Centre at Sooke Community Hall, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.KNITTING CIRCLE

Sooke Library, 6:30 to 8 p.m. 250-642-3022.BINGO

Sooke Senior Drop In Centre at Sooke Community Hall, 10 a.m.WOMEN’S CANCER

SUPPORT GROUP

The group meets every second Tuesday of month at Sooke Harbour House, 7 p.m. 250-646-2554.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR DEADLINE: THURSDAY @ 3PMItems for Community Calendar must be non-commercial

and free to the public. Please limit to 25 words.

SHOPPERSDRUG MART

250-642-5229

Thurs March 24 Fri March 25 Sat March 26 Sun March 27 Mon March 28 Tues March 29 Wed March 30

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Meat draw, 3 p.m.GERMAN PLAYGROUP

Sooke Library, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.ART EXHIBIT

Tales of Woe and Whimsey. Sooke Region Museum, all day.EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA

Free event for children. SEAPARC Leisure Complex, 10:30 a.m.

VITAL VITTLES

Free lunch, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Holy Trinity. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION

Steak Night, 6-7:30 p.m.Karaoke 8-11 p.m. SOOKE SENIORS’ BUS

Lunch and shopping trips to Victoria. Call June at 250-642-2032.ART EXHIBIT

Tales of Woe and Whimsey. Sooke Region Museum, all day.

All Community events purchas-

ing a display ad will appear in our current

community event calendar at no charge. FREE EVENTS

will be listed at no charge, space

permitting.

Octavian Lacatusu/Sooke News Mirror

Mammovan back in townLynn Hamilton, left, and Joanne Payment stand by the Mammovan, the B.C. Cancer Agency’s latest piece of technology that provides women across the province with instant mammograms. The van came to Sooke on March 21 and will be here until tomorrow, March 24.

Page 5: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A5

Find us on facebook atfacebook.com/sookenewsmirror

More greenery along the town core’s boulevard is in the books, as roundabout centrepiece remains to be determinedKevin LairdSooke News Mirror

Sooke will beautify its new traffic roundabout with flowers and low-grow-ing bushes, as part of its multi-million-dollar town centre project.

District council gave the go-ahead last week to plant “native and colourful, sea-sonal plantings,” but postponed plans to include artwork or artifacts in the round-about until traffic studies were complete.

“Substantial public art is needed in the community, but the centre of the round-about may not be the best location,” said Drew Johnston, Sooke Program for the Arts chair, which made recommenda-tions to council.

The reason? Art could be hit by a vehi-cle and damaged. It would also be difficult to get to the art to view it without imped-ing traffic.

The Ministry of Transportation needs to be consulted for placement of art with consideration given to viewpoints and sight lines on the roundabout.

Putting the final touches on the round-about are delayed due to inclement weather, said acting mayor Rick Kasper.

“When you start late in the season and then you’re inundated with lousy weather, it puts you in a bind,” Kasper said, adding there were also surprises with the project including the discovery of sinkholes.

Coun. Brenda Parkinson said both the

SPA and parks and trails committee had many people and groups approach them about beautifying the roundabout area and the town center.

“We had one suggestion to buy a piece of artwork for $30,000,” she said.

“It seems more prudent to wait and see how the roundabout goes and look at how everything in the project fits together.”

Work on the project is expected to be completed by the end of March.

Meanwhile, the district is thanking local business owners for being patient as the Transportation Ministry addresses

the deficiency list related to the round-about work.

“We understand this work had a nega-tive effect on local businesses and appre-ciate the support we received from good corporate citizens, Village Food Cen-tre, Home Hardware, Wood Travel and Cruise, Sooke Fax & Copy Centre, Island Land Surveying Ltd, Sooke Dance Studio and Randy Clarkson and Laurie Wallace (West Coast Design), who worked closely with district staff to mitigate disruptions” said chief administrative officer Teresa Sullivan.

Octavian Lacatusu/Sooke News Mirror

Wet weather didn’t stop Devin Gatey from laying out the last remaining bricks of the sidewalk in the Sooke core. Atey has been working to finish off the project for the last two weeks, finalizing what originally started as a behemoth construction project last summer.

Sooke roundabout centre artwork not expected to come ‘round soon

New amenities could soon be on the way to John Phillips Memorial Park.

Sooke council will consider adding public washrooms, loop trail, picnic tables and benches following a recommendation from the parks and trails advisory advisory committee.

The recommendations were forwarded to a future budget meeting.

Over the years there have been several proposals on how to develop the park from building a library, horseshoe pitches, even a bike skills facility.

Earlier this year, the committee hosted an information meet-

ing on the park at SEAPARC Leisure Complex where residents were asked to prioritize what they wanted to see at the park. There was also an online survey.

Acting mayor Rick Kasper applauded the current proposals but would like to see some provision for parking.

“This would give some additional opportunities for people that either have a physical impairment or have a hard time going down the stairs in order to get access to the park,” he said.

John Phillips Memorial Park was created in 2005 and is the largest green space in Sooke’s urban core at 7.75 hectares.

John Phillips Park to host new handful of facilities

* Free Pick up for Bottle Drives

* FULL REFUND forAll Beverage Containers

* Immediate PaymentPlease call to arrange date & time.

SOOKE BOTTLE DEPOT

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$$ FREE MONEY $$Bottle Drives!!!

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We Beat

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Testimonial #54“Thank you, Marlene, for all your hard work. Thank you for being so fl exible with your time. It was very diffi cult to get our large family all on the same time schedule when view-ing houses. We all felt you had our best interest at heart and in the end we found the perfect home for all of us!”

H.C. & H.C.

Page 6: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A6 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

3-COURSE DINNER THEATRE$75 at the Prestige Oceanfront Resort, Sooke

SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2016, 6:00PM(Doors open at 5:30 pm)

Tickets Available at: The PRESTIGE front desk, or online at eventbrite.com

STAGE SHOW$20 at Sooke Community Theatre at EMCSSATURDAY, APRIL 9, 2016, 7:00PM

(Doors open at 6:30 pm)SUNDAY, APRIL 10, 2016, 2:00PM MATINEE

(Doors open at 1:30 pm)Tickets Available at: Shoppers Drug Mart, The Stick, EMCS Program Office,

or online at eventbrite.com

sookeharbourplayers.com

CUT OFF FOR DINNER THEATRE TICKET SALES IS MONDAY, MARCH 28!

Jeff NagelBlack Press

Insurance fraudsters are increasingly being tripped up online by their own social media postings.

ICBC says it opened 2,350 cyber cases last year where investigators used social media or other online postings to try to uncover suspected fraudulent or exaggerated crash claims.

“Social media is a growing area that’s been highly success-ful for us,” said Chris Fairbridge, manager of ICBC’s Special Inves-tigations Unit.

“When you’ve got pictures and you’ve got video and you’ve got posts of what you’ve been doing, it’s pretty hard for anybody to look at that and say you’re tell-ing the truth when you’ve exag-gerated.”

Fairbridge said the dedicated unit now has 10 investigators dedicated to cyber cases, up from two when it was started in 2010.

About 70 per cent of their investigations have some effect in reducing payout costs or lead-ing to a complete denial.

One 2015 example was a B.C.

woman who claimed crash inju-ries kept her from returning to work as a hairdresser, but posted on Twitter and Facebook about hiking, running and being one of the “hardest hitters” on the roller derby team she’d just joined. She settled for half her original claim after being con-fronted with her social media posts.

In another case that went to court, a woman sought $1 mil-lion after being hit by a motor-cycle in a crosswalk. A judge awarded her just $20,000 and ordered her to pay $34,000 in ICBC costs after deciding from social media posts and other evidence that she’d grossly exaggerated her injuries.

Other phoney claimants were undone by their friends’ social media postings.

A Lower Mainland man said he couldn’t go back to his desk job after a crash but investiga-tors found a friend’s Facebook photo of him later running a gru-eling obstacle race in Whistler, as well as a video of him taking down an opponent in a mixed martial arts bout. Shown the evi-dence, he quickly settled, citing a miraculous recovery.

ICBC also denied a Kamloops man’s claim that vandals burned his truck after finding evidence the fire was suspicious and a Craigslist posting trying to sell the truck because he couldn’t afford to pay for its repairs.

Penalties may go beyond reduced or denied payouts.

Fairbridge said there were 520 successful fraud convictions in the last five years, some leading to jail time.

Those convicted may not be able to cross the border again or may have trouble getting a loan or a job, he noted.

Asked if fraudsters are getting wise and going dark on social media after a claim, Fairbridge said no.

“People can’t help them-selves.”

An estimated 10 to 20 per cent of auto insurance claims are fraudulent or exaggerated, cost-ing an extra $600 million a year in B.C. and adding $100 to the insurance premiums of the aver-age driver.

“We’re not going to tolerate that, we’re not going to pass those costs along to honest cus-tomers,” Fairbridge [email protected]

Car crash fraudsters hit wall after getting caught on social media ICBC cracks down false insurance claims posted online

Page 7: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I NEWS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A7

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Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

Not much is needed now except the refugee family the Team Sooke/Juan de Fuca refugee Sponsorship Committee is waiting for.

Sid Jorna, chair of the committee said they have already raised over $30,000 and all of the paperwork is to connect them with a family.

“We have no idea of the timeline,” said Jorna. “It takes a long time and depends on what country they have asylum in.

Jorna said their team of six contact people are now all trained and certified. They have taken sensitivity training through the Sponsorship

Agreement Holder, the Anglican Diocese and the Catholic Diocese. Cultural training and background checks are all done.

“Our team has an ESL specialist and settlement agencies in Victoria have a complete range of anticipated services. We are supported by all kinds of people around that.”

The team still have $15,000 to raise to help support a family of four for one year.

“Every cent goes to the refugee family, there is no overhead,” said Jorna.

The team will begin seeking housing once the timeline is locked in, although they do have interim housing.

Now all they need is a family.

For those who might wish to help and donate, they can send a cheque to St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 2191 Townsend Rd. Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0H4 with “refugee sponsorship” in the

memo line. Donations can

also be made online to Canada Helps, again with “refugee sponsorship” in the memo line. Tax receipts are given for all donations.

Sooke’s Wanted

Robert BARKERAge: 42Wanted: Breach of probation

Jeremy MURDOCHAge: 27Wanted: Theft, PSP, dangerous driving, breach of probation

Tyson KAYESAge: 36Wanted: Fail to appear, breach of probation

The following individuals are wanted by the Sooke RCMP as of March 22. If you have any information on these individuals or their crimes, you are asked to call the RCMP at 250-642-5241 or anonymously through Greater Victoria Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or online at victoriacrimestoppers.com.

Sponsorship team ready and awaiting refugee family

Saw something suspicious?

If you have information about a crime you can provide an anonymous tip by calling the Crime Stoppers 24/7 tip line at 1-800-222-8477.

Most programs also accept anonymous tips online using our secure and encrypted web-tip form.

Web tip or telephone tip, you will never be identified.

Police don’t want your name, phone number or email address, just information.

Page 8: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A8 I OPINION I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

The Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 4-6631 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A3 | Phone: 250-642-5752 | Web: sookenewsmirror.com

They Said It

Our View

Beginning in today’s edition, Black Press and the Sooke News Mirror will take an in-depth look at the sewage issue which has plagued and puzzled residents throughout the Capital Region for decades.

The Capital Regional District’s core area liquid waste management committee has recommended moving ahead with a wastewater treatment program that will feature treatment plants at Victoria’s Clover Point and either McLoughlin or Macaulay

points in Esquimalt. There’s reason for optimism

that Greater Victoria will finally find an alternative to pumping untreated sewage a kilometre out from shore into Juan de Fuca Strait. However, we’ve been here before, only to see the plan unravel amid political infighting.

The CRD identified McLoughlin Point as the preferred site for a single treatment plant back in 2014. That plan never made it past the initial designs as Esquimalt council rejected the

CRD’s rezoning application in a series of raucous public hearings.

There’s reason to believe Esquimalt may be more receptive in this go-round, as a Victoria plant serves to share the load on sewage flows.

The issue has taken some dramatic turns in recent weeks. The initial seven options, each of which included a main plant at Rock Bay, fell by the wayside as the committee focused on sites near existing outfalls at Clover and Macaulay points, saving the

$250-million cost of piping the effluent there.

But the project still carries an estimated cost of more than $1 billion, which would translate to estimated household costs ranging from a low of $352 a year in Saanich to a high of $741 in Colwood.

To address those costs, along with the technical advances in sewage treatment and the region’s history with the issue, Black Press assembled a team of reporters, photographers and

graphic designers, who devoted hundreds of hours researching the subject and putting together a two-part series that runs the next two Wednesdays.

We can only hope that this time we are finally on the road to a solution and won’t be sitting in the same place two years down the road, wondering how we got here.

•••We want to hear from you.

Send you comments to [email protected].

Series explores CRD’s sewage treatment

Publisher Rod Sluggett

Editor Kevin LairdOpinion

Substantial public art is needed in Sooke, but the cen-tre of the roundabout may not be the best location.

There was a process of working with the various special interest groups and we’ve come to a common ground.

We aim to be sending a senior team to the provincials in two to three years from now.

Drew Johnson Sooke Program chair– Page 5

Andrew Purdey, marina developer– Page 3

Trevor Bligh, basketball coach– Page 16

••

••

David SuzukiGuest Comment

Remote Australian communities often use diesel generators for power. They’re expensive to run and emit pollution and greenhouse gases. Even people who don’t rely entirely on generators use Australia’s power grid, which is mostly fuelled by polluting, climate-altering coal.

Now, one company is showing that supplying Australia’s energy needn’t be expensive or polluting.

AllGrid Energy produces 10 kilowatt-hour solar-power batteries that take advantage of Australia’s abundant sunlight and growing demand for solar panels. Their lead-acid gel battery is less expensive than Tesla’s lithium Powerwall, also available in Australia.

It’s an example of the rapid pace of

renewable energy development – one that clears a hurdle previously confronting many clean-energy technologies: their variable nature.

Many argue that because solar and wind energy only work when sun shines or winds blow, and output varies according to cloud cover, wind speed and other factors, they can’t replace large “baseload” sources like coal, oil, gas and nuclear. But batteries and other energy storage methods, along with power-grid improvements, make renewables competitive with fossil fuels and nuclear power.

With storage and grid technologies advancing daily, renewable energy could easily and relatively quickly replace most fossil fuel-generated electricity. In Canada, Ontario’s Independent Electricity System Operator contracted five companies to test

a number of storage systems, including batteries, hydrogen storage, kinetic flywheels and thermal systems that store heat in special bricks. Ontario is aiming to get about 50 per cent of its installed generating capacity from renewable sources by 2025.

The main renewable-energy storage methods are thermal, compressed air, hydrogen, pumped hydroelectric, flywheels and batteries. Some are better for large scale and some for small scale.

Renewable energy with storage has a number of advantages over fossil fuels. It can discharge power to the grid to meet demand more quickly and efficiently, and it’s less prone to disruption, because power sources are distributed over a large area, so if one part is knocked out by a storm, for example, other parts keep the system

running. Many fossil fuel and nuclear power systems require a lot of water for cooling and so can be affected by drought, and nuclear power systems are expensive and take a long time to build. Clean-energy technology also creates more jobs than fossil fuel development.

Because renewables don’t pollute or create greenhouse gas emissions, they also help lower costs for health care and the ever-increasing impacts of climate change. Although every energy source comes with consequences, the damage and risks from mining, processing, transporting and using coal, oil, bitumen and uranium, and from fracking and other extraction methods, are far greater than for clean energy.

•••David Suzuki writes for the Suzuki

Foundation.

A sense of insecurity in absence of leadership

Page 9: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I OPINION I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A9

WE ASKED YOU: Would you vote to increase the minimum wage to $15?

I think it should be increased, especially considering the cost of living these days.

Dola ParsonsSooke

Yes, just because of the high cost of living.

Paul DrennanSooke

No, because it would likely increase the cost for goods and services, or companies will likely just find another way to cut costs.

Josh SkinnerSooke

Yup, I would, because of the cost of living.

Jennifer DevinSooke

EDITOR’S NOTE: Would you like to be considered for We Asked You? If so, contact reporter Octavian Lacatusu by email at [email protected] or phone 250-642-5752.

Readers’ lettersSooke News Mirror letters policyThe News Mirror encourages dialogue on community issues. All letters are subject to editing. Letters should not exceed 300 words in length. All letters must include a full name, community of residence and a phone number. The number will not be published. Email submissions to [email protected]. Letters also can be mailed to Letters Editor, No. 4-6631 Sooke Rd., Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A3.

Finally getting a whiff of one’s own medicine

Good for acting mayor Rick Kasper setting the record straight about Sooke’s sewage treatment... I have long suspected it’s something in the air around Victoria that makes those residents claim that their effluent doesn’t stink, or why has it taken so many years to admit otherwise?

Andy NeimersSooke

International Women’s Day just not enough

March 8 is not a date most people regard as having any significance. Not a stat day off work or school. Since 1975, it has been International Women’s Day.

If ever society needed an International Women’s Day, it’s now. To remind women, men and children, of how it used to be and still is worldwide for half the population.

A country which calls itself the most progressive in the world still does not have the word “women” in its constitution which in effect would prohibit gender discrimination in the United States. 

A few Sooke female council members participated in last year’s Tea and Hat event.

The focus in the February 24 issue of Sooke News Mirror chamber chatter article by the Sooke Chamber of Commerce was to celebrate social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women, appearing two weeks prior to the designated day. 

This year’s Tea and Hat was

on March 6, likely to maximize attendance on a weekend. Why even bother with International Women’s Day?

Media has now normalized referring to adult women as “girls” as was the case pre-1970s, prior to the Women’s Movement.

Closer to home, this newspaper’s writers frequently use masculine form in their articles. These professional wordsmiths perhaps need to delegate editing to ensure language is gender and orientation inclusive.

With the top spots governing jobs in Sooke occupied by women, perhaps another precedent could be set.

Naming of the next new street or park after a female of historical significance would be a visible validation of one woman’s blood, sweat and tears of this town, which is long overdue.

Carmen NeumannSooke

Back to the future again and again

I won the debate about instituting Daylight Savings Time in 1954 as a high school senior in Oregon.

I wish I had lost. Back in my whimsical youth I didn’t know better.

Now at 80, as a retired sea captain, I can see the light, and it’s not saving daylight.

The other day I desired to get some photos of the noon light and realized I had to wait until 1 o’clock to get my noon sights.

As mariners we determine our longitude by the noon sighting, 1200, not 1300.

If landlubbers want to have

an extra hour of daylight after work, simply go to work an hour earlier. Everybody can go to work an hour earlier, don’t change the clock, change your work time.

I used to change 25 clocks twice a year with boats, cars, home, and business. Give me a break.

We live in a really awkward time of civilization, with some very stupid customs. District Standard Time is just one, but we live with it.

Why don’t we have 13 months of 28 days a year instead of 12 months of various days? The Earth has 13 moons a year and women (half of the Earth’s inhabitants) generally experience 13 menstrual cycles a year.

Speaking of years, do you really think they were counting down the years 3,000 years ago to reach zero (BC) and then start counting up (AD)? More religious nonsense, and yet we live with it.

And here is a stroke of mental genius - a natural plant of the Earth has been declared illegal: cannabis saliva (marijuana). Yet we live with it, or without it.

But maybe we are seeing the light on this last one.

We call ourselves rational?Ralph Hull

Sooke

Much applause for putting on a great show

As one of the prime organizers for the sold-out Chilliwack show which took place this last Saturday at the Sooke Community Theatre at EMCS, I would just like to take the opportunity to thank

my fellow organizers: Steve Anderson, Mel Dobres and Leighanne Georgeson, as well as all the many volunteers who came together on the day of the event.

Phil RossnerSooke

Find us on facebook atfacebook.com/sookenewsmirror

Throup

Road

Park

Throup Road

Ball Fields

Demamiel

Creek

Park

Ponds Park

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Ca

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Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator. Zone 10, North. North American Datum 1983.

November 17, 2015 | SEAPARCDeMamielCreekGolfCourse20151117.mxd | [email protected]

DISCLAIMER

Important This map is for general information purposes only. The Capital

Regional District (CRD) makes no representations or warranties regarding the

accuracy or completeness of this map or the suitability of the map for any

purpose. This map is not for navigation. The CRD will not be liable for any

damage, loss or injury resulting from the use of the map or information on the

map and the map may be changed by the CRD at any time.

Capital Regional District

DeMamiel CreekGolf Course

1:6,000

0 0.085 0.17 0.2550.0425KM

Proposed Acquisition

SEAPARC Property

Parks

DeMamiel Creek Golf Course

Journey Middle School

ySchool

SEAPARC

Public Information Sessions:Monday, April 4, 6:00-8:00pm JDF Office/CRD Planning Office, #3-7450 Butler RoadWednesday, April 6, 6:00-8:00pm Jordan River/Shirley - Shirley Community Hall, 2795 Sheringham Point RoadThursday, April 7, 5:30-7:30pmPort Renfrew - Recreation Centre, 6638 Deering RoadMonday, April 11, 6:00-8:00pm East Sooke Community Hall (old Fire Hall), 1397 Coppermine RoadMonday, April 18, 6:00-8:00pm SEAPARC, 2168 Phillips Road, Sooke

SEAPARC (Sooke & Juan de Fuca Electoral Area Parks and Recreation Commission) and the CRD invite you to attend a Public Information Session regarding the April 30th referendum to purchase 23 acres of land located at 6518 Throup Road in Sooke.

Meet Director Mike Hicks, SEAPARC Chair and Steve Knoke, SEAPARC Manager, learn more about the proposed purchase and provide feedback.

Strata-Arranwood

Dr

Strata-Ch urch Rd

Church Hi llD

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6512

Projection: Universal Transverse Mercator. Zone 10, North. North American Datum 1983.

November 17, 2015 | SEAPARCDeMamielCreekGolfCourse20151117.mxd | [email protected]

DISCLAIMER

Important This map is for general information purposes only. The Capital

Regional District (CRD) makes no representations or warranties regarding the

accuracy or completeness of this map or the suitability of the map for any

purpose. This map is not for navigation. The CRD will not be liable for any

damage, loss or injury resulting from the use of the map or information on the

map and the map may be changed by the CRD at any time.

Capital Regional District

DeMamiel CreekGolf Course

1:6,000

0 0.085 0.17 0.2550.0425KM

Proposed Acquisition

SEAPARC Property

Parks

Proposed Land Acquisition6518 Throup Road

SEAPARC PROPOSED LAND PURCHASE of 6518 Throup Road

PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSIONS

Page 10: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A10 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Elida PeersContributed

Today as we cruise down the hill approaching Coopers Cove when driving out from Victoria, with perhaps a quick glance at the quiet cove, noting small boats and kayaks, we see a background view of a closed-down industrial site.

Probably it’s hard to believe the enormity of the sawmilling enterprise that sustained much of Sooke’s working population for several decades, but this aerial photograph might help. The plane is flying low approaching Goodridge Peninsula in the foreground, heading from the East Sooke side. In the background today you would see the subdivision of Ludlow and Ayum Road, but this 1960s photo was taken long before that subdivision went in.

The enterprise was started by returning Second World War veteran Harry Helgesen in 1946 at Helgesen Road in Sooke, but soon moved to the Goodridge Peninsula site, where they could expand in all directions. When Harry Helgesen partnered with Bill Grunow the mill became Goodridge Sawmill, and later, when Grunow partnered with Hershel Smith, it became Sooke Forest Products. More changes followed, and in 1989 the mill closed.

The photo is centred by an Island Tug & Barge Company chip barge, with two hogfuel barges behind. These barges would be towed to Port Angeles or Crofton,

and were generally towed by Doug MacFarlane’s DEMAC. The “green chain” locations are just left of the barges. Milled lumber was trucked across the causeway (at left, out of photo) and hauled to Victoria for shipping, predominantly to the eastern seaboard, with some to local markets.

The extensive array of log booms in the close foreground were the responsibility of booming contractor Len Jones, who kept a crew of boom men employed there for many years. Timber delivered to the site for booming included Douglas-fir, western hemlock, balsam and red cedar. In its later years, the mill cut only cedar, and was regarded as one of the most efficient sawmills in Canada.

In its heyday, the 60s and 70s, the mill employed 400 men in three shifts around the clock. In fact, we residents would often be governed by the mill whistles; for instance the 11 p.m. whistle meant it was bedtime and the 7 a.m. whistle meant time to get up.

Close to the road that you see at far right, observe the dump and logbooms belonging to B.C. Forest Products at the left of the little inlet (there’s a restaurant there today), while on the right, you see the log dump used by logger Ted Shaw. While this site was the source of pay cheques that fed hundreds of Sooke families, that era is long gone.

•••Elida Peers is the historian of

Sooke Region Museum.

Sooke History

Sooke’s sawmill was one of the most efficient in Canada

Sooke Region Museum Archives

Aerial footage of East Sooke, with the Goodridge Peninsula in the foreground in the 1960s.

Sawmilling enterprise boomed in the region

Sooke Region Food CHI sends a big Thank You to our Seedy Saturday supporters.

Special thanks to the Sooke Fall Fair, all our many amazing volunteers and the Kids Garden Club.

Thanks to Sea Soil, Sooke Soil & Landscape and Stick in the Mud.

And special thanks to our vendors who contributed to our prizes.Barking Dog StudioBrother NatureBugs With BenefitsCowichan CompostCRD - Septic SavvyCreekside CraftsEisenhawer Organic ProduceEverything EdibleFarm N FoodFull Circle SeedsG Fletcher ConsultingGarden LoreGrow FoodHome HardwareHomesteader FarmInfuse HerbalsIsland Highlander Shortbread

J&R FarmJD’s Sunshine Jams and SuchLadybug GardenMetchosin FarmOmega Blue FarmsPerennial Ridge FarmsRebecca’s GardenSeedy Soaps for Gardeners and Earth Loving FolksSheila’s Coastal Crunch GranolaSooke Harbour HouseSooke Soil & LandscapeThree Sister’s FarmVancouver Island Regional Library

Missed Seedy Saturday? Many of our local farmers will have tables at Awareness Film Night, April 13, 7pm at EMCS. www.sookefoodchi.ca

Walk

With

Us

On Good Friday, March 25, Rev. Dimas and members of the Holy Trinity Anglican Church will walk the Stations of the Cross. Starting at 10:00am at the information kiosk (Evergreen Centre) ending at Holy Trinity, followed by Good Friday service at 11:00am.Come, just as you are and walk with us.

Holy Trinity Church

Walk With Us

KNOX PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH2110 Church Rd | 250-642-4124

SUNDAY SERVICE10:30 am Family Worship

Rev. Dr Gordon Kouwenberg

knoxsooke.com

HOLY TRINITYAnglican Church

1962 Murray Road | 250-642-3172SUNDAY SERVICE: 10am The Rev. Dimas Canjura

www.holytrinitysookebc.org

The Pastor's Pen

SOOKE BAPTIST CHURCH7110 West Coast Road | 250-642-3424

SUNDAY SERVICE 10:00 am Children, youth & adult ministries

Pastor Rick Eby Email [email protected]

www.sookebaptistchurch.com

JUAN DE FUCA SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

4251 Sooke Road | 778-425-3403SATURDAY SERVICE

9:30 am Bible Study • 11:00 am Church Service

Pastor Lowell Holmquist Sunday @ 10:30AM | clachurch.com/sooke

6851 West Coast Road | 250.642.4822

What is good about this coming Friday? It is a day commemorated by followers of Jesus for the better part of the last two millennia. It is a day to remember his betrayal, arrest, trials, sentence, beatings, and death on a cross. It is

a day of remembrance and mourning, much like a funeral or memorial. Doesn’t sound like it should be called Good Friday, does it? But what every follower of Jesus knows is that the drama of Good Friday doesn’t end with the lifeless body of Jesus being sealed in a tomb. Early in the morning on Sunday a discovery was made that impacted the whole world. Jesus did what he said he would do. He overcame death and the grave. He came back from the dead after three days and presented himself to hundreds of witnesses. This Friday is called Good not because of what happened on that day, but because it set the stage for the greatest day in history - Resurrection Day. Have you ever wondered why Christians gather for worship primarily on Sunday mornings? It’s a weekly celebration and reminder of the resurrection of Jesus. You’re invited to drop in at a church this Sunday morning to learn why the resurrection is such a big deal. There’s also a special inter-church sunrise outdoor service hosted at Sooke Baptist church at 7:30am. All are welcome!

Lowell HolmquistChristian Life Assembly

ST. ROSE OF LIMA Roman Catholic Parish2191 Townsend Rd. | 250-642-3945 | Fax: 778-425-3945

Saturday Mass 4pm | Sunday Mass, 9amThursday Mass 10:30 am

Children’s Religious Ed: Sat. 3-4pm Offi ce Hours: Tue 12-3 Wed 10-12 Thurs 1-3

Rev. Fr. Marinaldo Batista

Page 11: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A11

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Triple CreamBrie Cheese

/lb

/100g

Fresh

Bick’sSpecialty

Pickles

299

Produce

99¢

Uncle Ben’s

Stuff’NSuch

/lb4.39/kg

1L

COME IN AND ENTER FOR A CHANCE TO WIN

1 OF 2 PELICAN PREMIUM KAYAKSSPONSORED BY VILLAGE FOOD MARKETS.

This Month’s Featured Giveaway

120g

12 Pack

6.57/kg

California Extra Large

Green Grapes

298

Happy Easter

Your ticket to the best grocery deals

every week!

Page 12: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A21A12 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Dairyland and Village Food Markets are both teaming up to donate money to local schools. We’re proud to offer a full range of high quality Dairyland products and help our schools overcome funding shortages for activities and programs. Milk Money is a great fundraiser everyone can participate in! Sign up Now!

Mitchell’s Boneless

SmokedHams

Planter’s Dry RoastedPeanuts600g.....................................499 Aquafi naWater24x500 mL ...........................499

Dempster’sEnglish Muffi ns6’s .......................................2/500

DolePineapple398 mL ...........................

2/300ComplimentsPure Pumpkin398 mL ........................... 2/300Honey MaidGraham Wafers400g .........................................299

Clover LeafSmoked Oysters85g .................................2/300 Live CleanShampoo or Conditioner350 mL .................................599

PurinaMeow Mix2kg .......................................599

Fresh

Pork Side Spareribs

Cornish

Game Hens8.80/kg Frozen ...................399

Freybe

Pepperoni500g ...................................699

Freybe European Frankfurters orBavarian Smokies600g ...................................699

Freybe Double SmokedBacon375g ...................................499

Freybe

European Wieners500g ...................................699

1099

Fresh Imported

Lamb Loin Chops24.22/kg

249 299

Meat

449Fresh Pork Tenderloin9.90/kg

Manns

Romaine Lettuce 3 Pk ...298

Organic!

Roma Tomatoes 3.26/kg ..148

Organic!

Celery 3.26/kg ..................148

California

Oranges 4lb Bag ...............398

Organic!Cooking Onions 3lb Bag ..398

Organic!

Russet Potatoes 5lb Bag ..498

B E T T E R B E C A U S E W E C A R E . . . . A B O U T O U R K I D S !

Village Food Markets

Fresh Produce

CaliforniaBunchBroccoli2.16/kg

/lb

/lb

1lb

/lb5.49/kg

/lb

/lb6.59/kg

/lb

California

Yams2.16/kg

Regular or Sweet & Sour Cut

98¢

BulkSPECIALSExpo

Mix ....................109

Sesame

Sticks.................119

Chocolate

Rosebuds ...........79¢

Salt Water

Taffy ...................109

Roasted & Salted

Pistachios ...........109

Sesame Glazed

Cashews .............249

Raw Shelled

Pumpkin Seeds ..175

Yogurt

Chips ................75¢

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

Whole or Halves

/lb

98¢/lb /lb

All Varieties

Coca ColaProducts12x355 mL ............399

Lays Family Size

PotatoChips255g .................

3/800

Molson Exel

0.5%Beer12x355 mL ............599

Kettle Brand

PotatoChips220g .................

2/500

Christie

SnackCrackers200-225g ........

2/500

Tribal JavaFair Trade Organic

Coffee454g ........................899

Dempster’s

Cinnamon RaisinBagels6’s .............................299

QuakerReady to Serve

Oatmeal310-450g ........

2/500

Ocean Spray

CranberryCocktail1.89L .......................299

Terra Delyssa Organic Extra Virgin

Olive Oil1L ..............................699

French’s

GravyMixes21-47g .................99¢

Campbell’s

Broths

900 mL ............2/400

Check out a complete list of our weekly specials online or in our in store fl yer

Grocery SpecialsRogers Fine

GranulatedSugar4kg ...........................499

Betty Crocker

Frosting

340-450g ........2/400

Pacifi c

EvaporatedMilk370 mL ............

2/300

San Remo

CoarseSea Salt1kg ........................99¢

Kraft

MiracleWhip890 mL ...................399

Kraft Philadelphia

CreamCheese250g Brick ............399

Chipits Semi Sweet

ChocolateChips300g ........................299

Parkay

Margarine1/4’s

1.36kg .....................299

Purex Double Roll

BathroomTissue12 roll ......................699

Dawn Ultra

DishLiquid638 mL ............

2/500

Glad

ClingWrap60m ..........................299

Alcan

FoilWrap12”x100’ ................399

+dep

+dep +dep

+dep

Grocery

8”

Grocery

Village Food Markets

California

Strawberries

2/500

Island Gold MediumWhiteEggsDozen

2/500432g

499

Kraft

Salad Dressing

2/500

341-398 mL

348 mL

475 mL

Ocean Spray

CranberrySauce

Betty Crocker Super Moist

CakeMixes

Seafood

Ready to Serve Machine Peeled

Shrimp Meat ...........264Previously Frozen

Black Tiger Prawns .....198/100g

PREVIOUSLY FROZEN WILD

Sockeye Salmon Fillets

220/100g

Del Monte

Vegetables

99¢

2/300

/100g

Page 13: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A13

Octavian LacatusuSooke News Mirror

Lately, there’s been many oohs and aahs coming from the Sooke Fire Hall, but it’s not sirens or fire trucks making the noise, it’s the firefighters – over the latest piece of equipment.

Weighing in at a few pounds and made by hand entirely out of wood, it is a 1:25th scale replica model of the department’s flag-ship, the Rosenbauer Cobra lad-der fire truck.

“This is the biggest and most complex truck I’ve ever built,” said Sooke Fire Chief Steven Sorensen, who shares a lifelong passion for building wooden models, fire trucks in particular.

This is the chief’s 12th truck, joining a rich collection of exist-ing models he’s built over the years, most now displayed in his office. With detail and functional-ity though, the Rosenbauer easily is the biggest accomplishment. Or, as Sorensen puts it, it’s the result of a lifelong process.

“Each one gets a little better. Like anything, you refine it as you go along,” he said.

The project took five years, more than 3,000 hours of work and hundreds and hundreds of metic-ulously created wooden parts that not only had to be exactly to scale, but to also fit and work together properly.

No doubt, this wooden master-piece is teeming with super-cool features, such as a fully function-ing ladder system that stretches out and folds into itself along with retractable support mounts and a rotating superstructure, all like the real deal.

Devil in the details include switches and control dials on the sides, ladders in the rear with a functioning sliding door, full interior with opening doors and proper firefighting equipment. Even the seats fold up and down.

Sorensen recalled the biggest challenge was the ladder and the accompanying mechanism, which was initially prone to warping or snapping off.

“All pieces were individually cut out and made to fit together, and then held all together as the glue sets to keep it straight, because it’s really easy to warp and twist,” Sorensen said.

It did help a lot to have the real truck to use as a visual reference. Sorensen used factory scaled drawings, and lots of photographs to help with the truck’s overall

proportions.Sorensen picked up the wood-

carving hobby from his dad, a professional carpenter who ran a business building cabinets. At age nine, Sorensen built his first fire truck out of wood using basic tools in his dad’s workshop.

Now, with the flagship fire truck finished, Sorensen turns his sights on the next project, perhaps even

adding features such as LED lights to the existing one.

“I might now have to do the pumper truck too, have a little set,” he said.

Sorensen hopes to find a place or an event to display the big lad-der fire truck, though, despite the collective groans of adults and kids alike, it’s not a toy.

[email protected]

A labour of love: fire chief builds model fire truck Handmade masterpiece took more than 3,000 hours, and hundreds of individually-built wooden parts to turn the wooden replica into what it is today. And patience. Lots and lots of patience.

Octavian Lacatusu/Sooke News Mirror

Sooke Fire Chief Steven Sorensen stands proudly by his handbuilt scale model of the fire department’s Rosenbauer ladder truck. Notice the opening doors.

Good Friday Recycling Reminder

We Recycle on Good FridayIf your blue box collection day falls on Good Friday, March 25, your curbside materials will be collected as usual.

Please place your recyclables at the curb by 7:30 am in appropriate sized containers.For more information, please visit www.crd.bc.ca/bluebox.

2945 JACKLIN ROAD LANGFORD 80 STORES & SERVICES WINNERS HOMESENSE FAIRWAY MARKET CINEPLEX SPORTCHEK / ATMOSPHERE SHOPPERS MARK’S

More Bunny than EverEaster Photos for all!

Bring your camera, bring your phone, and put on your best Bunny ears for a photo with the Easter Bunny, selfie style! Each child will receive a Free Easter treat! The Easter Bunny will be available March 23 to March 27 between 11am and 5pm.

Complete details and visiting hours see westshoretowncentre.com.

March 23 – 27

Donations for Easter Bunny visits benefitting the Victoria Humane Society are

graciously accepted.

Page 14: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A14 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

The B.C. government is ending its practice of deducting WorkSafeBC death benefits from income assistance col-lected by the survivors.

The regulatory change is being made after Nanaimo MLA Leonard Krog ques-tioned the government about a constituent who has had her four-year-old son’s benefit deducted since she began receiving income assistance.

The father disap-peared and was pre-sumed drowned while working on a log boom at Port Mellon in 2011, before the child was born.

The boy was eligible for $286.72 per month in a WorkSafeBC benefit because his father was killed on the job, but under the province’s income assistance pol-icy, that amount was deducted, leaving the mother with $658 a month.

Social Development Minister Michelle Stil-well said Tuesday she has instructed min-istry staff to change the regulation, similar to a change that was made last September to exempt Canada Pen-sion Plan orphan ben-efits.

Stilwell said there appear to be only a few cases involv-ing WorkSafeBC, and she was not aware of them when regulations were changed to stop deducting CPP and parental child support payments.

“As with many gov-

ernment benefits, when it comes to staff mem-bers, they follow it word for word,” Stilwell said.

As of last Septem-ber, single parents on income assistance are allowed to keep child support payments made by the other par-ent.

That affected about 3,200 families and 5,400 children.

NDP social develop-ment critic Michelle Mungall said that since the Nanaimo case came to light, MLAs have heard of similar cases involving WorkSafeBC child benefits.

She urged the gov-ernment to make the change as quickly as possible.

“New Democrats advocated for more than a year to end the child support clawback, and we saw success on that, and at the same time, the government made the right decision to end the clawback of CPP orphan benefits,” Mungall said.

“Somehow they ignored this one and the minister needs to account for why they ignored it.”

Income assistance payments in B.C. were last increased in 2007.

For an employable adult, the rate is $235 per month plus a maxi-mum shelter allowance of $375 a month.

For an employable single parent with one child, the rate is $375.58 plus $570 for shelter.

[email protected]

Death benefits from income assistance halted by province

Octavian Lacatusu/Sooke News Mirror

Rise of the

machineEdward Milne Community School student Rowan Hensley tests the latest robot to come out of the school’s senior robotics program by testing its dexterity. Hensley and his team plan to take their creation to the provincial robotics championships, where they will use the impressive mobility of their machine to build a wooden boat.

If you served in Korean War, you may be eligible for the Korean Ambassador for Peace Medal.

This commemorative medal is an expression of appreciation from the Korean government to Canadian service men and women who served in the Korean War.

The Ambassador

for Peace Medal was awarded to veterans who participated in Korea’s Revisit Pro-gram, but has now been extended to Canadian Veterans who have not returned to Korea.

For further informa-tion, please email Royal Canadian Legion No. 54 (Sooke) service officer Camille Tkacz at [email protected].

Korean War veterans eligible for special peace medal

Income assistance rules to benefit single parents

KNOW THE ADVERTISING RULES2016 SOOKE AND ELECTORAL AREA

RECREATION AND FACILITIES NON-ELECTION ASSENT VOTING ADVERTISING

Non-election assent voting advertising is any advertising during a non-election assent voting proceedings period that promotes or opposes, directly or indirectly, a particular outcome for the vote.

Non-election assent voting is taking place in the District of Sooke and a portion of the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area (Port Renfrew, Shirley, Jordan River, Otter Point, East Sooke) within the Capital Regional District. If you advertise from March 31 to April 30, 2016, during the Sooke and Electoral Area Recreation and Facilities Non-election Assent Voting, you have rules to follow under the Local Elections Campaign Financing Act:

■ You must register with Elections BC as a non-election assent voting advertising sponsor before conducting any advertising.

■ You must include your name and contact information on all advertising.

■ You must file a disclosure statement with Elections BC by July 29, 2016.

To learn more about the rules and to download registration forms and the Guide for Local Non-election Assent Voting Advertising Sponsors in B.C., visit elections.bc.ca/lecfa.

Media outlets cannot publish or transmit non-election assent voting advertising on General Voting Day, Saturday, April 30, 2016.

elections.bc.ca/lecfa 1 - 8 5 5 - 9 5 2 - 0 2 8 0

Find us on facebook : facebook.com/sookenewsmirror

Page 15: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A15

BAKERYBaked Fresh Daily

BAKERYea

NanaimoBars6's ...............................499CupCakes6's Assorted Flavours ....499

Raisin

Bread

ea

ea

Cheese & Garlic

Focaccia....................................349

ea

Crumpets

284g ...........................229

454g

249

www.westernfoods.comSENIOR’S DAY THURSDAYS • SAVE 10% ON MOST ITEMS

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1974

SOOKE6660 Sooke Road

Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10 pm

We reserve the right to limit quantities

Go Greenuse

WesternFoodsCloth Bags

LANGFORD772 Goldstream Ave.Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10 pm

We reserve the right to limit quantities

DELIHealthy Choices In Our

DELI

Sesmark

Crackers................................. 349/100g ea

ea

/100g

HappyEaster!

California

Romaine Lettuce

99¢ea

Fresh

Grade ATurkeys 4.39/kg

199/lb

/100g

Boursin Assorted

Cheese150g ..........................649

Raincoast

CrispsAssorted

150g ...........................649GarlicCoil...................................169

Ambrosia

Salad

...............................99¢

149

Freybe

Old FashionedHam

/100g

Your Community Food StoreAD PRICES IN EFFECT MARCH 23 THROUGH MARCH 29, 2016

Sooke DeliveryNow offering a shopping service in Sooke for shut-ins.

Call Thursdays between 9am and 12pm at 250-642-6525

ea

ea

/100g

Page 16: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A16 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A17

WESTERN

Fresh For Your FamilyStock Up Your Pantry

5-A-Day for Optimum Health

PRODUCEPRODUCEGROCERY SAVINGSGROCERY SAVINGSBUTCHER’S BLOCKBUTCHER’S BLOCK

SEA ORGANIC CORNERTreats from the

SEA

Chocolate

Macadamia Nuts ....229/100g /100g

Chocolate Mararoons or

Rosebuds ..........................79¢/100g /100g

Sooke DeliveryWe offer a shopping service in Sooke for shut-ins

Call Thursdays between 9am and 12pm at 250-642-6525

Scotch Mints ............69¢Banana Chips ...........79¢

Western FoodsWhite or 60% Whole Wheat

Bread570g ........................99¢

ea

ea

1.89L

200g

Chilean

Red Plums

219

Mexican

Zucchini

79¢

California

Celery

89¢Mitchell Farms

GreenKale

99¢

California

Parsley

2/100

Maple Leaf

Bacon

375g .................................599Schneider's

Mini SausageRolls325g ......................................449

Maole Leaf

Chicken Cordons340g Assorted Flavours ........599

California

Romaine Lettuce

199

Cook's

HamsShank or Butt Half

5.49/kg .............................249Toupie

HamsHalves or Quarters

7.69/kg ....................................349

Previously Frozen

SockeyeFillets 5 oz

Fresh New Zealand

Leg ofLamb17.61/kg ...........................799

Fresh New Zealand

Lamb LoinChops21.36/kg ..............................969

Fresh

Grade ATurkeys 4.39/kg

199

109

Mexican

AtaulfoMango

2/250

99¢

Texana

Basmati IndianRice907g ..........................359

UnicoStuffed Manzanilla Olives375 mL .......................179

Ronzoni

PastaSauce650 mL ..................

2/500

Pine Mountian

Fire Logs

1.72 kg ........................449

Saffl o

Sunfl owerOil1L ................................389

Knorr

Chicken NoodleSoup338g ..........................229

Bush'sBakedBeans398 mL .................

4/500

Kraft

FlankerDinners200g .........................169

Dempster's

EnglishMuffi ns6's ..........................

2/500Spongetowels Econo Big-Roll

PaperTowels6's ...............................599

Brunswick

KipperedHerring100g .....................

2/300Glad

ClingWrap90m ............................349

General Mills

Oatmeal CrispCereal420-505g ..................399

Aquafi na

RemineralizedWater24x500 mL .................499

ea

/lb

Medium Yellow Onions.86/kg .................................39¢

Small NavelOranges1.52/kg ................................69¢

Dempster'sCinnamon Raisin

Bagels6's ...............................279

ea

2/700

/lb /lb

Candied

SalmonStrips

BULKFOODS

Washington

Imitation

Crab

1.96/kg

/lb

4.83/kg

/100g

California

Mexican

Honey DewMelons

99¢

Royale Double Roll

BathroomTissue12's ............................699

California Organic

Yams

2/1000/100g

Fresh Express Organic

Spinach3 lbs

2.18/kg

/lb

Rockstar

EnergyDrinks473 mL ..................

3/500

Maple Leaf

Top Dogs

450g ....................................449

/100g

/lb

Gold SealChunk or Flaked

Light Tunain Water

4/500

/lb

ea

12x355-500 mL

+dep

Kraft Pourable

SaladDressing

2/400250 mL 170g

Old El Paso

SeasoningMix35g ......................

4/500

Christie

Snack Crackers

Kraft PureRaspberry or Strawberry

Jam500 mL ........................399

Old El Paso

Stand 'N StuffTaco Shells133g ..........................199

/lb

199

SunRype Pure

Apple Juice

12x355 mL

Christie

Cookies

449

Motts

ClamatoJuice

2991.89L

Unico

Pasta

2/500900g

ea

Kool Aid Liquid

WaterEnhancers48 mL .........................299

Campbell's

ClassicSoups540 mL ..................

2/400

ea

99¢796 mL

HeinzSqueeze

Ketchup

369

Unico

Tomatoes500g

Del Monte

Vegetables

99¢341-398 mL

Fancy Feast

Cat Food

85g ..........................69¢

McLarensStuffed Manzanilla Olives, Onions orGherkins

2/500375 mL

ea

1.74/kg

ea

259

2/500

Ocean Spray

CranberrySauce348 mL

169

ea/lb

/lb

ea

1L

260-460g

General Mills

CheeriosCereal

349

Regular or Maple

ea

/lb

ea

ea+dep

ea

ea, +dep

ea+dep

2/800

255g

Lays XXL

PotatoChips

3/800

ea

Molson ExelLow AlcoholBeer

699

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea ea

ea

Regular or Barbecue

ea

ea+dep

Coca Cola orDasani Water

+dep

Page 17: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A16 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A17

WESTERN

Fresh For Your FamilyStock Up Your Pantry

5-A-Day for Optimum Health

PRODUCEPRODUCEGROCERY SAVINGSGROCERY SAVINGSBUTCHER’S BLOCKBUTCHER’S BLOCK

SEA ORGANIC CORNERTreats from the

SEA

Chocolate

Macadamia Nuts ....229/100g /100g

Chocolate Mararoons or

Rosebuds ..........................79¢/100g /100g

Sooke DeliveryWe offer a shopping service in Sooke for shut-ins

Call Thursdays between 9am and 12pm at 250-642-6525

Scotch Mints ............69¢Banana Chips ...........79¢

Western FoodsWhite or 60% Whole Wheat

Bread570g ........................99¢

ea

ea

1.89L

200g

Chilean

Red Plums

219

Mexican

Zucchini

79¢

California

Celery

89¢Mitchell Farms

GreenKale

99¢

California

Parsley

2/100

Maple Leaf

Bacon

375g .................................599Schneider's

Mini SausageRolls325g ......................................449

Maole Leaf

Chicken Cordons340g Assorted Flavours ........599

California

Romaine Lettuce

199

Cook's

HamsShank or Butt Half

5.49/kg .............................249Toupie

HamsHalves or Quarters

7.69/kg ....................................349

Previously Frozen

SockeyeFillets 5 oz

Fresh New Zealand

Leg ofLamb17.61/kg ...........................799

Fresh New Zealand

Lamb LoinChops21.36/kg ..............................969

Fresh

Grade ATurkeys 4.39/kg

199

109

Mexican

AtaulfoMango

2/250

99¢

Texana

Basmati IndianRice907g ..........................359

UnicoStuffed Manzanilla Olives375 mL .......................179

Ronzoni

PastaSauce650 mL ..................

2/500

Pine Mountian

Fire Logs

1.72 kg ........................449

Saffl o

Sunfl owerOil1L ................................389

Knorr

Chicken NoodleSoup338g ..........................229

Bush'sBakedBeans398 mL .................

4/500

Kraft

FlankerDinners200g .........................169

Dempster's

EnglishMuffi ns6's ..........................

2/500Spongetowels Econo Big-Roll

PaperTowels6's ...............................599

Brunswick

KipperedHerring100g .....................

2/300Glad

ClingWrap90m ............................349

General Mills

Oatmeal CrispCereal420-505g ..................399

Aquafi na

RemineralizedWater24x500 mL .................499

ea

/lb

Medium Yellow Onions.86/kg .................................39¢

Small NavelOranges1.52/kg ................................69¢

Dempster'sCinnamon Raisin

Bagels6's ...............................279

ea

2/700

/lb /lb

Candied

SalmonStrips

BULKFOODS

Washington

Imitation

Crab

1.96/kg

/lb

4.83/kg

/100g

California

Mexican

Honey DewMelons

99¢

Royale Double Roll

BathroomTissue12's ............................699

California Organic

Yams

2/1000/100g

Fresh Express Organic

Spinach3 lbs

2.18/kg

/lb

Rockstar

EnergyDrinks473 mL ..................

3/500

Maple Leaf

Top Dogs

450g ....................................449

/100g

/lb

Gold SealChunk or Flaked

Light Tunain Water

4/500

/lb

ea

12x355-500 mL

+dep

Kraft Pourable

SaladDressing

2/400250 mL 170g

Old El Paso

SeasoningMix35g ......................

4/500

Christie

Snack Crackers

Kraft PureRaspberry or Strawberry

Jam500 mL ........................399

Old El Paso

Stand 'N StuffTaco Shells133g ..........................199

/lb

199

SunRype Pure

Apple Juice

12x355 mL

Christie

Cookies

449

Motts

ClamatoJuice

2991.89L

Unico

Pasta

2/500900g

ea

Kool Aid Liquid

WaterEnhancers48 mL .........................299

Campbell's

ClassicSoups540 mL ..................

2/400

ea

99¢796 mL

HeinzSqueeze

Ketchup

369

Unico

Tomatoes500g

Del Monte

Vegetables

99¢341-398 mL

Fancy Feast

Cat Food

85g ..........................69¢

McLarensStuffed Manzanilla Olives, Onions orGherkins

2/500375 mL

ea

1.74/kg

ea

259

2/500

Ocean Spray

CranberrySauce348 mL

169

ea/lb

/lb

ea

1L

260-460g

General Mills

CheeriosCereal

349

Regular or Maple

ea

/lb

ea

ea+dep

ea

ea, +dep

ea+dep

2/800

255g

Lays XXL

PotatoChips

3/800

ea

Molson ExelLow AlcoholBeer

699

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea ea

ea

Regular or Barbecue

ea

ea+dep

Coca Cola orDasani Water

+dep

Page 18: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A18 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Your Community Food Store

AD PRICES IN EFFECT MARCH 23 THRU MARCH 29, 2016

SOOKE6660 Sooke Road

Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

We reserve the right to limit quantities

Locally owned and operated since 1974LANGFORD

772 Goldstream Ave.Open 7 Days a Week7:30 am to 10:00 pm

We reserve the right to limit quantities

For Your Healthy Lifestyle

NATURAL FOODSNATURAL FOODS

DAIRYRemember Your Calcium

DAIRY

Endangered Species NaturalChocolateBars85g ..................

2/500Red BullEnergy Drinks250 mL .............

2/400

Pacifi c RimPeanutButter450g ..........................349

Celestial Seasonings

TeaBags20's ............................229

AirCoalCharcoal Air Purifi er100g .........................549

Banana JoeBananaCrisps50g ..................

4/500

FROZENFROZENQuality and Convenience

Echo Clean

StainRemover900 mL .......................499Echo CleanFabric SoftenerSheets40's ...................

2/500

ORGANICQuality and Convenience

Let's Do Organic

Sugar Cones132g .........................................................................429

Spectrum Organic

Extra Virgin Olive Oil1L ....................................................................1499

ea

Coco Libre

Protein Coconut Water325 mL .............................................................

2/400

Que Pasa Organic

Tortilla Chips425g .........................................................................279

GLUTEN FREEOPTIONS

NATURALFROZEN

ea

Island FarmsCountry Cream or DenaliIce Cream

1.65L .........................499

+dep

Earth's Choice Organic

Chocolate Bars80g ...................................................................

2/500

ea

Gerolsteiner

MineralWater750 mL .......................169

Tropicana Pure or Blended

OrangeJuice1.75L ...........................499

Olympic Natural or Non-Fat

Yogurt

650g ...........................349

Armstrong

CheddarCheese700g ..........................699

Capri Non Hydrogenated

Margarine

907g .........................269Snowcrest

Fruit orBerries600g ..........................399Dr. OetkerCasa di Mama Ultimate

Pizzas400g .........................449McCain Extra Crisp

FrenchFries650g ..........................329

ea

Rumble

SuperShake

355 mL ............................299

ea

ea

ea

ea

ea

69¢

1099ea

Betty CrockerGluten FreeCookie or Brownie Mix

454-539g .......................499

Minute Maid

OrangeJuice295 mL

ea

2192/300

ea

ea

AlexiaSweet PotatoFries425g

....................269

Island Farms

WhippingCream473 mL

ea

Blue SkyNatural Sodas355 mL

ea

ea+dep

ea

ea+dep

ea+dep

ea

ea

+dep ea

Urbani

Risotto orMac & CheeseBalls350g

.................2/700

ea ea

ea

Level GroundOrganic Fair Trade

Coffee454g

Page 19: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A19

Photo: Charla Huber

Cash for the food bankSooke Food Bank president Kim Metzger accepts more than $550 from Kevin Albers, M’akola Group of Societies CEO. Albers presented the funds raised by M’akola employees through an office fundraiser. M’akola is moving its headquarters to the West Shore next month. M’akola houses 32 family members in Sooke at its Hope Centre Building. M’akola is the largest Aboriginal housing provider in B.C. and serves more than 5,000 family members.

This schedule is subject to change.Please call 250-642-1634 to confi rm meetings.Council meeting agendas may be viewed

at www.sooke.ca

2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634

Fax: 250-642-0541email: [email protected]

website: www.sooke.ca

UpcomingPublic Meetings

Sooke Program for the Arts(SPA) Committee

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 9:30 am

Special Council Meeting2016-2020 Five Year Financial Plan

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 7:00 pm

Sooke Fire Services Commission Thursday, March 24, 2016 at 6:30 pm

Regular Council MeetingTuesday, March 29, 2016 at 7:00 pm

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Page 20: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A20 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

††See Walmart.ca or contact Walmart customer service at 1-800-328-0402 for availability.

Working to bring you lower prices every day!

WE’RE LOWERINGPRICES SO YOU CANSAVE MORE

EL_WEST

117 170 g

Clover Leaf Skipjack Tuna

#9273260.Not available in all stores.††

127 398 mL

HeinzBeans

or Pasta#9276795.

297 650 mL

Classico Pasta Sauce

#9201008.

125 710 mL

Gatorade#9239303.

Plus deposit (where applicable).

497 170 g

NescaféInstant Coff ee

#30171807.797 14s

Tassimo Maxwell House Single Serve Coff ee

#9207946.

197 5-pack

Chewy or Chocolate Dipp Bars#9231778. 968

eachBecel Margarine

4 lb. #9051840.

new lower pricesWalmart® WILL MATCH the advertised purchase price of any competitor for an identical product.‡Ad

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Effective Thursday, March 24th, 2016. ‡Restrictions apply. See Customer Service desk for details.

Guaranteed UNBEATABLE! †

Page 21: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A21A12 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Dairyland and Village Food Markets are both teaming up to donate money to local schools. We’re proud to offer a full range of high quality Dairyland products and help our schools overcome funding shortages for activities and programs. Milk Money is a great fundraiser everyone can participate in! Sign up Now!

Mitchell’s Boneless

SmokedHams

Planter’s Dry RoastedPeanuts600g.....................................499 Aquafi naWater24x500 mL ...........................499

Dempster’sEnglish Muffi ns6’s .......................................2/500

DolePineapple398 mL ...........................

2/300ComplimentsPure Pumpkin398 mL ........................... 2/300Honey MaidGraham Wafers400g .........................................299

Clover LeafSmoked Oysters85g .................................2/300 Live CleanShampoo or Conditioner350 mL .................................599

PurinaMeow Mix2kg .......................................599

Fresh

Pork Side Spareribs

Cornish

Game Hens8.80/kg Frozen ...................399

Freybe

Pepperoni500g ...................................699

Freybe European Frankfurters orBavarian Smokies600g ...................................699

Freybe Double SmokedBacon375g ...................................499

Freybe

European Wieners500g ...................................699

1099

Fresh Imported

Lamb Loin Chops24.22/kg

249 299

Meat

449Fresh Pork Tenderloin9.90/kg

Manns

Romaine Lettuce 3 Pk ...298

Organic!

Roma Tomatoes 3.26/kg ..148

Organic!

Celery 3.26/kg ..................148

California

Oranges 4lb Bag ...............398

Organic!Cooking Onions 3lb Bag ..398

Organic!

Russet Potatoes 5lb Bag ..498

B E T T E R B E C A U S E W E C A R E . . . . A B O U T O U R K I D S !

Village Food Markets

Fresh Produce

CaliforniaBunchBroccoli2.16/kg

/lb

/lb

1lb

/lb5.49/kg

/lb

/lb6.59/kg

/lb

California

Yams2.16/kg

Regular or Sweet & Sour Cut

98¢

BulkSPECIALSExpo

Mix ....................109

Sesame

Sticks.................119

Chocolate

Rosebuds ...........79¢

Salt Water

Taffy ...................109

Roasted & Salted

Pistachios ...........109

Sesame Glazed

Cashews .............249

Raw Shelled

Pumpkin Seeds ..175

Yogurt

Chips ................75¢

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

/100g

Whole or Halves

/lb

98¢/lb /lb

All Varieties

Coca ColaProducts12x355 mL ............399

Lays Family Size

PotatoChips255g .................

3/800

Molson Exel

0.5%Beer12x355 mL ............599

Kettle Brand

PotatoChips220g .................

2/500

Christie

SnackCrackers200-225g ........

2/500

Tribal JavaFair Trade Organic

Coffee454g ........................899

Dempster’s

Cinnamon RaisinBagels6’s .............................299

QuakerReady to Serve

Oatmeal310-450g ........

2/500

Ocean Spray

CranberryCocktail1.89L .......................299

Terra Delyssa Organic Extra Virgin

Olive Oil1L ..............................699

French’s

GravyMixes21-47g .................99¢

Campbell’s

Broths

900 mL ............2/400

Check out a complete list of our weekly specials online or in our in store fl yer

Grocery SpecialsRogers Fine

GranulatedSugar4kg ...........................499

Betty Crocker

Frosting

340-450g ........2/400

Pacifi c

EvaporatedMilk370 mL ............

2/300

San Remo

CoarseSea Salt1kg ........................99¢

Kraft

MiracleWhip890 mL ...................399

Kraft Philadelphia

CreamCheese250g Brick ............399

Chipits Semi Sweet

ChocolateChips300g ........................299

Parkay

Margarine1/4’s

1.36kg .....................299

Purex Double Roll

BathroomTissue12 roll ......................699

Dawn Ultra

DishLiquid638 mL ............

2/500

Glad

ClingWrap60m ..........................299

Alcan

FoilWrap12”x100’ ................399

+dep

+dep +dep

+dep

Grocery

8”

Grocery

Village Food Markets

California

Strawberries

2/500

Island Gold MediumWhiteEggsDozen

2/500432g

499

Kraft

Salad Dressing

2/500

341-398 mL

348 mL

475 mL

Ocean Spray

CranberrySauce

Betty Crocker Super Moist

CakeMixes

Seafood

Ready to Serve Machine Peeled

Shrimp Meat ...........264Previously Frozen

Black Tiger Prawns .....198/100g

PREVIOUSLY FROZEN WILD

Sockeye Salmon Fillets

220/100g

Del Monte

Vegetables

99¢

2/300

/100g

Page 22: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A22 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Village Food Markets

729

Gypsy

Salami

289 249

Tenderfl ake

Pie Shells320-350g ..............................299

Green Giant

Vegetables750g......................................299

McCain Country Style

Hash Browns900g......................................199

Libby’s

Chopped Spinach300g................................

3/400

Deli

Irish

Ham

Naturally

ea

ea 629

169Chipotle Pepper

Turkey

Regular or Honey GarlicPepperoniSticks

99¢

EverlandWhole PittedDates908g

Lesley Stowe’s RaincoastCrisps

/100g /100g

Boursin

CheeseGarlic & Herb150g 499

/100g

150g

Dairy

Faith FarmsCheese 400g ...................................................................25%

Heluva GoodDips 250g .........................................................................

2/400

IogoNano Yogurt Drinks 6 pack .......................................329

TropicanaOrange Juice 2.63L ........................................................599

8”

Frozen

New World Organic

Peanut Butter

Soyganic

SmokedTofu

399

499

470 mL

Everland Organic

Organic Cranberries

3992/500210g

399

Simply NaturalOrganicSalsa

Frozen

500g

599

Breyers Creamery StyleIce Cream1.66L

227g

2/500

Dairyland

WhippingCream473 mL

BundtCakes

575g449

Made In StoreBunnyCakes

899RangerCookies

12 Pack 399Assorted Flavours

Bakery

FlaxBread454g

Bunny & EggEasterCookies

34912 Pack

OFF

Made from Scratch

269

+dep

Page 23: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A23

Sheila WallaceContributed

Sooke has a few imag-inative and determined souls to thank for the establishment of the Sooke Country Market.

As the market pre-pares to celebrate its 21st season, two Sooke seniors, Carol Harding and Joan Hanneson, shared their collec-tive memories with me over tea at the Reading Room.

A small group of local growers began meeting in each other’s living rooms in 1995.

Intrigued by the suc-cess of the Moss Street Market in Victoria they began to explore the possibility of devel-oping a local market in Sooke. Organizers and dreamers is how Hanneson described this merry band.

Mary Alice Johnson, owner of ALM Organic Farm and Full Circle Seeds, was involved in the development of the Moss Street Market and provided advice and assistance to the Sooke group.

In 1995, the Sooke

Country Market was incorporated as a non-profit society. Holger Busch, Kim and Norm Collins, Bernadette Huys, Marty Smith and Laura Stockridge, along with Hanneson, made up the first board of directors.

Busch developed the market logo and he and his partner Susa cre-ated the country mar-ket banner, which still guides folks to the mar-ket every Saturday dur-ing market season.

The first Sooke Coun-try Market was located

in the front yard at Mugford House, the stately, historic house behind the Chevron Station on Church and Sooke Road.

From 1996 to 1999, the market flourished on the Sooke elemen-tary school grounds.

“This was a very successful place and I remember it as a booming market,” said Hanneson.

During this time, vendor member-ship increased to 25.

Market spirit thrives in Sooke

File photo

Joan Hanneson displaying her organic produce at the first Sooke Country Market in 1995.

See Country market Page 24

Easter Monday Recycling Reminder

We Recycle on Easter MondayIf your blue box collection day falls on Easter Monday, March 28, your curbside materials will be collected as usual.

Please place your recyclables at the curb by 7:30 am in appropriate sized containers.For more information, please visit www.crd.bc.ca/bluebox.

VISIT SAUNDERS.SUBARUDEALER.CA

‡Ratings are awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Please visit www.iihs.org for testing methods. *Pricing applies to a 2016 Crosstrek Touring 5MT (GJ1XO)/2016 Impreza 5-dr MT (GG120) with MSRP of $27,190/$23,010 including Freight & PDI ($1,675/$1,595), Documentation Fee ($395), Tire Levy ($25) and Air Conditioning Fee ($100). Taxes, license, registration and insurance are extra. Dealers may sell for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Model shown is a 2016 Crosstrek Limited Package CVT w/ Tech (GX2LPE)/2016 Impreza 5-dr Limited Tech Pkg AT (GG2LPE) with MSRP of $31,895/$30,395. Taxes, license, registration and insurance are extra. Vehicle shown solely for purpose of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown. **0.5% lease/fi nance rates available on all new 2016 Crosstrek/2016 Impreza models for a 24-month term. Financing and leasing programs available through Toyota Credit Canada Inc. on approved credit. †$1,000/$1,500 Cash incentive is for cash customers only and is available on all new 2016 Crosstrek/2016 Impreza models. Cannot be combined with Subaru Canada supported lease/fi nance rates or lease payment offers. $500 Auto Show credit is for cash customers only and is available on all 2016 Subaru models. **/† Offers valid until March 31st, 2016. See your local Subaru dealer or visit www.western.subarudealer.ca for complete program details.

WHEN WINTER DOESN’T COME KNOCKING,GO OUT AND FIND IT.

MODELS EQUIPPED WITH EYESIGHT®

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Pet friendly &the coffee is always on! SAUNDERS SUBARU

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David Saunders Internet Sales, [email protected]

20ft Container Storage$110/month

Sooke Moving and Storage has acquired some new containers and we would like to pass the savings on to you.

Bring in this coupon to receive12 months container storage for$110 per month.

Offer good as long as there are containers available. Must pay 1st year in advance.Offer expires April 30/16.

2018 Idlemore Rd.250-642-6577

Page 24: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A24 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

So you’ve made your will and named your executor.

BUT IS YOUR ESTATE PREPARED?

• BC has the 2nd highest PROBATE fees in the country• Pros and Cons of Joint Ownership• Pitfalls of relying on your Living Will• Simple Strategies for relieving your EXECUTOR’S stress• Benefi ts to family of pre-planning your cremation/burial• Dangers of not having a POWER OF ATTORNEY

“Excellent…great info

delivered in easy to

understand language…

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Th e best seminar I’ve

seen on the topic”

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FREE SEMINARTHURS., MARCH 31 10:30-NOON

Prestige Oceanfront Resort6929 West Coast Rd., Sooke

To Register, call McCall’s Funeral Home at 250-385-4465

or email [email protected]

An unprepared estate can devastate your family

Sponsored by McCall’s Funeral Home

SOOKEBUSINESSCENTRE QUICK, SAFE & MOST OF ALL

FRIENDLY!

[email protected]

250-642-7900

Cleaning ~ AromatherapyFresh fl owers ~ Organizing

(778) 350-MAID

DEPUTY CORPORATE OFFICERThe District of Sooke is seeking a Deputy Corporate Officer. Reporting to the Director of Corporate Services as a key member of the leadership team, this role has responsibility for the statutory functions set out under the Local Government Act and the Community Charter. The Deputy Corporate Officer also provides assistance to staff, Council and committees of Council.

The Deputy Corporate Officer assists the Director of Corporate Services in the completion of his duties and exercises considerable independent judgement, initiative, tact, courtesy and diplomacy in processing assignments, some of which are confidential in nature.

2205 Otter Point Road, SookePhone: 250-642-1634 Fax: 250-642-0541

email: [email protected] website: www.sooke.ca

The hourly rate is $31.79. The District of Sooke offers a competitive compensation and municipal benefits package.

This is a CUPE Local 374 positionApplications will be received until 4:30 p.m. March 28, 2016.

Experience and qualifications we are seeking include:• Grade 12 plus two years post secondary education in public administration• Professional Certificate in Local Government Administration• Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy • Elections • Minimum five years related administrative experience in local government• Working knowledge of legislation and records management practices in local

government• Working knowledge of the Local Government Act, Community Charter and

Roberts Rules of Order• Experience with taking minutes• Experience with PCs and computer based applications

Interested candidates are invited to submit a letter of application and resume to:

District of SookeDirector of Corporate Services2205 Otter Point RoadSooke BC V9Z [email protected]

Although local produce and plants were the main features, honey, bread, chocolates, jams, knitted crafts and art were also offered for sale. Special activities, such as prize draws, clowns, Zucchini Day and the occasional musician kept the mar-ket spirit fresh and lively.

The market also became a popular

gathering place where people met to visit in a relaxed, family atmo-sphere. The board met almost every month and had potlucks to celebrate the beginning and ending of the mar-ket season.

When Sooke Elemen-tary began using its green space and park-ing area on Saturdays, the market moved to Edward Milne Commu-nity School for one sea-son, but the location

was not appropriate for a market. Then when another senior, Martha Moore, suggested the empty lot next to the Sooke New and Used as a possible site – the mar-ket had found a home.

Through the mar-ket’s evolution, the “make it, bake it, grow it” theme continues to attract keen and hard-working vendors and “buy local” supporters.

The market also pro-vides a valuable eco-

nomic contribution to our community and a family friendly meeting place for committed cit-izens to chat about how to change the world.

The Sooke Country Market season starts May 7 and is accepting new vendors. For infor-mation and application process, sookecountry-market.com.

•••Sheila Wallace writes

for the Sooke Country Market.

Sooke country market enters 21st yearFrom page 23

Where in the World?Martina and Guido Morgenstern visited Maui in January of this year and took the Sooke News Mirror along for a vacation.

If you would like to submit a photo of your holiday or exotic locale you visited, send along a good quality photo with the Sooke News Mirror to: [email protected]

Page 25: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I CLASSIFIEDS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A25

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

CALL FOR ENTRIES13TH ANNUAL

Kitty Coleman WoodlandArt & Bloom Festival.

Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show.

Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting

May 21, 22 and 23Applications for Artisans

are available at woodlandgardens.ca

or email [email protected]

250-338-6901

Easter SundayVintage, Retro and

Collectible Show/Sale

$4 @ Mary Winspear Centre, Sidney, BC.

March 27th, 9:30-4pm. 100 tables/60 dealers

(Early Birds: $20 @ 8:30am)

For info: 250.744.1807 or [email protected]

SOOKE SENIORS BUS TRIP

Duncan,Walmart, Wed.March 30. Home pick-up 9:00am $14.00

Hall 9:30am $12.00Call Iris 250-642-6209

Advertising Consultant

The Comox Valley Record, a twice-weekly award winning community newspaper, has an immediate opening for a full-time Advertising Consultant.

This is a career opportunity for a motivated self-starter that can thrive in a competitive sales environment. Candidates will be required to meet sales targets while deepening relationships with existing clients through superior customer service and strong sales skills. They will be expected to develop new business, employing extensive prospecting and cold-calling techniques.

The ability to work independently in a fast-paced environment while adhering to regular deadlines will be important for success.

Candidates considered for the position will be results oriented, strong communicators and be willing to learn and adapt in an ever-changing business environment. Previous sales experience is preferred. A car and valid drivers license are required.

We offer a great working environment with a competitive remuneration and a strong benefits package.

Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada and the U.S. and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Please email your resume with cover letter by Thursday, March 31, 2016, to:

Chrissie Bowker, Publisher [email protected]

Thank you to all who apply. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted. No phone calls please.

INFORMATION

SOOKE CRISIS & Referral Centre, 2043 Church Rd. Open 10am-1pm, Mon.-Fri. 250-642-0215.

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INFORMATION

CANADA BENEFIT Group - Do you or someone you know suffer from a disability? Get up to $40,000 from the Canadian Government. Toll-free 1-888-511-2250 or www.canada-benefi t.ca/free-assessment

CONTACT LOAN Cupboard call 250-389-4607. Need a ride? Call 250-389-4661.

CONTACT LOAN CUPBOARD

RENTALS AVAILABLE FOR

MEDICAL EQUIPMENT“Crutches

Wheel ChairsWalkers

Bathroom HelpersMisc. Items”

Call 250-389-4607Need A Ride?250-389-4661

SOOKE MEALS on Wheels, 1585 O’Neill Road, Sooke, BC V9Z 0T5. 250-642-2184.

SOOKE MEALS ON WHEELS

Are you retired? Like to Cook?

Looking for something to do two mornings a month?

Sooke Meals on Wheels a 100%

Volunteer Organization Can use your help.

Alma @ 250-642-2184 or May @ 250-642-4973

SOOKE SENIORSBUS

MEMBERSHIP $15.00

Tuesday & Thursday - Lunch and Bingo Community HallWednesday - Special Trips Advertised in Sooke Mirror Coming Events ColumnFriday - Lunch and Shop-ping Trips in VictoriaCall June - 250-642-2032Last Sunday of the Month - Dinner at different restau-rantsCall June - 250-642-2032Pick -up at home or community hallFor further information: Call Kay 250-642-4662

TURN YOUR REFUND into a Donation to the Sooke Food Bank at The Sooke Bottle De-pot. Also accepting cash and non-perishable Food items

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

INFORMATION

YOUR GENEROUS DONATION

Supports Sooke Hospice in your Community.

For your convenience Now Available

Pay Pal with credit card at

Sooke Hospice.com250-642-4345Box 731 , V9Z 1H7

LEGALS

AUCTION SALENotice is hereby given by West Coast Super Stor-age Ltd, 3220 Otter Point Rd, Sooke, BC, V9Z 0K8 that the following item(s) will be open for bids be-tween 9am-12pm on April 9th, 2016 on the premises to cover costs incurred. Only CASH ac-cepted.

• Kamal Abraham (M208) – Household goods

• Dorothy Guraly (ENC7107B) – Household goods

• Vivian Nault (M103) – Household goods

• Stephen Wallis (AM074) – 1977 Frontier Motorhome VIN:TGL3374512166

• Brandon Moore (AS056) – 1986 Chevrolet 4WHDR Pickup Truck VIN: 2GCEK14N3G1126718

• Christopher Davies (AS115) – 1979 Security Motorhome VIN:E21HHFF2321

TRAVEL

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SAVE 30% on our Heart of the Arctic adventure. Visit Inuit communities in Greenland and Nunavut aboard the com-fortable 198-passenger Ocean Endeavour. Call for details! 1-800-363-7566 or visit online www.adventurecanada.com (TICO#04001400)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

HIP OR knee replacement? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/Dress-ing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. Apply Today For As-sistance: 1-844-453-5372.

MAKE A FORTUNE with $5000., we know how! Free info pack. Call (250)384-9242.

NEW EXCITING mini VLT’s. Produce buckets of cash monthly. Attracts customers like money magnets. Loca-tions provided. Ground fl oor opportunity. Full details call now 1-866-668-6629. Website www.tcvend.com

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

HEALTHCARE DOCUMEN-TATION Specialists are in huge demand. Employers want CanScribe graduates. A great work-from-home career! Train with Canada’s best-rated program. Enroll today. www.canscribe.com. Call 1-800-466-1535 or by email to: [email protected].

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT SCHOOL. Hands-On Tasks. Start Weekly. GPS Training!

Funding & Housing Avail! Job Aid! Already a HEO?

Get certifi cation proof.Call 1-866-399-3853 or go to:

iheschool.com

START A new career in Graphic Arts, Healthcare, Business, Education or Infor-mation Tech. If you have a GED, call: 855-670-9765

ESTHETICIAN

HELP WANTED

COOK Required immediately on board a factory freezer trawler. Must be able to cook 3 meals a day within a budget. Rotation of 2 trips on and 2 trips off, approx. 14 days per trip.

Please email: [email protected]

THE SOOKE NEWS MIRROR Cautions Readers About Sending Money To Obtain In-formation About Any Employ-ment Opportunities.

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED

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INDEX IN BRIEFFAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

TRAVEL

EMPLOYMENT

BUSINESS SERVICES

PETS & LIVESTOCK

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

AUTOMOTIVE

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

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SELL IT IN 3 OR IT RUNS FOR FREE!*

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Page 26: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A26 I CLASSIFIEDS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

CLARK’S HOME RENOVATIONSFamily Owned & Operated

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HAVE YOU been denied Canada Pension Plan disability benefi ts? The Disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help you appeal. Call 1-877-793-3222 www.dcac.ca [email protected]

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MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

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used.ca

Pinty’s Grand Slam Elite 10 hits the West ShoreSome images from last weekend for Sooke curling fans

Photos by Ryan Landa/Mirror Staff

Team Koe’s Ben Hebert holds a rock while Marc Kennedy watches the weight on a Brent Laing shot during a game against Niklas Edin in draw 5 of the Pinty’s Grand Slam of Curling Elite 10 competition at the Q Centre in Langford this past weekend.

Team Epping’s third Mat Camm releases a rock to front end Tim March and Patrick Janssen during draw 5 action.

Rachel Homan delivers her last stone in the second end during a game against the eventual tournament winner, Team Gushue, in draw 6 of the Slam event.

Page 27: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I SPORTS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A27

Sports

With a new coach and new direction, the senior basketball boys look towards gold horizons

Kevin LairdSooke News Mirror

In the midst of last season, Alex Wright had an inkling something was up with coach Trevor Bligh.

Bligh, who has led the Edward Milne Community School Wolverines senior boys basketball team for 19 years, was giving subtle clues that this might be his last season.

“I had a hint he wanted to take a new direction,” said Wright, who served as co-coach this year.

Then midway through the season the message came: he wanted to retire as the senior boys’ basketball coach and develop the junior program.

EMCS’ basketball program has never seen a team advance to the provincial championships.

The reason, says Wright and Bligh, is that Sooke doesn’t have a junior program that feeds into the senior program.

“Teaching basic skills at the Grade 8 to 10 level will put us on par with other elite programs in B.C. We have gone as far as we can with teaching these skills in Grade 11,” Bligh said.

For Wright, who takes over as the Wolverines’ head coach next season, it’s

the right approach.It will allow the program the opportunity

to develop core coaching skills, from defensive stance to simple shooting and ball handling skills, something missing now with some players heading into their senior high school years.

“The problem with Sooke is most of the kids don’t get to try basketball on a competitive level until they’re 15 (Grade 10). You lose that developmental period because they’re not coming out early,” Wright said.

“Our goal is to eventually have it that when kids are coming up through elementary school, they’re getting into middle school, they’re seeing basketball as a primary sport.”

The transition to the development program is already starting, with plans for spring ball.

The idea is to set the foundation and create a love for the game early. (Any boy interested in the spring league who’s in Grade 7,8 or 9 can email Bligh directly at [email protected]).

The next step is to link up with Journey Middle School’s basketball program next season.

The team is expected to play in the Junior B league, but will have teams in the Junior A and B leagues the following year.

Bligh will co-coach the EMCS junior boys next season.

The plan will help coaches at all four levels of high school basketball, Bligh said.

Wright already sees merit in the plan where coaches will be able to

communicate more effectively and develop a program that is understandable for players from Grade 7 to 12.

“We’re trying to avoid taking one step forward and two steps back,” he said.

Don’t think you’ve seen the end of Bligh as the Wolverines’ head coach. He plans to

return in two years.“We aim to be sending a senior team to

the provincials in two to three years from now. If I was a Grade 8 kid into basketball, I’d be getting very excited for what will be available to them in the years to come,” Bligh said.

EMCS Wolverines focus on better bite for next season

This past weekend, the Sooke Boxing Club went over to Mission to participate in the tournament of champions.

Two fighters from the Sooke Boxing program got in the ring: Jill Doucet and Carson Campbell. 

Boxing Canada changed their policy in January 2015 to allow children aged eight, nine and 10 to get into the ring and have initiation bouts.

This allows these kids the opportunity to get in the

ring, put what they’ve learnt to the test and the best thing is they both come out as winners,” said the club’s head coach, Ellen Connor, adding that by doing so, it promotes self esteem, self respect and discipline.

She said after witnessing this past weekend’s matches with Doucet and Campbell, she was deeply impressed by their performances.

“I can honestly say the empowerment they both felt

after getting in that ring and achieving that goal by themselves, not with a team or anyone else helping them out was certainly immeasurable.”

Next scheduled fights will be in Nanaimo at the Nanaimo Boxing Club at the end of April. Currently there are 10 registered boxers at Sooke Boxing, five of whom are children.

[email protected]

Octavian Lacatusu/Sooke News Mirror

EMCS Wolverines trying to bite the Saanich Stellys during a face-off last year.

Sooke Boxing Club encourages strength and discipline in youth

FOR REGISTRATIONS AND INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL: 250-642-8000

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Page 28: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

The B.C. Games Soci-ety has launched the bid process to select communities to host the B.C. Winter and B.C. Summer Games in 2020 and 2022.

Bid packages have been sent to commu-nity mayors across the province.

Bidding communities are required to submit information on event hosting history, avail-able venues for sport and accommodation, and evidence of com-munity support.

The deadline for bid submissions is Sept. 9.

“These games are an important showcase for young athletes in this province,” said Peter Fassbender, minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Develop-ment. “Previous expe-rience demonstrates that hosting cities and towns become stronger communities through volunteer development and economic benefits that result from the staging of the games.”

With a history dating back to 1978, the B.C. Winter and B.C. Sum-mer Games are British Columbia’s premier multi-sport events and feature our best young athletes, and develop-ing coaches and offi-cials.

The B.C. Games are a galvanizing force that build volunteer and community capacity and contribute to posi-tive long-term legacies.

“Hosting the B.C. Games is considered a highlight in a communi-ty’s history,” said Kelly Mann, president and CEO of the B.C. Games Society. “The tremen-dous energy and com-munity engagement that is generated pro-vides memorable expe-riences for athletes and citizens alike.”

The 2016 B.C. Winter Games will take place in Penticton this month and the 2016 B.C. Sum-mer Games in Abbots-ford in July.

For detailed infor-mation on the bid pro-cess please go online to bcgames.org.

The BC Games were originally a vision of Premier W. R. Bennett who believed in pro-viding “an opportunity to bring all parts of BC together, large and small communities, in the spirit of sport and friendship”. Ben-nett’s vision for the BC Games has provided a substantial foundation and structure on which excellence in sport and

community has been and continues to be built.

Established in 1977 under the Societies Act, The original mandate of the BC Summer and Winter Games Soci-

ety was to provide an opportunity for all Brit-ish Columbians to com-pete in an organized sports festival that pro-moted physical fitness, individual achievement, and community pride.

The first BC Summer Games were held in Penticton in 1978 with the first BC Winter Games taking place the following year in Kam-loops.

Now named the BC

Games Society, in 1994, they shifted from a participation focused event to become a key part of athlete and sport development in B.C.

Their mission state-

ment: The BC Games Soci-

ety is the leadership organization that guides the BC Winter and BC Summer Games and prepares Team BC for national multi-sport

Games. We build on the expertise and support of partners to create devel-opment opportunities for athletes, coaches, officials, volunteers, and communities.

B.C. Games Society seeking host communities for 2020 and 2022 gamesA28 I SPORTS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

*Offer includes TELUS Satellite TV Basic Package and is available until May 2, 2016, where access and line of sight permit, to residential customers who have not subscribed to TELUS TV in the past 90 days. TELUS Satellite TV is not available to residents of multi-dwelling units. Cannot be combined with other offers. TELUS reserves the right to modify channel lineups and packaging, and regular pricing without notice. HDTV-input-equipped television required to watch HD. Minimum system requirements apply. Final eligibility for the services will be determined by a TELUS representative. Regular prices will apply at the end of the promotional period. Rates include a $5/mo. discount for bundled services and a $3/mo. digital service fee. †Savings are calculated based on the current bundled price for Satellite TV Basic ($41.95/mo.). ‡Service installation, a $150 value, is free with a service agreement or purchase of a digital box or PVR. If new outlet/phone jacks are required, the charge will be $75 for the first one and $25 each for the others. A cancellation fee applies to the early termination of a service agreement and will be $10 for the digital boxes and PVR rental multiplied by the number of months remaining in the service agreement. Rental equipment must be returned in good condition upon cancellation of service, otherwise the replacement cost will be charged to the account. **TELUS accounts must be in the same name. To be eligible, at least one new service (Internet, Home Phone, or Mobile) must be added to the account. Each new service equates to $5 discount. TELUS, the TELUS logo, TELUS Satellite TV, telus.com and the future is friendly are trademarks of TELUS Corporation, used under licence. ©2016 TELUS.

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Page 29: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

Rugby is a team effort at Journey Middle School, says teacher Robert Bryan.

With the emphasis on enjoying and learn-ing the fine art of rugby, both boys and girls have entered teams in league play this year,

under the auspices of the Journey Rugby Club

The goal is for every student to learn how to play rugby safely, to understand the rules, to develop the skills appropriate for their age level and to have

fun, Bryan said. Partnering with

EMCS rugby staff and students, Canadian national team coaching staff, parents and staff at Journey are prepar-ing their teams for the Middle School Rugby League which begins in

the first week of April. “We’ve been practic-

ing since the end of Feb-ruary with touch rugby at lunchtime and the

students are excited and keen to begin full contact games with other schools after Spring Break” said

Bryan, the new boys rugby coach at JMS.

The girls rugby squad is led again this year by Journey

teachers Katrina Abell, Grania Bridal and Claire Wilkie.

Journey Gems

Rugby a team effort at Journey Middle School

Contributed photo

Surprise! The Sooke Thunderbirds Peewees were surprised by Canucks Ben Hutton, left, and Chris Tanev, right, during a sponsored lunch at Earl’s in Yaletown. Christopher “Chris” Tanev and Ben Hutton are Canadian professional ice hockey defencemen currently playing for the Vancouver Canucks of the National Hockey League.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I SPORTS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A29

Once again this year our dedicated volunteers are hard at work rearing Chinook and Coho Salmon. Th is year’s production will include approximately 436,374 Chinook and 74,856 Coho. Returns of Chinook salmon into the Sooke River last fall are estimated to be between 750 and 1,000 adults. Despite reports of sport angling catches of Chinook salmon last summer being on the small side, we saw good returns of 4 and 5 year old adults for our October brood stock take. Coho returns were a bit harder to nail down this year as we continue to get signifi cant variances of water levels in November. Coho returning to the DeMamiel Creek system last fall were small in size and showed signs of stress. Similar reports were heard on many other systems on the island.

Th is year’s Chinook production will see the historic total of fi sh produced by Sooke Salmon Enhancement Society to exceed 19 Million !

Investment in water management systems at the hatchery are allowing us to rear more fi sh to a larger size for better survivability once released into the wild.

Our volunteers are busy working 2 shift s per day, 7 days a week feeding our little babies and keeping the hatchery clean. Th anks to new members that have joined us recently we can continue with our fi sh culture and hatchery maintenance. It is nice to see residents that are new to Sooke seeking out our society as a means of serving the community. Sooke Salmon Enhancement Society is a 100 % volunteer Registered Non-Profi t Society with no paid staff whatsoever. At Sooke Salmon we are committed to the preservation and enhancement of Salmon and Salmon habitat. We also serve our community by making educational opportunities available to various groups and working with other community associations.

Some notable upcoming events include …………

We have supplied Coho eggs to several local classrooms in support of the ‘’ Salmon in Th e Classroom ‘’ initiative. Children in our community will be able to learn about Salmon culture and see fi sh emerge from eggs. Th ey will then get the opportunity to release the fi sh into the wild.

Sooke Options for Community Living will be taking a shift at the hatchery to feed our fi sh.

SSES will participate in this year’s Rotary Spring Fair & Auction. Please come out and support this community event and place a bid on tickets to our Chinook Derby that we have donated to the Sooke Rotary Club.

We hope to receive students from the Environmental Studies program at Edward Milne Community School for a day of instruction at the hatchery in May.

Our Sooke Salmon Enhancement net pen is anticipated to rear an additional 100,000 Chinook this May. Th is will bring our total number of Chinook released into Sooke harbour to 530,000 this year.

Keep an Eye out for the announcement of details of our ‘’ 13th Annual Chinook Derby ‘Th is year to be held on July 30 & 31st.

As president, I would like to thank all of our volunteers for their dedication and hard work. We would also like to thank the Sooke & South Island business community for their support. Our motto is ‘’ Shop Local ‘’ , we encourage all to do so.

Spring 2016 update of activities

Robert GamachePresident, Sooke Salmon Enhancement Society

Top: A big chinook on it’s way to the hold-ing tank. Above: Placing the broodstock in the tanks for transport to the hatchery.

Spreading the sein across the river.

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For more stories and web exclusives visit sookenewsmirror.com

Page 30: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

The sparks will be flying this month in sculpture artist Bev Petow’s East Sooke metalworking studio, as she puts the finish-ing touches on a set of four life-size steel dresses. The intriguing garden sculptures will have their public debut at the season opening of the Abkhazi Gardens on April 9.

All this came about when a box of Prin-cess Peggy Abkhazi’s haute couture cocktail dresses was found in the house when it was finally taken over by the The Land Conservancy. Now these visual met-aphors for Peggy’s life and spirit will be on show throughout the spring and summer.

How did Bev, the woman of steel, come to take an unforgiving material like metal and develop an expertise in creating steel dresses?

She was introduced to tools and machines in her father’s mechanic shop and was given her love of design and sew-ing at 12-years-of-age by her mother.

After many years of working in graphic design, Petow went back to art school in mid-life — graduat-ing with honours from Marylhurst University in Portland in 1998 when she picked up the welding torch at the age of 37.

“Steel is my main medium of expression although I have worked with many materials in both 2D, 3D and on computer.

“My process is a bal-ance of construction

and deconstruction as I focus on the forces of integration and decay that are constantly co-creating the world,” states Petow on her website (www.bevpe-towdesign.com).

The steel dresses? When a dear friend of hers from childhood, with whom she had always sewn cloth dresses, passed away from a lingering leukae-

mia illness she fell into depression. Petow had nursed her to the end.

Devastated by this loss, lethargy set in. Then one morning she heard her friend’s voice declare firmly to her, “Get back out into the studio.”

This snapped her out of her mood and she thought, “Okay, I’m a metalwork artist - what should my next project

be?”She began designing

and fabricating dresses to be used as garden sculptures, based on the 60s and 70s designs that she and her friend used to make. Their combination of indus-trial masculinity and delicate femininity were an instant suc-cess and have made their way into art galler-ies and gardens across North America.

“I hand-cut the mate-rial using a plasma cut-ter or a grinder with cutting blade,” she explained. Then she bends, cold hammers and welds pieces into flowing shapes that evoke the human form. As you can imagine, it is very heavy labour. She keeps fit with jazzercise three times a week and has a good chiroprac-tor.

The results are

intriguing costumes that are mysteriously lacking any bodies

inside — even though they may weigh up to 40 pounds.

Rust? A coating of lin-seed oil helps even out the eventual beauty of weathering.

Petow’s work will also be seen at the Sooke Philharmonic Orchestra’s Secret Gar-den Tour on June 5 and the Stinking Fish Studio Tour running from July 21-15. The summer tour

brochures for the stu-dio tour will be avail-able for download in June. The summer tour map will be up the end of May and will show the locations of the art-ists’ studios and the list of artists participating (www.stinkingfishstu-diotour.com. Petow is showing her work at the Bellevue Art Museum biennial show is September as weil.

ArtsHaute couture sculptures fused with steel

Bev Petow/Cheryl Taves photos

Bev Petow’s Dragon Aunt dress, left, will be part of her exhibition at Abkhazi Gardens. Petow at work on a piece, right.

East Sooke artist Bev Petow finds her solace and her passion in visual metaphors

A30 I ARTS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

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The Hartland Landfill Facility will be closed on Good Friday, March 25, 2016. Hartland will reopen on Saturday, March 26 from 7 am to 2 pm.

Please make sure your load is covered and secured.

Capital Regional District

Hartland Landfill Good Friday Closure

For more information, please visit www.crd.bc.ca/hartland

SOOKESOCCER CLUB

2016/17 AND SPRINGSOCCER REGISTRATION

Spring Soccer runs April 18-June 13

March 30 ..... 6-8pm Spring Deadline

April 9 ................10am-1pmApril 25 ..................... 6-8pm

sookesoccer.com

Deadline for spring is mar 30.Deadline for next season is may 30.

Late fees will be implemented.Registration also available online.

See website for more details,or contact Laura Lockhart

at [email protected]

Learn it. Live it. LOVE it!

Page 31: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I ARTS I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM A31

DROP IN POOL TOURNAMENT 2nd SUNDAY OF EACH MONTH

LEGION RIDERS 2nd WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 7 PM

BLUEGRASS 1st & 3rd SUNDAYS 3 PM

Branch #54 6726 Eustace Rd. 250-642-5913

SUNDAY BREAKFAST BRUNCH 9AM - 12:30PM $5 Children Welcome

SUPPORT THE FOOD BANKDonate non-perishable food items

Find us on facebook Sooke Legion branch #54

MONDAYS

TUESDAYSWEDNESDAYS

THURSDAYS

6-7:30 PMONLY

General Meeting 4th Tuesday of the month @ 7pm— Members and Bona Fide Guests —

Tickets @ Bar$1500 FRIDAY Steak Night

KARAOKEEvery Friday 8:00 - 11:00 p.m.

with Pete & MeganMaster Card, Visa and Interac now accepted

Short Mat Bowl 1:00 pmEuchre 6:30 pmDrop-in Pool 7-10 pmPool League 7:00 pmLadies’ Darts NoonDominos 10:00 am Shuffl eboard 6:30 pm

Cribbage 7:00 pmShort Mat Bowl 1:00 pm

SUNDAYS

HAPPY HOUR MON. - SAT. 5-6 PM • ALL HIGHBALLS $3.75

ANNIVERSARIES / BIRTHDAYS / GROUP PARTIES WELCOME!

Open Mic & Jam

Hosted by54/50s

MEAT DRAWEVERY SATURDAY @ 3:00 PM

HAMBURGERS &HOT DOGS AVAILABLE

BUY TICKETS AT BARTHEN PROCEED TO REGULAR TABLE

AS PER USUAL

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What image best represents Sooke?Pirjo Raits Sooke News Mirror

In 2017 Canada will turn 150 years old and to celebrate the District of Sooke has autho-rized the creation of a mosaic. The mosaic will be designed by a local artist and painted by up to 400 residents.

Sooke was selected to be a part of the Canada-wide Canada150mosaic project because of the size of the community.

“We were picked because we are a smaller community and because it requires the entire community to be a part of it to be suc-cessful,” said John Rus-sell, one of three coor-dinators of the project for the Sooke Program for the Arts (SPA) Com-mittee.

The Canada 150 team consults with each community to learn about important and interesting moments that define the commu-nity, its history and its citizens to design key elements for mural.

Lewis Lavoie designs a conceptual mural for approval by the com-munity.

Russell said anyone can submit a design for the mural, which will be made up of 400 tiles each 4”x4”. The mural itself will be 8 feet by 8 feet.

The idea is for the mural to be “one simple iconic image or sym-bol that represents or defines your commu-nity.”

Entry forms can be picked up at the Dis-trict of Sooke municipal office (2205 Otter Point

Road) or online at www.sooke.ca and printed off. Those submitting can enter more than one design. The final painting of the mosaic tiles will be done by members of the com-munity. everyone from seniors to school chil-dren to artists.

The selection pro-cess is in three steps. First: all designs are submitted to the Dis-trict of Sooke.

Step two is the selec-tion process where five designs will be selected by council from the submissions.

Step three involves the designs being sent to the designer of the

Canada150mosaic. The selected design will be sent back to council for approval.

The local residents will paint the tiles at various community events in late June/July of 2016. The 400 tiles will be from a design of the individual partici-pants thereby complet-ing the whole mural. For an idea of how it will look check out the canada150mosaic.com website.

The finale will be a three-day affair where designers from Calgary will arrive in Sooke to put together the entire mosaic.

Forms can also be

picked up from the dis-trict at the Sooke News Mirror office. Once you complete your image in black and white on the square on the entry form you can submit it to the district office in person or by e-mail until April l5. Complete instructions are on the forms.

“Hopefully it will be installed in a suitable location,” said Russell. The designer of the winning image will be formally recognized for their design.

For more informa-tion: canada150mosaic.com or phone John Russell at 250-642-7837 or [email protected].

Canada 150 Mosaic project call for submissions

Canada150mosaic photo

An example of what a mosaic mural might look like. Each of the 400 small squares will be a painting by a member from the community. The Canada 150 team consults with each community to learn about important and interesting moments that define the community, its history and its citizens to design key elements for mural. Lewis Lavoie designs a conceptual mural for approval by the community.

Arts funding grants available Applications are now being

accepted for several project-assis-tance funding programs offered by the BC Arts Council.

• Arts Periodicals - assists arts periodicals not currently receiving operating assistance from the BC Arts Council that are devoted pri-marily to the first publication of any form of artistic expression, or social, cultural or intellectual commentary or inquiry.

• Professional Arts Training - sup-ports training activities and the development of recognized arts and cultural training programs and orga-nizations in B.C.

• Professional Performing Arts

(Music, Dance or Theatre) - supports the development, creation, produc-tion and/or live performance of clas-sical, experimental, original, tradi-tional and contemporary art forms from all world cultures.

• Professional Literary - supports activities in literary arts in B.C. Grants are intended to contribute to the successful realization of a single activity or event, or the artistic pro-gramming activities of a literary orga-nization.

Application deadline is April 15, 2016. Guidelines and program details, including eligibility, can be found at: www.bcartscouncil.ca

Page 32: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

A32 I COMMUNITY I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Loretta FritzContributed

On March 1, 2016 Bill Kempster passed away at Ayre Manor at the age of 98. While his death was not remark-able, his contributions to the South Island gardening community were.

Bill immigrated to Victoria shortly after the Second World War, bringing with him a love of outdoor activ-ity – hunting, fishing, exploring and garden-ing – and an unstop-pable drive to be busy and productive. He pur-sued all of these hob-bies for decades, but it was through his pas-sion for growing plants that most people came to know him.

Longtime dahlia growers all over the Island knew Bill well.

In the early 1950s, he began hybridizing and exhibiting dahlias throughout the Pacific Northwest and, in the late 1960s, was instru-mental in convincing the Victoria Gladiolus and Dahlia Society to join the Pacific North-west Dahlia Confer-ence.

To this day the renamed Victoria Dahlia Society remains an active member of the PNDConference, which oversees the training and certifica-tion of judges and the classification of blooms that present differently (e.g., in form, size or colour) in our climate.

Some years later, Bill installed a dahlia gar-den at the Horticulture Center of the Pacific. That garden subse-quently became the Victoria Dahlia Trial Garden, a sanctioned

seedling garden of the American Dahlia Soci-ety.

Envisioning a local world-class botani-cal garden and site for hands-on horticultural training, Bill co-founded the Horticulture Centre of the Pacific in 1979, now home to numer-ous gardens as well as the accredited Pacific Horticulture College. The Kempster Building acknowledges his enor-mous contributions as board member and president, labourer and builder, student educa-tor, and volunteer men-tor.

Bill’s lengthy involve-ment with the Saan-ich Fall Fair is equally estimable. He served as board member and president; he judged fruit, vegetable and/or flower entries; and he put in untold hours as a general labourer and go-getter. He also played a major role in the fair’s 1992 move to its current site on Stel-ly’s Cross Road.

The Peninsula Gar-den Club, Sooke Gar-den Club, and the Sooke Fall Fair were also long-term benefi-ciaries of Bill’s desire to encourage local gar-deners and gardening. He enthusiastically imparted encyclope-dic knowledge of and techniques for growing fruits, vegetables and flowers. He loved dem-onstrating “how easy it is” to prune a fruit tree or propagate a shrub. Gardening, he insisted, isn’t hard or compli-cated; it’s trial and error, and it’s fun.

For more than 60 years, Bill found plea-sure in gardening. He became a recognized gladiolus hybridizer, a

sought-after judge for flower exhibitions and fall fairs, a frequent presenter at garden club meetings, and a teacher and mentor for show judges in training. He even hosted a local Sunday morning radio call-in show about gar-dening.

Following the 2006 death of Bea, his wife of 62 years, Bill contin-ued living proudly and independently on his own until last summer. His friends are richer for his good humour, generosity, and abiding friendship. The South Island is richer for his legacy of gardening knowledge, his remark-able achievements, and his outstanding volun-teerism.

•••Loretta Fritz writes for

the Sooke Garden Club.

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Page 33: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM B1

Taxpayers, directors question the current $1-billion price tag

Don DescoteauBlack Press

As discussions continue around how to achieve sewage treatment for the core areas of the Capital Regional District, it’s interesting that many local residents still wonder why it’s needed at all.

Set aside for a moment that the federal government has mandated that Greater Victoria and other coastal communities in Canada undertake treatment to at least the secondary level.

The CRD currently gathers flows of sewage and drain water at Clover and Macaulay points, where the solids are screened out and the liquid is forced through outfalls that empty roughly a kilometre out into the ocean at a depth of about 65 metres (213 feet). Supporters of this system, including leading marine biologists, have been characterized by opponents as promoting the notion that “dilution is the solution.”

Given the roughly $1 billion estimated cost just to set up a treatment system, some residents find themselves further questioning the need.

The majority, however, argue that it’s just the right thing to do, but outside voices, such as from Washington state, have added to the noise.

While we’re not at treatment yet, we’re far ahead of where we were in the late 1960s, when sewage pipes emptied at our shorelines and caused regular beach closures. Screening out the solids and forcing the liquids a kilometre out into the deep ocean represented steps in the right direction in the 1970s.

On March 9 the CRD approved a two-plant system with facilities at Clover Point in Victoria, and McLoughlin or Macaulay points in Esquimalt. Taxpayers could be excused for wondering how either site found its way into the discussion, when neither was included on a list of seven options presented.

A clue came during a meeting of the CRD’s core area liquid waste management

committee last month.Directors grilled engineering consultants

over total costs, with some asking why a vacant Rock Bay industrial site was central to all seven options. Technical oversight panel chair, Teresa Coady, stated that better options including Clover and McLoughlin/Macaulay could have been created had consultants not been told those areas were “off the table.”

That got committee members thinking about the potential for a hybrid plan that took advantage of the fact the two sites are in close proximity to existing sewage outfalls. It would also avoid the need for $250 million to rip up Cook Street from Dallas Road to Bay Street for pipes.

Local politicians appeared to be looking out for their taxpayers. Some pointed to the project charter, developed last

October, which states as one of its goals that any solution should “minimize (construction and operating) costs to residents and businesses … and provide value for money.”

Feedback from an online survey and written correspondence determined residents are most concerned with how the project will affect their taxes. Showing it’s not all about the money, the

level of quality of effluent discharged into the ocean was also of high importance.

This may be the closest Greater Victoria has come to acheiving the goal. Success is not a given, with municipal approval still needed from Victoria and Esquimalt councils for Clover and McLoughlin points, respectively. Macaulay, which would require a land swap with the Department of National Defence, appears a dark-horse contender.

So does this scenario resemble 2014, when McLoughlin was chosen for a single regional plant, but shot down when Esquimalt council rejected the required zoning variance? Perhaps, but that plan also located the biosolids plant on Viewfield Road in Esquimalt, and the single plant was larger than under the current proposal.

The coming weeks will provide more insight as the two councils hear from the public on the proposed plan. The fact remains, the government requires us to treat our sewage, and the region needs to find a workable solution.

[email protected]

Pressure on to find a sewage solution

How CRD directors voted on McLoughlin/Clover Point option:

Arnold Lim/Black Press

Lisa Helps Mayor, Victoria; CRD sewage committee chair

Lanny SeatonLangford

Nils JensenMayor,Oak Bay

Carol HamiltonMayor, Colwood

Judy BrownoffSaanich

Denise BlackwellLangford

Barb DesjardinsMayor, Esquimalt

Andy ThomasChief, Esquimalt Nation

Ron Sam**Chief, Songhees Nation

Marianne AltoVictoria

Susan BriceSaanich

Vic DermanSaanich

Ben IsittVictoria

Colin PlantSaanich

David ScreechMayor,View Royal

Geoff YoungVictoria

Richard AtwellMayor, Saanich

RCN

SEWAGESEWAGESPECIAL REPORT

I N T H E

CRD** Excused himself from vote over perceived conflict

Success is not a given, with municipal approval still needed from Victoria and Esquimalt councils for Clover and McLoughlin points, respectively.

Page 34: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM B11B2 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Pamela RothBlack Press

Nearly two years ago, the citizens of Esquimalt spoke loud and clear – McLoughlin Point was not the appropriate site for the Capital Regional District’s $783-million sewage treatment plant.

Esquimalt councillors were met with a standing ovation when they not only rejected the shoreline site, but unanimously slammed the door on any future proposals.

Despite the closed door, the CRD put McLoughlin back on the table due to the cost and disruption of alternatives. This time, however, it’s not being considered as the sole site for a treatment plant, but part of a two-facility solution that also includes Victoria’s Clover Point and allows for a future site on the West Shore. A DND-owned section of Macaulay Point is part of the recommendation, but only as an alternative to McLoughlin.

Given the history, the move to revisit McLoughlin didn’t sit well with Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins, but now she’s in favour of moving ahead with the new plan to see how council will respond. She also wants to hear from the private sector, which may propose lower cost and more environmentally friendly solutions.

“With me or without me, the committee was going to have brought forward a site at McLoughlin, no matter what Esquimalt had said. There was nothing I could say that would have made any difference and that’s frustrating,” said Desjardins. “I am hearing from residents that there is an opportunity, given the right circumstances, to reconsider. I think the fact that it is not a single site option is really part of that discussion.”

Surrounded by Department of National Defence (DND) property, the CRD-owned McLoughlin site is a barren, fenced-off piece of land in an otherwise treed area, hiding it from public view except from the water. There are a few nearby homes used by DND personnel, but otherwise the site — a former oil tank farm — is isolated. It’s also located around the corner from the Macaulay Point outfall.

Nick Kovacs, chairman of the Esquimalt Resident’s Association, was surprised to see McLoughlin thrown back into the mix.

Park would top underground plant at Clover Point Dan EbenalBlack Press

Clover Point wasn’t on the public’s radar during the most recent consultation process on sewage treatment options. And if everything goes according to plan for the Capital Regional District, a Clover Point facility will remain out of public view once completed.

The CRD is moving ahead with a proposal for a two-plant option to meet the region’s wastewater treatment needs – with plants constructed at Clover and either McLoughlin or Macaulay points, near the location of current sewage outfalls.

The Clover Point plant would be located on a 1.25-hectare parcel of land on the hillside above the current parking lot. That land was granted to the City of Victoria from the federal government in 1988 on the condition that it be used as parkland.

“Clover Point has to be underground to be socially acceptable, and it has to be done in a way that doesn’t smell, doesn’t cause major disruptions for the neighbourhood,” said Colin Plant, a Saanich councillor who sits on the core area liquid waste management committee.

It was Plant who suggested that CRD staff should investigate locating a plant on the site. A previous option for a solo treatment plant at Rock Bay had become bogged down with concerns over cost, particularly $250 million in pipes to convey treated effluent to existing outfalls.

Plant sees Clover Point as a compromise between those who wanted a single plant at McLoughlin and those who wanted a distributed option with a number of smaller plants. “I suggested it as a way to spread the burden of sewage treatment,” he said, adding there is no social licence for a single plant at McLoughlin after that option was rejected by Esquimalt in 2014.

While some expressed concerns over locating a plant in a residential

neighbourhood at an oceanfront park, committee chair Lisa Helps called that a “20th-century argument.” The Victoria mayor said we now see treatment plants in the middle of downtowns and in close proximity to residences.

Wayne Hollohan, chair of the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association land use committee, said the organization didn’t learn about the proposed Clover Point plant until he received a March 9 email about the site gaining conditional approval from the CRD earlier that day.

“This idea is so new even to the CRD, that they do not have any actual plans for it (including) how much space will be required,” said Hollohan in a letter to Victoria council, suggesting the city is not following its own policy on civic engagement.

The association doesn’t speak on behalf of the community, but provides an opportunity for residents to voice concerns. Hollohan has his own worries about the future of this park he visits with his dog on a daily basis.

“I would say that section of Clover Point

probably gets upwards of four times the amount of people as Beacon Hill Park. It is now becoming the crown jewel of Victoria with regards to tourists and people coming … to walk their dog,” he said.

Helps said the federal land grant serves as an assurance that Clover Point will look almost identical to what it is today, with the addition of such amenities as washrooms and public art.

Residents may not realize what is at Clover Point now. Underneath that grassy hillside where people fly kites and walk their dogs, is a pumping station, where 50 million litres of raw sewage is filtered, then

pumped through the 1.2-kilometre outfall into Juan de Fuca Strait.

The pump station, built in the 1970s, serves close to 200,000 people. The new treatment plant would be built to a footprint that would meet requirements until at least 2045. It would initially handle flows of up to 48 million litres/day and treat the majority of eastside sewage.

The treated effluent at Clover would be pumped through a new 250-metre outfall, with the existing longer outfall reserved for wet weather flows.

An advanced treatment plant at Clover Point is estimated to cost about $220 million of the $1.05-billion total project cost, although directors are confident those costs can be reduced.

But hurdles remain before construction gets underway. Perhaps the biggest is getting the site rezoned from its designation for single family residences.

Victoria Coun. Geoff Young favours a single site at McLoughlin

Point and is confident the rezoning will fail.“From the perspective of the taxpayer,

we would be better off flipping a coin to determine a single site. This two-headed compromise has a cost of $250 million or so more than a single-site option,” he said. He expects to hear vocal opposition for the plan at the upcoming public hearing.

Helps said Clover Point was among the initial sites identified by Victoria council in 2015, and was green-lighted during the first phase of public consultations.

Clover Point has cleared the first road bump in the long path ahead, with Victoria council approving a motion establishing a number of conditions. Among them is the presentation by the CRD of a concept drawing of the underground plant to the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association.

The project must pass other regulatory hurdles, including a public hearing. If approvals are received, the plant is expected to take about 18 months to construct, with Victoria sharing in $20 million in public amenities provided to host communities.

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps stands at Clover Point, site of a proposed underground sewage treatment plant. Don Denton/Black Press

Sewage infrastructure already beneath hillside

SEWAGESEWAGESPECIAL REPORT

I N T H ECRD

This two-headed compromise has a cost of $250 million or so more than a single-site option.

— Victoria Coun. Geoff Young

Esquimalt takes an uneasy second look at McLoughlin

Mayor Barb Desjardins stands at Saxe Point in Esquimalt.Arnold Lim/ Black Press

Scaled-down site would take western flows only; Viewfield site surplus

VOTE

ReferendumClover PointMacaulay Point

20162015

2014201320122011201020082007

20041993

199519921984

1971

19601894 1981

1.2 B

$1.2 B?Estimated Cost

1.2 B$1.05 B?Estimated Cost$782 M?

Estimated Cost

to hosting a treatment plant at McLoughlin, in advance of further public engagement with local residents.

2012 - Provincial ($248M) and federal ($253.4 M) funding announced, project mandated to be completed by 2018. Federal government soon after announces regulations requiring coastal communities to have secondary treatment in place by the end of 2020.

2013 - The core area liquid waste management program, renamed Seaterra in October, begins overseeing public engagement and implementation.

- CRD purchases Viewfield Road property in Esquimalt for $17M as potential biosolids processing site. After receiving plant design suggestions, CRD purchases McLoughlin

Point site from Imperial Oil for $4.6M.

- Esquimalt hosts two-day public hearing on rezoning of McLoughlin to allow for a treatment plant. Alternate bylaw ultimately created stipulating Township’s terms; official community plan amended, bylaw passes.

2014 - After another two-day public hearing, Esquimalt council rejects CRD’s more project-specific application for rezoning McLoughlin. Sewage committee seeks direction from B.C. on how to move forward. Ministry of Environment states it will not intervene and CRD announces it will not proceed with project at McLoughlin.

- CRD board chair Alistair Bryson proposes a cost-sharing amendment that would see Esquimalt residents not taxed to pay for the Town’s 6.7% share of the project, worth

$18.9 million, instead of providing a list of amenities as previously offered. Esquimalt ultimately rejects request to reconsider its decision on rezoning.

- First meeting of Westside wastewater and resource recovery select committee held in October. Members are from Colwood, Esquimalt, Langford, View Royal and Songhees Nation.

2015 - Seaterra staff terminated as CRD tries to retool process and a way forward.

- Eastside committee begins meeting.

- In April, Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps takes over as chair of liquid waste management committee from Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen.

- In May, potential treatment sites revealed by municipalities; many parks put forward.

Eastside and Westside undertake surveys relating to possible sites.

2016 - Seven options put forward for public consideration; all include plant at Rock Bay.

- Online commenting closes Feb. 20. Results see less than enthusiastic responses to including Rock Bay.

- CRD staff recommend main plant at Rock Bay and tertiary treatment plant in Colwood to sewage committee. Directors instead ask for feasibility report on McLoughlin/Macaulay and Clover Point treatment sites.

- Sewage committee tweaks plan and approves recommendation to move forward with Clover and McLoughlin/Macaulay plan with provision for site on West Shore.

- Committee’s recommendation approved by overall CRD board on March 9.

1894 - Clover Point trunk system and outfall built to service downtown Victoria

1913 - Second trunk system added to service Oak Bay, northeast Victoria and parts of Saanich

1919 - Northwest trunk sewer system built to service parts of Esquimalt, Victoria and Saanich

1960s - Untreated sewage continues to be discharged directly at shorelines

1971 - Macaulay Point pump station and outfall constructed. Outfall extends 1.7 kilometres into Juan de Fuca Strait, effluent released at a depth of 60 metres

1981 - Clover Point outfall built, extends 1.2 kilometres offshore to 65m depth; solids filtered out using 6mm fine screen

1984 - B.C. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Environment invites all municipalities and regional districts to consider preparation of waste management plans

1990 - CRD board undertakes study into sewage treatment options

1991 - Report offers seven different siting options for wastewater plants

1992 - Non-binding referendum sees 57% support for current preliminary treatment model (screening), 22% for secondary treatment and 21% for primary treatment

1993 - Washington State tourism boycotts Victoria for conferences, hotel bookings. B.C. Premier Mike Harcourt promises Wash. Gov. Mike Lowry that Victoria will have primary treatment in place by 2002 and secondary between 2008 and 2013.

- Seven potential sites identified and approved by CRD board, including Macaulay Point.

1995 - Three possible main plant sites remain, including Macaulay Point, Burnside West and Yew Point in Colwood.

2004 - Poop mascot Mr. Floatie, a.k.a. James Skwarok, begins protesting the pumping of untreated sewage into ocean. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reviews CRD wastewater management. SETAC concludes that relying on dilution and natural dispersion is not a good long-term solution. A Ministry of Environment sediment study finds enough evidence to classify areas around both outfalls as contaminated sites.

2007 - The Path Forward report describes

a decentralized, six-plant system estimated at $1.2 billion, using Hartland dump as biosolids processing facility.

2008 - Esquimalt, after a presentation from Sewage Treatment Action Group (STAG), lobbies to have Macaulay option shifted to McLoughlin Point due to environmental, social and financial impacts.

2010 - Comprehensive tertiary treatment removed from plan due to lack of market for recovered water in the region. Further refinements improve triple bottom line output for project.

- In June, plan for West Shore treatment plant deferred for 15 years, helping bring the cost down to $782.7 million.

2011 - Discussions begin around community amenities for Esquimalt relating

MascotMr. Floatie

Sewage in the CRD: A Timeline

Citizens are concerned, he noted, but are waiting to see what’s in the details this time around.

“If you build a modern facility, then McLoughlin Point makes sense. It’s away from the community, it’s an industrial site – what else are you going to build there?” said Kovacs, who favours tertiary treatment using a distributed model.

“If certain conditions are met, I would feel much more comfortable, but again, the devil is in the details.”

In 2008, Esquimalt began lobbying the CRD to explore a potential sewage treatment facility at McLoughlin Point rather than Macaulay Point. The following

year, however, council pulled its support from McLoughlin and advised the CRD to explore other alternatives.

Nonetheless, the CRD moved ahead on the project, and later purchased a property on Viewfield Road in Esquimalt for $17 million as a potential site for biosolids processing. The McLoughlin Point site was bought from Imperial Oil for $4.6 million.

But in a second round of public hearings in March 2014, more than 100 residents from Esquimalt, Saanich, Victoria and elsewhere in the region spoke against the project, citing concerns with the size and environmental impact.

A few weeks later council rejected rezoning the site, noting the CRD failed to deliver requested information such as details on First Nations consultations, committee meeting minutes and an independent tsunami report.

The CRD was forced to go back to the drawing board, but first appealed to the province to mandate the rezoning of McLoughlin Point. The province refused to meddle in the ongoing sewage saga, even though about $60 million had been spent.

Now, however, the province has agreed to help facilitate the process in order to

move the project forward.The McLoughlin site still needs a green

light from the municipality.In looking back, Desjardins feels there

was a lack of respect for the community and that residents still don’t trust the CRD. McLoughlin had been offered as a proactive solution, she explained, with residents seeing it as an opportunity for a possible distributed model with multiple plants. But the CRD sewage committee, basing its decision on staff recommendations, went with a centralized plant there instead.

“From there on, it was all about ‘that’s going to happen, you better accept it and by the way we’re not going to give you any mitigation,’” Desjardins said. “Had they done it differently, had they listened to the community and what the needs were, I really believe that process might have ended up differently.

“The reality is, it was off the rails long before we made the decision, and that was because of the lack of working with a community … Esquimalt has never been NIMBY and yet it’s painted as NIMBY. It’s always been about ‘let’s get the best solution.’”

I am hearing from residents that there is an opportunity, given the right circumstances, to reconsider.

— Esquimalt Mayor Barbara Desjardins

on McLoughlin Point

Page 35: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM I B3

* Redeem only * Redeem only * Redeem only 188,000188,000188,000Q-Points for your Q-Points for your Q-Points for your

FREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEQ-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!Q-Bird!

instantly at the checkout!instantly at the checkout!instantly at the checkout!instantly at the checkout!instantly at the checkout!instantly at the checkout!

C

H O I CE

Hertel’s Smoked Ham Shank or Butt Portion5.49 per kg 249249

PerLB

Hot Cross Buns 8 pack299299

HawaiianExtra Large FreshPineapple 499499Lindt

Gold Bunny100gr

499499

PEIRusset Potatoes10lb bag

499499

Shop early for the best selection!

Size Chart

8 7 6BIG SIZE6#

B.C. Grown & Vancouver Island Processed!

EASTER LILIES AVAILABLE!

Copyright © 2016 Quality Foods and its licensors. All Rights Reserved. Photos for Presentation Purposes Only • All QF Stores Email: [email protected]

www.qualityfoods.com

FREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREEFREE Triple Q-Points!TripleTripleTripleTripleWednesday March 23

Prices in effect March 21 - March 27, 2016

Page 36: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B4 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

Easter entertaining made easy!

199

399PerLB

Pepsi, 7-Up or Mountain Dew12-15x355ml

Lay’sFamily Size Potato Chips255gr

$15

FreshGrade A Turkey4.39 per kg

TostitosTortilla Chips220-320gr

PerrierCarbonated Natural Spring Water1lt

San PellegrinoSparkling Beverage6x330ml

PerrierCarbonated Natural Spring Water10x250ml

New ZealandStrip Loin Grilling Steak

3 Pack

349PerLB

Sunrise FarmsWhole Roasting Chicken7.69 per kg

Sunrise FarmsChicken Breast Fillets13.20 per kg

Canadian AAATenderloin Grilling Steak37.46 per kg

Boneless Centercut or Rib End Pork Loin Roast8.80 per kg

4$10for399DoritosTortilla Chips225-255gr

SmartfoodPopcorn180-220gr

1699PerLB

Chicken Breast Chicken Breast Chicken Breast Chicken Breast Canadian AAACanadian AAATenderloin Tenderloin Grilling SteakGrilling Steak37.46 per kg37.46 per kg

Grain Fed Free Run

Locally Raised BC Poultry

LindtGold Bunny & Carrot Pack154gr

CadburyEaster Hollow Eggs168-203gr

LindtLindor Mini EggsSelected, 100gr

forforforforfor599

799

399

299 4$10for 299

3$5for

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES 599

PerLB

599PerLB

299

Whole Roasting Whole Roasting Sunrise FarmsChicken Breast Chicken Breast Fillets13.20 per kg13.20 per kg13.20 per kg

Grain Fed Free Run

Locally Raised BC Poultry

FINAL WEEK!

1/4 poundFREEFREE Crush, Mug Root Beer, Dr. Pepper, or Lipton Brisk Iced Tea 12 Pack Cans

when you purchase any

and a coupon will print on your till receipt12 Pack Cans

Crush, Mug Root Beer, Dr. Pepper, 12 Pack Cans

Over$9

VALUE FOR ONLY 5.55

ONLY AT

555Plus applicable fees

BUY 1Minute Maid Frozen Orange or Grapefruit Juice 295ml FREE

GET 1

Grapefruit Juice 295mlOffer valid March 21-27, 2016

Meat

Page 37: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM I B5

899

Long weekend breakfast favourites!

Aunt JemimaWaffles354gr

Aunt JemimaPancake & Waffle Mix905gr

Tropicana100% Pure & Natural Orange Juice2.63lt

399JohnsonvilleBreakfast Sausage375gr

Aunt JemimaSyrup750ml

McCainHashbrowns Fried Potatoes900gr

SchneidersOld Fashioned HamSemi-Boneless, 8.80 per kg

ButterballSeasoned Boneless Turkey Breast1.5kg

1199PerLB

599

NalleyClassic Dip225gr

Rice WorksGourmet Rice Crisps155-156gr

Canadian AAAPrime Rib

Oven Roast26.43 per kg

399 1999 399

ChristieRitz Crackers140-200gr

Martinelli’sNon Alcoholic Sparkling Juice750ml

Bottle GreenSparkling Beverage750ml

Miller SpringsMountain Spring Water1.5lt

99¢

Boneless Centercut Pork Loin Chops

8.80 per kg

5$10for

5$5for

PerLB

PerLB

Maple LeafPrime Chicken Wings, Strips, Nuggets or Burgers750-800gr

3$5for

299 299

399

2$5for

3$5for

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

2$7for

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

Everything upstairs**Excludes Dualit and Emma Bridgewater

UPSTAIRS INSIDE QUALITY FOODS IN:Comox • Powell River • Qualicum Foods • Courtenay • View Royal

Everything upstairs*Everything upstairs*25%OFF

3

Long weekend breakfast favourites!

SchneidersBacon375gr 499499

Meat

Page 38: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B6 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM I B7

HOP TO QF FOR MORE GREAT DEALS!

AND HAVE A Happy Easter!DRIVE AND PLAY SAFE THIS LONG WEEKEND

SPECIALS FOR EVERY BUNNY!

E.D. Smith100% Pure Pumpkin796ml

Mott’sTomato Clam Cocktail1.89lt

KnorrSimply Broth900ml

Reese Half Pound Cup!226gr

KnorrClassic Sauce or Gravy Mix26-47gr

CadburyMini Eggs154gr

Bick’sPickled Beets500-750ml

Green GiantFrozen Vegetables750gr

Hellmann’sMayonnaise890ml

499

PlantersPeanuts275-300gr

2$5for

Green GiantSimply Steam Vegetables226-250grGreen Giant

VegetablesSelected, 341-398ml

Fraser ValleyCreamery Butter250gr

PlantersCashews225gr

Uncle Ben’sStuff’n Such Stuffing Mix120gr

Ocean SprayCranberry Sauce348ml

DolePineapple398ml

4$5for4$5for

399

KraftPhiladelphia Cream Cheese227-250gr

MacLaren’sImperial Carefully AgedSharp Cold Pack Cheddar Cheese Product, 230gr

Bick’sPremium Pickles1lt

Bick’sDill or Hamburger Slices Pickles1lt

Cracker BarrelCheddar Cheese907gr

Chapman’sPremium Ice Cream2lt

TassimoCoffeeSelected, 108-472gr

Chapman’sSorbet2lt

PillsburyReady To Bake Easter Cookies312-454gr

McLarensOlives, Onions or Gherkins375ml

599 699499

HersheyEaster Eggs or Eggies185-220gr

1199Nabob Coffee

CompanyGround Coffee

915-930gr

PillsburyGrands Cinnabon Cinnamon Rolls496gr

Cracker BarrelShreds300-320gr

Chapman’sSlice Cream Ice Cream1.5lt

2$5for

499

PillsburyCrescents, Biscuits or RollsSelected, 227-340gr

1199ChristieCrackers175-454gr

2991299

Uncle Ben’sClassiques Recipe Rice Selections170-180gr

499

2$7for

AllanMr Bunny150gr

499

KraftDressing250ml

3$5for 399 2$5for299

E.D. SmithPie Filling540ml

3$5for2$5for

Green GiantValley Selections Vegetables300-500gr

3$5for4$5for

4$5for3$5for

2$5for

3$10for3$10for

2$4for299 299

CadburyMini Eggs943gr

299 299

399NestleSmarties Hide-Me Eggs or Boxes156-240gr

499

299

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

2$5for

TenderflakeShells or Puff Pastry255-397gr

4$5for2$5for

2$5for 555forfor554$4$555555 55555forforforfor5555555forforforfor4$4$55555forforforfor5555555forforforfor

4$4$4$555 4$4$4$4$4$555555 2$2$554$4$4$55555forforforfor4$4$4$4$4$4$4$4$5555555forforforfor5555forforforforforforfor

2$2$55forforforfor 55555555forforforfor 555 55555555forforforfor 55555forforforfor5555 55

CadburyMini Eggs200gr

399

Quality Foods an Island Original DairylandWhipping Cream473ml

DairylandCream, Creamo or CreamerSelected, 473ml

2$5for

DairylandSour Cream500gr

2$4for2$4for

Prices in effect March 21- March 27, 2016

Page 39: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B6 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM I B7

HOP TO QF FOR MORE GREAT DEALS!

AND HAVE A Happy Easter!DRIVE AND PLAY SAFE THIS LONG WEEKEND

SPECIALS FOR EVERY BUNNY!

E.D. Smith100% Pure Pumpkin796ml

Mott’sTomato Clam Cocktail1.89lt

KnorrSimply Broth900ml

Reese Half Pound Cup!226gr

KnorrClassic Sauce or Gravy Mix26-47gr

CadburyMini Eggs154gr

Bick’sPickled Beets500-750ml

Green GiantFrozen Vegetables750gr

Hellmann’sMayonnaise890ml

499

PlantersPeanuts275-300gr

2$5for

Green GiantSimply Steam Vegetables226-250grGreen Giant

VegetablesSelected, 341-398ml

Fraser ValleyCreamery Butter250gr

PlantersCashews225gr

Uncle Ben’sStuff’n Such Stuffing Mix120gr

Ocean SprayCranberry Sauce348ml

DolePineapple398ml

4$5for4$5for

399

KraftPhiladelphia Cream Cheese227-250gr

MacLaren’sImperial Carefully AgedSharp Cold Pack Cheddar Cheese Product, 230gr

Bick’sPremium Pickles1lt

Bick’sDill or Hamburger Slices Pickles1lt

Cracker BarrelCheddar Cheese907gr

Chapman’sPremium Ice Cream2lt

TassimoCoffeeSelected, 108-472gr

Chapman’sSorbet2lt

PillsburyReady To Bake Easter Cookies312-454gr

McLarensOlives, Onions or Gherkins375ml

599 699499

HersheyEaster Eggs or Eggies185-220gr

1199Nabob Coffee

CompanyGround Coffee

915-930gr

PillsburyGrands Cinnabon Cinnamon Rolls496gr

Cracker BarrelShreds300-320gr

Chapman’sSlice Cream Ice Cream1.5lt

2$5for

499

PillsburyCrescents, Biscuits or RollsSelected, 227-340gr

1199ChristieCrackers175-454gr

2991299

Uncle Ben’sClassiques Recipe Rice Selections170-180gr

499

2$7for

AllanMr Bunny150gr

499

KraftDressing250ml

3$5for 399 2$5for299

E.D. SmithPie Filling540ml

3$5for2$5for

Green GiantValley Selections Vegetables300-500gr

3$5for4$5for

4$5for3$5for

2$5for

3$10for3$10for

2$4for299 299

CadburyMini Eggs943gr

299 299

399NestleSmarties Hide-Me Eggs or Boxes156-240gr

499

299

PLUS

A

PPLICABLE FEES

2$5for

TenderflakeShells or Puff Pastry255-397gr

4$5for2$5for

2$5for 555forfor554$4$555555 55555forforforfor5555555forforforfor4$4$55555forforforfor5555555forforforfor

4$4$4$555 4$4$4$4$4$555555 2$2$554$4$4$55555forforforfor4$4$4$4$4$4$4$4$5555555forforforfor5555forforforforforforfor

2$2$55forforforfor 55555555forforforfor 555 55555555forforforfor 55555forforforfor5555 55

CadburyMini Eggs200gr

399

Quality Foods an Island Original DairylandWhipping Cream473ml

DairylandCream, Creamo or CreamerSelected, 473ml

2$5for

DairylandSour Cream500gr

2$4for2$4for

Prices in effect March 21- March 27, 2016

Page 40: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B8 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

Quality FreshFamily Favourites RaisinsSultana or Thompson, 440gr

39949¢

Scotch Mints

Available at select stores only.

2495Dinner for Two

Little Cedar FallsSteelhead Fillets

FrozenSockeye Salmon Fillets

FreshHand Peeled Shrimp

2498 Piece Happy California Rolls

8 Piece Happy Tuna Rolls

799

599

FreshGrey Cod Fillets199

249Per

100 gr

Maple LodgePremium Oven

Roast or Jalapeno Chicken Breast

249

Our Own Fresh CookedRoast Beef

MediumSalad

599

Per100 gr

MastroRosemary Ham

Per100 gr

• Ambrosia• Caprese• Greek• Potato & Egg

Per100 gr 199Per100

gr

Egg Roll 199

Quality FreshSweet Treats CandySelected, 150-250gr

Organically YoursOrganic Flax Seeds250gr

299199Per100 gr

BoursinSoft Cheese125-150gr

599

349Per100 gr

299Per

100 gr

FRESHFRESHfrom

NANAIMO

Alexis de PortneufBelle Creme Brie CheeseTriple Cream

299per 100gr

Deli & Cheese

Seafood • Quality Foods

Sushi

Available at select stores only.

Page 41: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016 SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM I B9

Two Layer Cake

Crusty or Dinner BunsChelsea or Raisin Bread

2$4Cinnamon Buns

Chapman’sNo Sugar Added Ice Cream or NoveltiesSelected, Assorted Sizes

Cake Donuts

349Quality FoodsRaisin Butter Tarts

Cream Puffs

PurexDouble Roll Bathroom Tissue

8’s

499

for24912 pack

Dempster’sEnglish Muffins6’s

2$5for

Dempster’sSignature or Cinnamon Raisin Bread600-680gr

2$6for

J ClothCloths5-8’s

ZiplocContainers & LidsAssorted Sizes

Green WorksCleanerSelected, Assorted Sizes

2$5 399

399Omega NutritionOrganic Apple Cider Vinegar946ml

Blue DiamondNut-Thins120gr

Pacific FoodsOrganic BrothAssorted Sizes

L’AncetreOrganic Cheese200gr

399Pacific FoodsOrganic Soup1lt

Farmer’s MarketOrganic Pumpkin or Pumpkin Pie Mix398ml

499

9993696 pack

499

2$5for

Coffee Cake

499

2$5for2$5for299

for2$5for

3496 pack

8 pack

• Banana with Cream Cheese Icing• Triple Chocolate Fudge• Carrot with Cream Cheese Icing• Pumpkin with Cream Cheese Icing

• Lemon Truffle• Chocolate• Cookies & Creme

Bakery

Quality Foods • Taste for Life

Household

Page 42: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B10 I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 2016

Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter Happy Easter BouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquet

California GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownCalifornia GrownOrganic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Organic Bunched Bunched Bunched Bunched Bunched Bunched Bunched Bunched CarrotsCarrotsCarrotsCarrotsCarrotsCarrotsCarrotsCarrots19191919999999999999999999999999999999 Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”Canadian “Premium”

Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet Organic Russet PotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoesPotatoes5lb bag5lb bag5lb bag5lb bag5lb bag5lb bag5lb bag

California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”California “Medium”Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Organic Yams or Sweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet PotatoesSweet Potatoes3lb bag3lb bag3lb bag3lb bag3lb bag3lb bag3lb bag

Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer Easter Cheer BouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquetBouquet

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2$72$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$7777777777777777777777777777777777777forforforforforforforfor

California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”California Grown “Andy Boy”Romaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine HeartsRomaine Hearts3’s3’s3’s3’s3’s

B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”B.C. Grown “Hot House”

Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English Long English CucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbersCucumbers

forforforfor

2$32$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$2$3333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333

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21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Page 43: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM B11B2 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Pamela RothBlack Press

Nearly two years ago, the citizens of Esquimalt spoke loud and clear – McLoughlin Point was not the appropriate site for the Capital Regional District’s $783-million sewage treatment plant.

Esquimalt councillors were met with a standing ovation when they not only rejected the shoreline site, but unanimously slammed the door on any future proposals.

Despite the closed door, the CRD put McLoughlin back on the table due to the cost and disruption of alternatives. This time, however, it’s not being considered as the sole site for a treatment plant, but part of a two-facility solution that also includes Victoria’s Clover Point and allows for a future site on the West Shore. A DND-owned section of Macaulay Point is part of the recommendation, but only as an alternative to McLoughlin.

Given the history, the move to revisit McLoughlin didn’t sit well with Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins, but now she’s in favour of moving ahead with the new plan to see how council will respond. She also wants to hear from the private sector, which may propose lower cost and more environmentally friendly solutions.

“With me or without me, the committee was going to have brought forward a site at McLoughlin, no matter what Esquimalt had said. There was nothing I could say that would have made any difference and that’s frustrating,” said Desjardins. “I am hearing from residents that there is an opportunity, given the right circumstances, to reconsider. I think the fact that it is not a single site option is really part of that discussion.”

Surrounded by Department of National Defence (DND) property, the CRD-owned McLoughlin site is a barren, fenced-off piece of land in an otherwise treed area, hiding it from public view except from the water. There are a few nearby homes used by DND personnel, but otherwise the site — a former oil tank farm — is isolated. It’s also located around the corner from the Macaulay Point outfall.

Nick Kovacs, chairman of the Esquimalt Resident’s Association, was surprised to see McLoughlin thrown back into the mix.

Park would top underground plant at Clover Point Dan EbenalBlack Press

Clover Point wasn’t on the public’s radar during the most recent consultation process on sewage treatment options. And if everything goes according to plan for the Capital Regional District, a Clover Point facility will remain out of public view once completed.

The CRD is moving ahead with a proposal for a two-plant option to meet the region’s wastewater treatment needs – with plants constructed at Clover and either McLoughlin or Macaulay points, near the location of current sewage outfalls.

The Clover Point plant would be located on a 1.25-hectare parcel of land on the hillside above the current parking lot. That land was granted to the City of Victoria from the federal government in 1988 on the condition that it be used as parkland.

“Clover Point has to be underground to be socially acceptable, and it has to be done in a way that doesn’t smell, doesn’t cause major disruptions for the neighbourhood,” said Colin Plant, a Saanich councillor who sits on the core area liquid waste management committee.

It was Plant who suggested that CRD staff should investigate locating a plant on the site. A previous option for a solo treatment plant at Rock Bay had become bogged down with concerns over cost, particularly $250 million in pipes to convey treated effluent to existing outfalls.

Plant sees Clover Point as a compromise between those who wanted a single plant at McLoughlin and those who wanted a distributed option with a number of smaller plants. “I suggested it as a way to spread the burden of sewage treatment,” he said, adding there is no social licence for a single plant at McLoughlin after that option was rejected by Esquimalt in 2014.

While some expressed concerns over locating a plant in a residential

neighbourhood at an oceanfront park, committee chair Lisa Helps called that a “20th-century argument.” The Victoria mayor said we now see treatment plants in the middle of downtowns and in close proximity to residences.

Wayne Hollohan, chair of the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association land use committee, said the organization didn’t learn about the proposed Clover Point plant until he received a March 9 email about the site gaining conditional approval from the CRD earlier that day.

“This idea is so new even to the CRD, that they do not have any actual plans for it (including) how much space will be required,” said Hollohan in a letter to Victoria council, suggesting the city is not following its own policy on civic engagement.

The association doesn’t speak on behalf of the community, but provides an opportunity for residents to voice concerns. Hollohan has his own worries about the future of this park he visits with his dog on a daily basis.

“I would say that section of Clover Point

probably gets upwards of four times the amount of people as Beacon Hill Park. It is now becoming the crown jewel of Victoria with regards to tourists and people coming … to walk their dog,” he said.

Helps said the federal land grant serves as an assurance that Clover Point will look almost identical to what it is today, with the addition of such amenities as washrooms and public art.

Residents may not realize what is at Clover Point now. Underneath that grassy hillside where people fly kites and walk their dogs, is a pumping station, where 50 million litres of raw sewage is filtered, then

pumped through the 1.2-kilometre outfall into Juan de Fuca Strait.

The pump station, built in the 1970s, serves close to 200,000 people. The new treatment plant would be built to a footprint that would meet requirements until at least 2045. It would initially handle flows of up to 48 million litres/day and treat the majority of eastside sewage.

The treated effluent at Clover would be pumped through a new 250-metre outfall, with the existing longer outfall reserved for wet weather flows.

An advanced treatment plant at Clover Point is estimated to cost about $220 million of the $1.05-billion total project cost, although directors are confident those costs can be reduced.

But hurdles remain before construction gets underway. Perhaps the biggest is getting the site rezoned from its designation for single family residences.

Victoria Coun. Geoff Young favours a single site at McLoughlin

Point and is confident the rezoning will fail.“From the perspective of the taxpayer,

we would be better off flipping a coin to determine a single site. This two-headed compromise has a cost of $250 million or so more than a single-site option,” he said. He expects to hear vocal opposition for the plan at the upcoming public hearing.

Helps said Clover Point was among the initial sites identified by Victoria council in 2015, and was green-lighted during the first phase of public consultations.

Clover Point has cleared the first road bump in the long path ahead, with Victoria council approving a motion establishing a number of conditions. Among them is the presentation by the CRD of a concept drawing of the underground plant to the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association.

The project must pass other regulatory hurdles, including a public hearing. If approvals are received, the plant is expected to take about 18 months to construct, with Victoria sharing in $20 million in public amenities provided to host communities.

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps stands at Clover Point, site of a proposed underground sewage treatment plant. Don Denton/Black Press

Sewage infrastructure already beneath hillside

SEWAGESEWAGESPECIAL REPORT

I N T H ECRD

This two-headed compromise has a cost of $250 million or so more than a single-site option.

— Victoria Coun. Geoff Young

Esquimalt takes an uneasy second look at McLoughlin

Mayor Barb Desjardins stands at Saxe Point in Esquimalt.Arnold Lim/ Black Press

Scaled-down site would take western flows only; Viewfield site surplus

VOTE

ReferendumClover PointMacaulay Point

20162015

2014201320122011201020082007

20041993

199519921984

1971

19601894 1981

1.2 B

$1.2 B?Estimated Cost

1.2 B$1.05 B?Estimated Cost$782 M?

Estimated Cost

to hosting a treatment plant at McLoughlin, in advance of further public engagement with local residents.

2012 - Provincial ($248M) and federal ($253.4 M) funding announced, project mandated to be completed by 2018. Federal government soon after announces regulations requiring coastal communities to have secondary treatment in place by the end of 2020.

2013 - The core area liquid waste management program, renamed Seaterra in October, begins overseeing public engagement and implementation.

- CRD purchases Viewfield Road property in Esquimalt for $17M as potential biosolids processing site. After receiving plant design suggestions, CRD purchases McLoughlin

Point site from Imperial Oil for $4.6M.

- Esquimalt hosts two-day public hearing on rezoning of McLoughlin to allow for a treatment plant. Alternate bylaw ultimately created stipulating Township’s terms; official community plan amended, bylaw passes.

2014 - After another two-day public hearing, Esquimalt council rejects CRD’s more project-specific application for rezoning McLoughlin. Sewage committee seeks direction from B.C. on how to move forward. Ministry of Environment states it will not intervene and CRD announces it will not proceed with project at McLoughlin.

- CRD board chair Alistair Bryson proposes a cost-sharing amendment that would see Esquimalt residents not taxed to pay for the Town’s 6.7% share of the project, worth

$18.9 million, instead of providing a list of amenities as previously offered. Esquimalt ultimately rejects request to reconsider its decision on rezoning.

- First meeting of Westside wastewater and resource recovery select committee held in October. Members are from Colwood, Esquimalt, Langford, View Royal and Songhees Nation.

2015 - Seaterra staff terminated as CRD tries to retool process and a way forward.

- Eastside committee begins meeting.

- In April, Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps takes over as chair of liquid waste management committee from Oak Bay Mayor Nils Jensen.

- In May, potential treatment sites revealed by municipalities; many parks put forward.

Eastside and Westside undertake surveys relating to possible sites.

2016 - Seven options put forward for public consideration; all include plant at Rock Bay.

- Online commenting closes Feb. 20. Results see less than enthusiastic responses to including Rock Bay.

- CRD staff recommend main plant at Rock Bay and tertiary treatment plant in Colwood to sewage committee. Directors instead ask for feasibility report on McLoughlin/Macaulay and Clover Point treatment sites.

- Sewage committee tweaks plan and approves recommendation to move forward with Clover and McLoughlin/Macaulay plan with provision for site on West Shore.

- Committee’s recommendation approved by overall CRD board on March 9.

1894 - Clover Point trunk system and outfall built to service downtown Victoria

1913 - Second trunk system added to service Oak Bay, northeast Victoria and parts of Saanich

1919 - Northwest trunk sewer system built to service parts of Esquimalt, Victoria and Saanich

1960s - Untreated sewage continues to be discharged directly at shorelines

1971 - Macaulay Point pump station and outfall constructed. Outfall extends 1.7 kilometres into Juan de Fuca Strait, effluent released at a depth of 60 metres

1981 - Clover Point outfall built, extends 1.2 kilometres offshore to 65m depth; solids filtered out using 6mm fine screen

1984 - B.C. Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Environment invites all municipalities and regional districts to consider preparation of waste management plans

1990 - CRD board undertakes study into sewage treatment options

1991 - Report offers seven different siting options for wastewater plants

1992 - Non-binding referendum sees 57% support for current preliminary treatment model (screening), 22% for secondary treatment and 21% for primary treatment

1993 - Washington State tourism boycotts Victoria for conferences, hotel bookings. B.C. Premier Mike Harcourt promises Wash. Gov. Mike Lowry that Victoria will have primary treatment in place by 2002 and secondary between 2008 and 2013.

- Seven potential sites identified and approved by CRD board, including Macaulay Point.

1995 - Three possible main plant sites remain, including Macaulay Point, Burnside West and Yew Point in Colwood.

2004 - Poop mascot Mr. Floatie, a.k.a. James Skwarok, begins protesting the pumping of untreated sewage into ocean. Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry reviews CRD wastewater management. SETAC concludes that relying on dilution and natural dispersion is not a good long-term solution. A Ministry of Environment sediment study finds enough evidence to classify areas around both outfalls as contaminated sites.

2007 - The Path Forward report describes

a decentralized, six-plant system estimated at $1.2 billion, using Hartland dump as biosolids processing facility.

2008 - Esquimalt, after a presentation from Sewage Treatment Action Group (STAG), lobbies to have Macaulay option shifted to McLoughlin Point due to environmental, social and financial impacts.

2010 - Comprehensive tertiary treatment removed from plan due to lack of market for recovered water in the region. Further refinements improve triple bottom line output for project.

- In June, plan for West Shore treatment plant deferred for 15 years, helping bring the cost down to $782.7 million.

2011 - Discussions begin around community amenities for Esquimalt relating

MascotMr. Floatie

Sewage in the CRD: A Timeline

Citizens are concerned, he noted, but are waiting to see what’s in the details this time around.

“If you build a modern facility, then McLoughlin Point makes sense. It’s away from the community, it’s an industrial site – what else are you going to build there?” said Kovacs, who favours tertiary treatment using a distributed model.

“If certain conditions are met, I would feel much more comfortable, but again, the devil is in the details.”

In 2008, Esquimalt began lobbying the CRD to explore a potential sewage treatment facility at McLoughlin Point rather than Macaulay Point. The following

year, however, council pulled its support from McLoughlin and advised the CRD to explore other alternatives.

Nonetheless, the CRD moved ahead on the project, and later purchased a property on Viewfield Road in Esquimalt for $17 million as a potential site for biosolids processing. The McLoughlin Point site was bought from Imperial Oil for $4.6 million.

But in a second round of public hearings in March 2014, more than 100 residents from Esquimalt, Saanich, Victoria and elsewhere in the region spoke against the project, citing concerns with the size and environmental impact.

A few weeks later council rejected rezoning the site, noting the CRD failed to deliver requested information such as details on First Nations consultations, committee meeting minutes and an independent tsunami report.

The CRD was forced to go back to the drawing board, but first appealed to the province to mandate the rezoning of McLoughlin Point. The province refused to meddle in the ongoing sewage saga, even though about $60 million had been spent.

Now, however, the province has agreed to help facilitate the process in order to

move the project forward.The McLoughlin site still needs a green

light from the municipality.In looking back, Desjardins feels there

was a lack of respect for the community and that residents still don’t trust the CRD. McLoughlin had been offered as a proactive solution, she explained, with residents seeing it as an opportunity for a possible distributed model with multiple plants. But the CRD sewage committee, basing its decision on staff recommendations, went with a centralized plant there instead.

“From there on, it was all about ‘that’s going to happen, you better accept it and by the way we’re not going to give you any mitigation,’” Desjardins said. “Had they done it differently, had they listened to the community and what the needs were, I really believe that process might have ended up differently.

“The reality is, it was off the rails long before we made the decision, and that was because of the lack of working with a community … Esquimalt has never been NIMBY and yet it’s painted as NIMBY. It’s always been about ‘let’s get the best solution.’”

I am hearing from residents that there is an opportunity, given the right circumstances, to reconsider.

— Esquimalt Mayor Barbara Desjardins

on McLoughlin Point

Page 44: Sooke News Mirror, March 23, 2016

B12 I SPECIAL FEATURE I SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23 2016

Pamela RothBlack Press

Walking along Halifax’s harbour in the 1960s was an unpleasant experience. For decades, the city had pumped raw sewage – fecal matter, tampons, condoms and other flushed items – into its harbour and it was starting to take a toll.

The harbour water was murky, prohibiting swimming at popular beaches and the harvesting of shellfish due to health concerns. A pungent smell lingered, as brown sludge burbled to the surface.

“It was kind of disgraceful,” said James Campbell, public relations co-ordinator with Halifax Water.

Pressure mounted on city officials to clean up the harbour and institute sewage treatment. In 1970, a secondary treatment plant was built in the community of Bedford, followed a few years later by a primary treatment plant in the Eastern Passage. But the city outgrew the facilities and the vast majority of sewage continued to enter the harbour untreated.

It wasn’t until 2001 that the city embarked upon the Harbour Solutions Project, a phased-in approach that involved constructing three wastewater treatment facilities. The largest was built near downtown Halifax, a second near a neighbourhood in Dartmouth and the third in the village of Herring Cove, combining to serve a population of 415,000.

Also included was a sewage collection system and a biosolids processing facility constructed near Halifax airport. The cost of the three advanced primary treatment plants was pegged at $333 million. Then came the question of how to pay for the costliest infrastructure project in Atlantic Canada.

The federal government contributed $60 million, the province kicked in $30 million and city taxpayers paid the remaining $243 million. The municipality took a loan and raised money through an environmental protection levy on residents’ water bills.

“There was overwhelming public support for getting the project done,” Campbell said. “People had

heard decades of indecision about how to get moving on the project and it’s always funding that’s the biggest problem.”

It seemed everything was finally on track, but the project hit another roadblock when the city terminated its contract with the company hired to design and build the treatment system, putting more pressure on city staff to move the project ahead. A new company was contracted a year later.

Shovels hit the ground in 2005 and the Halifax Wastewater Treatment Facility opened in 2008. Over the next year, the Dartmouth and Herring Cove facilities came on

line. The project came in $3 million under budget at $330 million.

A few days after the Halifax plant opened, the murky waters started to clear, providing a pleasant walk along the harbour again. The public was astonished to see the ocean floor, noted Campbell, and a diving salvage company was hired to retrieve some of the garbage previously hidden. Two public beaches that had been closed for decades also reopened for swimming.

In the project’s lengthy history, getting the funds was one challenge; where to build was another. Various solutions were

tossed around, including one giant plant on an island in the harbour. Ultimately engineers decided the best option was three facilities.

That decision wasn’t nearly as difficult as convicing residents that having a sewage treatment plant in their backyard wasn’t a bad thing, Campbell said. The city received much pushback during public consultations and meetings with community groups, but eventually citizens got on board.

“We worked with the community on the facade of the facilities so they had some input on that. It was really trying to break that concern (about having) a big, smelly industrial facility in your backyard or blocking your view of the harbour.

“The biggest facility is in the middle of downtown Halifax and there’s no smell whatsoever, no noise, no smoke stacks. There is another directly across the harbour that’s also close to a residential area in the same situation.”

[email protected]

Halifax spent $330 million on treatment

Courtesy City of Halifax

The Halifax Wastewater Treatment Facility sits downtown in the shadow of residential towers.

Maritime harbour city undertook costliest infrastructure project in Atlantic Canada

Share your thoughtsGet the dialogue going. Send your opinions on this series to [email protected], or call 250-478-9552 ext 224. You can also post comments to the Facebook or Twitter pages of your Black Press community newspaper. Please include your name and a telephone number for verification.

In the next instalment in our series, we examine money: what’s been spent on sewage treatment, how much you can expect to pay; and what scientists think of the mandated need to treat our sewage. As well, we look at integrated resource management and what’s in store for the West Shore.Read your Sooke News Mirror on March 30 to learn more.

In nextWednesday’s

report:

The biggest facility is in the middle of downtown Halifax and there’s no smell whatsoever, no noise, no smokestacks.

— James Campbell, Halifax Water spokesman

Saanich Peninsula

The Saanich Peninsula wastewater plant is a secondary treatment facility with the capability to produce Class A biosolids. The plant commenced oper-ation in 2000, replacing three individual CRD sewage treatment plants that were constructed in the early 1970’s.

In 2011, the treatment plant’s heat recovery system was commissioned. It recovers thermal energy from the efflu-ent and supplies hot water to heat the Panorama Recreation Centre pool.

Sewage treatment around the regionSooke

Construction of the Sooke col-lection system and wastewater treatment plant began in 2004 and the system was commis-sioned in November 2005. Indi-vidual domestic and commercial hook-ups began in January 2006 and continued throughout 2006 and 2007, with the majority com-pleted by December 2006.

This secondary treatment system services a core area of approximately 5,500 residents.

Sewage treatment south of the borderOlympia, Wash.

The Budd Inlet Treatment Plant was con-structed in 1949 and has been upgraded three times, the latest time in 2004, to meet changing needs such as moving to secondary treatment.

Servicing 108,000 people, the treatment plant’s estimated replacement value is $500 million. The modern 32,500-square-foot LOTT (Lacey, Olympia, Tumwater and Thurston) Regional Services Centre is the public face of the facility. Reclaimed water is used in the plant and the LOTT centre. The plant (web: lottclean-water.org/plant.htm) also reuses methane gas to fuel operations and the services centre.

Biosolids are captured for use as fertilizer and soil amendment nearby.

Snohomish County, Wash.

Commissioned in 2011 at a cost of $1.86 billion, the Brightwater Wastewater Treat-ment Plant was the largest clean water capital project in King County in 40 years.

Built on 114 acres, it services a popula-tion of 189,000 and has planned capac-ity for 435,000. In addition to a secondary treatment plant, conveyance pipes and a marine outfall, the multi-faceted proj-ect also includes a 15,000-sq. ft. educa-tion and community centre (online: 1.usa.gov/1S6Xvq4), the restoration of salmon habitat and the creation of 70 acres of public open space.